Review: e*thirteen's TRS+ 12-Speed Cassette Offers a Whopping 556% Range

Aug 9, 2019
by Richard Cunningham  
E 13 TRS 12 speed wide range cassette


e*thirteen's new TRS+ 12-speed cassette is poised to ruffle SRAM's feathers again. E*thirteen's 11-speed TRS cassettes were an ambitious project for the high-performance accessory maker. One-by drivetrains simplified the duties of the rear derailleur and transferred the onus of smooth shifting onto the shoulders of the wide range cassette. But the new crown jewels - SRAM's and Shimano's 11-speed cassettes - left many riders wishing for a wider, more useful range of gears.

E*thirteen seized the opportunity to squeeze in between the two giants with an innovative 9 x 46 tooth option that offered a significantly wider gearing range The shifting was a little clunky, but it was light, affordable and exactly what one-by drivetrains needed at the time.
TRS+ Wide Range Cassette

Construction: 10-cog steel, 2-cogs aluminum
Compatible: SRAM XD or XD-R only
Gearing 556%: 9,11,13,15,17,20, 23, 27, 31, 36, 42, 50
Gearing 511%: 9-10-12-14-16-18-21-24-28-33-39- 46
Weight: 9 x 50 (reviewed) - 390g, 9 x 46 - 336g (stated)
MSRP: $299 USD
Contact: e*thirteen

Enter SRAM's 12-speed Eagle, which seemed to put the wide range issue to rest and with it, a big chunk of e*thirteen's 11-speed TRS cassette sales. Undaunted, e*thirteen's design team volleyed back with a completely redesigned 12-speed cassette that shifts smoothly across an impressive 556-percent range of gearing.

e Thirteen 12 speed TRS cassette
e*thirteen's TRS+ cassette is machined in two interlockiing halves: Ten cogs machined from 4130 alloy steel, with the two largest cut from 7075-alloy aluminum.


TRS+ Features

E*thirteen's TRS+ 9 x 50 tooth cassette weighs only 395 grams, requires only a 3mm allen key and a chain whip to assemble onto an XD or XD-R driver, and retails for $299 USD. If you pale at a 556-percent range, there is also a TRS+ with a closer ratio, 9 x 46-tooth option for the same cost. Both operate with any Eagle derailleur and 12-speed chain. Like the 11-speed model, the TRS+ is a two piece design that latches together with a twist. The outer half is a one-piece steel, ten-cog cluster, while the inside two cogs are machined from aluminum. Profiled teeth and a number of improved machined ramps assist gear changes.

To install theTRS+ cassette, the aluminum side simply pushes onto the XD driver and is clamped in place via a 3mm Allen key. That seems simplistic, but it can be argued that the micro-fine threads of SRAM's XD driver are a disaster waiting to happen. There's no clear indication whether or not you've cross-threaded a SRAM cassette or if you are simply experiencing the resistance of its press-fit sleeve. The only way to be sure is to remove it, check, and then risk cross-threading it once more. E*thirteen's clamp-on arrangement settles that doubt by eliminating the threads and you'll never need to search for a spline tool to remove it either.

Gearing for the 9 x 50 and 9 x 46 is different, across their ranges: 9,11,13,15,17,20, 23, 27, 31, 36, 42, 50 for the 556-percent wide-range option and 9-10-12-14-16-18-21-24-28-33-39- 46 for the 511-percent, close-ratio option. I weighed the 9 x 50 at 400 grams, which is close enough to e*thirteen's 398-gram figure to call it good. The weight of the 9 x 46 is stated at 336 grams.

Both the weight and price of the two cassettes fall between SRAMs Eagle XX1 and GX, (360g / 450g) which makes the TRS+ an attractive option, especially for those who want to upgrade from SRAM's 600-gram, lower level 12-speed cassettes. Sadly, e*thirteen's TRS+ cassettes are not Shimano compatible.
e Thirteen 12 speed TRS cassette
TRS+ cassettes slide over the threads of XD or XD-R drivers...

e Thirteen 12 speed TRS cassette
...And are clamped in place by a 3mm-hex Allen screw on the aluminum cogs.


Getting Started

TRS+ cassettes are shipped with easy to follow instructions and e*thirteen further equips their customers with video tutorials and downloadable PDF format instructions on their website. The cassette requires grease in a few places, which is pre-applied on new product, so initial assembly is a piece of cake. Slide the aluminum half of the cassette onto the XD driver (in the rare instance you are installing it on an XD-R road driver, you'll need to add a supplied 2mm spacer). Wiggle the cogs until they engage the XD spline and press down until it bottoms on the driver body. Torque the 3mm-hex Allen screw to 3 Newton meters and you're half-way there.

e Thirteen 12 speed TRS cassette
TRS+ two-piece cassettes are remarkably simple.

e Thirteen 12 speed TRS cassette
Tangs interlock with the aluminum spider. The threaded hole is for the safety screw.
e Thirteen 12 speed TRS cassette
Rotate the steel half with a chain whip to lock or remove the cogs.

E 13 TRS 12 speed wide range cassette
Down and locked, The screw prevents the cassette from accidentally unlocking.

The steel half of the cassette has a hole that lines up with a pair of lock icons printed on the matching aluminum cogs. Push the steel half onto the driver with the hole under the "unlocked" icon and use a chain whip to rotate the steel half counterclockwise to lock it in place. A tiny, 3-mm hex Allen screw is provided that fits into the hole and prevents accidental disengagement. The assembly process is simple and intuitive.

To remove the TRS+ cassette, reverse the steps; I use a gloved hand to hold the two largest cogs while I rotated the steel half with a chain whip. Alternatively, a Shimano cassette spline tool fits into the nine-tooth cog and can be used to rotate and unlock the steel half, while you secure the aluminum side with the whip. Either way, it's a three minute task. Don't drop that tiny screw, though - I did, and it was gone forever. E*thirteen sent a replacement.


Trail Report

I have complimented e*thirteen's wide range 11-speed cassettes for offering a more useful and lighter-weight alternative to the second-tier cassettes typically found on mid-priced mountain bikes. That noted, I never rode one that didn't have a clunky shift somewhere in the range, and while their overall shifting performance was good, TRS cassettes lacked the precise feel of the SRAM or Shimano items. I begin this review with an 11-speed slap-down because e*thirteen appears to have addressed those issues with their new 12-speed TRS+ Cassettes.

Shifting feels much smoother in both directions across the cogs, and the noticeable change in shifting performance between the steel and aluminum cogs of the old TRS cassettes has vanished as well. I tested the TRS+ cassette using a lower level SRAM NX Eagle derailleur so if there were any compatibility issues, they would have been exaggerated by the reduced precision of NX mechanism. Does it shift as well as SRAM's XO1 Eagle? No, but e*thirteen has narrowed the gap to the point where I never gave the TRS+ cassette a thought while I was riding - except to note how well spaced the gearing range felt for such a massive spread.

