Review: Fix It Sticks Blend Edition Tool

Oct 5, 2018
by Richard Cunningham  
Fixit Sticks Blend Edition


I fell in love with the original Fix It Sticks at first sight. A pair of double-sided tools that locked together to form a T-handle wrench was far more user-friendly than a folding tool. Fix It Sticks could reach beyond the stubby lengths of most folders, and their T-handle shape provided more leverage and a better feel. Goodbye fussy folding tool. Hello sturdy, capable Fix It Sticks.

Sad to say that our honeymoon didn't last long. The downside of Fixit Sticks reared its ugly head the moment I needed something other than their four permanently fixed bits to work on my bike. I returned to a folding tool, wishing that at least one of my estranged Fix It Sticks had a magnetic replaceable bit option.


Fixit Sticks Blend Edition
Fix It Sticks Blend Edition

• Double-sided tool interlocks to form T-handle
• Fixed Stick - 4mm x 5mm Allens
• Interchangeable Stick: 2mm, 3mm, 6mm & 8mm Allens, T-25 & Phillips-2 bits
• Options: accepts all 1/4" bits
• Comes with carrying case and bottle-mount carrier
• MSRP: $34 USD
• Contact: Fix It Sticks


The Blend Edition

Salvation came a while ago when Fix It added Sticks with magnetic bit holders to the range, and their swankiest offering is the new Blend Edition. As the name implies, the Blend version is made up of one permanently attached 4mm / 5mm handle, while the second handle features replaceable magnetic bit-holders on either end. The idea is that bits won't spew from the permanent Stick while you are using it for a T-handle. Blend Edition Fix It Sticks come with a handy carrying pouch that includes seven bits: a 2mm hex, 2.5mm hex, 3mm hex, 6mm hex, 8mm hex, T-25, and a Phillips #2, Also included, is an engineered-plastic tool holder that fits in place of, or underneath a water bottle cage. MSRP is $34.00 USD.

Fixit Sticks Blend Edition


Trail Report

Before I hit the trail, I used my Blend Edition Sticks in my workshop to switch-out a drivetrain and some brakes. The new and improved Sticks made short work of the job, with the right bits to fit the SRAM T-25 lever screws, my lock-on grips, the rear derailleur pivot bolt and even the derailleur's high-low range adjustment screws. Much of that task would not have been possible using the original Fix It handles. I did have to consult outside assistance, however. There is no chain breaker in the Fix It tool bag.

On trail, the well-made carrying pouch slid into the pocket of my TLD Skyline shorts and its slim profile did not interfere with pedaling. The high point of my trail experience with the tool was when I had to remove my saddle to access the Schrader valve of a Tranz-X dropper seatpost.

Minor saddle adjustments can be a chore using a folding tool. Using Fix It Sticks' T-handle action to loosen the bolts, and a single Stick as a screwdriver to back them out, it was a simple five-minute task.
Fixit Sticks Blend Edition

The low point occurred when I had to switch pedals at the trailhead. The good news is that the Blend Edition has an 8mm Hex that fits most pedals. The problem was that, without a breaker bar, I couldn't muster enough strength using the T-handle to unscrew the pedals. I can (and occasionally do) stand on a folding tool to loosen a stubborn pedal, which works quite well.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesI'm a fan once more. Fix It Sticks' Blend Edition is exactly what the original version should have been from the start. I find it particularly useful to make trail-side cockpit and drivetrain adjustments when I am dialing in a new test bike. The kit falls short of the amenities that good folding tools feature, but on the plus side, you can customize this kit with readily available bits to perfectly match your cockpit and drivetrain components. Keep Fix It's Blend Edition comfortably in your pocket, and you'll be well served by this versatile and professional-feeling tool kit.RC


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45 Comments

  • 55 1
 My fix it stick is a hammer
  • 4 0
 Hammertime is time well spent.
  • 7 0
 My fixit stick is cottonwood. It was found several months ago and i have kept it near the door. It fixes everything that ails me.
  • 4 1
 Greatest tool ever in my book would be a dead blow hammer. Something working not quite right, give it some good whacks with a dead blow for some percussive maintenance and it will probably work as it was originally intended. Best part of the dead blow is since they have the nonmarring surface you can smash stuff with a surprising amount of force without damaging anything.
  • 2 0
 Heavy-ended-persuaer
  • 4 0
 @vtracer: You could be a professional BMX street mechanic.
  • 12 0
 Every tool is a hammer. Except for a screwdriver, which is a chisel.
  • 4 0
 @dgm10: look at the other end of the screwdriver... It's a plastic ball peen hammer!
  • 1 0
 @DarrellW: I use a dead blow, not a hammer
  • 11 0
 I had the original fix-it-sticks and rarely used them... and when I lost them, I didn't care. One of my issues was riding with them in a jersey pocket or shorts... sweat and water would lightly corrode the bits (they're not stainless) making them very difficult to extract by hand (if the bit was left in the tool for extended time). With the new design, the added bits are nice but this seems more like a novelty. You have the bulk of the case and nothing is captured. I'd much prefer a good folding tool with chain breaker that can be had for similar cost.
  • 4 0
 Amen to corrosion. I also lost track of the bits in the first version of this...
  • 3 0
 "Captured" is a strong word for how the bits were attached - they were just glued into the tool, so the bits separated easily from the orange handle on mine. The alloy was pretty crap too - using mine in a T-shape caused the hex hole in the centre of the tool to round off. And these were just trailside adjustments - tweaking a brake lever or a seatpost clamp, not heavy work like trying to remove a pedal. 100% agree - I'd prefer a good folding tool.
  • 5 19
flag ShempHoward (Oct 5, 2018 at 2:11) (Below Threshold)
 I can only think of one place to mount that tool,,, right up your ass!
  • 4 0
 I find good grease and understanding pedals need not be that tight when installed helps tons when its time to remove.them. Also putting one stick in the side rather than the top does give a bit more leverage for certain situations.
  • 4 0
 A OneUp EDC is whole lot easier to carry and way more functionality.

