Review: Devinci Troy Carbon 29

Oct 15, 2018
by Mike Kazimer  
When the Troy first emerged back in 2013 it really didn't have that many contemporaries – 140mm trail bikes were something of an oddity, and most bikes on the market at the time either had more or less rear travel. Fast forward five years and that number doesn't stand out as much, especially if you're talking about a bike with 29” wheels. The aggressive trail bike category has grown rapidly, and for good reason – it's where the bikes that can be ridden just about anywhere reside, the bikes that make sense for the widest range of riders.

The latest version of the Devinci Troy still has 140mm of rear travel and a penchant for the rough stuff, but a 29” version has been added into the mix, and the back end now uses 12 x 157mm 'Super Boost' spacing in order to gain even more stiffness and to allow for extra-short chainstays while still maintaining clearance for wider tires.
Troy Carbon 29 GX Eagle LTD

Intended use: all-mountain
Travel: 140mm / 160mm fork
Wheel size: 29"
Frame construction: carbon fiber
Head angle: 65.5º
Chainstay length: 432mm
Sizes: S, M, L, XL
Weight: 30.5 lb (13.8 kg) size large, w/o pedals
Price: $5,799 USD as tested. Frame only: $3,249 (includes dropper post)
Lifetime warranty on frame
More info: www.devinci.com

Prices range from $4,499 up to $8,799 for the carbon models, and from $3,199 to $3749 for the alloy versions. It's the $5,799 Troy Carbon 29 GX Eagle LTD that's reviewed here, which receives a 160mm RockShox Lyrik up front rather than the 150mm Pike or Revelation that's found on the other models in the lineup.


bigquotesRough terrain is the Troy's forte – the rear end tracks very well, and seamlessly took the edge off abrupt square-edged hits. Mike Kazimer







Devinci Troy review


Construction and Features

The new Troy certainly has a different aesthetic than its predecessor, with all sorts of bends and bulges that weren't present on the previous version. The design change was partially due to the switch to 12 x 157mm rear spacing, along with the addition of a 29” wheeled model. Big wheels and shorter chainstays can be a tricky design feat to achieve, but the Troy can easily fit a 29 x 2.4” tire with room to spare. The shock now uses a trunnion mount, which means that it's rotating on bearings rather than bushings at the upper link, a change that can help improve small bump sensitivity.

Internal cable routing, a threaded bottom bracket, and ISCG tabs – if you're playing frame feature bingo you can fill in those boxes, because the Troy has them all. There's also room to mount a water bottle cage on the downtube, and Devinci even added an extra mounting hole that can be used to move the cage forward if more clearance is needed to keep the bottle from hitting the shock.

Devinci Troy review
The Troy now has a trunnion mounted shock, with a wide, carbon rocker link.
Devinci Troy review
A flip chip at the lower shock mount provides two possible geometry settings.




Devinci Troy 2019

Geometry & Sizing

For the LTD model of the Troy, Devinci spec'd a fork with 44mm of offset and 160mm of travel. Those changes alter the geometry slightly from what's listed the geometry chart, dropping the head angle down to 65.5-degrees in the low setting, and putting the seat angle around 74-degrees. Those numbers can bee steepened by half a degree thanks to the flip chip located at the lower shock bolt.

Overall, the Troy's numbers are what I'd call contemporary – the reach numbers aren't crazy long, and the head angle isn't DH-bike slack, but they make sense for a bike like this, at least on paper. You can obsess over numbers all you want, but how a bike handles on the trail is what really matters.


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Suspension Design


The Troy uses Devinci's Split Pivot suspension design, which uses a pivot that rotates concentrically around the rear axle. According to Devinci, the design is intended to separate acceleration forces from braking forces, and to allow the bike to maintain good small bump sensitivity while still having efficient pedaling performance. The new Troy has a similar level of progression compared to the prior version, but the spring curve has altered slightly due to the switch to a metric shock, and the amount of anti-squat was altered to work well with the gearing on the 29" model.