I prefer a 30-tooth chainring for 29ers to adjust my climbing gears for the larger diameter wheels. Now that most trail bikes are shipped with 2.5" or larger tires, that issue is more acute. e*thirteen's nine-tooth cassette cog gives back the top speed I'd normally sacrifice by dropping from a 32-tooth chainring, so the TRS+ is a win/win accessory.

I had some reservations that the gearing steps would feel too extreme across a 556-percent range, but such was not the case. SRAM's Eagle range has a 500 percent spread and it looks like this: 10,12,14,16,18,21,24,28,32,36,42,50. TRS+, with a 556-percent spread looks like this: 9,11,13,15,17,20, 23, 27, 31, 36, 42, 50.
E 13 TRS 12 speed wide range cassette

As you can see, the differences are spread across the first nine cogs, and with one exception, the TRS+ steps feel more seamless than SRAM's. I expected the five-tooth jump between the TRS's 31 and 36 tooth to be the deal breaker, but such was not the case. The shift from the 11 to the 9 on the e*thirteen cassette, however, feels more dramatic than the shift from the 12 to the 10 cog on the SRAM cassette. I can live with that and after riding both back to back, I prefer the TRS+ gearing steps over those of the SRAM Eagle cassette.

Wear is on par with a SRAM cassette, which is good. Steel cassettes last a long time, and while the large cogs are aluminum, they also have a lot more teeth, which extends their lifetimes to compete with their steel siblings. If you do manage to beat one down, e*thirteen sells replacement halves on their website. Aesthetically, however, e*thirteen's TRS cassettes, with their white graphics and matte black finishes, look old in about an hour's use and never really clean up that well. Most of us will be buying the TRS+ for the extended range, but if you are "that guy" there are more handsome looking alternatives with less range - like a golden Eagle or a snazzy color-matched Garbaruk cassette.



Pros

+ Good gear spacing
+ Light weight
+ Extends range without enlarging cogs
Cons

- Dowdy looks
- SRAM and Shimano 12-speeds shift better





Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesRiders who need a low climbing gear but don't want to sacrifice top speed will find e*thirteen's TRS+ is a just-right solution. The nine-tooth small cog is the range extender, which enables a 56-percent increase in the TRS+ gearing spread without resorting to even larger diameter cassette cogs than we already suffer with. e*thirteen has improved the shifting and smoothness of their TRS system to the degree that it can stand as a viable alternative to the big players.RC







210 Comments

  • + 73
 The best thing about this cassette is that now someone can make a cassette with 580% which will lead to 620%. The art of boiling the frog. I think it is about time Netflix does episode of Black Mirror with en employee in a MTB company.
  • + 52
 I've got a great idea for a video: 6-minute abs. I mean, who's gonna buy the 7-minute abs when they can buy 6?
  • + 13
 @bishopsmike: unless of course someone then came out with 5 minute abs.
  • + 12
 Personally, I need about 110% more range than the E.thirteen, give me 666%!
  • + 5
 The Black Mirror idea might be your best one to date.
  • + 5
 @bishopsmike:

vjunior21: Step into my office.
Bishopsmike: Why?
vjunior21: You're F##king fired.
  • + 9
 Should have stopped at 420%.
  • + 0
 @bishopsmike: Step into my office....
  • + 1
 @vjunior21: Beat me to it, I tip my cap sir.
  • + 15
 @bishopsmike:

Ethirteen: I'm going to start my own company...you want in? You hear of this thing called 500% gear range? Well this is going to blow that thing right out of the water. Listen to this...556 gear range. Think about it, you walk into a bike shop and see 500% sitting there and you you see 556% sitting right next to it. Which one are you going to pick man?

Consumer: I'd go for the 556%

Ethirteen: Bingo bingo 556% and we guarantee to get just as good a workout as the 500% folk.

Consumer: You guarantee it? How do you do that?

Ethirteen: If your not happy with 556% we will send you a new cassette to reduce it to 500% free. See that's where we are coming from. That's our motto. A to B.

Consumer: That's good. Unless someone comes up with 580% then you're in trouble.

Ethirteen: NO...NO! Is said 556% not 580%. Who rides 580%? You won't even get your heart going. Not even a mouse on a wheel.

Consumer: Good point.

Ethirteen: 556% is the key number here. Think about it. 556-11s... 556 dwarfs. 556% man that the number. 556 chipmunks twirling on a brand, eating a bunch of sun flowers on my uncles ranch. It like you're dreaming about gorgonzola cheese when it is clearly brie time baby.
  • + 4
 @maxyedor: "The gear range of the Beast"
  • + 2
 [Ryan Renoylds gif] "but... why?"
  • + 2
 Another commercial from Mountain Bike Fiction. RS does not even comment on the (lack of ) wiseness of having a 9 cog AND a 10 cog but what cracks me up is calling a 400 grams cassette a "light" cassette. Only on Pinkbike!
  • + 4
 @duzzi: the best bit about bike internet in general:

1day after press release:
Who needs that range?

1year after press release:
I use the whole range! Come to the Rockies or tonColorado and you’ll use every single last tooth of that cassette.
  • + 2
 @duzzi: It's a matter of perspective. It is lighter than GX eagle and a hell lot lighter than the NX/SX Sram fertilizer that seems to creep out on oh so many bikes lately. Granted X01 and XX1 are still little bit lighter, but the range is lower so a trade off there.
  • + 2
 @Ferisko: Anyone having problem with 10-50 range being too little needs to see a doctor. I am personally hoping Shimano will release their 11 cog XTR race 10-46 cassette in 12sp spacing. Currently running 10-42 with 32t up front and quite frankly I’d like to go for 34t
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I kind of agree with you, but quite a few of new bikes with eagle, esp 29ers come with 30t chain ring up front. I figured customers (you know, those who actually buy those things, not keyboard warriors) must be complaining in shops they want it lighter... either that or OEM's give great discounts on the 30t's.

Personally I used to run 32t with 10-42 like you and now run eagle with 34t up front. My riding buddy who recently bought a new bike with eagle as well. That being said I would probably welcome that 9t in the back while keeping 34t up front because there are a few places on my local trails where I can spin out if I really try to steal those KOM's but don't really feel like going for a 36 up front.
  • + 1
 @sspiff: YOU CAN'T DO FIVE MINUTE ABS!
  • + 0
 @Ferisko: I know how it works with folks who actually buy stuff, although that is a gross generalization which would indicate that

a) Pinkbike is full of experts
b) Experts buy one bike per 5 years
c) it is the other way around and people who buy stuff more often actually know what they are doing.

