Review: DT Swiss EX 1700 Spline Wheelset

Apr 28, 2021
by Dan Roberts  
DT Swiss EX 1700 Spline Wheelset Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot


What would you build? That's a question that DT Swiss sought to answer with the new 1700 Spline wheelset range.

The previous version of the 1700 wheelset was a common sight on bikes coming in for test as well as individual bikes from people wanting a reliable aluminum wheelset.

Offered in the same flavours that cater from XC, through all mountain, to enduro racing, the XR, XM and EX prefixes, the new wheels actually borrow a lot of technology and know-how from the company's more expensive and exotic wheelsets.

These fairly unassuming wheels have been put through the wringer over the past nine months in an attempt to throw every and all manner of riding their way to see how they come out the other end and if they live up to DT Swiss' statement of "made for the roughest enduro tracks around the world."
EX 1700 Spline Details

Wheel Size: 27.5" / 29"
Hub: 350
Hub Spacing: 15 x 110mm front & 12 x 148 rear
Rim: EX 511 aluminum, 30mm
Brake Mount: Centerlock / 6-bolt
Spokes & Nipples: Competition spokes, Pro Lock Squorx aluminum nipples, PHR washers
Weight: 942g F, 1024g R, 1966g pair (EX / 29" / 6-bolt / XD driver / taped / with valves)
Price: From $886 or €699
More info: DTSwiss.com





DT Swiss EX 1700 Spline Wheelset Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
The EX 1700s use an aluminum rim, basically DT Swiss' EX 511 rim, already a favorite of many racers and riders.
DT Swiss EX 1700 Spline Wheelset Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
Printed on the rim are mix and max tire widths, along with min and max tire pressures. Included in the manual is a detailed matrix of tire and rim widths and the max recommended pressures.

Design & Construction

The EX 1700 Spline wheels use DT Swiss' 350 hubs at their center and the EX 511 rim at the edge, laced with Competition spokes, Pro Lock Squorx aluminum nipples and PHR washers.

The 350 hubs take a lot of features from the previous generation 240s, and that's certainly a good thing with those aforementioned hubs still being some of the best in the business. They even use the same end caps and ratchet parts as the old 240s helping with sourcing spares or replacement parts should you need them.

The hubs come with the 36-tooth star ratchet as standard with the ability to change the number of teeth with the purchase of an aftermarket ratchet kit with 54-teeth. There are also options for the freehub itself, with Shimano HG, Shimano Microspline and SRAM XD options available.

There's also the ability to run the hubs with the Torque Cap fitment to take advantage of the increased surface area on RockShox forks.

The EX version of the 1700 Spline range we tested came with a 6-bolt interface, although there is also the option of centerlock. But for the new wheels, DT Swiss felt that offering the 6-bolt option for the more extreme wheels EX versions would give rise to less problems with the likelihood of the brake rotors fitted being 200mm or bigger.

The aluminum rim is the EX 511 rim and has an internal width of 30mm, an external width of 35mm giving a bead thickness of 2.5mm and an overall height of 21mm. The rim itself has been a mainstay of the DT Swiss collection for a while now with many riders and racer choosing this rim for its balance of weight and durability.

DT Swiss EX 1700 Spline Wheelset Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
The 350 hubs at the center use 28 straight pull spokes front and rear.
DT Swiss EX 1700 Spline Wheelset Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
The EX version of the 1700 wheels are available with a 6-bolt rotor mount for fewer problems with the larger rotors that might be fitted to the EX versions.

DT Swiss EX 1700 Spline Wheelset Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
The 350 hubs use the same ratchet system from the older generation 240 hubs. It' still a fantastic system that is durable, quick to maintain and easy to work on.


The Competition spokes are butted from 2.0mm - 1.8mm - 2.0mm and are cold forged in some pretty hefty machines that make the ground shake. They're also a go-to spoke for a lot of wheel builders, regardless of the rim and hub manufacturer they use. Both front and rear wheels have a count of 28 spokes in a 3 cross pattern. There are 3 different spoke lengths on the wheels (302mm, 304mm and 305mm on the wheels we tested), but those lengths are easily found on the DT Swiss website along with part numbers for replacements.

Nipples are DT Swiss' aluminum Pro Lock Squorx. The part of the nipple that sticks out of the rim is a standard spoke tool size, but at the other end of the rim the interface is a little different. It does require a specific tool, but unless you're building wheels from scratch, you don't need it to keep the full built wheels running, even if you break a spoke.

In between the rim and spoke sits a little curved PHR washer. It's there to spread the load from the spoke tension over a wider area and to also allow the nipple to sit comfortably at the same angle as the spoke. If you do break a spoke and need to replace it, just remember the washer and to put it in the correct way with a dob of grease.

Printed discreetly on the rim are min and max tire width and pressures for both eventualities of tubeless or tubed. Also, on the rim is the QR code for DT Swiss' ID system. This support tool for riders and shops allows all the relevant user manuals, spare parts and possible conversion or upgrade components to be easily seen for the product you have.

In the box are the wheels, taped up ready, and the tubeless valve. Wheels with the centerlock hubs will also get an adapter for 6-bolt rotors.

Our front test wheel came in at 942g and the rear was 1024g with a SRAM XD freehub and 1032g with the MircoSpline freehub. In total that puts the pair at 1,967g with XD driver and 1,974g with MicroSpline driver, a few grams under the claimed weights of the wheels. That's including tubeless valves and rim tape, at 11g per wheel.

Compared to some of the other hard charging aluminum wheels out there, the EX1700s are actually pretty competitive with the weight. Many more, like Race Face's Aeffect Rs, Crank Brothers Synthesis E and the recently released Hunt Enduro Wide V2s are between 40 - 140g heavier for the pair. Newmen's Evolution SL A.30 do come in lighter, but seem to point more at the all-mountain to weight conscious enduro crowd. The EX 1700s are a bit higher up the price scale than those mentioned competitors though, but that price is somewhat justified, as you'll read about in how they performed.

DT Swiss EX 1700 Spline Wheelset Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
The aluminum rims have a 30mm inner width with a hooked bead thickness of 2.5mm.
DT Swiss EX 1700 Spline Wheelset Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
The tubeless valves on the EX 1700s use a steel shaft and have remained fairly free of clogging sealant throughout the test.


Setup

The wheels came taped up, so all that was left to do was fit the tubeless valves, rotors, cassette and tires.

With the EX versions of the 1700, and higher end carbon 1501, the wheels now having the option of a 6-bolt rotor interface it was a bit more satisfying to tighten up the bolts knowing that any rocking or potential issues from centerlock combined with big rotors would now be gone.

There's no need for tools to remove the end caps and therefore the freehub. For the majority of the test, we used the Microspline freehub from Shimano and everything bolted on easily with the XTR, XT and SLX cassettes being used. There's also a nice snug fit with the end caps meaning that even the heavier SLX cassettes attached to the freehub don't result in it falling off onto the floor.

