close
Pinkbike is now part of Outside! As of December 3, 2021, please refer to the Outside Terms of Use and Privacy Policy which govern your use of the Pinkbike website and services.

Review: Fox Transfer SL Dropper Post

Jan 12, 2022
by Daniel Sapp  

Fox have long had the Transfer dropper post in their line, but the Transfer SL that was released last spring is quite unlike its longer travel sibling. The SL is a different post from the ground up - a pared-down, lighter-weight, and shorter travel option designed for the likes of XC racing, gravel riding, or riders who place a priority on lightweight rather than having the most drop possible.

The Transfer SL weighs a mere 327g for the shortest travel 27.2mm diameter Kashima coated Factory Series model and there are lever options for various types of mounting, including drop bars.
Transfer SL Details

Diameters: 27.2mm; 30.9mm & 31.6mm
Travel: 50mm; 70mm(27.2); 75mm, & 100mm (tested)
Weight: 327g - 399g (dependent on size/travel) 346g (30.9 / 100mm - tested)
Price: $399 USD - Factory (tested); $329 USD - Performance
More info: Ride Fox


One of several major differences between the Transfer and Transfer SL is the design of the saddle clamp and area. The SL is engineered with weight savings in mind, with less of a focus on stack height and maximum drop.

Construction and Features

Starting at the top, the seat clamp looks more like a throwback to previous versions of the Transfer, but a bit more refined. This departure from the standard Transfer clamp, which Fox had heralded as a crucial innovation to maximize post drop, was done to keep the weight down. With the post only needing to accommodate up to 100mm of drop for XC applications, maximizing the post's travel and keeping the stack height low wasn't as much of a constraint during development.

Moving down, the post has an entirely new mechanical spring, rather than an air-sprung, cartridge-style post, as more commonly seen these days. Additionally, the mechanics and function of the spring system give the post only two positions, up or down, rather than the infinite adjustment we've grown accustomed to. The reasoning behind this is again weight. The team at Fox claims that for XC racing, the post is typically either up or down and few riders tend to use it in a mid position.

While the aforementioned mechanical spring is an additional mass of metal, according to the engineers behind the design it allows for weight savings because the sealing mechanism does not need to be as robust as it would if there was a sealed air chamber.

The seals on the Transfer SL don't have to be robust because they're only keeping out dirt and not preventing air or fluid from escaping.
Cables anchor on the post which provides plenty of options when it comes to remotes.


The spring is only used for the extension of the post and it doesn't support the rider's weight - it has a very low spring rate that is highly preloaded. Locking it all in place, and supporting the weight of the rider, is a mechanism with hardened steel balls that engage through grooves in the upper post in either the raised or lowered position. There is a mechanism to prevent rotation between the upper and lower post composed of two preloaded bushings designed to prevent any angular free play. In the smaller diameter 27.2mm post, there are traditional anti-rotation pins which Fox claim allow a little saddle angular play when in a harder rotational stop.

A closer look at the inner workings of the locking mechanism on the Transfer SL. You can see the pins, steel balls, and entirety of the locking mechanism that supports the riders' weight.

Internally routed is the only option for the Transfer SL. The post has a window in the lower half that allows the cable to be run in either direction for compatibility with various dropper levers. Fox engineers said this also minimizes extra cable housing length to, you guessed it, save more weight. With the lower post walls being thinner than usual, torque spec does have to be considered as over-clamping the seat post binder can cause the post to incorrectly function or cause damage to the post.

So, how's that compare to other similar offerings? The post that first comes to mind as a lightweight, XC-style option is DT Swiss' D232 ONE. The D232 is polarizing in its look thank to its inverted design. The D232 has 60mm of travel and comes in two sizes, 27.2 and 30.9, with a claimed weight of 369g for both sizes. With a similar lightweight spring system, it is able to keep weight down, but the inverted design only allows the post to go so low in the seat tube. It sells for $566 USD, significantly more than the Transfer SL, has less travel, weighs more, and has fewer size, travel, and setup options than the Fox post.

Looking at many of the more standard length dropper posts just for sake of comparison, the Transfer SL, at 346g, is far lighter than the 595g average weight of the 13 posts tested in our past Ridden & Rated article. While those posts are all longer travel options, which inherently means they will weigh more, 346g for a 100mm dropper is pretty darn light.

