Review: EXT Storia Lok - A Custom Tuned, Italian-Made Coil Shock

Aug 28, 2019
by Mike Kazimer  
EXT Storia Lok V3 review


EXT's suspension roots run deep, and over the years they've amassed an impressive resume of mountain bike and motorsports achievements. From rally car racing to World Cup downhill, the Italian company has been involved at the top levels of multiple sports – Technical Director Franco Fratton even spent time as a technician on the Lotus F1 team in the early '90s.

The Storia Lok V3 Lok shock is available in a wide range of sizes, from 190 x 51mm up to 250 x 75mm in standard and trunnion mounts. The Storia is intended for enduro bikes, while EXT's Arma shock is the more downhill oriented model.

EXT Storia Lok V3 Details
• Adjustable low- and high-speed compression, rebound
• Hydraulic bottom-out control
• Lock out lever
• Metric, imperial, standard and trunnion mount options
• Weight: 700 grams (210 x 52.5mm, 500lb spring)
• MSRP: 799 Euro
www.extremeshox.com

Every shock is custom built in Italy according to the bike it'll be going on and the rider's preferences, and a dyno test is performed before each shock leaves the factory. Delivery time is between 2-4 weeks, and the retail price is 799 Euro.


EXT Storia Lok V3 review
The Storia has externally adjustable high- and low-speed compression damping, along with a lever that can be used to firm up the shock for climbing.


Details

The Storia uses a mono-tube design, where the main piston travels through a column of oil, and a nitrogen-charged internal floating piston moves to handle the displaced oil. That IFP is pressurized to a relatively low 55psi, which EXT says helps improve the shock's sensitivity.

It's the inclusion of a hydraulic bump stop that sets the Storia apart from other mountain bike shocks on the market. Coil shocks are linear in nature, which means that they work best with bikes that have more progressive leverage curves. It is possible to run a coil on a more linear bike, but over-springing may be necessary to avoid bottoming out too often, which reduces some of that small bump sensitivity and plushness that coils are known for. EXT's solution addresses that by delivering a 50% increase in the force required to compress the shock during the last 15% of the travel.

A look inside the EXT Storia Lok. The hydraulic bottom out feature is made possible by the smaller tube seen at the left of the image.

How does it work? As the shock nears the end of its travel, a secondary piston passes through a smaller tube. This increases the hydraulic pressure, and helps keep the shock from bottoming out. On EXT's Arma DH shock, the amount of bottom out resistance is adjustable, but on the Storia Lok it's pre-set from the factory.

That hydraulic bump stop allows EXT to use a smaller bottom out bumper than what you'd typically find on a coil shock – in this case it's a 5mm piece of foam, protected by two plastic washers.

The Storia has externally adjustable rebound, and low- and high-speed compression damping. There are 14 clicks of LSC, 14 clicks of HSC, and 10 possible rebound settings. The low-speed adjustments require a 4mm Allen key, and you'll need a 12mm wrench or socket for the high-speed adjuster. Keep that in mind if you're planning on doing any trailside tinkering - most multi-tools don't have a 12mm wrench on them.

There's also a small lever that's used to firm up the shock for climbing (hence the 'Lok' in the model name). The Lok lever controls a completely different valve and circuit than the one that's used to adjust the shock's compression damping in the open mode, and it has a blow off valve in case you forget to open it up before heading downhill. Two springs are included with each shock, with a 25 lb difference between them. My 210 x 52.5mm test shock with a 500 lb spring weighed in at 700 grams.

EXT Storia Lok V3 review
The hydraulic bottom out feature allows EXT to use a smaller bottom out bumper, but the rattling of the plastic washers can be distracting - I glued the washers to the foam to quiet things down.
EXT Storia Lok V3 review
EXT's springs are available in 25 pound increments, and are designed to be run with a maximum preload of 2mm.



Ride Impressions

EXT actually sent me two shocks, each with a different compression tune, in order to demonstrate the range of possible options. I started off with the softer tune, and was immediately impressed by the level of sensitivity it provided. The glued-to-the-ground sensation that coil shocks are known for was there, but the overall feeling was different than what I was used to, in a good way. Instead of making the trail feel as if it had been covered by an extra-thick shag carpet, the Storia made it feel more like there was a layer of memory foam over everything. The impacts were muted, but there was still a liveliness to the way the shock responded that made it very easy to tell what the rear wheel was doing. The overall feel of the shock was more supportive than super cushy and soft, although I'm sure EXT could tune a shock to feel like that if you really wanted.

That liveliness was still present with the firmer compression tune, but the overall comfort level was diminished. I could see how that firmer tune could be appropriate for a racer looking for a lot of support, but for my riding style and the slippery, rooty trails that I prefer, it was simply too much.

Once I'd settled on the base compression tune, I started experimenting with the various compression settings. Each click makes a difference, and there's enough range to really change the feel of the shock. For the most part, my happy place was right in the middle of the settings, unless it was super wet and slimy out – then I'd back things off to maximize the amount of traction.

The Storia was installed on a Stumpjumper EVO carbon, a bike that has a fairly linear suspension curve. With the stock Fox DHX2 I'd been running a 550 or 600 pound spring for my 160 pound weight in order to keep from bottoming out too easily. Thanks to the Storia's hydraulic bottom out feature, I could run a 500 or even a 475 pound spring without any issues. The ramp up is fairly subtle, with no sudden harshness when landing off a big drop, and it was a welcome improvement over the DHX2's tendency to bottom out on flatter landings.

As for the Lok feature, that worked exactly as intended. Flip the little lever into the closed position and the shock will firm up nicely, with just enough give to keep it from feeling too rough. I mainly used the Lok lever when I was spinning on pavement or grinding up a long gravel road. On more technical sections I'd flip it to the open position for maximum traction.


EXT Storia Lok V3 review

Issues

EXT use two plastic washers to protect the Storia's thin bottom out bumper, which makes sense. Unfortunately, those washers have a tendency to rattle around, especially on rougher sections of trail. I ended up carefully putting a dab of SuperGlue on each washer to permanently affix them to the bumper. That did the trick, and the sound of rattling plastic disappeared, although I'd like to see the shock come this way from the factory – messing around with SuperGlue near such a fancy shock seems a little silly.

On the topic of noise, the Storia can be a little noisy at times. It wasn't overly distracting, and it's nothing to worry about, but I did notice the 'click-squish, click-squish' sound on quieter sections of trail.