The reality is more like online programs for abs. 5 minute abs for 19.99$ and a short story why X set of exercises is more effective will always be better than 6 minute abs for 19.99$. Same is true for horsepower, megapixels, nr of teeth on cassette, grams on a product etc. Arguments like SID is lighter than 32SC for less money are not uncommon. The way of thinking completely ignoring other important factors, typical of ignorant individuals (fair enough, I am completely ignorant of playing pool, driving gokarts, shooting rifle even though I love doing it from time to time). Ignorants always hang on to information most often propelled in press and media, along with bro science.

It doesn’t matter if someone is distorting the truth, the market is a battlefield, if SRAM makes 10-50, Shimano will make 10-51. Reality of usage, purpose of the product becomes less relevant if opponent successfully convinced their potential clients that the solution makes sense. Spec lost greatly on not going 275, Shimano of not going 12sp giant flying saucer, possibly expecting it to not catch on, and opponent taking damage from not getting the return on the investment.

This behavior was illustrated in the movie “men who stare at the goats” where one general explains to the senate why US Army went into mind control research. “Initially it was just a scam to make Russians believe we work on mind control while we didn’t” - “so why do we keep spending so much money on it?” - “because Russians believed us, started their own research and now we cannot afford staying behind if they do discover something”
  • + 1
 @maxyedor: the maths hurting my head
  • + 51
 It’s a good job we’re making wheels bigger. #26inchcassette
  • + 2
 Manufactures might have to start designing around 32" wheels if the cassette gets any bigger. lol
  • + 1
 @vjunior21: Jokes aside, I drew up a 32” full suspension bike (700mm rim diameter) and with #wokeasfuk long&slack geometry, it doesn’t even look weird. I will be genuinely surprised if this wheelsize will not become a reality within 5 years. 29” bikes became a norm from xc marathon, through Enduro and now we have them even in DH. So if 29” bikes are the way to go, they are optimal even in Small sizes and with lots of travel, why should they be the end of evolution? Bikes got longer so there is room for even bigger wheels, keeping pedals, saddle and bars/grips in the same place.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: #36wheelaintdead lol
  • + 0
 @vjunior21: 36” is way above what geometry for average human height can handle. It’s for NBA players.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: 35wheelsaintdead. Compromise. Lol
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: whilst we are talking about height etc, is it too outlandish to imagine the wheel size changing with the frame size? If Danny and Laurie can use a 29, surely Payet could cope with a 32 as you suggest? It is often suggest that big wheels are for big riders and whilst I realise there is some crossover due to riding preference.. if long frames are for long people, why aren’t wheels treated the same? Being a purist I rejected 29 for ages, but at 6’4, when I tried them, they almost instantly made sense and felt natural. I haven’t been on a 26 for ages but I dare say it would feel like a bmx.
  • + 47
 This is gonna make climbing trees so much easier
  • + 35
 in rough af 4, watch Jordie climb up the tree on his bike before dropping it down
  • + 13
 Sadly, for me, everything from E thirteen have failed me. Worst wobbly dropper post (sent it to E thirteen and got it back with the same wobbliness). The tires= extremely slow rolling and only gripped ok in wet conditions. My 11 speed cassette just gave up after around 800 km.
  • - 2
 The only good E13 parts I had is the bash guard and chain guide which is very good and the wheels with the awesome killer wasp sound. The other parts are shit.
  • + 5
 I like the mechanical dropper. needs a service though.
  • + 2
 1st gen tires were good but they actually did not make them
  • + 0
 Agreed. I’ve gone through these cassettes in months. A few a season..... They wear too fast. Had e thirteen wheels and they were junk.
  • + 2
 I’ve never used anything good from e13. I’ve not been impressed with anything my friends have used ether and as they tend to not keep it for long or replace with something else so I’m guessing neither were they and honestly I’m still pissed about the amount of money they stole from me making me buy cheap shitty plastic bash plates that broke every other week at £60 a pop.
  • + 4
 I also only have bad things to say about e13 that I have bought. I thought that I could get Eagle range without paying Eagle money, so paid out for the 11-12 speed upgrade kit. Turns out that no matter how I tuned the derailleur, there was always a sticking shift right on the place where the 2 pieces of the cassette joined. I ended up buying GX Eagle cassette, derailleur, and shifter. If I hadn't bothered with the substandard E13 stuff, I could have had X01 for the same amount I spent on both. That was the 2nd time bitten. 1st was an extender sprocket that also never wanted to shift smoothly. Never again E13, never again.
  • + 6
 @Endurip We're sorry that you've had issues with our products. We strive to make great components that last a long time, but once in a while people just get really unlucky. We'd love it if you send us a DM so we could learn more about that cassette and dropper post. Our new catalogue of TRS tires are much faster rolling than the previous generation and are out best lineup yet, so those are worth a look too.
  • + 11
 @Endurip Your complaints about tire grip make me question everything else you say (like, ever). Slow rolling, sure, but to complain about grip is ludicrous
  • + 1
 My 11 speed cassette suffered a folded over aluminum cog which they replaced, but they said it was my fault and wouldn't replace it again. The steel cogs have mushroomed on the drive side very quickly- worked great at first but now unusable. Only got a season and a half out of it- maybe 400 miles.
  • + 1
 I have had 2 of the 11sp 9-46 cassettes and both failed. 1st one was shipped without a plastic bushing that caused play and resulted in garbage shifting. 2nd one was good for a handful of rides before the 46t somehow bent and caused the chain to drop. This was the newest version with the pinch screw setup. Great in theory but not reliable in real world.
  • + 3
 The old school guard/guide combo was their finest work.
  • + 4
 Had the 11 speed cassette on 2 bikes now and they’ve lasted longer than the XO1 cassettes I’ve had for sure. Shifted great and we’re cheaper too Love the wheels and super grippy tires as well. Well done e13. Don’t listen to the trolls. Can’t wait to try this cassette.
  • + 4
 @covekid: you definitely work for e13 don’t you??
  • + 2
 I have their dropper and 9-46 11sp (pinch bolt version) that came on my Jeffsy. Like the dropper despite the excessive side play that's always been there despite tightening everything up. Very fast and you definitely know when it's up. The aluminium spider on my cassette is decidedly NOT press fit, unless you have access to a hydraulic press. Every time I need to remove it, I literally have to hammer the driver in or out with a mallet and a block of wood and pray I don't damage the pawls. This means it's basically impossible to get the spider totally bottomed out on the driver straight and always results in a noticeable wobble of the cassette and a possible re-index. I contacted E13 about it and they blamed the DT swiss driver for being out of spec.
  • + 0
 800Km for a cassette sounds pretty good. Especially when you can replace the individual sections when needed. My e*thirteen stuff has been amazing. Tires are some of the best Ive tried and the new 3rd Gen are really a huge step forward. The 9-46 12s is sweet. Tighter jumps than sram and less fickle setup.
  • + 1
 My TRS+ rims has been one of the most durable aluminum rims I've ever ridden. Maybe I've been lucky but smooth is not what I am.
  • + 3
 @ckcost: Are you kidding? Cassettes generally last a couple thousand and outlive several chain replacements, which depending on the conditions and which part of year I use them also generally last longer than 800km before they get 0.5% stretched... I've done 8000km on the a sram X01 11speed before I replaced it with another one which did the same. And my current X01 eagle is at 4000 and looking at it will do at least as much if not more.
  • + 3
 Update: Chris from E thirteen kindly offered me a new 12 speed cassette and they'll look into my dropper post again. Thats really excellent customer service, best I´we had ever!
  • + 1
 @Endurip: they are super good with customer service they just lack good engineers and material science, so they backfill with the former and marketing.
  • + 2
 @slabba53: at least they replaced yours. I was told to just buy another. Also, mine has developed play between the steel and aluminum halves of the cassette. After far less than 400 miles.
  • + 1
 @ckcost:
800km for a cassette is a freaking joke.
I had everything, from 7, 8 and 9 speed freewheel cassettes, normal Shimano, Sunrace, Sram and chinese cassettes as well.
There was not a single one of them which did not at least made it up to something between 3000 and 4000km.
Seriously 800km. What the heck!
  • + 2
 Update:

After being contacted by E thirteen I will receive a new 12 s cassette from them, and they'll look into my dropper post again. That is some amazing customer service!
  • + 12
 I’ve got the updated 11-speed that came last year. It uses the pinch bolt design instead of the lock ring. I’ve been running it for about a year with M9000 XTR shifter and derailleur. Shifting and performance have been great and right up there it’s competition. I don’t doubt the claims against the first design, but if you’re thinking about the 11 speed cassette, I would definitely do it. I’ve actually been happy with all my e*thirteen stuff(dropper and alloy cranks). Their components were key in hitting my goals for weight and gear range on this bike. Accomplishing a weight of 29.8(with pedals and empty water bottle) on a 160 travel 29er with over 500% range, 2.5” tires, alloy wheels and cranks, and a bash guard.
  • + 2
 haha my 150mm carbon 29er with carbon rims carbon xo cranks carbon bars, no bash, and EXO casing 2.4" minions weighs more. What did you do, not include a seat post and saddle?
  • + 3
 @hamncheez: lol I thought my carbon nomad with carbon rims send bars was light. Then I realized my luggage scale was reading 3lbs too low and now the bike feels so heavy!
  • + 4
 @hamncheez: EXO casing for me too(Minion DHF/Aggressor), my Spank rims are as light as a lot of carbon, the e*thirteen dropper and Fabric Line saddle are both fairly light, I went with XTR on the drivetrain, MRP Ribbon air fork, and used a good bit of Ti hardware. Since I’m running that 9-46 cassette on a 29er, I run a 28t chainring and MRP’s micro XCg bash(never dropped a chain). It’s all on an Intense Carbine which isn’t that light but I custom built it to be light without compromising beefiness and that’s what two scales told me ????‍♂️
  • + 2
 @hamncheez: also have crazy amounts of ground clearance with that setup.
  • + 0
 @rideyobike86: ya no way that shit weighs under 30lbs.
  • + 1
 @reverend27: I had my SC Hightower at 26.5lbs with piggy back monarch shock, pike 140mm, 150mm dropper, 2.35 nobby nics, E:13 cassette, NX shifter and derailleur, and so on. It's definitely possible. He even has scale shots.
  • + 14
 I can’t wait for the Doctor Evil version which offers “One hundred million ratio”
  • + 5
 With logos etched by frickin' sharks with frickin' lasers!
  • + 6
 "Unlike the 11-speed design, which required a special spline tool, the aluminum side of the TRS+ cassette simply pushes onto the XD driver and is clamped in place via a 3mm Allen key."

FYI, the 11 speed has been re-designed also. The first 10 gears are steel with last being aluminum, and the last (aluminum) is also a pinch bolt now.

Been on one now for about a month with a GX derailleur and X01 12 speed Eagle chain and has been working great. I would say shifting almost as good as GX cassette (maybe just a tad slower) and does not drop chain on back pedaling.
  • + 7
 I'm on an updated 11s TRS+ as well, it's smooth to mount/take apart, lighter than the competition and the gearing step at the second lightest is better than e.g. Shimano XT 11-46 (e13 46-39 vs Shimano 46-37) which has a slightly too big jump.
  • + 5
 @in2falling Thank you for the clarification! You're absolutely correct and we appreciate the input.
  • + 1
 Wow "almost as good as gx" for $300. Gotcha let me run right out and buy one lol.
  • + 4
 @reverend27:

Eagle GX Cass=$215
Eagle GX Derailure=$125
Eagle GX Chain=$35
New Front Chain Ring=$60
Total=$425

E13 11 Speed Cass=$249
Eagle GX Chain=$35
Total=$284

Money over for beer=$141
  • + 0
 @in2falling: some of the best math ive seen all day!!! No brainer when you put it that way. Only slight edit I would make ....beer...bourbon...bud anndd....booty?
  • + 1
 @ethirteen-components: good that you ditched the smaller aluminum cogs, was rather disappointed to have to replace my aluminum section after my #2 and #3 on my trs+ started slipping
  • + 5
 I hope this doesn’t constantly rattle like my 11 speed.
I have to regulary take it all apart, grease where the the 2 cassette parts meet and re-assemble. Once the grease disapates, I have to do it again.

However other than the extra maintenance, mine is 18 months old and works like the day it was new.
  • + 2
 I think they have a re-released version of 11 speed, with improvements addressing this issue?
  • + 2
 Hey @Richt2000, if you have any questions please shoot us a DM, but those issues were resolved in a future generation of TRS cassettes. However, we can give you some advice on making it much more silent if you shoot us a direct message.
  • + 1
 @ethirteen-components:

Cool - will do - thanks :-)
  • + 6
 A cassette for 300 bucks - jepp that is what I've been waiting for.
Seriously thouhg - as long as I can I will stick with a front derailler and a light 11-32 cassette (less than 300 grams) for 40 bucks!!
  • + 5
 Thats why I bought the Deore 11-42 der. ... The Cassette costs less than half of a 11/12 speed.