Designed around XC racing, the Transfer SL is a good option for those looking to keep the functionality of a dropper but at a slightly lower weight penalty.


Ride Impressions

I've had the Transfer SL for several months now, enough time to put it through the wringer in a full range of weather conditions, from wet to dry and hot to cold. The post is undoubtedly light, coming in at about 25% less weight than a standard Transfer, depending on what length you're comparing. While you've read the word "light" plenty of times already, I'd say that it's the best way to describe how the post operates and functions.

Similar to a standard post, the Transfer SL has a smooth and consistent action and feel at the lever, but that is where the similarities split as the minuscule amount of effort required to push the post down was quite a departure from the norm. It's strange saying that it takes some getting used to, but it really does take a different style of operation. The Transfer SL may be aimed at the XC racing crowd, but one potential benefit is that the post works really well for kids or very light riders who may have trouble compressing and lowering a more traditional dropper post.

Upon dropping the post, it's key to ensure that it's fully dropped, as it doesn't have the infinite travel adjust many of us are accustomed to. It was surprising to me how often I didn't quite fully drop the post until I was more mindful to ensure it was fully down. It didn't take too long to adapt to the different style, though; I'd imagine it's similar to someone getting used to a different style shifter from what they've always used. Do a ride and you're good to go.

I did miss the infinite travel adjustment, but I can't really knock the post for that as the two-position design was intentional. As for that, it works precisely as it should.

Another thing worth noting is that there is a slightly more noticeable amount of play at the top of the post than I've grown accustomed to. Again, this is a difference in design and while it's quite noticeable off the bike and with the post at full extension, it was merely an afterthought while riding.

Overall, I was very happy with the performance of the Transfer SL. It's light and functions exactly as it should. While I wouldn't recommend the post for the modern-day trail rider looking to slam their seat and ride varied terrain where having some selection in drop is truly beneficial, it does give XC racers and connoisseurs of gravel sports an option many will appreciate. As sure as the sun rises in the morning, XC racers will be counting those pesky power-robbing grams, and more often than not, I feel that those bikes and those riders can appreciate a little skill boost when the going gets more technical, which is where the Transfer SL helps level the playing field and truly shines as the best option available for this application.



Pros

+ Lightweight
+ Light and smooth action
+ Multiple cabling options
+ Great option for lighter riders / kids
Cons

- Limited size options, 100mm max
- Some riders may prefer infinite travel adjustment rather than only up or down.
- Still won't be light enough for some hold outs




Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesThe Transfer SL is light in weight, light in action, and performs great for its intended application. With a measurable reduction in weight from a standard dropper post, it will be a great option for many XC racers and possibly serve as a gateway drug of sorts for hold-out riders in certain locales (yes, South Florida and Europe, I'm talking about you) who refuse to deviate from a rigid carbon post, no matter how great the performance gains of modern equipment may be.
Daniel Sapp





188 Comments

  • 134 6
 36g lighter than a Oneup V2 dropper with 20mm less travel and costs twice as much? Don't really understand the value proposition here.
  • 70 6
 It's Fox.
  • 61 2
 kashima. we all know that is the main reason to buy this.
  • 38 1
 The 30.9 120mm OneUp V2 weighs 435gr, 89gr difference. But your point is still valid. 20mm more travel, infinite adjust, and half the price.
  • 50 0
 You've obviously never been addicted to the weigh-weenie lifestyle
  • 19 3
 The size lol. One up doesn’t make a 27
  • 5 6
 @adrennan: then just get the big boy transfer
  • 15 6
 @Daweiknowdaway: I would rather not get any transfer after owning one for a while. If I am going to drop big money, I will go bike yoke. Otherwise the pnw post is flawless.
  • 1 4
 @adrennan: true, but if you did, just get the big boy
  • 4 2
 and having different versions with a significant price jump is BS. Just make a reliable, functioning dropper post.
  • 16 11
 Oneup > Fox
  • 6 1
 @ibis88: good catch, I misread the weight. I guess I just expected more weight savings from such a specialty product.

I’ve never understood the appeal of a “premium” dropper post. I’m a heavy guy and have had several oneup and PNW $199 posts without issue. Initial cost is cheaper, maintenance is easier and cheaper and they are as light as almost any post available.