There was also a noticeable top-out 'clunk' on the first version that EXT sent, but the second revision had a softer top out bumper which got rid of that issue.


Marzocchi Bomber CR
EXT Storia Lok V3 review
EXT Storia V3 Lok


How Does It Compare?

Does an $885 shock really perform that much better than bare-bones, $330 option? I wondered the same thing, so I headed up to the Whistler Bike Park to do some back-to-back testing of the Storia Lok and a Marzocchi Bomber CR (which is basically a slightly modified Fox Vanilla RC).

If you're afraid of dials, getting the Bomber set up is extremely simple. Make sure you're running the correct amount of sag, set the rebound to your liking, and then turn the low speed compression dial for the final bit of tuning – it's as easy as that. The Storia Lok takes a little more time to set up thanks to the addition of adjustable high-speed compression, and the fact that you'll need a 4mm Allen and a 12mm wrench to make adjustments. But, that's also going to be part of the appeal for some riders. The Storia also gets a point for having a climb lever, which is a nice feature to have on rides with extended fire road climbs.

Weight's probably not too much of a concern if you're considering installing a coil shock on your bike, but it's a factor to consider. The Storia handily takes the win there when compared to the Marzocchi with a standard steel spring – you're looking at 700 grams vs. 924 grams. However, that difference can be flipped around by installing an SLS spring on the Bomber, which results in a final weight of only 614 grams. Of course, the SLS spring costs $130, which will bump the Bomber's price up to $430.

The biggest difference that I noticed was the extra traction that the Storia provided compared to the Marzocchi. It felt more stuck to the ground when faced with repeated impacts, and there was a higher level of grip when pushing into loose turns. The Storia's compression tune likely plays a large roll in that sensation – remember, it was set up exactly for my weight and bike. It is possible to alter the shim stacks in the Bomber, but that'll typically require the services of a knowledgeable suspension technician.

For most riders, the Marzocchi is going to leave little to be desired – it's a set-and-forget option, with easily adjustable, consistent performance. But for those who want a fully bespoke setup, the exotic Italian damper does offer noticeable performance benefits, as well as looks that stand out from the crowd.



Pros

+ Custom tuned for rider / bike
+ Very usable range of adjustments
+ Hydraulic bottom out allows more linear bikes to run a coil shock


Cons

- Expensive
- 12mm wrench required to adjust HSC
- Noisy bottom out bumper washers


Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesThere's no denying the fact that the Storia Lok is a specialty item, designed for riders who want to eke the most performance possible out of their bike. It's a luxury, not an absolute necessity, but the Storia does deliver a very high level of custom-tuned performance. Mike Kazimer








189 Comments

  • 117 0
 Great to hear that it outperforms a damper half its price but how does it compare to a dhx2, ccdb, ttx and the like?
  • 33 1
 I would like a comparison with the MRP Hazzard, another boutique mono-tube shock with a climb switch.
  • 11 3
 i had a ccdb coil in my nomad 3. it was a really good working shock. but it bottomed out on flat landings like they say in the article the dhx2 does it too and a was a really plush and planted feeling. now i have the storia v3 in my bronson 3. it works just perfect. i have a 36 with push acs3 coil conversion in the front. you can just blow down double black diamond dh tracks (fai della paganella) with no bottom outs even on big huck to flats. the front and rear ramp up so nicely and unnoticable that you get the feeling that you can huck everything while having a plush feeling at the beginning of the stroke. and as they say in the article the bike is still playful with perfect feedback from the ground and exactly the right amount of support in the midstroke. not to plush and not to harsh. just perfect. you can fully concentrate on blowing through the rough stuff and gaining speed through compressions and berms. planted when you need it, poppy when you want it.
  • 6 1
 @Mettwurst82: I think you'll find the Bronson 3 is more progressive than the Nomad 3 Regessive-Linea-progressive Leverage ratio. I had a Nomad 3 with a CCDB Air half full of volume spacers but my new bike Kavenz is far more progressive where I run a CCDB Coil.
  • 2 0
 *Linear
  • 2 0
 @Cashman39:
How come you ride a Kavenz, ALREADY?
  • 1 1
 @Mettwurst82: sounds like poor suspension design -the old sc have pretty poor progressioncurves -especially for coilshocks. with a constant progressioncurve and lets say 25% of overall progression a cc coil works perfect. i have to admit it is a nice feature though and would not mind if my cc db also had it.
  • 12 0
 I have a Rallon V5 and have used both the DHX2 and storia V3. No comparison, the EXT is a better shock by a fair margin. The rallon is quite a linear suspension curve and the EXT allows me to still run a coil shock without the bottom out problems that the DHX2 suffered from. The EXT is plusher to begin but provides more mid-stroke support too. Grip is increased and it works better over square edged hits. Weirdly, the climb switch is also better on the EXT - not something I thought I would have noticed. Would definitely recommend if you have cash to burn.
  • 2 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: nomad 3 is not a linear bike... it has a typical VPP behavior at the initial and mid part or the travel, but it's very progressive overall... Different concepts... I bet the Bronson it's not more progressive than old nomad 3, just more similar to Nomad 4, with a progressive rate, without the linear part at the mid stroke, which came with lower shock placement and revisd VPP linkage.... anyways.. I have this shock and it's way different than most ... I have not tried push 11-6, which is the only thing I would like a comparison with.. well, maybe with ohlins ttx also..
  • 15 0
 Hi, I have a capra with storia v3 and an instinct bc with a dhx2/ previously DMN coil shock.