Specifications

Specifications
Price $5799
Travel 140mm
Rear Shock RockShox Deluxe RT3
Fork RockShox Lyrik RC2 160mm
Headset FSA Orbit
Cassette SRAM XG1275 10-50t
Crankarms SRAM GX Eagle 32t
Rear Derailleur SRAM GX Eagle
Chain SRAM GX Eagle
Shifter Pods SRAM GX 12-speed
Handlebar Race Face Next R 800mm
Stem Race Face Turbine R 50mm
Grips Devinci lock-on
Brakes SRAM Guide RSC
Hubs Race Face Vault
Rim Race Face Arc 35
Tires Maxxis Minion DHF 2.5 / DHR II 2.4
Seat SDG Fly MTN
Seatpost RockShox Reverb


Devinci Troy review

Devinci Troy review














Test Bike Setup

Other than trimming the Race Face Next R bars down to 780mm, and swapping out the house-brand grips for something a little thinner, I left the Troy in its stock configuration for the duration of the test period.

After a couple of rides I added one more volume spacer into the Super Deluxe RT3 for a little more bottom out resistance – with 30% sag in the stock setting I felt like I was using all of the travel a little too often, but adding that spacer did the trick, providing the end stroke ramp up I was looking for.

Testing began took place over the course of a dusty summer in Bellingham, Washington, and concluded with multiple wet and slippery rides as the fall rains arrived.

Mike Kazimer
Mike Kazimer
Location: Bellingham, WA, USA
Age: 35
Height: 5'11"
Inseam: 33"
Weight: 160 lbs
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @mikekazimer


Devinici Troy review
Jed Sims climbing to get to the goods.


Climbing

A couple of seasons ago it's unlikely that I would have thought twice about the Troy's 74-degree seat tube angle (that's with a 160mm fork and the flip chip in the Lo position). Time are changing, though, and at the moment I have a couple other test bikes in the rotation with seat angles in the 76-degree range, and the difference between those bikes and the Troy was immediately noticeable. I felt more stretched out on the Troy, with my weight further back towards the rear axle, which meant I had to pay a little more attention to keeping the front wheel tracking where I wanted it.

If you're sitting down and spinning away the miles the Troy is a relatively neutral climber, although standing up and pedaling out of the saddle will get the RockShox Deluxe rear shock to bob a bit - for longer climbs I typically flipped the compression lever into the middle setting. In that setting it was still active enough to keep the wheel stuck to the ground on chunkier sections of trail, but with more support to keep it riding higher in its travel.

The Troy doesn't have the same snappy, energetic climbing manners that a bike like the Ibis Ripmo possesses; instead, there's a more subdued, calm feeling to its handling. There's no shortage of traction, though, especially with that meaty Maxxis rubber mounted to 35mm rims – even on wet, slippery days there was plenty of grip on tap for getting up tricky climbs.


Devinici Troy review


Descending


It took me a few rides to really get the hang of the Troy. I think I'd been expecting something a little more mild mannered, an overgrown trail bike if you will, but it turned out the Troy was a slightly different beast. It's not the longest or the slackest bike in this category, but it still performs best when you make a conscious effort to be the pilot, and not a passenger. This isn't a bike where you can sit back and expect it to do all the work for you. Pay attention, and get aggressive, and the Troy starts to make more sense. It's a stiff, stout bike that feels best once it's up to speed.

Rough terrain is the Troy's forte – the rear end tracks very well, and seamlessly took the edge off abrupt square-edged hits. The 140mm of travel is well managed, and the tune on the Deluxe shock was excellent, delivering a very smooth, plush ride. The Troy can accommodate a piggyback shock, and I can see bigger riders, or riders who are regularly doing massive, non-stop descents going that route, but I was completely happy with the performance of the in-line Deluxe, especially after I added that additional volume spacer.

The Troy may feel best at higher speeds, but the trail doesn't need to be pointing straight down the fall line for it to feel at home; those short chainstays make it easy to pump through more undulating terrain and to really whip through tight corners. The 65.5-degree head angle likely helps here too – that number's still relatively slack for a bike with 140mm out back, but it's not so slack that the front end gets floppy and awkward in tighter, less vertical terrain.



Devinci Troy review
Devinci Troy
Ibis Ripmo review
Ibis Ripmo

How does it compare?


The Ibis Ripmo and Devinci Troy have similar amounts of rear travel (145mm for the Ripmo and 140mm for the Troy) matched with 160mm forks, but out on the trail they have very distinct personalities.