Tires always seem to fit just perfectly with DT Swiss rims and that extends to Maxxis, Schwalbe, Vee Tire, Panaracer and Kenda tires. It's nice not to need a compressor to seat the tires as, usually, with a large volume floor pump the tires inflate just fine without even breaking a sweat. Occasionally, with some pretty well worn and swapped tires, the added blast from an Airshot inflator helps, but was only needed on a handful of occasions in the nine-month test period and on multiple sets of the 1700 wheels ranging from single play casing tires all the way through to thicker DH casings.

And that's it. There's no need to adjust a preload system or any further steps. Out of the bike the DT Swiss hubs might seem like they have a touch more friction in there, but once bolted into the fork or frame the axial load preloads the hub system and the wheels spin freely and without any resistance in the bike stand or out on the trail.


DT Swiss EX 1700 Spline Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot

Performance

Throughout the past nine months, that encompassed the whole summer and autumn seasons of 2020, through even the rideable portions of the winter season and now into spring, the EX 1700 wheels have been thrown down literally anything and everything. The added fact that some test bikes have come specced with these wheels meaning that I've had a lot of time on them. And don't think that having more than one set has spread the work, as I really like riding bikes. They've also been used as a test bed for tires and been in and out of multiple bikes, even the occasional DH bike that needed a boost rear wheel. But I tested the same set of wheels mainly on a manner of long travel enduro bikes like the RAAW Madonna and Nukeproof Mega and the big-intentioned but small travel Privateer 141 and RAAW Jibb.

Holding lines at speed when everything in your path is trying to ping the wheels off is met with control and the ability to remain focussed. Sure, it's not like they're magically flexing so much as to find their own line like flowing water, but they certainly take the initial harshness off those rock filled tight line choice situations and leave you with more than ample control to adjust and pilot your bike out the other end. There's a wonderful feeling of balance in every aspect of these wheels, be it stiffness or engagement points, that often highlights the consideration by DT Swiss that the wheels are part of a bigger system.

Gone too are the days of a 28-spoked wheel loading up so heavily in a high g-force situation to only then fire all the energy back at you, leaving you with a slightly unnerving feel. This was only ever really highlighted when laying it in with much gusto to big vertical bermed corners and buckets at speed. But the EX 1700s never gave that feeling of sudden snap energy release. They load up and release with a very linear feel and never leave you coming in hot to a big turn wondering if something weird is going to happen.

Throughout their long test period the wheels of course hit the ground from time to time when the tires bottomed out. First time it's always a bit nervous, checking the rims over for damage. But time and time again, be it on roots or rocks, the wheels remained undeterred from hitting the ground and it started to become more of a humorous situation hearing the tell-tale rim on ground contact noise knowing that you never even needed to stop and check the wheels anymore. You don't need to call the pressure police either, as the tires were never run below 22psi front and 25psi rear, often going a touch higher depending on tire casing and where being ridden.


Vee Tire Co Snap WCE Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot

Even at the lower end of the pressure spectrum that I use, there's always a brilliant connection between the tire and rim. While a bit of burping does occur in some really high g-force situations, or on some really extreme square edged hits, there's never really enough loss of air to warrant an issue. That's combined with the relative ease of tire installation too, another good balancing act that DT Swiss have achieved. They've held air extremely well throughout the test period too, with there being no big loss of pressure overnight or after a couple of days of not riding. The valves have also stayed pretty free of sealant and blockage for the entire test period too, something that can play havoc with pumping up a tire and accurate pressure readings.

The 30mm inner width of the rims seems to be a nice settling ground for the 2.35" - 2.5" tires that the wheels were tested with. Tire profile is good and allows the tires to work as intended with good feeling and control at all the lean angles from bolt upright to last resort anchor deploying.

I mentioned engagement points earlier and this topic might be somewhere where some brands might not A. consider their wheels as part of a system, B. understand the effects of impacts and how that is translated into what the rider feels or C. think that more is always better. While a million engagement points might sound good rolling around in the carpark, DT Swiss chose to spec the 1700 wheels with 36 teeth in an effort to address the balance of hub pick up, for when you get on the gas, and the influence of impacts to the rider when rolling.

As the new 350 hubs are pretty much the same as the older generation 240s, it means you can play around with the number of teeth in the ratchet system depending on your preference of bike type and even suspension characteristics. And while playing around with a 54T ratchet in the rear hub, I settled back at the standard 36T ratchet for exactly the balance that DT Swiss sought to have. There's more than enough pick up in the hubs to reduce the delay between stabbing on the pedals to having something happen, while reducing the potential for impacts to come through to the rider's feet if in that grey zone of above zero speed and the point where the impact would never cause the freehub to catch up to the spinning hub. And while it is personal preference, I think the 36T doesn't spin with an obnoxious sound. You can hear it clicking but not to the point that it dominates the riding experience.


DT Swiss EX 1700 Spline Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot


Issues & Durability

For those nine months of testing, there have been a grand total of zero issues. Zilch. There are scuffs on the rims and a couple of very mellow dents in there, but nothing has impeded the wheels wanting to just keep on working. Almost as if they're quietly asking "is that all you've got?". None of those dents have needed straightening out to keep the tubeless seal intact.

I kind of see rims as disposable items. Getting two years out of a set before you start to think about replacing them is a good lifespan for me, and anything more is then a bonus. The EX 1700s definitely then seem on track to easily be up to those expectations after giving nothing but signs of their willingness to keep on rolling for a while to come. That life expectancy is very much personal and factors around the amount of riding in the terrain we have in this part of the Alps. If you're a weekend warrior or one that rides in smoother and less demanding terrain then these wheels are likely going to a companion for a much longer time than my own expectations.

The wheels come out of the box with a nice high spoke tension, something that I'm trying to figure out how their wheel builders manage to achieve, and it's something that the wheels have held over time. There were no pinging noises on the first ride as everything settled, along with the ensuing need to re-tension. Despite having a really nice DT Swiss spoke key in the basement I haven't needed to touch the wheels for their entire time testing. In all cases they've remained dead true since day one and I can't see that changing.

Bearings too are still spinning smoothly and show no signs or feeling of wear or damage after a lot of riding in conditions that ranged from cloggy mud that made your bike weigh twice as much to fine dust that covers the bike and makes so many of the moving parts creak.


DT Swiss EX 1700 Spline Wheelset Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
It's a shame to call this "old" technology, but the ratchet system is still one of the best freehub systems in the business.
DT Swiss EX 1700 Spline Wheelset Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
The wheels come specced with the 36T ratchet, but can easily be changed to a 54T ratchet if you prefer, by purchasing the upgrade kit.


Servicing

Those toolless end caps mean that servicing the ratchet system is a simple and quick process. It requires some specific DT Swiss grease, but a small pot is likely to last the average rider a lifetime as the hubs will inevitably get swapped from bike to bike, barring any new standard that might set the pitchfork mob off. About the only thing to consider is the spring orientation when re-assembling, with the smaller diameter end of it touching the ratchets and the larger diameter end facing the bearings.