I would buy hands down another storia
- a lot more sensitivity on roots and little impacts
- tuned to the bike and rider. They wouldn't allow a test on a bike the shock was not tuned. I had to fill in a sheet asking bike, model, year, flat vs clip pedals, weight, any specific requirements (eg ride several 3000 feet laps trails)
- the guys at storia are very kind, professional and down to earth, no sales bullshit
- the price for the storia with two springs is lower than the dhx2 without springs
  • 1 0
 @Cashman39: Yes it is, but still not that much, that's why santa cruz recommends only air shocks for the bronson. But which this bottom out control of the storia v3 and with the air chamber in acs3 push kit you can do what you want. no chance to bottom it out and still not running into a wall of progression. it combines the best of the two worlds.
  • 1 0
 @Lagr1980: i did not say its linear. the leveveragecurve is as Cashman39 described. this makes it hard to set up. the bronson 3 has a perfect curve for a coilshock, pretty much any coilshock will make it work better than the nomad 3 - all i was saying is that the fundamantally different leveragecurves makes for a hard comparrison. I have no doubt that it is a very good shock. I Almost bought it myself but got a cc db for half of the price of the storia (which is actually not 799€ but something above 900 € with taxes here) and then could not justifie the extra 450 €.
  • 4 0
 @Hiderspider: I'm lucky enough to be one of the testers. I think I'm the only person outside of Germany. (I live in Sydney)
  • 1 0
 @ninjatarian: I pedaled a bike around last week with the EXT Storia shock on it and while the bike was okay, the shock felt amazing. The Hazzard with a progressive spring is about $100 less. I am dying to try one of those out.
  • 2 0
 @ninjatarian: I have the Hazzard on the Rune. Replaced Monarch rt3 debonair. The difference was noticeable with extra traction, actually helped a lot with low speed techy climbing, and high speed repeated bump performance was the biggest improvement that stood out. That said the in my opinion the climb switch (aka 'Shred Lever') is useless. It allows for a bit of travel then feel just like a 'lockout', to harsh to use especially if your looking for something that is more like a Fox ProPedal switch. I did have issues with the initial build quality (compression knob literally fell off, I resolved this by removing one of preload spring for the ball bearing for indents) - that said when I contacted MRP about this their customer service was top notch. On a scale off 1-10 I'd give it a solid 8.5. Still haven't rode something as good as the Push 11-6 but it's not soo much better I could justify the additional cost
  • 2 0
 @nicoweiss: new job? you went from a cheaply made Chinese shock that you can buy on Amazon to the highest end, most gucci coil shock the market has ever seen
  • 2 0
 Agree but other than being what 90% of people ride, still doesn't make sense to compare to these shocks. Its a custom shock so compare it to other shocks built with a custom stack or otherwise tuned to for the user. Push Elevensix, Ava Woodie, Fast Fenix....
  • 1 0
 @74tenomresc: theninstinct bc came with the dnm, then have upgraded to dhx2 which was better. But with the storia on the capra, it is another world. I appreciate I didn't ride the same bike and my comments are not bulletproof
  • 3 8
flag hamncheez (Aug 28, 2019 at 9:55) (Below Threshold)
 This really is a direct competitor for the 11-6. Both are custom-tuned monotubes, both advertise as having bottom-out control, and both are as expensive as hell (but look amazing).

I'd also like to see it against a good twin tube like the beloved Ohlins. The whole point of a twin tube is that there are no shims, so you can tune the shock to any (reasonable) rider weight, suspension design, and terrain with just the external adjustments.

FINALLY nearly all the problems of coil shocks could be solved with progressively wound springs. No need for complex hydraulic bottom outs.
  • 2 0
 @nicoweiss: pric eof Storia with two springs is cheaper than DHX2? You mean DHX2 with two SLS springs maybe?
  • 5 1
 @hamncheez: progressivly wound spring are inferior solution that stores energy and then overworks rebound circuit instead of dissipating it. Also good twin tube shocks also use shims not poppet valves.
  • 1 3
 @Mettwurst82: linear designs and coil shocks are ideal if you set your shock up properly in my opinion. If you’re bottoming out all the time it’s not how linear your frame is it’s not having the right shock tune spring rate.
  • 2 1
 @Mondbiker: A progressive spring design doesn't "overwork" your rebound if you can tune the high speed rebound separately from the low speed rebound, which twin tubes allow for. If they hurt rebound performance, the most important part of suspension tuning, then why are they found in moto, trophy truck racing, normal cars, and virtually every other high end offroad motorsport?
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Linear design is always going to be compromise, progressive is the best just has to be smooth progression not linear linear linear bang wall of progression kind of progressive.
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: pretty sure trophy trucks and such use mono tube.... hydraulic bottom out isn't complex.

Push does not have Hydraulic Bottom Out.
  • 3 0
 @jaydawg69: Here is a pic of trophy truck suspension. What do you notice?

www.pinterest.com/pin/491244271830756476
  • 4 1
 @hamncheez: most of those use different spring rates stacked on each other to deal with different parts of travel, sometimes just as helper springs, most of those mentioned offroad shocks use different techonologies like bypass valves to make shock position and speed sensitive, only very few shocks in mtb use smart position sensitive damping like EXT. Sure, you can make prety much any shock to be digressive in rebound curve, but it isn´t the best way to get results. It´s always better to use hydraulic bottom out solutions to deal with the stuff and all high performance offroad suspensions do use some kind of it. Only comparable coils to the MRP coils you mentioned are used in low end OEM cars because they work relatively well with basic dampers, supple in the beginning of the travel than increasingly firmer to prevent excessive body roll. The problem is, they aren´t really cheap in bike world either, I mean I could buy springs for all 4 corners of my car cheaper than single MRP ffs! I would really have to be desperate and/or dumb to choose band aid solution for a lot of money to be honest. If it was cheap and I for some reason have bought wrong shock for my frame kinematics and needed to fix that without buying new expensive shock, maybe then I would opt for this, and I think many people are in this exact situation with expensive and sweet looking frames with not very well designed kinematics and oh my god so great DHX2 shocks on them that don´t really allow to use HS damping to control bottom out without creating very harsh ride.
  • 2 0
 @RaceOnlySprings , care to comment on how progressive coils are a "bandaid"? @Mondbiker
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: everything that is fixing dampers/kinematics shortcomings is band aid, isn´t it? Might as well use progressive bump stop instead, if only someone was selling them in money hungry MTB industry... Oh well.
  • 2 0
 @Mondbiker: @mrp and @RaceOnlySprings sell progressively wound coils because they can improve performance, even on bikes that already are progressive in nature. These aren't dramatically progressive, I think the MRP one is between 10% and 15%, nor do they dramatically increase performance. However, they give frame designers and shock tuners more flexibility in their products. The barrier is that since bike shocks have very short strokes relative to motorsports, its expensive to get meaningful progression.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: well it´s all relative isn´t it? for some people 10% progression is 5% too much, for some too little. On the other hand it´s possible to have adjustable HBO to suit most if not all designs and preferences? I agree with the space restrictions, even though with metric shocks now it should allow manufacturers to implement new technologies, they mentioned it as one of the reasons for another new standard haven´t they? So far, I´m waiting for those innovative technologies, not holding my breath though.
  • 1 0
 @Mondbiker: interestingly, EXT Arma has an adjustable HBO ...#justsaying
  • 1 0
 @gramboh: yes sir
  • 1 0
 @gramboh: yes sir and more important, they will tell you which spring rate works for you. If too heavy/light they will swap them.