When it comes to climbing, the Ripmo has the edge thanks to its snappy, efficient feel under power, and a steeper seat tube angle. The Troy gets the job done without much fuss, but it just doesn't have the same level of climbing quickness, and the fact that its frame weighs over a pound more than the Ripmo doesn't do much towards helping it scamper up the climbs.

If I was on the hunt for a bike to regularly take on long, all day adventures with an even mix of climbing and descending I'd lean towards the Ripmo, but if my riding tended to be fireroad grinds to access gnarly trails, I'd go with the Troy. The Troy has a solid, smash-through-everything feel, and its travel is very well managed, with support for pumping the terrain, and enough cushion to take the sting out of big, unexpected hits. The Ripmo has livelier personality, and it feels most at home bounding from one side of the trail to the other, or manualing through corners at every opportunity.



Devinci Troy review
A bolt-on thru-axle would make a lot of sense here.
Devinci Troy review
The ARC 35 rims held up well to all the root and rock smashing.


Technical Report

Guide RSC brakes: The Guide RSC brakes didn't give me any issues, but I wouldn't have minded seeing a set of Codes spec'd on this particular parts package. Once you've become accustomed to the extra power the Codes deliver, especially in the steeps, it's tough to go back to the Guides.

Race Face ARC 35 rims: The Race Face wheels held up will, and they're still running true. The 35mm internal rim width does mean that running tires narrower than 2.4” isn't the best option, but they worked well with the 2.5" Minion DHF and 2.4" DHR II WT.

Race Face Next R handlebars: Just like grips and seats, handlebars are a matter of personal preference, but I like the feel of the Next R bars. They're stiff without being too harsh, a trait my hands and forearms appreciated.

Thru Axle: I'd like to see a bolt-on thru-axle rather than having a large lever extending out from the bike, especially considering how wide the Troy's back end already is with that 12 x 157mm spacing.


Devinici Troy review


Pros

+ Stout do-it-all machine
+ Excellent rear suspension feel
+ Quick in the corners
Cons

- Seat tube angle could be steeper
- Super Boost spacing means your current spare rear wheel might not be compatible.
- On the heavier side for a full carbon frame



Is this the bike for you?

Thanks to advances in geometry and suspension technology, it's no longer possible to just look at how much rear travel a certain model has and place it neatly into a pre-determined category – that way of thinking just doesn't work any more. That being said, I'd place the Troy smack dab into the all-mountain category. It's a bike for the rider who prioritizes the descents over the climbs, but wants something a little more versatile than a full-on enduro race machine. All the same, there's no reason you couldn't use this as a race bike.



Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesThe new Troy is a tough trail smasher, a bike with an appetite for the technical. Some of its geometry numbers may be on the conservative side, but when it comes time to descend the Troy more than holds its own. Mike Kazimer








Must Read This Week

191 Comments

  • + 87
 Do you remember when we all thought super boost plus was an April fools joke?
  • + 51
 Just wait for Super Duper Boost Extra Thick
  • + 7
 The name started as a joke by Pivot, but it's kind of a fun term. I'm a little disappointed we've lost the "Plus"--that really put it over the top.
  • + 1
 I literally stopped reading after I saw the words Super boost... one more time you all know how it goes... Die supaboost, die.
  • + 8
 Well if it's a level beyond Super Saiyan then... He must be a Super Duper Saiyan!
  • + 3
 @mnorris122: dude stop talking about my Willy on pinkbike, geez! Time and place, bro. Time and place.
  • + 8
 I think back ends of bikes are still headed wider to a point where they could accommodate two rear wheels in a sort of 'tri' cycle set up if you could ever picture such a thing. This would give unparalleled stiffness and stability, plus if one goes flat you can still keep truckin'
  • + 3
 I'm living in the dark ages. I still haven't moved to Boost yet, and now there is a Super Boost. Ugh.
  • + 7
 They revealed metric shocks on march 31st I still think it's a joke
  • + 2
 It's fun everyone discovered and called it superboost, while this standard is already existing for ages...
  • + 1
 @h82crash: There are already bikes like this for riding on snow...
  • + 3
 @mnorris122: Thats spelled THICC now I believe.
  • + 4
 Nest year we get the super boost metric
  • + 2
 @aliikane: That's perfect. Boost is dead, and you got to skip it entirely. Sort of like skipping 27.5, or B-plus.
  • + 2
 @h82crash: that is honestly a better idea than a lot of what the bike industry has come up with
  • + 25
 A fair enough assessment. I've always liked Devinci bikes, and they treated me well enough when I needed a warranty replacement on my frame (crack at weld on seat tube of alloy hardtail), though that was over a decage ago (time flies).