I have the original (waste of money) stuck somewhere in a cabinet and if I ever do find them, they will be posted for sale.
  • 2 0
 Obviously demands on a trail tool are different for everyone. For me personally, it needs to be something I can operate with wet gloves whilst shaking as I rapidly cool down. This won't do for me. The Y-shaped tool is great on most occasions unless you need to access the bolts under the saddle (depending on the clamp design). Still haven't found anything better than a basic fist length folding tool.

@JanB: Yeah you always need a chain tool. Personally I prefer a separate tool (like the small portable one from Park Tool). Haven't had good luck with built-in chain breakers.
  • 2 0
 I absolutely agree with the shaking! That's the first consideration whenever I look at a new multitool: I'm not in optimal workbench condition when I need it. Additionally, my last use of my multitool was for the chain breaker; it's is a must-have.

I recently spent a half hour trailside helping a guy look for a dropped tool bit. While it was great to get to know a new fellow rider, it was a complete waste of time as we never found the bit. You should carry a good magnet if you use one of these.

I'll stick to my folder for all of the reasons above: easier to use when jacked up from the ride, has chain breaker, no loose bits to lose.

That said, I'm sure there are so good use cases for this tool, and it sure looks cool. Reminds me of my Stihl chainsaw field sharpening kit.
  • 1 0
 @tripleultrasuperboostplusplus: Yeah, I personally find those from Wiha most comfortable. I've got one specifically assembled for Magura products (and Magura branded) even with an 8mm open ended wrench for the brake hose connections. I don't think they have these anymore, also because Magura reduced the number of different connections (and now stick mostly to T25 wherever possible and their front axle already houses a T25 tool). I've also used a generic folding tool from the hardware store for a good while and actually liked it. It didn't have the T25 tool so I carried that separately but it did have a 10mm allen key which I've never found on a bicycle specific folding tool. And I more regularly had to tighten the crankbolts of my 2004 Shimano Deore LX octalink cranks (only replaced a year ago or so) than I had to tighten a rotor bolt.

So yeah, if I'd ever lose that specific Wiha tool I might get one of their generic allen key sets and get the Magura axle (currently using Maxle). I'll stick with the separate chain breaker.
  • 2 0
 Keep a regular set of hex keys in your vehicle if your switching pedals at the trailhead. Don't see the point in your tail tool needing the ability to break pedals loose unless you carry extra pedals and shoes in your pack. At that point just strap on the whole damn tool kit!
  • 6 1
 No chain (deal) breaker...
  • 2 0
 Just get the mountain kit, or separate chain breaker. Job done! [Does this link thingy work?](store.fixitsticks.com/collections/mountain/products/mountain-kit?variant=41795550925)
  • 1 0
 Yup, and I balls'd it up.
  • 3 0
 Or a OneUp EDC tool
  • 1 0
 I feel really bad that I broke a friends fix-it-stick trying to swap pedals between bikes, the 6mm rounded out the aluminum portion of the tool. That being said I can't think of any mini tool that is strong enough to take that level of torque.
  • 3 0
 PC Load Letter? WTF does that mean?
  • 1 0
 The kit in your link looks really nice. The mountain bike in the images has rim brakes, though. What's up with that?
  • 2 0
 @pinhead907: but carbon headset spacers! Must be fancy.
  • 2 0
 @bforwil: yeah, well at least your name isn't Michael Bolton
  • 1 0
 @malerba423: ??? I told those fudgepackers I liked Michael Bolton's music...
  • 2 0
 Should have called it Stick 'N' Bits, and I'll shove it under the steerer tube.
  • 1 0
 I have a small chainbreaker that I roll up inside the Fix-It Sticks pouch, along with some zipties. I slide a couple spare links into the bit sleeves.
  • 4 1
 Not one picture or attempt to use the cage mount?
  • 1 0
 I bought a 30 or so piece Bosch 1/4 bit set with mini ratchet,
never used it for biking but it cost £10 and beats the shit out of this crap.
  • 2 0
 You kept your tool in your shorts?
  • 1 0
 Haha, I've combined the two previous kits years ago to have exactly this. By far the best tool kit.
  • 2 0
 18 Pc 1/4 In. Drive Metric Finger Ratchet Set for $7.99 at HARBOR FREIGHT!
  • 2 0
 If they could add a corkscrew this would be brilliant.
  • 2 0
 i have not bought this and I've already lost a few bits
  • 1 0
 Cool littler tool. This would fit perfectly in my under the saddle Evoc pouch tup
  • 1 0
 Tranz x dropper post? Vtracer we got a job for you bro
  • 1 0
 This seems like it should be under $10
  • 1 0
 dead- blow- hammer. Faf
  • 1 1
 Novelty item
  • 1 1
 RC rides a cheap TranzX?

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