Those toolless end caps made freehub swaps fast and easy. The only thing to take care of is to use the corresponding end cap to the freehub. But each end cap is laser printed with the freehub it mates to.

Bearing services are also a pretty easy task, although a little more involved that just greasing the freehub. Front bearings knock out easily with the ability to move the central tube spacer out of the way and access the races with a drift. The same is true of the freehub bearings. The rear hub bearings need a little different technique that removes the hub axle along with the bearings, but it's certainly not rocket surgery. Something that I'd actually forgotten about until recently, when another set of wheels showed up with this, was the issue of aligning the tube spacer in the front hub with the incoming axle. That's never been a problem whatsoever on the EX 1700s and the axle has gone straight in every time.

And with the DT Swiss ID system, getting information on the right service parts is easier than ever. I can't speak for the availability right now however, but at least they're not going to be consuming bearings and ratchet parts at a rate of knots.


DT Swiss EX 1700 Spline Wheelset Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot



Pros

+ Fit and forget performance
+ Fantastic durability
+ Controlled & comfortable ride feeling
Cons

- More expensive than the competition
- Only available in boost hub spacing




Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesFit and forget is the best kind of trait in a bike product for me. I received these wheels quite a while ago, and essentially forgot about them while taking them on every single type of mountain bike ride you can imagine.

Put simply, they just work, ride after ride, are easy to work on and are actually the same wheels that many of us, Pinkbike editors and industry riders, would build up if we had the choice. That says a lot about DT Swiss' individual components but in particular these EX 1700 wheels.

They are more expensive than the competition, but their combination, and especially balance, of performance, reliability and weight is a tough one to match, and adding in the various riding flavours that they're offered in means that I can't recommended these wheels highly enough.
Dan Roberts







PHOTOS: Kifcat / Shaperideshoot


201 Comments

  • 115 2
 How do you improve the Vee tyre review image, ya double it! Seriously though, Dan is one of the best additions to the team in recent times, so well thought out, in-depth but understandable reviews he really is doing top work. One more thing WHHHHEERRRREEE IS LEEEEEVY?
  • 30 0
 #whereislevy or #levyleaves are going to start trending
  • 8 7
 He's on the field trip...
  • 14 0
 @mafflin: that was filmed months ago
  • 8 0
 I wonder how many PB minions copped wheels to the head trying to get that shot.
  • 15 2
 @sewer-rat: exactly. My theory is he's moved on but everyone agreed to keep it quiet until after the field trip vids have all been released.
  • 2 2
 @sewer-rat: well, writing an article takes some time.
  • 23 0
 @big-red: I found this, but am still unsure being honest

brianpark MOD PLUS (Apr 8, 2021 at 19:57) @neb636: 100% not true. Levy's taking some well deserved time off, but absolutely not off the team or going anywhere else.
  • 7 0
 @big-red: Brian Park posted a week or two ago saying that he was taking some time off
  • 13 0
 @big-red: future spy shot editor at nsmb
  • 5 0
 @sewer-rat and @Mattgc Thanks for the heads-up. I was sad thinking of PB without Levy. All the PB staff seem pretty good, but his character would be hard to replace.
  • 4 1
 Levy's time away is almost enough to start rumours of him moving over To Loam Wolf.
  • 6 0
 There's a pandemic going on... I hope Levy is ok.
  • 19 0
 He's on the Ever Given, obviously causing trouble...
  • 4 0
 @mafflin: He's in Taiwan enjoying bubble teas and making SLAAAACK bikes
  • 3 0
 @big-red: I think he might be recovering from the unfortunate specialized Status review that ended up being taken down.
  • 3 0
 He went inland to go train at altitude for the mike vs mike enduro
  • 2 0
 a real Rocky IV vibe, but with zwift
  • 1 1
 Levy probably gittin' a COVID tattoo Big Grin
  • 2 6
flag JohanG (Apr 30, 2021 at 4:17) (Below Threshold)
 Levy was a guinea pig for science, took the Pfizer vac, and didn't make it three days. Sad.
  • 1 0
 @KennyWatson: the bike that kinda but also doesn't exist. Lol
  • 75 1
 I have built wheels professionally for more than 20 years and I can honestly say that dt complete wheels are a superior wheel. I choose j bend hubs 32 hole count for tradition and compatability knowing they are a compromise. But I've chose dt spokes for almost every wheel I've built and their hubs among my favorite. Kudos to dt Swiss, you can't really go wrong with buying from them
  • 8 0
 This is a very compelling product and no doubt built to I higher standard than I can pull off, but I still like the idea of FR560 rear/XM481 front (I've only ever destroyed one front rim, but kill rears all the time), 32h, j-bend, brass nips. Save some coin while I'm at it, and it's just damn pleasing to ride wheels you built yourself.
What is the compromise with J-bends? Or why are straight pull considered better? From what I've heard you get a slightly better bracing angle with J-bends because the spokes are as far out as possible. I also appreciate that they don't spin, and for who knows why, are generally cheaper.
  • 9 0
 @FatSanch: I built and repaired wheels professionally for a little over 10 years and I'm with zark on the j-bends. They don't spin and are easier to find replacements for. Not that the spin on straight pulls is that big a deal when building except maybe at final tensioning, but more that if/when they need truing down the road it's a bit easier to work on as the nipples get crusty and tend to spin the spoke more. Especially for the home mechanic who may not have a spoke clamp or experience. Not a huge deal, but a nice convenience.

What I do appreciate about straight pulls is that you can replace spokes w/o having to remove anything. Also, if your chain drops over the largest cog it's not as likely to eat any spokes. Personally, I think the bracing angle etc isn't as important. Technically it's there, but I'm not sure it ultimately matters enough to use as part of the decision making process.
  • 5 3
 @FatSanch: There's no "compromise". They work just as well, no matter what the marketers want you to think. J-bend are cheaper because of the economy of scale.
  • 4 0
 @FatSanch: straight pull spokes are supposed to get rid of a weak spot at the bend.. The wheels that came on my current bike have snapped 2 straight pull spokes mid spoke... Since it's a carbon hoop, I've been playing with decreasing the tension a bit... See what that does...
  • 2 2
 @FatSanch: Without the bend, they are stronger, and it's not marginal and if you have a tension issue, and start popping spoke heads off, it less likely to continue to happen with straight pull. The single biggest advantage (IMO) is the ability to change a spoke without pulling the rotor or cassette. But the initial wheel build is a lot easier (once again IMO) with J-bends. If I'm building a wheel, for me, it's always center lock and J-bend, but I build a lot of wheels for customers or friends and they are typically straight pull. My biggest takeaway has been that straight pull tend to not change initial tension much, which is likely due to the spoke head not settling into it's opening and giving up a tiny amount of tension. You can pre-stress a wheel, but you can't really mimic a ride. One additional note, the Squorx nipple tool makes wheel building a breeze, and a dab of grease holds everything together and allows you to insert a nipple into a deep wheel without using a spoke to hold it from the backside. I don't prefer an aluminum nipple, but If someone askes me to build with one, I'll choose squorx over the other options.
  • 7 9
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: Straight pull stronger, just no. If you're having problems with tension or broken nipples, it's not the spokes. Unless you're doing something seriously weird, j-bends don't break at the bend anyway so to claim it makes a difference is just silly.