I was disappointed at the pricing when I first saw this released, but now I see that they have the alloy versions, which is the one I would go with.
  • + 0
 IIRC the old carbon ones (cheaper) weren't full carbon but just the front triangle.
  • + 4
 The STA is not 77' too.
  • + 13
 My carbon Django cracked twice already.. barely scraped a rock (as you do). Rock strikes are not covered by their lifetime warranty.. meaning either get carbon repair or get a new front triangle at discounted price.

Rant note - what is the worth of a lifetime warranty if in 2 years time nothing will fit on the bike because of 'progress made on millimetres?'
  • + 11
 @Ricardo-Sa: Parts will still fit fine and will be widely available. If it's a fun bike, it's a fun bike, who cares what the "latest' is? Bikes are to be ridden, they're not investments. /rant against the rant.
  • + 3
 @Svinyard: the last Gen had carbon seat stays but the rocker and the chain stay was aluminum. Your point is still valid
  • + 9
 The alloy is also quite expensive but made in canada so kinda worth it.
  • + 3
 @chyu: actual seat tube angle looks slacker than the head angle. lousy geo for tall people.
  • + 5
 @Ricardo-Sa: pretty much every company is this way. Read the warranties, they all say “against manufacturering defects.” Running into a rock, tree, cactus or what ever at full speed and it breaking has nothing to do with a low quality frame. Having a barely scraped by a rock and it cracking also doesn’t mean it’s low quality. It means shit happens sometimes.
  • + 8
 This probably just shows the state of bike pricing right now, but I looked at the price, looked at the spec, and said, “hey, not bad”. There are no major components I would want to replace, which is uncommon even on bikes costing more. Great fork, solid drivetrain, nice cockpit, decent wheels ... all looks pretty good to me.
  • + 0
 @thejake: That's why my last frame (for an xc build) was generic Chinese. Inexpensive and a no haggle warranty - just order a new one when it cracks. Lots of people are doing this.
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: Carbon front and seat stays. AL chainstays.
  • + 5
 @Ricardo-Sa: What doesn't fit a bike from two years ago? The super boost hubs, to the new XTR that aren't available yet?
Classic PB regurgitated statement. "This new standard just made my 2 year old bike obsolete." No, it didn't. You can still get parts for 10 year old steeds everywhere. If you want the latest and greatest, shell out for it. Or don't.
  • + 3
 @Abacall: Actually not really. you can find some parts but you really need to dig deep and have some bike mechanic knowledge to make it work.

- 2 examples:

1- My bike came with a boost rear and non-boost front. I damaged a wheel but want a new wheelset - I can't find anything in this combination, having to recur to building a wheelset or buying 2 different wheels at a more expensive than a normal price.

2- Couple of years ago I was on a ride with a riding buddy that had a trek bike, A bolt of his chainstays fell off - proprietary stuff rounded bolt. There was no replacement in the UK for it - the dealers told him that maybe even difficult to source from the US. The guy was without a bike for quite a while and eventually had to buy a new one because of a stupid bolt they didn't make anymore. This bike was like 3 years old.

These are two random examples. However, I have seen tons of stuff going in the bin because they can't be fitted anywhere, and bikes going in the bin because we can't source parts at an acceptable cost.

Yes, the new standarts every 6 months render bikes obsolete in a short period and lower their value immensely. There is nothing worse than buying a bike and 6 months later you find out that that long term savings you spent just lost half its value because the manufacture decided to change 3 mm to the axle.
  • + 1
 @thejake: I understand this, however, a bike should not crack at the slightest scrape with a rock. The first one I didn't even notice (can't remember hitting anything) until 2 rides later I turned the bike upside down and there was a crack form one side to the other of the downtube - definitely not bashed it against anything. The second, slow speed rock garden, a slight slide and scraped a rock - cracked again near the bottom bracket.

The funny thing is that they told me that the Django and Troy didn't need a bash guard - the new models now have one. I just wonder how many cracked frames they actually had complaints about!