200-300€ bucks for a cassette is insane.
  • + 2
 @NotNamed: sure but 11-42 =/= 9-50. The E.13 cassette is pricey but it's also got an insane gear range if that's what you're after. Nothing else really comes close in that price range.
  • + 1
 To be fair, the wide-range, high-end cassettes from Sram and Shimano last fairly long. Probably due to the large cogs. Not sure about the e13 one specifically, though.
  • + 5
 whats that "front derailler" thing your talking about ?
  • + 1
 @Ttimer: Mine seems to last two chains. Can't get a third new one now, without it jumping off the smaller cogs. Didn't keep each chain too long either.
  • + 1
 @seraph: I know- but 11-42 is plentyful for lot of stuff- normally If I cant climb it with 42t I wont be able with a 50t also to be fair.

The cassettes are just too expensive - they cost 10x more than a 10speed.
  • + 4
 300 bucks for a cassette that will wear out, jeez.

I don’t even see the need for this. My old Shimano 11-speed only left me a bit wishing on the smaller gears, and my new bike came with GX Eagle and I have absolutely no complaints about the range.

This just feels like a solution to a nonexisting problem.
  • - 11
flag WAKIdesigns (Aug 9, 2019 at 0:55) (Below Threshold)
 Did you miss Sram cassettes? That shift like crap to make it better?
  • + 6
 Manufacturers don't really care about what consumers want. Consumers seem to think this is some kind ask and they make it happen kinda deal. They are there to develop the product they think you want because you don't even know what's coming next. This whole solution to no problem line is so long in the tooth now,
  • + 1
 Their 9-46 cassette made sense(at least on paper) when all that you could get from Sram was a 10-42. This cassette seems pointless as it costs nearly as much as an x01, shifts worse, has half the range advantage, and most of all doesn't provide a lower gear like the previous version.
  • + 0
 @thenotoriousmic: shifting under power of sram cassettes is shit, as I and all of my friends who I asked about it have experienced I don’t know what you are trying to prove with this video. The difference between Eagle XX1 and 11sp XTR is so evident that this discussion should not even take place. Not to mention even better 12sp xtr. It is Not like wondering whether Coke is better than Pepsi or BMW better than Merc, no. It is like Nobby Nic Performance VS Magic Mary soft. My wives Sunrace cassette shifts better than my X01.
  • + 5
 @Upduro @SoDiezl350 I understand how it can be a little confusing. It falls within our lineup of 12 speed cassettes and makes a little more sense when viewed that way. We currently make a 9-46 12 speed cassette that can be used for cases where someone wants much more manageable shifting, better price, ($199), lighter weight (336g), and overall improvement from Eagle. The 9-50 is better suited for people who are looking for more range than Eagle, a differentiating factor, or are out to save a little money.
  • + 2
 @Upduro : I got their 12 speed upgrade kit for $215. Comes with this cassette, chain, and ball bearing shifter upgrade along with other bits. I didn't need 12 speed but it was cheaper and nicer than any other cassette near that price (including the individual ethirteen cassette). Plus it turned my GX shifter closer to a XO shifter with the plastic to ball bearing upgrade. Only complaint was the kit needed one additional washer which ethirteen sent me. It's been running great since then.
  • - 4
flag thenotoriousmic (Aug 9, 2019 at 7:33) (Below Threshold)
 @WAKIdesigns: success... I have made the fanboy cry. Enjoy gouging out your freehub with your cheap pressed steel sprockets and smashing your knee of your stem whenever you change down a gear as I pedal of into the sunset shifting flawlessly savouring my victory.
  • + 0
 @thenotoriousmic: hahaha Shimano bout to drop the microspline license for all.
Sram is going to lose the one thing it has.
It's easy to have a leigon of fanbois when you are the only game to n town.

Slx and xt 12 speed over any eagle including xx1.
Start talking xtr and you might as well drop your head turn and walk away.
  • + 1
 @thenotoriousmic: and no I'm not a fanboi I piss on their brakes.

But the shifting quality is sublime under power it's no comparison.
  • - 2
 @thenotoriousmic: don’t call me a Shimano fanboi. At least not when it comes to cassettes. I have been using 10sp Sram and Shimano cassettes side by side until 2016 and didn’t have any issues. Then I changed to 11sp Shimano. The XT 8000 cassette was shifting well but backpedaling chain dropping was a disaster. Bought XTR. Got better. Then I wanted a bit more range than 11-40 and a thought that Sram is a but lighter. So I bought a barely used X01. This is where my problem with Sram started. On my XC rides I shift a lot under power, I couldn’t believe how crappy my shifting got. And that was only the beginning because then I rode a few rental bikes with GX, NX and XX1...
  • + 1
 @ethirteen-components: Is the takeaway here that the 9-46 will shift a bit better than 9-50 because of the ratios?

Full disclosure I'm happy with the 9-46 range. Good product!
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I run shimano and a xt cassette so I know you’re lying not that your second hand cassette turned out to be shit would have meant anything. Probably the reason it got sold in the first place so it’s not just shimano that are pulling the wool over your eyes then? Wink
  • + 7
 Must be too flat round here. I've never felt I've needed anything lower than 32x42t.
  • + 5
 It also depends on your wheels size. 32x42 riding 26 is definitely good, a bit limiting on 27.5 is you're riding somewhere with somewhat decent elevation, I can imagine that with a 29er it is then quite limiting.
  • + 8
 Depends on your climbing style. If you are a masher you need a lot less gear range than if you are a spinner. Might need replacement hardware in the knees sooner, though.
  • + 3
 not so many alps in the uk if i remember correctly. i kept saying i do not need more than 36 t even though i used to live close to the alps- but on a long enduroraceday in the alps with DH Tires,pretty steep climbs and going allout in the stages i really missed a small spinniggear to conserve energy. not so sure if i really need that 50t plate my current bike came with but then again i have not done such an event on it.
  • + 5
 Come to Colorado where we have steep climbs at over 12,000’ of elevation. That’s where you need wide range drivetrains, or the fitness of a pro.
  • + 5
 I was in the same boat. Then I visited BC for the first time. Started the ride with a long fire-road climb that felt pretty normal and was happy in my normal gear range. But after 20 minutes I realized I needed to slow down a bit lighten the gearing. That's when I realized that the extremely low gears are more about long, steady grinder climbs than it is about having an easy enough gear for short climbs on the trail.
  • + 0
 @m-t-g: Or a ski lift ticket.
  • + 7
 YES! Heavier cassettes with gears that'll never get used. I'm in
  • + 3
 Ssssshh they’ll start buying alllll our cheap x01 11 speeds. Wink
  • + 2
 "I had some reservations that the gearing steps would feel too extreme across a 556-percent range"

I have an E*thirteen 9-42 ten speed. Its super light has great gear spacing, and shifts like crap (my hangar is a bit bent and my 10 speed derailleur is 9 years old).