I feel like the premium feel comes more from the lever and cable quality you use.
  • 1 0
 @rusty904: I ended up using a KS lever on my Transfer, I hated the Fox one.
  • 9 0
 It's for mr. and mrs. 'Too much kashima pocket'
  • 5 3
 This is the next chapter of "why I still can't find a reason to purchase anything made by Fox".
  • 1 0
 @rusty904: agreed
  • 2 1
 @Daweiknowdaway: please stop saying ‘big boy’
  • 7 0
 @Hayek: lengthy boy
  • 1 1
 @Daweiknowdaway: haha much better
  • 4 0
 @adrennan: And the PNW posts are just re-branded, more expensive Trans-X dropper posts
  • 3 0
 Have had problems with both Fox and OneUp but the OneUp’s felt and sounded cheaper and didn’t seem to work as well.
  • 3 1
 @JohanG: guessing this post won't come with a lever just like the other transfer posts. They expect you to drop another $75 for their actuator.
  • 1 0
 @Chonky13: Most droppers don't come with a lever.
  • 4 1
 Cons:
If you don't service your fox dropper once every year for £100+, your warranty is void. Do not waste your money.
  • 1 0
 Also, you or your local service centre will need $600 worth of tools to service it, and those tools will be redundant with the next generation. And the warranty is half the next best company’s. Plus if you’re in Canada you have to deal with Raceface.
  • 1 0
 @Will762: I have a transX Kitsuma on one of my bikes too. Definitely similar to the PNW but for some reason the PNW is a decent chunk lighter. Also, you get a better warranty. Both nice though.
  • 70 7
 If you run a saddle bag with a tire lever, tubolito, and CO2 this post will struggle to return to full travel. Not a product I've ever used on my own bikes but the three we've sold so far have all been hyper sensitive to seat collar clamping pressure, had tons of bushing play, and can't lift a saddle bag.
  • 137 9
 Running an SL post and having a saddle bag are counterintuitive.
  • 76 4
 @z-man: fair enough, that said most people who can afford to run one of these fall into the saddle bag demographic, at least in our area
  • 21 1
 @shmeef45:

haha, fair enough.
  • 6 1
 @shmeef45 Great insight. Love hearing from shops. I run the Backcountry Research tube strap on my post so this post would be a real problem for me (sounds like the post has other problems too).
  • 8 3
 If you're running a saddle bag you're definitely not the target market for your product...
  • 18 4
 I have run a small tool bag with a tube, 2 CO2's, tire lever, and multitool on mine for months with 0 issues. Probably a thousand miles (it's on a gravel bike). Over tightening a seat collar doesn't sound like a manufacturer defect to me.
  • 13 0
 @z-man: I usually run a saddle bag on my XC bikes because I don't wear any pack for XC. There's more wheel->saddle clearance on a short travel bike so no interference problems with a saddle bag, plus pretty much every XC rider uses CO2 (fits in saddlebag) instead of a pump (doesn't fit in saddle bag) for racing. I also want 2 water bottles on the frame for rides and races where the aid station/pit interval is greater than one bottle, which means less room for tube and tool storage on the frame. Seems like exactly the target market.
  • 1 3
 Get a frame strap.
  • 6 0
 @badbadleroybrown: plenty of weight weenies with saddle bags in my circle of acquaintances. They will take them off for an xco race, but for training and leisure a saddle bag is a popular option
  • 4 0
 @Lokirides: Fox posts, all of them, are really sensitive to seat clamp pressure. Fox have a max of 5nm listed but have found that they can bind on some seat tube designs as low as 3.5nm, which is very low for a seat post collar.
  • 5 0
 Hmm, I have this post and small saddle bag with tubolito, CO2 and CO2 head,, tire bacon and tool, chainbearker tool, spare quick links and lever. Zero issues with return speed. If you tighten the seat post clamp too much then it can fail to return.
  • 2 0
 @z-man: Disagree. You're using the saddle bag (and in-frame bottle cages!!) in lieu of a hydration hip/back pack.
  • 6 0
 @sevensixtwo: I have a Transfer Sl and run a tube + tire lever + 20g CO2 in my BR tube strap.