Lesson learned - no more carbon for me!
  • + 3
 @Ricardo-Sa:
1. Buy a non-boost wheel set cheap, get the boost adaptors. $15
2. Propriety shit is proprietary shit, regardless of changing standards.

Changing standards do lower values of older bikes, as in most industries that innovate. But your bike is still the same bike you bought 2 years ago. It's not obsolete, it doesn't ride different, but there's newer better stuff.
If you don't like that, you have 2 options; buy something that you're ok losing money on, or buy something that you love and you'll ride into the ground and you'll lose more money on.
MTB is expensive. It wasn't before, it is now. You can circumvent that expense by riding cheaper stuff.
  • + 1
 @Abacall: I am building new wheels from old 26', reclaiming parts as far as I can to save some pennies.. to the 'industry's' dismay Big Grin Big Grin :Big Grin
  • + 15
 Thank you for this review mike. I appreciate ypur hinesty and ability to describe what it feels like up and down. I especially appreciste the xescription of the climbing performance and the comparison to the ripmo.
  • + 30
 This post brought to you by Pinkbike Mobile
  • + 0
 Yep. Exactly the comparison I wanted to see. Thanks.
  • + 10
 Am I the only person how think that carbon is the wrong material for Devinci?
Just in sense of heritage… To me the credibility of Devinci is and will always be the alloy frames.
And with that point of view it is always strange that the alloys are more affordable.
  • + 3
 Especially when the alloy in they use is mined in their own town...
  • + 8
 @j-t-g: Transformed, not mined.
  • + 2
 I've had 2 carbon Troy's, currently a 2017 Troy and am a pretty aggressive rider. I've never had an issue with the carbon frame. The carbon Troy has been a great bike so far, only issue i've had is the geometry of the XL, but that is solved with the new 29er, which PinkBike give a mediocre review, not buying it (the review) it's a great bike, ride it hard and it will perform
  • + 12
 Would be interesting to see it stacked up next to the Knolly Fugitive! Any plans for that to be reviewed?
  • + 29
 We just gone one in - keep an eye out for a review later this year.
  • + 3
 @mikekazimer:

Hopefully the LT version?

The aggro mid-travel 29er segment is so hot right now.... so hot right now.
  • + 4
 @WasatchEnduro: Hansel, He's so hot right now!
  • + 13
 Thank you for calling out superboost as a negative.
  • + 1
 Good call! Next gen 2024 bikes will be Super Duper Boost +... Where does it stop?
  • + 1
 Did he? I think he called out the lack of compatibility with previous wheels as a negative.
  • + 2
 what negative? boost and superboost are REQUIRED for any bike with 29" wheels in my opinion. it adds stiffness to the big wheel. you cant deny the wider hub flanges make for a increased spoke-bracing angle. the numbers add up. thats why they made the standard.
  • + 5
 @mojopedaler: go pedal your mojo
  • + 4
 @mojopedaler: Do a little reading and you'll see that boost barely added any support for the bigger hoops. Superboost however did, as long as you get hubs with actual wider flanges.
  • + 1
 Yeah, why would anyone want stronger wheels, more tire clearance and a better chain line for 1X setups...
  • + 2
 @racecase: "where does it stop?" Crazy Stupid Thicc Boost Plus maybe?
  • + 9
 So I know there is no review yet on the Evil Offering, but when there is one can you put this Troy 29er, the Ripmo and Offering in talks about pointing the steed down? I would like to know how these three bikes would climb and descend from one another.
  • + 9
 “You can obsess over numbers all you want, but how a bike handles on the trail is what really matters.”
  • + 9
 You lost me at super boost Frown
  • + 5
 Still riding a 2014 Devinci Troy and love Split Pivot. The review is spot on, the stiffness of the bike and support of the suspension respond to rider input and quick timing. I'd love to get this as my next bike.
  • + 5
 This is such a nice looking bike. I love it. I own a devinci troy 2014. Maybe not the fastest bike on earth, but I think the smoothest bike for going up and down. Congrats Devinci!!!!
  • + 4
 30.5 lbs isn't a bad weight for a bike with 140mm of rear travel, but...my transition patrol weighs 30.8 lbs w/out pedals, and it's alloy, with an xt drivetrain, saint brakes, and I9 wheels. didn't go crazy trying to build it light. i'm not sure the 6th element is all that.
  • + 1
 Carbon frames don't save that much weight on mountain bikes...your XT drivetrain is much lighter than this GX Eagle garbage, and no doubt your trick I9 wheels are lighter than those Raceface pieces.
  • + 5
 @mnorris122: or manufacturers are tired of the warranty issues and they're building their carbon frames heavier to avoid problems.
  • + 1
 I was looking at this, too. This bike could save a 500g with a wheelset. I won't complain about more carbon in the frame if it lasts.
  • + 3
 @upchuckyeager: That's exactly why carbon doesn't save that much weight on MTBs. On road bikes they can make them crazy light because people aren't taking them to Whistler.
  • + 2
 Must be an old patrol because I was looking for a 2019 but they are just too f*ckin heavy to buy one!! 33.17lbs for a really good build! Carbon is 2lbs lighter but I don't really like carbon + 3000$ us for a frame? Mmm nah thanks!