At least for dhx2 it is lime a tresure hunt to find the right spring rate. For the rocky, rocky in europe says "sorry guys we do not do tests on coil, so cant recommend spring rates for your weight". Same did YT for the capra.
  • 1 0
 @Mondbiker: just run a longer / firmer bottom out bumper. I don’t see what a progressive spring would do that wouldn’t. Though I’m yet to try a pro spring.
  • 1 0
 @Lagr1980: That´s why I mentioned it...
  • 1 0
 Wish I had bought this rather than the Push. Their “take or leave it attitude” convinced me to leave it the next time. They absolutely won’t do or offer anything outside their robot programming. So I’m going to leave it on the next purchase and won’t buy another one again. I’ll likely buy this one instead.
  • 18 4
 Beat shock out there, simple. I've had ohlins, bos, eleven six, fox, Rockshox etc. These things are so supple, yet controlled and with inbuilt bottoming resistance can be fitted to bikes that may bit have otherwise suited a coil.
  • 4 1
 Maybe you need to get a Fast Fenix now to complete your list? However I’m surprised you didn’t just stop at the 11/6? Italian products usually are not very reliable...maybe this one is the exception?!
  • 1 0
 I was just going to send you this article!
  • 9 1
 @gbcarmona: I didnt see the need for the second circuit on the eleven six as the damping is very good, so having two shocks in one was kind of pointless, but I have changed shocks when changing bikes, not just swapping shocks out for the fun of it.

The Fast Fenix is interesting, but I already have a shock with the same characteristics (ext did it first) built by a company that specialises in racing suspension, so I dont see me trying one soon.

As for reliability, it's a bit of a negative generalisation to suggest all Italian products are poor quality - this thing is absolutely perfect, plus I have had the prior version and the Arma on my DH bikes.

Not many companies hand build and dyno every shock, nor would Mojo UK distribute anything that isnt high quality so hopefully that gives you some reassurance!
  • 2 1
 @captainian: way ahead of you buddy ;-)
  • 9 1
 @gbcarmona: Had the V2 version for almost 2 years - 0 issues so far, as the review says, it takes a bit more time to find your set up, but once found it, you barely remember it's on the bike. I actually don't even have the rattling sound of that washer. Only thing that ever happened to me was that I lost the pre-load screw (the black one in the second picture): sent an email to EXT and they sent it to me to Switzerland for free in 4 days.
I think that the stereotype that italian products aren't so reliable is slowly disappearing - I have the latest Formula brakes and fork and an Aprila naked bike from this year and honestly I think these products have nothing to do with the old italian products from 5 10 20 years ago.

I've had an MDE Damper 29 enduro frame (Italian) and compared to the Last frame (German) of one of my buddies one would think that the Last frame is italian (bearings tolerance issues, rear triangle that wasn't straight anymore after few months of riding) and the MDE is German (still runs perfectly smooth after 2 years with no maintenance) Big Grin

For the rest, I can only second the review.
  • 4 0
 @keru: So true, the service from ext and their partners is amazing.

My v3 had a small topout noise when first fitted, this was fed back to them and a revised internal bumper design was created, even though it was a tiny sound with no actual detriment.

I had a new version fitted for free and now its silent. If that was one of the bigger brands, it would either be ignored or claimed as a feature.
  • 3 0
 @keru: i put my V3 in my Bronson V3 just before an enduro race. Did not turn any of the knobs. Works just perfect.
  • 2 0
 @Mettwurst82: had to play around with high speed and low speed compression for 3-4 weeks initially. Now I just change one click of rebound depending on the terrain (but rarely - I make it faster when really rough terrain) and one click of low speed compression when I'm more or less trained (softer when I'm less trained which is also when it's muddier, harder when I'm more trained which is usually when it's drier - just my mindf.ck).
  • 3 0
 @keru: I have Formula 35 fork and just got Cura brakes. EXT might be next IT thing in shopping cart. And the coil Selva! Smile
  • 2 0
 @keru: i fully understand that. my setup is pretty racy and when i'm not in a good shape i wonder how i could ride this setup. but this is more a problem on the fork side for me.
  • 4 0
 Please elaborate on your comparison with the 11-6. I was waiting for the release of the 11-6 for my Druid and am very interested in knowing why you prefer this shock over the 11-6. To me, the failure in the article to do a head to head comparison with the 11-6 is an obvious oversight.
  • 3 0
 I'd like to try this shock. Living in the states makes it less compelling due to servicing/parts. Maybe that's not as much an issue anymore? I have the 11/6 which I really like and, while I wasn't originally sold on the two damping circuits - it really works for me. I run one circuit for trail riding - where it has a nice trail coil feel...the other is for a dh/descend and gives it a nice open fast feel. I guess the point is that my 'trail' tune feels like a real bike and not a climb switched dead log and my DH mode is there if I want to do some proper chunk blasting.
  • 10 0
 @mtnbkrmike: ok, so my comparison is this.....

The eleven six is an awesome shock, service from Darren and the guys is amazing. Like I said, I didnt see the real need for two circuits, although I appreciate others like that function. My view is that a very good damper can do pretty much everything well, so a second is a luxury I can live without and therefore surplus to requirements. The damping on the push is a little muted by which I mean it doesnt feel very lively, but it is incredibly plush. No real negative points on the shock, it just does its job and does it incredibly well in comparison to most other shocks. When I had one, I went from an Ohlins ttx22 coil and I felt the push was a 10% improvement in control and feel on both compression and rebound.

As for the EXT, it has the most sensitive breakaway I have ever felt, literally any movement will get it to start through the range of travel. However, when you hit the mid stroke, it doesnt blow through what travel there is, it just gets on with damping and it hovers around the mid point of usable travel incredibly well. The difference to most other coils being that despite being super plush, it is also very playful, much like an air shock. Then due to the bottom out damping, you have no need to be concerned about running out of travel, or indeed feeling the end of the range at all. I know I have bottomed mine, many times, but not once have I felt it. On my push, i was aware when i used the whole travel as the bottom out bumper was not as controlled as the ext is with a hydraulic stop (I actually asked for a firmer bumper at its service). The EXT is also lighter than pretty much all other coil shocks.

Being honest, both are epic shocks at the very top of their game. If you value the two circuits and a super smooth ride, then the Push is great if you want the ultimate in damping and sensitivity then the EXT is my choice all day long.