It has no trouble returning to full extension.
  • 2 0
 @Lokirides: not sure anyone said “over tightening”, just sensitive to seat collar pressure.
There’s a possibility that other people have had issues with the product, even though it’s worked for you. Strange how different people in similar circumstances can have different experiences….
  • 2 0
 @solephaedrus: ya I can hardly torque mine past 2nm before it’s affecting the return of the post. It’s just barely tight enough that the clamp bolt will even stay in. Wouldn’t even stay in the frame without friction paste. 2019 Fox Transfer.
  • 1 0
 Yes, the fox is very sensitive to clamp pressure.. I'd say give or take it's around 4nm. It for sure is an area of improvement for fox, but we know how fox is. Their @#$# doesn't stink so there's that. As far as saddle bags, I have a small saddle bag with 2x co2's , tire lever, quick link, stans dart. (no tube as I run inserts and tubeless and haven't needed a tube in 5yrs). It returns to max height no problem with this setup. If i ran a spare tube i'd run it on the frame anyways, but with plugs/inserts/stans I haven't needed to.
  • 2 1
 Why tf are you running a bag on your dropper post?
  • 2 0
 @RGonz: For those rides where you only have an hour (and you don't want to hydration pack all your shit).
  • 1 0
 @RGonz: I run a compact one on my Diamondback since it doesn't have a SWAT box like my Specialized. Saddle bag and a frame strap, I've got everything I'd need in virtually any situation. For decades I rode with a hydration pack. Never had anything on the bike. Then suddenly I saw the light a couple years ago, having that weight on the bike and not me. Now I'll only wear a pack if I need the extra water.
  • 3 2
 #teamjerseyswithpockets

Just say no to saddlebags.
  • 1 1
 @badbadleroybrown: Yeesh. I can safely say that since I started in '89, I tried pockets once, then never again. Bad enough having the weight on my body in a pack rather than the bike. Worse having it bouncing around in a pocket, waiting to surprise you if you bail and roll. No thanks to that, but if that's your jam, that's you jam.
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: a co2 cart, tire lever, and a tube isn't much weight and spread across a couple jersey pockets isn't noticeable at all, especially when you're talking about xc riding.
  • 1 0
 @badbadleroybrown: All good, whatever works for ya. Since it took me almost 3 decades to change my routine, maybe in another 3 I'll go the jersey route. Smile
  • 1 0
 @badbadleroybrown: It's also not a lot of weight under your saddle either. That and it doesn't turn your jersey into a pendulous ball-sack.
  • 1 0
 @Dopepedaler: Putting a tube, some co2, and a tire lever in your pockets doesn't turn your jersey into a pendulous ball-sack either. It also avoids issues on your dropper, questions about tire hitting the pendulous saddle-mounted ball-sack, and saddle-mounted ball-sack rubbing on dropper shaft... and looks roughly 4,000,000x less stupid.
  • 2 0
 @badbadleroybrown: 4,000,000x ?! That might be a bit of an exaggeration. Takes one to know one, I suppose. Are all those tube-strap/bag style things stupid now? I wish I had considered all those dropper post clearance issues prior putting one on.
  • 1 0
 @Dopepedaler: Tube straps work, and are much more secure. No qualms with those.
  • 1 0
 @badbadleroybrown: It was a rhetorical question. I think cut-off, denim shorts and handlebar mustaches are stupid but those folks kick my ass up-and-down the trail all day. As such....maybe they're not that stupid.
  • 1 0
 @Dopepedaler: Sorry to hear about you being bullied on the trails... have you considered asking to speak to their manager?
  • 2 0
 @Dopepedaler: understandable. As long as it's a seat rail mounted and there's no strap around the stanchion yer good.
  • 2 0
 @RGonz: Exactly. I use the Lezyne Road Caddy Small: www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00NAR0U4Q
You'd be amazed at what I fit in there!
  • 1 0
 @badbadleroybrown: That's a good one. Chapeau.
  • 21 0
 Will this fit my stand up paddle bike?
  • 17 0
 I feel like this is kinda expensive for what it is...
  • 57 0
 When did people who care about weight start caring about price?
  • 20 1
 @rustiegrizwold: I care that I'm fat and cheap?
  • 2 0
 @rustiegrizwold: This is the way.
  • 3 0
 @juicebanger: I prefer built for comfort not speed.
  • 7 0
 but KASHIMA
  • 21 3
 Just get a BikeYoke.
  • 27 14
 That'll be one beautiful paper weight when it stops working after 3 months.
  • 13 3
 It would still be under warranty...
  • 2 0
 I know this one is a Fox and there are plenty of differences in the details, but this basic mechanism can be solid. I had a post from 2009 that used a spring with ball bearing travel stops and it worked without issue for almost 10 years, with only some minimal cleaning and lube once every two years
  • 8 2
 @z-man: Not with today's FOX warranty department. I had to send a post back 6 months after purchase and got charged $110. It was on a secondary bike and they claimed it had seen enough riding to merit the charge.
  • 15 0
 @scrawnydog: that is insane. It beats the warranty claims on my 38. First time (creaking) it was fine but slow to get back to me. Second time (creaking and damper) they tried to deny it because apparently (and I shit you not) I had been riding it: “downhill in an aggressive manner.”