This tight spacing only matters if your climbs are IMBA certified to never have any variation in climbing pitch and have to be weekly smoothed out to be as rough as a new driveway. That way you can pick your perfect gear and spin like you're on a road bike.

I'm super excited for the box prime 9!

singletrackworld.com/2019/08/box-prime-9-is-a-9-speed-cassette-for-the-12-speed-generation

I thought about trying the sram ebike cassette/derailleur, but its a boat anchor and the shifter sucks.
  • + 2
 This product looks pretty ideal.
  • + 2
 Underrated comment, imba can pound sand.
  • + 2
 @cyrways: no, they already pound sand, thats why their trails are so smooth.
  • + 2
 E-Thirteen
Re: above complaints
-I've been riding the updated version of the TRS+ 9-46 11 speed cassette with XT derailleur..no issues whatsoever.
-More range, lighter and reasonably priced
-Been riding TRS race carbon wheels-tough as hell and haven't had to tru them once..
-Just had issue with converting my hubs..E-Thirteen went out of their way to get me sorted-Fantastic customer service!!!
  • + 1
 @bikeblur Couldn't agree more, my wheels and cassette have been absolutely stellar. I swear I have broken my wheels numerous times smashing them on rocks and they just keep taking the hits. I often discuss this with folks that say they will never ride carbon, those impacts would have easily been 4-5 new aluminum rims.
  • + 4
 I just bought a Sunrace 10-46t for 85,-. I sacrificed on the tall gear, but that's fine, I would use it only 1% of the time.
  • + 4
 The sun race is a fantastic cassette for the price.
  • + 2
 Honestly I just want someone to make an XO or XT level 10-42 10 spd set up with a cassette under 300gm. Take what we've learned for manufacturing and build quality and apply it back to 10spd, which I still think shifts better longer than anything else. I'll go ride my single speed now...
  • + 3
 I think Seth announced a new Box cassette that was 11-50 but only 8 speed. I would be VERY interested in demoing that! Big range, durable, not heavy and not expensive.
  • + 1
 xt or xtr11 speed derailleur with 10 speed shifter and garbaruk cassette, lighter than anything out there with that range and beautifully machned, reasonably priced considering the quality...
  • + 1
 No matter what the cassette, pedalling hard in 11t or smaller cog gives me the heeby jeebies and the notch out of my knee cap (back of the stem) from last time I did it on rough terrain is a good reminder that it is a bad idea... skipping a tooth or whatever happened. Between chainline, amount of chain wrap, amount of teeth engaged, the speed you're at if in those gears... expanding range by making the small end of the cassette smaller is no bonus in my eyes.
  • + 1
 Huge bummer that these only work with an xD driver, because replacing the boat anchor of the NX cassettes seems to me to be the ideal use case for these. If you're already on a GX cassette, unless you need to replace it, it doesn't seem like you gain much. Another nice feature is that they don't use the tiny threads the std SRAM cassettes use. I definitely stripped some of mine on a brand new hub, so depending on how bad they are stripped this may be a good option when it times come to replace my cassette without replacing the hub driver.
  • + 1
 Everything e13 makes seems to fail early.
My Capra has the mechanical dropper that doesn’t work.
My tues has a wheel set with a crappy free hub that stopped spinning.
Their tires last about six rides before needing to be replaced.
No clue how they’re still in business.
  • + 1
 Been wonder that for a while. Their chain guides have always worked well but since they’ve made other stuff has been pretty subpar
  • + 1
 becasue people buy YTs and YT spec e13. Thats the only reason they still exist.
  • + 1
 My E13 cassette that came stock with my bike lasted less than one season. Sprint gears rounded over and chain would skip under load. Replaced with SRAM and very happy. In 2nd seasons of hard riding and still performing perfectly. Won’t go back to E13. Too expensive
  • + 1
 This is keyboard warrior culture at it's finest. It's fair for people to have an opinion on a product but the fact that everyone's just bashing it and writing it off is classic Pinkbike. Everyone needs to think about their own needs and their own riding more, and less about what some lifeless troll thinks who rides a 2002 Nishiki that they found on the side of the road.