To pre-stress wheels I stand on the spokes. Yes, you heard that right - I lay the wheel down and carefully step on the spokes with all 170 lbs of my weight (with soft rubber-soled shoes). I got that tip from Ali Clarkson's build vid. I have yet to break a spoke and only ever had to adjust tension on one wheel (out of 9 and counting) after it got seriously tweaked in a crash. All alu rims and nothing even remotely burly.
  • 11 6
 @noapathy: They do break at the bends, often. An under-tensioned wheel will cause a lot of stress at the J-bend and cause the bend to work-harden and fail. This is less of an issue with a straight pull since you don't have the j-bend to act as a "spring". Once you work on wheels for a little while, you'll begin to understand the nuisances of wheel building, it takes decades.

We've been pre-stressing wheels similarly for decades, I used to just use the floor, but I've since developed a method using a cutout in a piece of plywood and a hydraulic press. Ali's method works Ok, it's how we stressed wheels for a long time, but it unevenly stresses the wheel and is hard to quantify. The press method evenly stresses all the spokes on a given side, and is quantifiable with the use of a pressure gauge. (I stress my builds to about 250kg) But static loading can't account for the dynamic on/off loading of a wheel experiencing a serious off-road thrashing. Wheels ridden on the road don't really change tension much, but wheels used off-road get all sorts of odd-ball loading that can cause tension issues.

I have a reputation of being able to straighten wheels without a truing stand just by applying the right whack in the right place. Spoken tension changes very little since spokes are unlikely to unwind in a properly built wheel using the correct amount of spoke prep. In an aluminum rim most of the wobble is due to other issues specifically stressors that get the hoop to move and realign spoke tension throughout the rim. If you can properly relieve those tensions, the wheel will naturally return to it's previous shape and tension. Once the big hop is removed its just a matter of taping around the wheel to get the tension correct everywhere. I can usually get a wheel nearly perfect before I ever pull the spoke wrench out. I've tried to true a wheel on my press rig, and it works but I find that shocking the wheel with a sharp blow works better.
  • 3 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: I have a friend who has the same skill of straightening wheels with a shock in the right place. It's quite the thing to watch.
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: I used to stress relieve wheels on the floor, but the last wheel I built I tried the method of bending the spoke over the flange (some tap the spoke on the flange with a mallet, but that seems sketch to me - BTW if you are not doing one of these, that may be why you are breaking spoke heads - no disrespect meant, it sounds like you've built many more wheels than me, but I read that from Wheel Fanatic as well as Sheldon Brown), and did a 1/16th reverse turn on each nipple every time I tightened. No other stress Relief required. It's by far the best wheel I ever built.
  • 3 0
 @FatSanch: Yeah, backing off will usually do the trick to remove any twist in the spoke and help to relieve any issues. The pushing on the spoke at the hub flange or using a mallet to set the bends works well, or using an old crank arm to set the spokes against each other helps too. I have thumbs of steel at this point so I just bend them that way, but the final step is the pre-stressing, which bends and slightly elongates the spoke at the bend. I saw Trek using a press with an air ram to pre-stress their rims, thought on it and built my shops assembly. I arrived a 250kgf to set with after experimenting quite a bit. If you pre-stress this way, you add enough slack to the opposite side spokes to take the twist out naturally. It's actually a three step process for final stressing. Builds a wheel that never looses tension on the road and lasts longer off road.
  • 3 1
 @dan-roberts: Yeah, don't let the customer see you smack their expensive wheel on the anti-fatigue floor mat and then go after it with a mallet. And I should have said spoke length as it relates to spoke tension not changing. The tension is all over the place, but that's due to stressors in the rim. I have read so many tech articles relating to proper wheel building over the decades that I've come to a few conclusions that are probably not widely shared, but I build a good wheel, and lots of them. Additionally, I haven't tried whack-a-wheel with a carbon hoop yet, but It's been my experience that they don't displace as much as an aluminum hoop, so maybe that's the place to use my press assembly.
  • 2 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: The truth here. I did this a few times to try to salvage a customer wheel while they were standing nearby. They were not happy, at least not initially.
  • 2 8
flag noapathy (Apr 28, 2021 at 11:12) (Below Threshold)
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: So your builds break at the bends? Neato. If you have them break there frequently you'll wanna rethink what you've been doing "for decades". LOL
  • 2 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: now that you mention it, I think I stressed the spokes by squeezing them by hand at the end per one of those websites. It turned out solid AF and I've been thrashing it on a heavy ass E-Bike.
Sounds like your setup is better though, but mine works good enough for the few wheels I'm building.
  • 1 0
 @FatSanch: Isn't the squeezing spokes method what Jobst Brandt suggested in The Bicycle Wheel? that's a "book". Smile I've had good success with that, but I've built 10 wheels. What about that method do professional builders not like (other than it hurting your hands)?
  • 1 0
 @muumuu: I don't read BOOKS, Sir. I'm a man of the people and have my websites read to me with an app, thank you very much. I'm not some fancy, highfalutin, cosmopolitan consumer of literature
Read BikesBoatsNJeeps comments above about pre stressing. Mostly about consistency I guess. I think as long as you don't have wind up, and you stress enough to seat the spokes in the flange, it should be good enough.
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: I do like the stronger design and easy replacement of straight-pull spokes, but what's your trick to keep them out from turning? The flat ones are quite acceptable to work with a slot key but those cylindrical ones are just a hassle. I can't find any other technique yet than using a soft jaw vice-wrench close to the nipples...
J-bends twist a bit but you can still turn them back on and all with one hand, that's their advantage I like.
  • 1 0
 @qblambda: I have a tool, and I honestly can't remember where I got it, but it's a small set of vicegrips with some 50 or 60mm wide jaws that are lined with leather. Works well on all spoke shapes. They should wedge into the hub body and not spin but if they do I use the vicegrip tool.
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: nice tip on the leather, I'll try making a custom vicegrip based on that. Thx
  • 31 7
 Begs the question why would you spend 2k on a set of plastic wheels when you can have these?
  • 16 2
 Because everyone has them, resulting in zero bragging rights.
  • 5 0
 I think that unless you have a strong need/want for a certain wheelset in that price range, nowadays there are a lot of excellent carbon wheelsets below the $2k mark. Now, I'm not saying one needs to spend that much, but it is possible to spend less than even $1.5K on high performing carbon wheelset.
  • 29 2
 that "plastic" has superior properties to aluminum. Whether those properties are worth it to you is very subjective. I am happy that both options are available.
  • 1 0
 would you rather spent more or get newmen wheels that weighs 1650 for less
  • 13 2
 I spent $1200 on plastic wheels with lifetime warranty that are almost 200g lighter. Beat the piss out of them for a year already with no issues. Totally worth it IMO. The real question is why would you spend $1200 on more expensive alu wheel like I9?
  • 5 11
flag MattP76 (Apr 28, 2021 at 10:56) (Below Threshold)
 @conoat: There is no such thing as superior qualities with carbon. In the real world (not a lab) that is a complete and utter myth! It just an alternative overrated and ridiculously expensive option.
  • 3 2
 I like a zero questions ask, free shipping, free new rim install to your hub replacement and free shipping back when something does break. Does dt offer that? When you race or ride hard enough that you go through a few rims a season, it's nice to have that warranty of spending hundreds more each year. Yes proper tires/inserts/pressures applied.
  • 6 1
 @MattP76: Tell that to the people who have thoroughly tried both. We had a 2x national DH champ/ top 5 national Enduro racer working at our shop here. He said he went from breaking up to 10 alloy rims a season to 0-2 carbon hoops a year. He is "butter smooth" but still a complete mad man on the bike and puts things through their paces. It's not an uncommon theme either as I've heard the same kind of thing from many North Van locals who absolutely shred. I never had too many issues with wheels, but I've had my fair share of dents with alloy wheels. I got sent a set of Reserve wheels a few years ago, and I think I've tensioned them once over 3 years? I can't even remember it's been so long. I was sent an E-bike that came with another set of Reserves as well, and so far so good on that beast.