Hope that helps, sorry for the lack of detail, but I'm on my phone in the woods right now taking a quick rest :-)
  • 4 0
 I agree, my 11/6 is set up similar. A real trail setting I use most of the time and a dh setting for super rough or the unknown dh runs. I’ve never experienced a better peddling or cornering shock. Firm, not bouncy and so predictable and consistent. I know I won’t be bucked off my line ever. The guys a push are great also. @CarlMega:
  • 3 0
 @CarlMega: there is Brennan autosport, they take care of EXT service in USA no prob...
  • 6 0
 @gbcarmona: Italians are quite reliable in hydraulics and mechanics and very good, mixing them with electronics is a bad idea.
  • 6 0
 @Lagr1980: Actually the US distributer and service center will be the Suspension Syndicate located in Salt Lake. We are about 2 weeks out on becoming fully certified. We will have a full range of demo shocks.
  • 2 0
 @CarlMega: Brennan Motorsports in Northern California is the US distributor and tuner for EXT and they know their stuff.
  • 12 1
 I’m surprised climbing on this shock didn’t get more mention.
Yes it descends like a boss and I agree with the comments.
But the shock doesn’t wallow in its travel under pedal like a Fox DHX2 X2 or Ohlins TTX. It provides a firmer pedaling platform higher up, perfect for enduro, or just making that slack seat angled or not very efficient 170mm travel bike a lot more efficient...

If you buy one in the UK you have Mojo suspension covering your back as an added bonus.

Best shock I’ve ridden hands down.
  • 1 0
 But you’ll also pay for that privilege!
They are about £1000 at Mojo aren’t they?
  • 22 1
 @jaame: The price in this review is a little misleading. The EXT shocks are €799 + tax, so around €1000 on average in the EU. This includes hardware, custom tune, and 2x springs, so slightly cheaper than a Fox DHX2 still.

The Mojo price reflects this at £950 GBP inc VAT.


Oh, yeah, and they are amazing shocks! The Geometron/Nicolai versions also have a coil negative spring and spherical eyelet bearing with turn the performance up a couple more notches.
  • 10 0
 @paulaston: thanks dog. Everyone has been talking about you positively. I hope everything is going well for you!
  • 3 0
 @paulaston: I got to test one of those Geometrons with the Ext shock that you mention last week thanks to my friend who rents them out at Wildcoast bikes in Barcelona. Amazing ride! So much fun! I'm already saving my money up :-)
  • 11 1
 Why is no one interested that this is the only brand that supplies a mechanism to stop your coil from unscrewing? Fox recommends like 2-3 turns of preload to prevent it but with this coil all you need is like a 1/4 turn and then you can fasten the mechanism and your coil never unscrews. This is so cool!
  • 7 0
 Öhlins offer that feature too on the TTX 22. But I agree, it makes a lot of sense.
  • 4 0
 The 11-6 does as well
  • 2 0
 BOS has had that feature since 2008 too.
  • 7 0
 *Runs out to garage to check spring hasn’t unwound*.
  • 12 1
 Looks shit compared to the double elastomer set up in my Proflex. Pffft.
  • 6 0
 Concerning shocks and forks i have learned only to trust what i have found out by riding. Almost every review says airshocks are good these days, but every time i ride a coilshock i am baffled how much better they are. I own the vanilla rc (2017) wich is rhe same shock as the bomber. Honestly its the worst coilshock i have ridden in the last years. I have not ridden the storia but compared to the cc db coil the damping just feels off.
  • 2 0
 My Bomber CR coil shock isn’t that bad aside from the high speed compression spikes. A single click of lsc or lsr actually makes a noticeable change, that’s all I really want in a cheaper shock.
  • 2 0
 @yzedf: sounds pretty bad haha
  • 1 0
 You cannot review the shock without mentioning frame / tune; shock itself can suite or not for the specific frame design
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: it’s on a Kona Operator... it’s never going to feel that great in high speed chop.
  • 1 0
 I bet if you put a better shock on it would! @yzedf:
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: it’s a single pivot tuned for anti-squat. Makes for a fun bike on jump trails and it’s long and slack which is fun in steep loamy conditions. Hard on the brakes in chunk and it’s just skipping along and not absorbing much but your feet aren’t sinking or rising. Short chainstays mean it’s easy to control the rear in the right conditions, but it’ll get offline pretty easily once it starts skipping. So yeah, the worlds best shock could only fix so much. Stock shock blew up in a year (I aim for 20 park days a season — 2 young kids) so I’m not spending a lot on this bike.
  • 9 2
 This review seems very short for such a product.
Where are the comparisons to the other 20 types of shock you have no doubt ridden over the last few years?
  • 4 0
 Put a V3 on my Sick Bike Deathwish, and there were some issues. Wasn’t shimmed enough and was blowing through the travel with correct sag.
Chris at EXT in Australia is INCREDIBLE!
Sent it back, he went above and beyond to help me get this shock sorted. He was frequently in contact with the engineers to get the right shim configuration, install it and express it back to me.
I loved how good my CCDB felt, but my Storia is just on another level with the small bump and bottom out.
Would totally recommend if you can afford it.
  • 16 0
 wait hang on you actually got a sick bike? whats it like?
  • 1 1
 @GumptionZA: its SICK!!
  • 1 0
 Haven't put enough miles on it yet. Steep STA is awesome for climbing though, like, incredibly better than current bikes. Sitting so much more upright is better for my old man (I'm 36) back.
  • 4 0
 Well those plastic washers are loose, so they can clean potential dirt from the shock. There was a good thought of why they did it like that. I have it on my arma as well, and you can hear the rattling only on the parking ground...
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: here you go brother--fixxed. No glue needed
  • 4 0
 @pinkbike. Can we make a commitment to at least try & comment on the ease with which potentially interested customers can get items serviced/repaired in all future reviews of suspension components please? Since many of us ride enough to require a full rebuild at least annually this is important information. Even moreso for forks where industry standard lifetime for a CSU for many of us is around 6 months...
  • 3 0
 I have the EXT on my Alum Stumpy Evo 210x55 with the 160 Smashpot up front.
It is the first bike I have had with coil suspension and I love it.
EXT have great support here in CA and I had the shock much quicker than expected Smile
  • 1 0
 same as me.... 170mm Smashpot setup.
  • 1 0
 @jaydawg69: Nice! I have thought about going 170....
  • 1 0
 @bedwards13: I went with a 10lb stiffer spring than what Vorsprung recommends and it was way better as well.... for me anyways. More Travel = More Fun (also slacker HA) --> Win Win
  • 1 0
 @jaydawg69: Rad. How do you find the bike handles climbing? I guess the xtra 10mm shouldn't be too much difference from my 160....? Plenty of steep and gnarly trails that the xtra travel would be nice for here in Penticton but I like to climb as much as I can to get to them...
  • 1 0
 @bedwards13: I don't think you would notice... just push the seat rails forward and you get a steeper STA. I was in Penticton couple of weeks ago and rode Bronco, any better trails up there?
  • 2 0
 @jaydawg69: Nice! Yeah, lots of good ones. Rock Oven, Naramata Beer Run, Drops Alot
  • 1 0
 @bedwards13 : will check out next summer. Thanks!
  • 2 0
 Would love to try one of these out. I met a fellow rider the other day who develops suspension for one of the big German car manufacturers and he said if you want the best shock, then this is the one to go for. Eyewateringly expensive, yes, but tuned to your bike, weight and riding style.
  • 4 0
 It even isnt that expensive. A DHX2 costs the same with 2 springs if not more- and no custom tune and modofications to swap it over your new bike.