Like no shit, it’s a 180mm fork on a long travel frame. That was a long fight but they eventually replaced it. I sold the replacement on the very day I received it.
  • 11 5
 @Afterschoolsports: My buddy just pulled a 36 Factory off his bike because it, and I quote, "felt like garbage". He called FOX and they told him to pull the air spring and see if there was too much grease - he did that and nothing changed. FOX told him he could send it in but that it wouldn't be a guaranteed warranty. Fork had 3 rides on it. He is now riding a Lyrik Ult. FOX is no doubt a great company but they're clearing having QC issues they're forcing consumers to pay for and that ain't cool.
  • 11 1
 @scrawnydog: pretty easy to make a fork feel like garbage if you don't have right damper settings, air pressure or tokens
  • 2 2
 @scrawnydog: it’s really sad to see companies end up in places like this. The only loser is the consumer. Decent QA doesn’t cost much more than poor QA. My canam x3 is currently back at the dealership for a fox live valve issue. I regret buying it almost every time I use it.
  • 4 0
 @scrawnydog: Most of the time when I hear this it's because people don't know how to properly set up the fork.

Not saying that's the case here. But more often than not the adjustability of a factory level fork just isn't for everyone.

I'm on a 36 and a 38. Zero issues. Love them. The new forks are insane.
  • 2 1
 @scrawnydog: same story here, my factory 38 has 48 rides and already developing bushing play.... not stoked to say the least
  • 2 0
 @scrawnydog: best thing your buddy can do is pop a Vorsprung smashpot in that 36 and he will have a great fork
  • 3 0
 +1 on recent and very poor experience with FOX warranty on a shock. Could tell the employee I talked to felt bad about not helping me out. Experiences years ago were a little better.
  • 2 0
 @phalley: @onemanarmy: Agree completely but that was not the case in this situation.
  • 12 3
 I was an early adapter to this post and honestly, I love it for XC use. The actuation is super fast and I've not noticed any of the 'overclamping' issues that the tester notes. I much prefer this post over my One-Up on my enduro bike. I've had it on my bike for ~6mos in various conditions and haven't noticed any issues. Cable installation is stupid easy and the post is so simple that it's hard to eff-up. I also found that installing a saddle on this post is much easier than a traditional hydraulic post.
  • 11 2
 TBH one up posts are pretty average all round. Mine had loads of problems and had to be warrantied more than once. I ended up buying a bike yoke, and wish I had done so from the beginning.
  • 10 0
 Been using a 100mm version for few months, non factory Kashima, FWIW. I dig the light action.
  • 11 1
 Off topic, but I broke my fox DHX2 and they covered the replacement for free. Good on ya fox! I appreciate it.
  • 7 0
 I'm using the 100mm Fox transfer SL on my XC bike and its great. Coming from an infinite dropper post, its not a big deal that it has 2 positions. I really dont think the weight of a saddle bag is going to keep this post from extending all the way up. Saddle bags are a bad idea for a dropper anyway. Ive had it for 2 months, had a good amount of rides on it. came from a 125mm post and having 25mm less drop isn't very noticeable. I can still get back and low without any problems.
  • 1 0
 Out of curiosity, why is a saddle bag a bad idea for a dropper post?
  • 2 0
 @onawalk: My guess would be rear tire clearance when the post is down and the suspension is compressed.
  • 2 0
 @onawalk: Yes hitting the tire is an issue, but most saddle bags have Velcro that wraps around the post. this can wear the coating off over time when riding. It takes a while but does happen. Its like your front shock, you dont want that coating to be worn away or excess air/dirt/ect... will get past the seal
  • 1 0
 @MaplePanda: that’s a possibility for sure.
These posts have a short drop 100mm, so they’ll likely won’t be slammed in the seat tube.
I run a 180mm on my Sentinel, and it’s not fully dropped in the seat tube. There would be room for a seat bag if I chose to run a small one
  • 2 0
 @august4072: this seems like an easily mitigated concern, small bit neoprene if it’s actually got a wrap around the post.
The two seat bags I had were a solid mount on the rails, no need to have anything wrapped around the post, but I do know of the strap you’re talking about.
  • 9 0
 9point8 Fall Line R dropper is a remarquable competitor in this category. Same price, lighter, probably more reliable
  • 5 14
flag z-man (Jan 12, 2022 at 8:38) (Below Threshold)
 Absolutely not. RaceFace (Fox) actually did use 9point8's FallLine dropper for their originally released dropper post. It was just a FallLine branded Turbine with a different lever. It failed miserably. It was a shit product and led to Fox designing the Transfer.
  • 11 2
 @z-man: ...with a big difference: it was made in China instead of Canada. This design needs tight tolerances.