I see carbon wheels as a one-time payment for wheels (the top ones have well honored life time warranty), and that is appealing to those who do go through rims. They have also proven multiple times in the real world to be stronger (or at least as strong, not many people are fully breaking wheels during race runs, and big freeride sends gone wrong will basically break anything).
  • 3 10
flag MattP76 (Apr 28, 2021 at 14:12) (Below Threshold)
 @leon-forfar: Sorry but that's bollox. Years and years and years I have seen aluminum wheels been ridden by some of the very best, hardest charging riders and their metal wheels have lasted all year without a single break. Carbon is not stronger than metal in the real world it never has been. Enve.... It's only recently that their 2k carbon plasticy wheels have stopped snapping on test riders and owners.
It's about time people just accepted that carbon is not better than metal, it never has been and is a total rip off!
  • 7 2
 @MattP76: Anybody who races (or frankly just rides) at a high level will go through alloy rims regularly. One of our team riders (who placed 14th at the last snowshoe world cup last year) went through 4 alloy rims in a WEEKEND at MSA. I realize MSA is not a nice place to be a wheel, but that is ridiculous. I'll agree that Enve are definitely not all they're cracked up to be (pun intended). But reputable carbon rims like any WR1 or Reserves will and do hold up extremely well. I can't tell you how many people I've personally dealt with that have said carbon rims are game-changers for them in the sense that they don't go through rims all the time anymore. I see and hear it on a regular basis from real people riding their bikes in the real world (and this is in North Van where we have some very rocky and rough terrain).

Carbon is not better in all aspects, but it is better for certain purposes. They wouldn't be using carbon on F1 cars' chassis/ bodies if it wasn't strong enough to hold up to 200mph crashes. Layup is VERY important and can make or literally break carbon products. When done right, it has a much higher strength-to-weight ratio, and it has been proven time and time again whether you want to believe it or not.
  • 4 1
 @leon-forfar: Add me to the list of regular Joe riders that went from at least breaking a rear rim every season to just checking the trueness every couple months (e13 carbon dh rims).
  • 5 9
flag MattP76 (Apr 28, 2021 at 23:01) (Below Threshold)
 @DHhack: You all sound like there is aluminum rims exploding everywhere and they should litter the trails. Fact is there isnt. The carbon ones are not stronger and more durable at all. They never have been its a myth. The amount of carbon ones I've seen, heard and read that have broken far far outweighs metal rims. That is a fact!
  • 5 2
 @MattP76: that’s because carbon is a developing technology and nobody will talk about the mature technology (alloy wheels) having regular failures because it’s already accepted as normal.
  • 2 1
 @MattP76: Right! All anyone has to do is look at WC DH & EWS racers that run Alu rims. Nobody posting in this comment section goes that hard. I don't give 2 farts how fast they think they are in their mind.

I'll just leave this here... m.youtube.com/watch?v=PUoCSzVmhhQ
  • 3 1
 @m1dg3t: Ah yes, I remember that. Certainly super impressive. We aren't saying alloy rims aren't good, just that carbon hoops can be (and some are) stronger. Gwins rim held up to the remainder of his race run, but at what point would it just implode? All rims will break, carbon or alloy. DT, in my opinion, currently is making the best alloy rims on the market. But I've seen many more of them fail/ broken than I have seen carbon rims over the last year or two.

A big factor is the strength to weight ratio. Gwins 26" EX471 weighs 475g with 32 spokes. Nowadays, a 27.5" carbon rim, like a SC Reserve 30mm (which is a wider rim with a bigger diameter keep in mind) weighs 470g but with 28 spokes, and they hold up probably as well (we've all seen Danny do bad things to those rims). This is comparing DH rims against trail bike rims, and they ARE comparable in strength. If a carbon wheel in the same size weighed the same as its alloy brethren, it would be stronger.

Any stories I hear against carbon wheels are generally the same "I hucked into a rock garden back in 2014 with my first carbon rim and it broke, so I don't trust them. So I'll go back to my alloy rims". Which leads me to ask, how many alloy rims have these people broken? You think the alloy rim wouldn't have crumpled under the exact same situation? Carbon wheels have come a long way even in the last two years.

I would love to see a strength test both in a lab and on a trail where they try and break 3 popular alloy rims and 3 popular carbon wheels. My buddy is a rim and wheel builder at WR1, and from what I've heard of their comparison testing, I think it would change people's minds.
  • 5 0
 @MattP76: when did I say that? You are anti-carbon, which is fine, but don’t use your bias to try to turn my experiences into some imaginary narrative you’ve built for yourself.

I’ve seen one carbon rim break in person, it was a 3 year old Light Bicycle (cheap Chinese dtc brand at the time that more legit now) rear on a full suspension trail bike.

I’ve personally broken Roval, Giant, Stans, DT Swiss and Sun Ringle alloy rims. XC, enduro and DH builds all while riding their intended terrain.