If you feel like you need more range on your bike and you're running 12 speed, I think this makes sense. I've had plenty of fantastic components from e*thirteen and have never once understood why people bash them. Sorry, /end rant.
  • + 1
 I loved the spacing of my 11 speed TRS+ but that Aluminum third gear would literally last weeks before the chain began to jump. TRS has exceptional customer service and always sent a replacement right out, but after my 3rd one in 2 months I sold it off and have been on the same Eagle cassette for the 2 years since.
I did find it annoying that the TRS rep would always say "Huh, never seen this problem before..." when I was on my 3rd one and my friends had all experienced the exact same thing as well.
  • + 2
 I wonder if you chain was worn? If so you would just be chasing your tail and the same thing would keep happening even thought the cassette is new. When I start with a fresh chain and cassette the aluminum piece lasts for a very long time and I still haven't worn out the steel part. Being able to change just the aluminum piece has been awesome.
  • + 1
 @silkyrhino: I had an entirely new drivetrain when I installed the TRS cassette including new chain. And I then swapped brands of chain when chasing down this problem. And my friends also killed theirs in short order. I then used that 2nd chain on a new Eagle for over a year with no problems.
It was the TRS cassette.
  • + 1
 I’ve always loved the concept of these cassettes, but have yet to try one. My question is, what if we went to say an 8-40t setup? Same “range”, less material, weight, cost, smaller jumps between cogs, derailleur won’t stick out as much, and you would just have to run a size or two smaller chainring to have it feel similar, further cutting weight, bb strikes, and such a long chain. The only downside I see would be faster wear, but we could go back to 10 speed and make it burlier and longer-lasting. I’m surprised it hasn’t happened yet.
  • + 1
 I’m already concerned that the highest load-bearing cog has less teeth than my derailleur tension pulleys
  • + 1
 I've had good luck with my new style 11t TRS+ cassette with a GX mech, although I admit that downshifting under any kind of load isn't quite as smooth as a SRAM cassette. Paired with a 30t Absolute Black oval ring on my 27.5 2.6" wheels the gearing works well for the techy trails I ride.
  • + 1
 the 11 speed version wears so quickly that I would not dare to try the 12 speed. I went through 2 cassettes in a season when I switched back to GX cassette. and it is also a mess removing the e13. But if you do just a few km per year, why not.
  • + 1
 I find their products do not last, my e13 LG1 rear wheel was trashed after half a season at Whistler Bike Park and I do not run low pressure however I'm 220lb before wearing gear so maybe the rim just cannot withstand heavier riders. My e13 PF30 BB also needed to be replaced after 1 season since it was badly corroded inside. I was shocked to discover so much dirt had collected in the BB which destroyed the bearings because the sealing is very poor and I rode only 2 rainy days the entire season. I've ditched the LG1 hubs/cassette as well after 1 year and I can't even replace them because they have been discontinued since they only offer the LG1R now. That being said the LG1+ chain guide/bash guard is still holding up after multiple rock strikes.
  • + 1
 Too Bad their 556% range wont make up for the fact everything E*thirteen is garbage, had a trs+ cassette on my YT Capra and out of the box I have had problems with it, the "awesome" system that allows you to take it off without any proprietary parts is flawed and the set screw loosens on me constantly, only creating my a MM or two of play but its enough for it to make the chain want tot jump on the next cog. I've tried to fix this problem and it always comes back, i just switched to full Sram, flawless.
  • + 1
 I’m interested to understand how it is not shimano compatible. Does a derailleur know what brand of cassette it is shifting across? And does it know the size of said cassette? What else is there that causes this non-compatibility?
  • + 9
 I think they're referring to the fact it's not available for Shimano hubs.
  • + 5
 9t is physically to small to fit on a shimano freehub body.
  • + 1
 I think what is being asked is about cross compatibility. In the past, I've used sram cassettes with Shimano derailleur/shifter and visa versa, but that was on 10spd. I'm not sure how the new 12 speed would be. In theory, a shifters pull on the derailleur should match the spacing between cassette cogs it's designed for... But we're taking fractions of MMs. You could get it to work, I'm sure, but it wouldn't be optimal, and you'd probably lose shifting quality at one end or the other as you try to get optimal shifting.
  • + 1
 @bigmike9699: I was under the impression the actual cog spacing is exactly the same for sram and shimano cassettes. I know for 11-speed, one can mix and match cassettes. Only the sifter and derailleur have to be the same kind because of the cable pull/leverage. I thought this was the same situation for 12-speed but I could be wrong. If so, I can't see any reason why you couldn't run one of these cassettes, on an XD freehub of course, with a Shimano mech and shifter. That is, unless they are saying the new Shimano 12-speed has to be used with a Shimano chain.
I am just interested to know the specifics of the non-compatibility mentioned in the article.
  • + 0
 I don't know for this one but Hope cassettes have the same compability issues with Shimano, although not formally adressed by Hope. Despite the good reviews I never could get a clean shifting with a shimano xt and so did two accointances with XTR, untill I realized they were all tested with Sram mech. I dunno why but Shimano doesn't seem to work with every cassettes indeed.
  • + 1
 They mean XD only no micro spline version but you can run it with the new shimano 12 speed chain and mechs.
  • + 1
 Isn't the main selling point of Shimano 12sp that it has shift ramps in both directions which require Shimano proprietary cassette, chainring, and chain? The e13 definitely doesn't fit on microspline and probably won't work with a Shimano 12ap directional chain.
  • + 1
 @dthomp325: I switched my 11 speed TRS drivetrain over to a Shimano XTR 12 speed chain and it improved shifting and backpedaling support. I still would prefer a pure Shimano or SRAM setup but the 12 speed directional chain worked great with TRS 11 speed.
  • + 1
 @dthomp325: Yes, what you said. The 12sp shimano chain is pretty different that any thing else out there and the cassette spacing might be a bit different.
  • + 1
 @boyslikedirt: as e13 don’t make chains it will have to work with existing chains. Ether way your getting a chain that works.
  • + 1
 I've had 2 e13 cassettes on 2 different bikes. One has been great for a quite a while now. The other not so much. The middle of the range was all funky. Its not on my sons bike and he's complaining about it too. I welcome the competition and root for them, but hopefully the build quality is more consistent on these?
  • + 0
 It also comes with a massive wobble due to the nature of the pinch bolt system.
They’ll tell you it’s your freehub body.
But it’s not.
It’s just the way that design works.
Nice work on the t25 Seatpost head bolts too.
  • + 1
 Good article. But, the, gearing, typography, is-pretty-messed-up.

Also, you show three weight figures for the 9-50 version: 400 grams measured, 398 grams claimed by e*thirteen, and 390 grams in the table.
  • + 0
 I've never had a component on a bike I've hated more than my e13 cassette. Backpedal even 1/4 turn in the big cog, drops chain. Shifting issues galore. I went from SRAM to Shimano to Box derailleurs with the same results...thinking "surely this $250 cassette can't be my problem." IT WAS.

Threw a shitty GX on there and my bike has never shifted better.

Never again e13. Would rather try a Garburuk a million times over.
  • + 0
 Oh Jesus, not sure if there can be a worse insult to a cassette than “shifts worse than GX”...
  • + 2
 That’s crazy. Me and my 3 friends are all on the cassette with zero issues (and on 3 different bike brands) There has to be more to your problem than just the cassette.
  • + 1
 @covekid: Unless the frame is out of tolerance, it's the cassette. This is on a stock bike.

Things I've done:
1) Started with driveline issues, moved spacers on Race Face cranks all sorts of around. No improvement.
2) Maybe it's the GX drivetrain, switched to both Box and Shimano, still shit.
3) Screw it, switched to Microshift 9 speed just to test and for the lolz, perfection. Backpedal all I want, shifts beautifully.
4) Bent microshift cassette under seated peddling (it's a POS), back to e13/GX. That's it, has to be the cassette.
5) Purchased GX cassette. Perfection. Backpedal all I want, shifts beautifully.


It's the cassette, it's crap, and I'm not the only one.
  • + 4
 I'm still on an 11-34 9s cassette and don't even use all of it.
  • + 7
 Hmmmm, maybe try playing with the limit screws on your derailleur. That might fix your problem.
  • + 2
 @SoDiezl350: You sure? I'm not a mechanic.
  • + 1
 Wow $300 for a cassette. I rather keep my type 2 GX 1x10 drivetrain. Could make an upgrade to 1x12 with cassette 11-50, sram shifter and sram rear derailleur for $275.
  • + 1
 $300 for extra range that you don't need. Oh, and it also shifts worse. Maybe they're counting on YT speccing it on all of their bikes?
  • + 1
 I just switched to 12 speed XT for $322 for chain, cassette, derailleur, and shifter. I'll bet it shifts better than anything from E13.
  • + 2
 Was that with a new freehub body or without?
  • + 2
 Yeah, what about freehub body and chainring? I was about to do this but everything, all-in was about $500 IIRC.
  • + 1
 Does it last longer than the 11 spd? Gone through 2 in under a thousand miles... Range is great, but that's pathetic.... Also awful customer service.
  • + 1
 Running this cassette with Eagle AXS. Everything has been great thus far. Lighter the GX cassette and cheaper than X0. Win/Win!!!
  • + 2
 Cal me old school, but I really enjoy the E-13 9-44. Big steps in cogs suck
  • + 1
 I enjoyed it as well. I ran one on my gravel bike for quite a while, with a 40t up front.
  • + 1
 How I ever made it up a hill back in the day with just a 36 tooth rear and 30 tooth up front, is beyond comprehension now! I am getting to old for this marketing hyperbole.
  • - 1
 This 556% ratio is such a bullshit marketing math. Sure, it's 556% if you divide 50T from the biggest cassette ring by 9T smallest cassette ring. However, that's not the ratio anyone should look at on a drivetrain. That 50T should be inversely divided by the front chainring to give you a ratio of climbability.