By the way, I thought the spartan was already a big bike for me and now with 29 wheels, just forget it... but it weights the same as the troy and is supposed to climb really good so maybe this could be the dream bike!? Can't wait to read some reviews (already saw one)!! Smile
  • + 1
 Oh and by the way, alloy spartan, troy, sentinelle and patrol frames (medium) are all between 9.2 and 9.5 lbs!!! Those bikes have a 2 pounds difference between carbon and aluminium so it might be worth it to pay the extra for carbon! :S
  • + 7
 Good details in the review, thank you! Also the Ripmo is a good pick to compare against.
  • + 6
 I was thinking how the second photo makes the devinci look better, then I realized it was an ibis.
  • + 5
 Sacrifices a bit of snappy feel on the way up . Feels great on rough stuff. Not for everyone but that's how I want my bike to behave.
  • + 7
 A true, good fun, mountain bike
  • + 3
 Innovation, no matter how big or small, will never cease. People need to get over it. You can skip generations, techs or whatever, but just accept the fact that even if it ain't broken, people will always try to fix it. Innovation will never stop
  • + 3
 How much of the descending bias do you think is down to the slightly overforked model you rode?

Seems like the 150mm fork that's found on all the other builds would steepen the seat and head angle about .5 degrees and drop the stack height a bit, all things I've found increase a bikes eagerness to go uphill.