If you’re not breaking stuff, and I’m not breaking stuff, we win. Who cares what it is that works for each of us?
  • 3 1
 @m1dg3t: Pierron runs Enve. I’m sure there are many other examples.
  • 2 3
 @DHhack: It not imaginary when you have been in the sport 30 years plus and seen all the b*llshit. It's called experience!!
  • 2 1
 @MattP76: I’d suggest a Materials Science course or two at the local uni.
  • 20 6
 Give it a year, you'll go to true them up, you'll proceed crack/round the aluminium prolock nipples, turning what should be a simple job into replacing all the nipples. You'll be thankful of the squorx head to remove the remnants of knackered nipples.
  • 9 1
 Lol, yes. What I was trying to say. But you won't just be changing the nipples. Because after a year the spokes will be slightly seized in the nipple and since it is a round spoke you would be truing them without ruining the spoke trying to hold it. So you end up changing all of the spokes and all of the nipples when you have to true it. When that is said, damn. Dt makes some of the, or maybe the best spokes, hubs, nipples and rims. Just weird that the solution for some of their system wheels are so little user friendly
  • 18 0
 Put some oil on your nipples, it helps )
  • 18 0
 @mafflin: that is probably the only time on pinkbike that I can't tell if it is a joke or not.
  • 39 0
 @mafflin: spokes still stuck and now my t-shirt is wet and oily
  • 3 0
 Yeah....this is why I build my own wheels and use liberal amounts of anti-seize. Nothing worse than trying to true a factory wheel that used some sort of glue on the nipple threads (I'm looking at you, Shimano).
  • 7 0
 @bengtleon:

"You cant win a marathon without putting some band-aids on your nipples"
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: Still one of the best spoke preps is boiled linseed oil. I use that or good ol' spoke prep. Anti-seize works great, but can be messy and can allow the spokes to back off a little over time. There is a specific type of loctite that can be used as well, I believe it is pink, it is designed for electronics, provides some galvanic isolation and is reworkable. I've done a wheelset with blue loctite at a customer's request, it was a nightmare to build since the loctite was kicking off during the assembly and getting to final tension was a race between cure time and spoke turning.
  • 16 0
 @mafflin:
( • )( • )ԅ(‾⌣‾ԅ)
  • 3 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: antiseize works just like linseed oil except it takes longer to dry and there's less friction at high tensions. I find it superior. I apply it using a large diameter catheter attached to a syringe, a little squirt inside the nipple. No mess. But without this system it would turn you into the Tin Man haha.
  • 1 2
 @Richridesmtb: Germans are not known for their humor
  • 2 1
 @mtallman2: Germany = Birkenstocks BMWs and engineering
  • 18 3
 In regards to the first question, I would not build a wheel with straight pull and round spokes
  • 5 4
 why? even with bladed spokes you have to hold on to them with a tool!? uniortools.com/eng/product/1753-2B-straight-pull-spoke-pliers#947101
  • 6 0
 I like straight pull spokes as they're dead easy to replace in the field, no need to remove discs or cassette. But they have to be bladed otherwise they're the worst invention ever. Tip - a tubeless insert tool is perfect for holding a broken spoke to unwind it from the nipple
  • 7 1
 @conoat: that's the point. You can hold onto them with a tool. How do you hold a 2mm diameter round spoke without damaging it?
  • 5 1
 I've built two wheelsets (350 straightpulls onto a 511 & 481 then 240 J-bends onto the same type of rims). Lacing was more intuitive with the straightpulls because the hub directs each spoke in the direction it needs to go and tensioning is no big deal - just grip the spoke with your fingers or or padded pliers until tension at the hub end is enough to hold it. And spare spokes are easy to buy. Two local shops refused to build the straightpulls for me the first time around because of the time and effort involved. I don't get it.
  • 3 1
 @inked-up-metalhead: the tool in the link I posted. lol
  • 5 2
 @Lornholio: at least you found the two shitty shops in town quickly!???
  • 1 0
 @conoat: does that actually hold round spokes? I don't see how it could without teeth to dig in, round stuff just spins...

Edit: I reread the info in the link and yes, it does hold round spokes. Apparently unior are wizards...
  • 1 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: friction is your friend(TWSS)! they work a treat, mate. As someone else said, it doesn't take much until theres enough tension that the friction of the spoke head trying to spin in it's seat, is higher than the friction of the threaded nipple(use. spoke. prep.). then you really don't have to hold them. Sometimes right at peak tension, they can want to spin, but then you just need to add a small amount of resistence to over come that.
  • 3 0
 @conoat: I find that bladed straight pull spokes do twist when you try to true them, as the friction in the threads can be higher than the friction at the hub end. But bladed are easy to hold with various tools - one-up tubeless insert tool being my favourite
  • 4 0
 @conoat: that Unior tool is cheap and works perfectly, even on round spokes.
  • 1 0
 Same here, but it looks like 28 is the new 32. Is that because rims are generally better these days? Or have I been under a rock?
  • 2 0
 I used the thin dremel cut off wheel to cut a perfectly sized notch into a piece of 5mm thick aluminum. Holds all my bladed spokes perfectly when trueing or building.
  • 1 0
 @GDPipsqueak: Rims are getting stiffer - parallel axis theorem.
  • 4 0
 You can hold the spokes with a pair of Knipex pliers and they won’t spin or damage. It’s really no harder to build straight pull than j-bend.
  • 3 0
 @rickybobby18: Can confirm, use Knipex pliers all the time for straightpull wheels, and imo it's a must have tool for every mechanic.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: What kind of knipex pliers?
  • 1 0
 @GDPipsqueak: I noticed the same thing. My intuition is that an 'all mountain' wheel should be 32 holes, always... Does anybody know the science on why lower spoke count doesn't equal lower strength?
  • 1 0
 @NickBosshard: awesome i own these
  • 7 0
 I've build my own wheelset with DT swiss components (last gen 240 hubs, XM481 rims). I went with DT swiss components not only because I'm Swiss but also because their parts and tools are available virtually everywhere... in the Swiss!

This was my second wheelset and I became a big fan of the Squorx nibbles. Working on the wheel is much easier than than with ordinary nibbles and the torque transmission way better. No brocken or twistet nibbles (and I have used the aluminum version.)