The 11-6 costs 500€ more here in Europe- which is kinde insane- and I wasnt that happyn with my 11.6 as I would liked to
  • 3 0
 @NotNamed:
Actually
If you compare to the onlineprice of a dhx 2pos plus 2x SLS spring you'll pay approx. 1250€
The EXT will be custom tuned at 950€ incl. Tax with 2 springs and you'll get an extra re-tune if needed.

So it is actually a lot cheaper and custom tuned compared to an ordinary out of the box fox shock!

Riding the previous version myself and lovin it!
  • 1 0
 @kaisa: Yeah and then when you look at the dhx2 as such does it feel like something deserving boutique price? I mean I was shocked by casting marks on the shock body, that would be appropriate on 100 dollar ebay special shock not on one of the most expensive shocks on the market.
  • 6 0
 I do not need this. But I want it.
  • 2 0
 This is a great review, and I hate all reviews. I absolutely love the common sense comparison at the bottom, it cuts through the bullshit and raises the proverbial bar of the review without overly discounting the top shelf offering being reviewed. Excellent job. I say this as a "professional" reviewer myself, and someone who hates just about every review I read.
  • 5 1
 This made my 140mm sentinel feel like it has 160mm+. Best shock on the market.
  • 1 0
 @MattInNZ did you get yours direct or is there a NZ distributor now ?
  • 2 0
 The shock costs the same as a stock DHX2 with 2 springs- let alone a 11-6 which will set you back 1350€ here and cant be tuned for lot of bikes (the SJ Evo for example) and is not available in nearely all sizes.
  • 7 3
 Buy the Fox van rc/marz cr, send it to Avalanche & you’ll have a shock that shits on everything else
  • 2 0
 or Push
  • 4 0
 I've been super happy with everything I've gotten from Avalanche over the years.
  • 1 0
 I want to send my Bomber to avy. It would rad.
  • 2 0
 @panzer103: do it man! I had him pimp mine last year & it’s on another level.
Can only imagine how good his own shocks must be. AVY POWER ✊
  • 2 1
 This looks great for a much better and more aggro rider than I am. I've been looking at a Hazzard for my Cannondale Prophet. That is a regressive design that normally doesn't play nice with linear coil shocks. But in talking to MRP they told me that a Hazzard would work very well using their progressive springs. So that is a great option for those who have less progressive bikes. The smallest size the hazzard comes in is 200x57 while the Prophet takes a 200x50 stock. Its a fairly common mod to run a 200x57 on those to get 160mm of travel so no worries there. I can just raise my fox 34 to 160. Anyway it is nice to see that there's enough of a market for boutique suspension brands like this one to diversify into the mtb world.
  • 1 0
 Or just run more sag on the rear though that’s one of the few frames I wouldn’t run a coil on.
  • 4 0
 I dont know why people bottom out every ride, sacrifice some cushion for a faster ride and more control
  • 1 0
 I'd like to see a same bike head to head comparison of all the "multi adjustable" coil shocks, with the tuning managed by someone who actually tunes suspensions for a living.

For example, I have a Bomber, CR Coil it's rides overly firm, but because it lacks the tunability that other shocks have, it doesn't work on my Guerilla Gravity because my suspension is regressive (ramps up quickly); the Bomber IFP pressure is not adjustable.

I also think it woudl be interesting to take a common shock (or fork) and let a bunch of tuners have at it, say Avy, PUSH, Vorsprung, etc... then compare the results across a number of different platforms and different riders.
  • 1 0
 Up until recently custom tuned van rc’s we’re up there with the best. Definitely be worth talking to someone like Tf tuned who’d it dialed for you and your bike for about £150 if I remember correctly.
  • 1 0
 nurseben, I can just tell you that if your Guerilla Gravity is possible to be set up with a coil shock and you will have the best coil shock there is, you should buy an EXT (Storia V3) shock. This is one of few, among products in MTB industry that I would just put on the list "you regret you did not buy it before" and at the same time swear of all the money and time wasted on unsatisfying products.

Why is EXT shocks so much better? The way it is designed and the behavior of it. That paired with specific tuning, set to your weight, bike frame and type of riding. If you think of stock shocks out there, how in the earth will a general tune fit riders in the weight range from 130-260 lb? Of course that is why the race teams out there does not use stock shocks, it is actually tuned specific for them.

EXT nailed it with their design and how it suits modern frame designs, original made to fit air shocks. For my Transition Sentinel, with 32% sag and a stroke of 57mm, it was actually a Transition to get it with EXT. It was harsh ramping up, and stressed aggressive kind of feel to me and the way I needed to run it (295psi). I was willing to trade away the poppy agile feeling. Not did it took away all the other negative issues of the DPX2 but it kept the agile poppy feeling even with a super low coil spring rate, at 550lb.

What makes it stand out from the rest:
-HBO- you can run super soft spring, believe it or not it makes also a short travel bike at 140mm feel more like 155mm.
-Lowest Internal Pressure (55psi) - super soft initial feel because of the lowest brake away force out there
-Rider specific tuning specific for weight and style

Yes I know I am only one happy customer bragging, and there are lot other nice shocks out there.
Obviously there are more of the same opinion in the comments here and I happen to know 6 other with different bikes that are super happy with their EXT shocks.