We're only talking about .5 degrees and 10 mm, but I'm still curious.
  • + 9
 A shorter fork would help tip the scales a little bit, but I think it'd still feel like a better descender than climber. The stiff frame, bigger tires, and overall weight make it better suited for riders that prioritize the descent, even if it was set up at 150 / 150.
  • + 4
 @mikekazimer: you suggest the seat angle could be steeper. Why not acknowledge the real issue here which is that the seat angle given is meaningless. The ACTUAL seat angle here is slack as hell. If you have a longer inseam than average you’re going to hate climbing on this bike.
  • + 3
 @powderturns: aye that's true on many bikes
  • + 2
 @leelau: it’s just laughable to me that PB will make reference to the advantage of a dropped nose saddle when climbing but somehow fails to recognize that actual seat tube angles might also have an impact. I just got a steep seat tube angled bike and the difference when climbing is unbelievable.
  • + 3
 @powderturns: what bike/frame did you buy ?
  • + 2
 @powderturns: Changing the sta 2 degrees would shorten the ett of a large from 630mm to 606mm. That would be unpleasant for anything but going down hill, unless you like the feeling of sitting in a lawn chair while pedaling.
  • + 1
 @cheetamike: Fezzari La Sal Peak. It’s been a life altering few weeks of making climbs I never used to make, short and punchy tech stuff and long slow grinds, all while pushing a larger gear than I normally would. Descends pretty well too with the fox kit on it.
  • + 1
 @JohanG: I’m not finding this to be the case. And who sits while descending anyway?
  • + 5
 Frame-only price isn't bad actually considering it comes with a dropper that is a $300 value.
  • + 5
 Curious how a coil would feel , I just put on on my Django and it helps a lot.
  • + 14
 I've ridden plenty of bikes where I've thought the same thing, but that honestly never crossed my mind on the Troy. The rear shock tune felt really good on chunky sections of trail, and there was plenty of traction to keep the wheel tracking well in wet conditions. A coil could potentially increase the amount of grip even further, but then you'd be adding more weight, and losing a little bit of the poppiness that comes from an air spring.
  • + 2
 I know Matthew Slaven has been running a custom X2 coil on his 29" Troy. He obviously likes it, but he's also running a 170mm 36 soooo...
  • + 2
 @UncleCliffy: got my shock from Matthew , my bike is similar to his old Django 29er.
  • + 3
 First, Trek steals DW's split pivot, adds 'full floater' to get around the patent....now Devinci designs a bike to look like it has the full floater setup....the whole world has gone mad.
  • + 3
 That is a funny point about this bike looking, at first glance, like it has some sort of dynamic lower shock mount. I did a double take too. Also funny that Trek has ditched full floater on the newer models, at least the heavy duty ones, so apparently they no longer feel the need to differentiate from Split Pivot via that distinction.
  • + 3
 That's mostly to get rid of the water issue on the old ones. There was a pocket where the shock mounted that always collected water and dirt, with the new design the water and dirt doesn't collect.
  • + 1
 @Abacall: very cool that you worked on the design of this bike , seems to me like this detail isn't just for function, some companies put drain holes in their lower shock mounts to deal with this issue.
  • + 2
 Wouldn't it be nice if the short video of the rear suspension movement had the bottom bracket stationary and the tear axle moves. Get a Feedback sport scorpion bike stand to hold the bottom bracket in one place. Then place a board under the rear tire that moves up and down. It would show the rear wheel travel path more realistically.
  • + 1
 Or somehow affix your camera to the crank spindle facing the bike. I wonder what kind of dyno's there are for built up suspension bikes, if any.
  • + 1
 I see it was running minion tyres front & rear, what’s your go to Maxxis combo? Is it minion DHF/DHR as reviewed or would you throw a Highroller in there?? And what about compounds maxterra vs maxgrip? I use maxgrip on the DH bike but tend to go with maxterra on the trail bike for a bit less wear and rolling speed but have often wandered wether there is much difference?
  • + 5
 Ride the 27.5 version...where’s that review.
  • + 7
 Agreed, can't help notice a huge level of bias towards the 29er versions of bikes this year. Good if that's your preference but personally I want to hear how the 27.5 versions ride as that's what I'd be buying e.g. Can't help but notice how much more awesome the new Ransom looks in it's 27.5 version - chuck an X2 on that and I'd be sold!
  • + 0
 Boost 148 was marketing bullshit king - who bought it now can start saving for 157. We're in time when if you want to keep whatever that left from bike back compatibility you stick with 142 or buy new bike at least 3 years after "new" standard emerged.
  • + 2
 Spent the day doing a Troy vs. Ripmo comparo on East Coast tech. I was a king on Ripmo, but had more fun on Troy. Ordered Troy.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer coming from a Norco sight 2016, would that be a great replacement you think? I love my Norco but consider this change. Thanks
  • + 4
 Glad to see a direct comparison to another bike in a review.
  • + 1
 Best bike i've ever riden ! Awesome in technical sketch trails, steep ascent easy and doesnt make you feel like you need the brake lever in going down section. Crazily happy... and oh created in my town !
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer After you added the additional volume spacer did it have a total of two in the deluxe rt3 for your test rides?
  • + 3
 Yes, that’s correct.
  • + 3
 And a life time warranty!
  • + 4
 “Lifetime” is a sort of get out clause. It’s the lifetime of the product, not the owner so they can basically refuse your claim on the grounds that you got a full product lifetime of use out of it.