For example, I have a 36T cassette ring and my smallest chainring on my 2x10 is 24T. 24T/36T = 2/3 = 0.67. Most people can climb with that ratio without any problems. To have this similar ratio on a 1x10, you can put on:
1) 28T Chainring with 42T cassette ring - 0.67

Other similar ratios will have the following combos:

1) 34T chainring with 52T cassette ring - 0.65!!!
2) 30T with 46T - 0.65
2) 32T with 50T- 0.64
3) 30T with 48 - 0.63
4) 28T with 46T - 0.61
5) 30T with 50T - 0.60

Those are probably the optimal range for climbing. Anything about 67% is harder and requires really strong legs. Anything below 60% means you'll be moving a lot slower and spinning on your pedals and not moving anywhere. For those who ride single speed, that ratio is from a 1:1 ratio or above 100% and you have to give them props for doing that because they're riding fast to maintain that momentum to go up the tough climbs.

As for the 10T or smaller cassette ring, I'm not sure why the average Joe will need this on a downhill or flat section. If you have the proper chainring size up front, you will have enough speed to carry you up and down a mountain.
  • + 2
 Dude running a 2x system claims wider range gearing is bs...
  • + 1
 @SoDiezl350:

Dude, is this why companies come like SRAM has to come out with more and more cogs for their cassettes every year to satisfy the consumers who think there's not enough gear ratios to compensate for 1x systems when multiple crank rings are eliminated? Read the posting again, all my other 6 options are actually 1x systems. I make no reference to the range of the cassette other than the fact the I use a 2x system to show the ratio of the drivetrain that's necessary for 99% of the climbs that most people would need.
  • + 1
 What I want is a 50t thats made of steel, thats the gear we use the most here in the rockies. 300$ usd is not cheap but at least it fits on Sram XD.
  • + 1
 We had one of these in the shop the other day. Poor shifting performance. Chain slips off the 9t. Creeks like a mofo. It's a pass for me.
  • + 1
 E13 products usually suck, but their customer support is second to none. At least in Europe. Just saying...
  • + 1
 @ethirteen-components is there any noticeable reduction in chain slap when switching from 11-50T NX eagle?
  • + 3
 All the unsprung mass.
  • + 1
 its pretty light
  • + 1
 What the hell are people climbing that warrants a 56t on the back? If it’s that steep, I’ll probably be hike-a-biking
  • + 3
 No cassette even has a 56t.... Yet
  • + 1
 Nothing has 56, but with some bikes having 29+ tires, you could make an argument for touring mtb drivetrain. You have the top end for pavement cruising, and the low end for some steep climbing.
  • + 1
 @Demoguy: (ominous foreshadowing....)
  • + 0
 My top 3 cogs wore out after 6 weeks! On my 11spd, The replacement half cost more than a new GX block that has last me a year riding 4-5 days per week.
  • + 2
 Who cares, $300us for a wear item? next.
  • + 3
 An XX1 Eagle cassette is $450 and an X01 Eagle cassette is $385. For more gear range and less money, the E.13 cassette is a steal.
  • + 5
 @seraph: sram can get f*cked with their cassettes also. sunrace 11-50 12s is $115nz (around $75us) and does a better job. $300 for something that will wear out in 6-12 months is not a steal.
  • + 5
 @zyoungson: actually it is a steal...they steal money from your wallet Wink
  • + 0
 You should ditch that Sunrace anchor and use the E13, same range and 200g lighter. Your suspension will work loads better.
  • + 1
 @Demoguy: or run a dh tyre or insert for free.
  • + 2
 What @seraph said. Also change your chain before it wears ( I change chains at between 0.5 and 0.75 on the Park Tool checker) and have had up to 3 seasons on the same cassette
  • + 2
 @seraph:
Except one is a solid functioning design that wears well and one is about as tech as a screen door.
  • + 2
 @Demoguy: gaining weight at the center of the wheel does not matter much, it is much more important to gain on the sides (rim, tyres, going tubeless). Sunrace cassettes I have on my bikes are quite robust (50t -11sp and 42t-10sp).
  • + 0
 @zyoungson: if you already have an XD driver and need a new cassette, the E.13 TRS+ is a good alternative to the SRAM XD cassettes.
  • + 0
 @zoobab2: Gaining any weight on the rear effects unsprung weight. This then effects how reactive your suspension feels,like going from a steel spring to a titanium spring or fitting a thrust bearing to your spring to minimise spring wind up. We're not talking about rolling resistance here. Go read a few books and learn.
  • + 0
 People actually pay attention to gearing steps? Pick a gear to pedal up the road then hop on the trail and enjoy the downhill. Rinse and repeat. Gearing steps, really??
  • + 0
 Er yeah. Why you f*cking yourself over by not knowing things? Who actually wants peddling to be harder than it needs to be?
  • + 1
 That said, due to the exceptional customer service I would consider their updated products.
  • + 1
 I would like a 50+ tooth 9 speed cassette. Oh and make it cheap since you know I am gonna need to replace it annually..
  • + 1
 @contigo: Thats awesome. 12 gears is too much in my opinion and over engineered. But the range is what I really want. And cheap durable replaceable parts since I am not a pro racer. Making products for everyday riders is different from racers. Many companies seem to overlook this.
  • + 3
 get rekt sram
  • + 2
 Deore m6000 derailleur, sunrace 11-46t and old xt 10speed shifter FTW
  • + 2
 Just mount the biggest cog to the rim already.
  • + 1
 9T cogs are bad engineering
  • + 1
 Or really good engineering, because they know that no one is actually using it. Wait, I use mine. So confused now.
  • + 1
 Nothing a 30t front chainring cant solve.
  • + 1
 50/42 is an oddly close chainset... oh, that's the cassette.
  • - 1
 The thing we are missing with these the ability to replace the bigger cogs.
  • - 1
 Keep your 9 and 10 tooth, make mine 11-50 please. New XT microspline kit for a long term relationship.
  • + 0
 My error. Deleted by me.
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