PS! Of course special treated Van RC/ and other special tuned shocks will be good, but at what cost? If you add 2 SLS springs, Avy tuning you will have 800USD, that is in the same price range anyhow. And you will not have the HBO, and for sure not the super soft initial feel of the EXT.
  • 1 0
 Probably good shock, however what i like about coils shocks - set and forget set up, my current frame does not require hsc or bottom out resistance or whatever advance feature, so i’m happy with basic shock with right tune;

Competitor wise i like push shock since you can fit to any frame when you change it - nice investment
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer very well written review of the EXT Storia V3. The only thing that I can´t recall is the nitrogen that you wrote about that works with the floating piston. The IFP is filled with air and other than that there is nothing in the shock then oil and the parts displayed in the cross section.
  • 1 0
 I believe the IFP is filled with nitrogen from the factory, although you could use air as well.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: no, definitly air - I was at at the factory and also serviced a shock last week. They use air and so did I for the service.
  • 1 0
 I recently put this shock on my Remedy 9.8 and the performance top to bottom is outstanding. Andrew at Brennan Autosports helped me and the guys in Italy even reached out when I had a few questions. Great customer service! It's expensive but that's quality for ya. Let's hope long-term service and repairs doesn't pose to much problems?
  • 3 0
 EXT is more like direttissima brakes. its nice to have one, and it's probably great. but most of ass can live with out it.
  • 1 0
 Don't try the Maxima brakes then, because if you do, you can barely even live with Direttissimas haha...
  • 1 0
 bicyclerider could not agree more!
  • 8 5
 Italian products at their best
  • 4 0
 I was a bit surprised that they mentioned it was noisy - it’s Italian, of course it is. But I probably won’t be able to hear it over the squealing of my good old Formula brake ;-)
  • 2 0
 @FuzzyL: italians noisy? :-D
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL: i confirm it is noisy. If you go fasy you will not hear it. If you are having a beer and somebody is just pushing bike around you will hear it.
  • 3 3
 What happened to BOS?

What would put me off this, and indeed any other boutique suspension parts, would be the unknown level of backup two or three years down the line.

Will the company simply disappear?
  • 3 0
 Read the article again, EXT has been making suspension for a while now. Their main business is motor sports suspension, so I doubt they will be going anywhere soon.
  • 1 0
 BOS seems to care more about things with motors than about bikes.
They are still there, still sellings 2 forks a year.
And you can buy the old products for cheap just now.
www.bos-suspension.com

They just stopped every ad or marketting or whatever that concern bikes.
  • 1 2
 @Upduro: I see. Unlike every other suspension manufacturer then. Oh wait, BOS claim to be a motorsport suspension manufacturer too. Perhaps they will still be around to support their mountain bike products? They will not.
I think Jaame makes a legitimate point, and reading some boutique company's website or press release claiming motorsport heritage changes nothing. Fine words butter no parsnips.
  • 4 6
 Totally valid point @Jaame. I wanted this shock for my Carbon Jack initially. Then went for Cane Creek. And it is hard enough to service it locally. That is why I will stick to Fox/ RS in the future, could not be arsed about waiting months for exotic parts to arrive. I may try DVO, because they are not some pretentious moto/automotive company where some employee wanted to make suspension for his kids mountain bike. They have to stick to their products.
  • 1 0
 @Upduro: read the article? What is this mountainous task you speak of?
  • 3 1
 @WAKIdesigns: DVO LOL
Do yourself a huge favour and don't, Cane Creek support is pretty good - depends on your location though I suppose
  • 2 2
 @finlay: I am honestly listening, what is wrong with DVO according to you because mechanics I spoke to have nothing special to say against it. I am seriously considering buying Fox 36 or DVO Onyx.

Cane Creek, yeah, Scandinavia and their ridiculous demand on ordering big batches of service parts at once, makes it quite hard for workshops here to work with them. Which makes for drug smuggling strategies to obtain parts. Quite a silly move by Cane Creek.
  • 1 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I've had a Fox 36 and want another one. I really wanted a DVO Onxy SC last year until I had a go on one on a Giant Reign. Not impressed. I know, it wasn't set up for me etc... but also the quality is more Rockshox than Fox. Seeing it in the flash really put me off.
  • 4 0
 @jaame: couldn´t this be affected by the fact DVO on Giants could be let´s say OEM version?
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns: No Ohlins? shocked
  • 2 0
 LMAO. Someone never learnd how to tune suspension. My diamond is in another league than my 2020 boxxer. It’s leaps and bounds better than anything cane creek makes or Fox for that matter. @finlay:
  • 1 0
 I would highly consider giving DVO a try. Great guys and even better products. (People who talk shit just haven’t tired them) @WAKIdesigns:
  • 2 1
 @BornOnTwo: if they made 180 version I’d consider it. But they don’t.
  • 3 1
 @freeridejerk888: while I am not a fan of Boxxer, or anything from RS, shocks in particular, I am a big Fox fanboi. I doubt whether RS is worse, I just prefer the feel of 36/40
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: Curious, how much do you weigh, and whats the HTA on your bike? My diamond is as plush as any old school Marzocchi coil fork, but it also dives just as bad. No matter what I do, even over-inflating it by 20 PSI (which obviously removes the super-sensitivity) and low OTT it still dives. I've read other putting oil in the air spring like a volume spacer, and when I get around to it thats my next option.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Did you ever try a Formula Selva?
Another great italian product, by the way...
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Fox is better built. I’m not sure if it works better than rockshox in general, but I spend more time looking at my bike and pedalling backwards in the kitchen than I do riding it. Fox pleases my eye because the quality is clearly higher than RS.
  • 1 0
 205 and I’m not what it comes out to but a 65.5 with a 10mm up fork so somthing like that. I don’t have a diving issue like you say at all. I run 160 psi full OTT and very high compression. I like a very stiff front end and it delivers I would call them up and ask what you can do to keep it higher up in the travel @hamncheez:
  • 3 0
 @freeridejerk888: in my experience it’s like this: Lyrik works best on big hits, big compressions think Val Di Sole. It stays on top of things very well. But it sucks on chatter making it harder to see where the hell I want to go. It also dives a bit too much when pressing brakes. That’s my opinion and how I perceive it.

Fox 36 Fit1, Fit4 and Grip2 - they are excellent at removing chatter and somehow are more stable under braking. It doesn’t fly through travel up and down as much as Lyrik. Rebound also seems better.