Highly recommended!
  • 2 0
 Have you tried the Sapim double square nipples? I found the squorx nobble would twist off much easier than the Sapim at high tensions. Like, if you have an asym rim and your tool isn't perfectly straight down on top of the nipple, the squorx doesn't handle it well.
  • 3 0
 @JohanG: yep, sapim is better, pillar uses the same double square system, I haven´t tried them though.
  • 4 0
 @JohanG: Same here, Sapim double square nipples are by far my my favorite nipples. The DT Squorx aren't too bad either as long as you don't have to true them with a regular spoke wrench.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: No I dont. Since the nibble came with the rims, I went with these.
  • 4 0
 I love DT Swiss rims. I've had FR 560 on my big bike for 3 years and they are as true as the day they were built and they've been to the French and Italian Alps. My XC wheels are XR 391 on 350 hubs, which again seem unharmed. Not bad when I'm around 95kgs kitted up.
  • 5 0
 That dinky washer at the nipple even out stress at a crucial spot. It is a simple thing that makes a big difference. Add a tink of light oil.
  • 3 0
 Producers like Swiss are worth every cent, now even more than ever. So many brands just cheapen their products and drive away their customers so it is very comforting to know we have people like DT Swiss delivering quality year in year out. Too many hub and rim outfits are not what they once were so it makes choosing DT Swiss a no brainer.
  • 3 0
 Had a very good local shop build up a set of wheels with the normal 350 hubs and these rims. They're bomb proof and the hubs are nice and quiet which I prefer. It's a component decision I just don't have to think about.
  • 3 0
 I've just ordered a pair of 29er EX511's on 32 spoke Hope hubs with microspline freehub for £449. Seemed pretty good value to me, I usually run Stans Flow EX rims so these should be tougher and a bit cheaper.
  • 3 0
 That's what I have and they are absolutely superb. Not to take anything away from these lovely factory wheels, but the Hope (or 350s) custom option is probably a better real world option for many of us.
  • 2 0
 @chakaping: I would think so. Cheaper, more options regarding spoke count, J-Bend or SP.. I would always go that custom way.
  • 4 0
 200€ hubs + 160€ rims + 30€ Spokes = 700€ Wheelset. DT have good wheels, yet at a horrendous pricetag. I'd always get them custom built by an experienced wheelbuilder
  • 1 0
 How are they cheaper than stans.
  • 1 0
 @Cyclehd: You’re right to question that, I was going by the cost of EX3 rims last time I bought some. They’re a bit cheaper now. The place I ordered my wheels sells an EX3 version for the same price as the 511’s. Looking on CRC the EX3 rims are £70 (down from £110) and the 511 £100. I think for the same overall cost you get better value from the 511 wheelset. The EX3 are slightly lighter though.
  • 1 0
 @Heywood165: The EX3 rims seem like a great idea, but I found them ridiculously difficult to fit tyres to - because of the very shallow rim bed.
As mentioned in this review, the EX511s just work.
  • 1 0
 @chakaping: yeah, getting CushCore in and out is a bit difficult on EX3's but I've managed okay on the couple of occasions I've needed to remove/fit it.
  • 1 0
 I'm pretty sure the MK3 and EX3 rims are being discontinued. I has a large backorder in for both, which was cancelled yesterday morning. That was the reason I was given, discontinued. "Don't expect new rims for months" I was told.
  • 4 0
 I've always been confused by DT's naming convention. I always thought 1900, 1700, and 1500 referred to the wheelset weights in grams.
  • 2 0
 It was like that in the past in the 26" times. (e.g. EX1750, EXC1550 etc)
  • 1 0
 It's just a rough level indicator these days.
  • 5 1
 "Nine months of hard riding later and the EX 1700s are still going strong"

I should bloody hope so ! I'd want to see some years on that, at least 5
  • 9 1
 Nine months of hard riding by Dan is like several lifetimes of riding for me. That's a good enough sign off.
  • 3 0
 As written in the article, that depends a lot on frequency and type of riding. Can't imagine Danny MacAskill riding the same wheelset for 2 years. On the other hand, I can't imagine destroying my wheelset in only 5 years.
  • 2 0
 The one unfortunate, but apparently unavoidable design decision is the need to loosen and set back the neighbouring spoke in order to remove and replace a broken spoke (I don't know how I did it but I did it.)
I imagine there is a good reason for it because you don't design something like this by mistake, but it is unfortunate. Otherwise a no bullshit solid wheelset.
  • 3 0
 I wonder how the new Mavic Crossmax XL and new Hunt Trailwide wheels compare to those wheels. On paper they are very simular but I would like to see a comparison test betwwn the three.
  • 2 0
 Hunt's own testing suggested their new Enduro rims are comparable in strength to the EX511 rims on these, just a bit cheaper and heavier.
  • 4 0
 I have those wheels for the last 3 months and they are just as perfect as described here ! :-)
  • 4 0
 I have a set since 6 months, am having the same very positive experience and would buy again.
  • 1 0
 An updated 350 hub was announced earlier this month: m.pinkbike.com/news/dt-swiss-updates-350-hub-launches-ratchet-upgrade-system-and-releases-a-limited-number-of-oil-slick-240-hubs.html

Is that hub different from what comes with this wheelset?
  • 1 0
 Nice review Dan but in the future can you include rim cross section image or photo of the drop center/bead area. The drop center channel is all important for how accommodating a rim is to some inserts such as a Vittoria air liner. I discovered this the hard way when it took an act of Congress to install tire + insert on a DT H1700 rim. The same tire/rim combo had gone on my prior rim with little effort. Fortunately that H1700 rim was made of cheese and lasted about 2 months before I got a Newmen rim. Not only is it vastly superior on sidewall strength, it has a proper drop center and install was easy breezy again.
  • 3 0
 Very good suggestion. I'll implement that in future wheel reviews.

Here's a look at the rim section, if that helps - www.dtswiss.com/en/components/rims-mtb/enduro/ex-511
  • 1 0
 For rough terrain, these wheels are about as good as it gets. Comparably strong carbon wheels weigh almost as much and cost 2 or 3 times as much.

My only caveat-for bigger riders, I’d build a set of wheels with the same parts except using brass nipples.
  • 2 1
 If they are using EX 511 rims why do they say EX 1700? I wish I had known that, I knew EX 511's were great rims and wanted a wheelset with them but when I saw DT wheels with the new numbers and decals I thought maybe they werent as good so I didnt consider buying them. Really bad marketing.
  • 1 0
 I have a set of these in 29. worst wheel set in years, flex a lot laterally, hard to turn nipples without turning the spoke in the hub itself, really disappointed from DT Swiss. Can find cheaper custom build with Hope hubs and DT EX471 rims. My set is hanging in the locker just as backup set.
  • 1 0
 Got these on my new bike and have to say I'm pretty impressed over the last few weeks. Magic Mary and Rock Razor just seated perfectly with a track pump and they seem very responsive.
  • 2 0
 What are you doing if you're not riding DT rims?