I fell for that one ten years ago...
  • + 3
 @m47h13u: its more of a statement that they want the frame to last. I am wary of the term life time warranty.
If they offer a life time crash replacement to the original owner im good with that.
  • + 1
 They are refusing prety much every claims bases on empty reasons (stone chips on down tube for exemple)
  • + 3
 Its time to agree, 1 foot spacing for all hubs, and 4 feet for handlebars.
  • + 2
 So what is the head angl? Up top it says 65.5, then in specs its 66 or 66.5 dependent on flip chip.
  • + 3
 It’s 65.5 with a 160mm fork and in the low setting. The geo chart is for a 150mm fork.
  • + 3
 @mikekazimer Nice. Will you be reviewing the Spartan 29 as well? Thanks
  • + 7
 Yep, the Spartan was included as part of our Whistler Field Test - you'll be able to see what we thought about that bike a little later this year.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: thanks a lot. Cant wait!
  • + 1
 @Foxy87: Same for me!! Same weight for a 165/170mm, 29er, bike that seems to climb really well and is short enough so we can still enjoy those tight turns?! Looks like this could be my futur bike!! Smile
  • + 1
 @Timo82: I hope it to be an absolut beast on the Downhills though. Might need to size up.
  • + 1
 @Foxy87: Hulk SMASH is how the new Spartan was described to me. This is coming from someone with some decent time on it. There is a couple reviews on it and they where pretty positive. Heard it called a long travel trail bike.
  • + 1
 @cheetamike: Yeah so a Long travel Trail bike is not exactly what I am looking for... Bible of bike describes it as this, but all the other Review states its a downhill bruiser.
  • + 1
 Yeah read that too and that is what had me thinking about it.... a good all arounder, a bit like the Orbea Rallon! Well thats what one review said so let's wait a bit! Smile
  • + 1
 @Foxy87: If it is like my Django it will be killer on the down. I rode a new Process 153 and it did not downhill like I thought it would. Climbed like a HT but was no where near as confidence inspiring as my Django.
  • + 1
 @cheetamike: Process 29er? I did and was a bit disappointed too...climbed well but nothing special when going down... I heard the 27 was better but didn't have time to demo it! Frown
  • + 2
 So I see we all aren’t tired of the “super duper A+ gonzo boost” jokes yet. They are all so...clever.
  • + 2
 Trail-duro It's a thing, and I freakin' love it.
  • + 1
 Anyone thoughts on how this would compare to a Rocky Instinct? Or the Instinct BC Edition?
  • + 2
 PS: brake line inside the frame - just f*cking brilliant. As always.
  • + 2
 I'm holding out for Mega Boost before I buy a new bike.
  • + 2
 I'm waiting for Quantum Uber Mega Boost Turbo 4000, once my bike is wider than it is long, I'll be satisfied and know I have the stability I demand, hopefully by then IMBA will have widened all the trails so my bike will fit too
  • + 1
 @ctd07: Cant ride any trails with an ass that wide
  • + 1
 Geometry is in the database if you'd like to compare side-by-side...
geometrygeeks.bike/bike/devinci-troy-29-2019
  • + 1
 What's with skinny, bent top tubes? It looks like they come pre-broken, or ready to break.
  • + 0
 Weird, when I push my 2019 Santa Cruz Chameleon's saddle down nothing happens?
  • + 1
 definitely need more riding video
  • + 1
 Just one question: why tee?
  • + 1
 Why you gotta bring race into it?
  • + 1
 Kinda meh. Could have been way cooler
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer
How’s this ride in comparison to the previous version?
  • + 1
 Show the front wheel in the suspension video
  • + 2
 Super boost. I'm out.
  • + 1
 ill be back.
  • - 1
 Super boost for 29er's is great, not really needed for 27.5. But could be the new standard soon.
  • + 0
 Looks similar to a Giant Reign
  • + 1
 I thought the same
  • + 0
 ABP anyone?
  • + 7
 Nah, it’s the legit patented Weagle version, not a cheap knockoff...
  • - 2
 Looks like a Ransom.
  • - 2
 That seat tube boner tho...
  • - 2
 Seat angle dated right out of the gate!
  • - 8
flag mattsavage (Oct 15, 2018 at 9:09) (Below Threshold)
 No one would notice the different seatangles if they hit you in the ass...
  • + 2
 @mattsavage: bs! I noticed first ride out on an sb130
  • + 1
 @bohns1: Did you notice it in a good way? I'm thinking yes. The SB 130 is on my very short list. Just about to put a deposit on one then wait another month for it to come home to me. Thanks,
  • + 0
 yuuuppp, they done fucked up
  • + 3
 @pdxkid: yes... It just puts u in a better climb position given the head angle of the sb130.. Doesn't feel as slack as it is during climbing.. The thing smashes!
  • + 2
 @bohns1: Awesome, thank you for the feedback. I'm going to order one tomorrow! I just wish they were in stock and ready to ship.
  • + 1
 @pdxkid: yep, ordered mine three weeks ago and won't see it u til November.. I wanted the black tho so that one is back ordered for a few.
  • + 1
 @bohns1: Sick! ordered a black size large on Monday. Dealer said he's expecting them mid-late november. Psyched!
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