Now Marzocchis like 66RC3 Ti, 350CR, 380CR were super supple, and excellent on big hits. The trouble was everything in between. They were diving a lot.

I rode only the DH version of Formula and it felt a it overdamped and dull, but maybe different tune wouldwork better, it was very nicefork.


Now... where does DVO Onyx lie? I want 36 but I don’t want to pay as much for it as Euro shops ask
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Get a 2017 FIT 36 used for cheap, then drop a Vorsprung Luftkappe in it. It will give you slightly better negative air chamber than even the EVOL (if the vital review is to be believed) and since you and I are heavier than average riders, the FIT will not feel overdamped to us compared to the newer GRIP2 dampers.
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: I weigh the same, and I thnk I'm running 150 PSI. At that pressue, you lose that super-supple, super responsive off the top that helps with grip in deep dust (what I ride a lot) and helps keeps your hands from getting sore.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: ask for. It
  • 1 0
 @finlay: CC has been a huge let down for me on so many occasions. Wont respond to emails or calls. Im not a fan f.... them. Im in Nebraska maybe thats my problem. Which im sure it is.
  • 1 0
 Best shock on the market right now. EXT knows well what they are doing, racing expertise on Rally and F1 Wink . Custom tuned and great performance. What else can you ask for?
  • 1 0
 Hmm didn't scream omg like every owner. Are you going to test the motion ride or the mara @pinkbike
  • 2 0
 How does the EXT-Storia V3 compare to an 11-6?
  • 1 0
 Both feel much better than stock shocks. Im still in setup process with the ext. Lok lever is much easier to activate. You get a bit more offroad baja truck feel with the ext, im guessing from the negative spring. You can feel it
  • 1 0
 Does the Storia still use bushings or does the manufacturer utilize roller bearings?

Thanks
  • 2 0
 standard eyelet bush
  • 2 0
 @SunsPSD the standard shocks use bushings.

Custom shocks for Nicolai/Geometron G1 frames use spherical bearings.
  • 1 0
 @paulaston: will the spherical bearings work on a G16 29?
Or would I be ordering an 8.5x2.5 and putting offset bushings in the eyelets?
  • 2 0
 @gonecoastal: spherical bearings won´t fit into standard shock eyelet, the best alternative is to use needle bearing in the rear eyelet in the g16 and properly sized bushing in the front one, offset or not depends on your needs and preferences.
  • 2 0
 @gonecoastal:

I don't think it is possible because the eyelets are larger to take the spherical bearing, plus they are 20mm wide on the G1 instead of the 22.2mm hardware.

The custom G1 shock is only available in 230x65mm so it would raise your BB height, and you would need to find 2.2mm of washers to make it fit.

EXT can do custom sizes at an extra charge, so get in touch with them directly. I have a custom 250x75mm for my own G1 I am building at the moment!

Maybe it's time for a G1 frame?
  • 1 0
 @paulaston: thanks for the reply.

Oh man does an idiot like myself not need the “get a new bike” encouragement. I’m dumb enough to think this is a good idea.
In all seriousness if I was to get another frame it wouldn’t be another quiver of G1; but rather the Saturn 14.

I’m already planning a 14 build in my head and upsizing the G16 to a dual crown to harvest select parts off it...
  • 1 0
 @gonecoastal: check amachete components, www.amachete.com/html%20ingles/index.html , they will tell you if you can go needle bearing and/or offset ones. They are the only ones who were able to fit them in my Strive (odd Shapeshifter config...)
  • 3 0
 @Davichin: Thanks for this.
  • 1 0
 @SunsPSD: if it is not a very strange config, you have in the US www.enduroforkseals.com who also sell needle bearings for shocks etc...
  • 1 0
 @Davichin: Thanks for this link. Amachete has the roller bearing I need on the way for for my Avy tuned RT3 on my Foxy.
RWC doesn't have the 10mm size that is specific to the Foxy.
  • 2 0
 Best shock I´ve ever used!
  • 1 0
 Has anyone put one of these on a newer Patrol? Im looking for a good coil set up for mine.
  • 1 0
 I am sure there are a lot of riders out there using EXT on last generation of Patrol. Ask them since they told me they have worked close with Transition to get it right.
  • 1 0
 @G1EXTStoria: Thanks! Good to know. I appreciate the advice.
  • 1 0
 How does it compare to an AVY shock? The Storia probably sexier but is it better?
  • 1 0
 best coil shock outthere, highly recommended as an upgrade on any trail/enduro bike!
  • 1 0
 600 pound spring for 160lb rider......stud.
  • 1 0
 The industry has designed based on friction and spring force...they finally understand that damping force is a much better tool. Having a 160lb rider on a 600 spring is pretty dumb...
  • 2 0
 @downcountry: That depends on the frame design and leverage rate
  • 1 0
 @jewpowered: no design should require the use of 600 spring for such a light rider, I mean do you realize how much load it puts trough the frame and how much energy it throws back through the rebound circuit?
  • 1 0
 @jewpowered: I believe the frame design and leverage rate depends on the friction and spring force. Improved seals, low IFP, spriing pressure and the comeback of springs is allowing frame folks to make make progressive linear bikes without worrying about quasi static break away friction, peak bottom out loads etc. I'm stoked on where things are headed (back to MX style products).
  • 1 0
 @downcountry: yeah, my ext is a #425 and im 190lbs
  • 1 0
 I wonder how well this would work for riders 200+?
  • 1 0
 @Explodo it works great and holds up well for agressive riding. A friend of mine is well over 200lbs and after a year of abuse no issues at all.
  • 1 0
 @listeryu: Thank you, good to know.
  • 1 0
 I am 255 lb rider and I could not be happier, see my comments above. Use a 550 lbs spring on a Transiton Sentinel. I am at a 475lbs spring on a Nicolai/Geometron G1.
  • 1 0
 Bouncy bouncy, OHH IT'S STILL A GOOD TIME.
  • 2 3
 That was a pointless comparison, esp when Storia went to the trouble of sending you two shocks.
  • 1 0
 nurseben, what do you mean? Pointless in terms of what? To me it is no comparison, it is meaningless. Yes both are shocks, but look at what you miss on the Bomber. You need at least to get Avalanche tuning of the Bomber and buy 2 fox sls springs, at the same price, to get close to the EXT Storia V3. Even then you need to pin point the HSC tune and you still not have any hydraulic bottom out control.
  • 3 5
 I was sold at ‘italian’
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