250 lb rider been smashing hand built EX 471 sets for years now, haven't had to true em once
  • 3 0
 also over 200lbs. and have been smashing EX471's on Hope hubs, with Comp spokes and brass nipples for 6 years now without even a single true. Early this spring finally had a freehub bearing come apart, but that's about it. Amazing wheels. Doing a new set of the same thing with EX511's now and the newest Hope hubs this summer. Flawless wheels.
  • 3 0
 @Sweatypants: that's exactly what I run as well. Hope pro 4s. Haven't had to service mine yet other than routine clean and grease, and even when it gets to the point of any bearings fallings apart as in the case of your freehub, its a simple sealed bearing removal/install. you sir have great taste in wheels.
  • 2 0
 @Ironchefjon: 8-9 years ago I tried to go fancier with lighter rims and CK hubs. Broke a dozen spokes and ovaled the rims. CK hubs always needed servicing. Eff that man. Hope hubs need nothing. DT rims and spokes never fail. Brass nipples never corrode and snap. Ever since I started over-building wheels in maybe 2013? And using the beefiest cranks I could find, I hardly have any problems. I've broken frames, pedals, cranks, BBs, seats, spokes, hubs, rims... the little extra weight is worth never having to think about it.
  • 1 0
 These wheels are a great value considering they are basically the same as the 1500s from a year ago that cost $1000+ and there isn’t anything else out there with this level of durability and weight for the same price.
  • 3 0
 Meanwhile over at Hunt you can get a complete carbon wheelset for $800 and lifetime replacements.
  • 7 1
 Buying DT vs Hunt lifetime replacement is like buying a Toyota vs Mazda unlimited mileage warranty, it’s nice having the free stuff but it’s better not needing it in the first place
  • 2 0
 While on paper that kinda thing sounds neat, and its nice to have for money's sake, the reality of that is, unless you keep 2 of everything, warranty replacements are still annoying as shit and/or result in a bunch of downtime. I had a Ti hardtail once develop a crack, that they gladly warrantied, but it still took 2.5 months to get my new frame. If that's your only bike, or only wheelset, you're gonna have a lousy summer.
  • 1 0
 @Sweatypants: I would like to hear real customers feedback on the Hunt's cause if its as good as it sounds you can't argue with them being a good deal
  • 1 0
 Interestingly enough you only save 90g (1966g vs 1876g). Its been interesting watching the evolution of carbon on parts that necessitate high durability such as wheels and frames. The weight savings has really diminished over alloys.
  • 1 0
 Last October, I somehow got a set of 2021 XM1700s delivered to my USA door for $509 from Lord Gun.... best factory wheelset I have ever owned. I still think they screwed up the price.
  • 1 1
 I have these wheels on my Yeti SB115. For a slow, rocky trail in PA, OH or WV, I run them at 13psi in front on a 2.5 Maxxis DHR and 17psi in back on a 2.4 Maxxis Agressor. On a fast flow trail, I'll run them at 16/20. Bring that hate, Pinkbike trolls!
  • 4 1
 Squorx are good but give me good 'ol square brass anyday!
  • 1 0
 They make squorx in brass for aftermarket, got em on my wheels. Have always hated alloy nipples
  • 1 0
 And the external torx tool is brilliant
  • 4 3
 Why in the world would you buy a DT EX1700 wheelset with 350 hubs when you can have a DT EX1700 wheelset with 350 hubs for half the -oh wait
  • 2 1
 They just need to offer EX1700 in classic 32h variant and it will really be a best wheelset from factory - otherwise we will still build it custom Smile
  • 1 0
 I've got a set. They were extractions from a dentist-mobile, $450 on eBay. EX1700, 32h J-bend, 110/148. As the Brits would say, "That's GEAR, mate!"
  • 3 2
 Honestly if you think you need more wheel than this you are wrong. but for sure just spec the EX511 with a hub of choice and brass nipps rather than the above monstrosity
  • 1 0
 Im surprised their wasnt a segment saying, "these broke, but I'm sure carbon would too". All too common in a positive carbon rim review.
  • 1 0
 I’ve hammered xm421, xm481 and xm551 rim builds for 5 years now. I recommend them to everyone. Weight, Price and durability are the best compromise I’ve found.
  • 1 0
 Didn't this wheelset cost like $550 just a couple, maybe 3, years ago? It's a great wheelset, but what's the reason for the price hike? Is it the straight pull hubs?
  • 3 0
 You can remove the two "cons" by building the wheels yourself.
  • 2 1
 As far as product naming goes, DT Swiss is on the same level as BMW and Mercedes... it's all just numbers and letters lol
  • 3 3
 Nah. You gotta compare them to say a Lexus. The wheels aren’t shit and unreliable
  • 1 0
 @MillerReid: my family has an early 90's BMW and a late 90's VW, both of which are still running fine.. idk about you but that doesn't exactly scream unreliable to me
  • 3 1
 Imagine working for Enve and reading this review.
  • 1 0
 Make sure not to scuff the QR code on the rim or it might direct you to a rub and poke website instead
  • 3 2
 Bizarre that I can get those wheels built up at my local shop for £460 compared to £699 as a factory wheel.
  • 1 2
 Mentioned newmen wheels were aimed squarely at the same market as these and aiming to beat them in direct comparison. That is compliment to the DT wheels I guess, but lets not pretend they are better than sliced bread.
  • 1 0
 DT Swiss EX1700 wheelsets are fantastic! Tough, reliable, great looking and easy to service.
  • 1 0
 I love the new wheel thumbnail template!
  • 3 4
 Nice try, but no cigar. Maybe next time with 32 j-bend spokes and brass nipples, for spare part compatibilty and ease of maintenance.
  • 3 0
 Build em yourself. Brass nipples are a must imo, especially with salted winther roads
  • 1 1
 My XM1700 had a drive side bearing die in 132km. New one in at my cost.... with any luck they actually last.
  • 1 0
 I sold a set of these for like $350. Should have kept them.
  • 1 0
 Why would centerlock have issues with large rotors?
  • 1 0
 Good question. It says max 203 mm on dt's cl adaptors
  • 1 0
 I have the M1700s and they are great.
  • 1 1
 Ya'll batching about the wheels aren't nonboost lol
  • 2 2
 crybabies whining about non boost hubs
  • 1 2
 LoL I have a DT350 non boost front and rear hub if someone wants to make me an offer
  • 3 5
 What is the point in centre lock rotors? Why are the still an option?
  • 10 4
 Because they are far superior to Soviet level technology 6 bolt.
  • 2 4
 @JohanG: how? Haha mine are so noisy when braking over rough ground and you have to use adapters to run most rotors and you need a cassette / bb tool to take your rotor off. 6 bolt is far superior.
  • 3 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I'm sorry yours are noisy but I have many wheel sets and no noise. I use the bb tool lockring and can take a rotor off in seconds.
  • 3 1
 What kind of straw man argument is this? There is nothing wrong with six bolt rotors. Besides, If the rotor were to come loose on the trail (when does that ever happen?) what kind of multitool has a bb tool and enough leverage to get your center lock tight agin?
  • 3 0
 Would much rather have centerlock
  • 3 2
 @endoplasmicreticulum: exactly anything that needs specific tools that you couldn’t find in the average garage is a massive negative and there needs to be an actual benefit to using them where centre lock is actually worse. The rock on the splines making a terrible noise before eventually coming lose all together and though the disk won’t come of the splines, you’ll bend your disk in the process so you constantly need to be taking your wheels off to tighten them and the lock rings start to look chewed up almost straight away. Complete crap. Who’s actually ever had an issue with 6 bolt?
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