I have my 9point8 since 2017 and it still work. The first version had air leaks problem, but then they redesigned the collar and works great now.
  • 5 0
 @z-man: Agreed! Raceface failed miserably in manufacturing these posts overseas. Fall Line & Fall Line R are designed and manufactured by 9point8 in Canada. Both of mine have been working great and were easy to rebuild after 2 years of abuse. They even work in sub -15 degree Celsius temperatures on my fat bike. Honestly, the craftsmanship is on par with Thomson.
  • 2 2
 @dolmen:

Thomson's craftsmanship is absolute trash. Their dropper failed miserably and the hardware on their stem is a joke. They're heavy, and unfinished looking.
  • 12 1
 @z-man:
The turbine was not a Raceface branded FallLine, they licensed the patent for the design but they made it as cheap as possible which in turn resulted in a shit product. The FallLine is a great post and very high quality.
  • 7 0
 another vote for 9Point8. I've had one for five years now and no problems, and it is easy to do your own service at home
  • 5 1
 @Loche: You really think China doesn't do tight tolerances? Wake up. China is the major manufacturer of a lot of high end stuff. If you want to blame anyone, I'd nominate the Canadian client company for trying to cut costs, maybe not choosing the right factory or lacking in QC.
  • 1 0
 @dolmen which I could use the word reliable with my Fall Line Type R. It was made in Canada, and nothing but problems since basically day 1. Got it warrantied, all that jazz...

On days it works properly, I will say it has the most refined actuation of any post I've ever seen in person. And the saddle clamp is fantastic.

That being said, I listened to fellow Pinkers and got a Bike Yoke Revive. Hands down a superior product, with an ever so slightly less refined actuation.

Now I just look at that Fall Line and think what the hell am I going to do with it? I don't sell things that I think are going to fail for other people.
  • 2 0
 The Fall Line reminds me a lot of the Reverb. Some people never had any issue with them, others swore off ever buying another. I really want to try a Fall Line, but the mixed reviews has my very skeptical. Their clamp is the unique piece of their posts, and I could care less if they had a cartridge inside, in fact, if they were as reliable as other posts utilizing cartridges, I think I'd probably prefer that.
  • 1 0
 @PHeller:

I have serviced over 1000 reverbs in the last 5 years and I must say that is the one product SRAM nailed. The C1 at least. The others are reliable when you update the internal IFP and fluids, (A1,A2 and B1).

Super serviceable, parts available in tackle boxes and I can make them extremely reliable. My return rate on serviced reverbs is well under %1.
  • 1 0
 Absolutely not. The Fall Line has literally three times as many parts as the Transfer SL. It’s a very complicated, finicky post. It’s great most of the time, but I was happy to sell mine for a simple, reliable Transfer SL.

The standard Transfer isn’t more reliable than most other good posts out there. But the SL does away with the air spring and hydraulic lock, and replaces them both with incredibly simple, zero maintenance mechanical devices. For marathon MTB races, reliability is paramount.
  • 7 0
 South Florida and Europe.. what?
  • 1 0
 Florida chiming in. It’s flat here. Not a lot of call for an enduro bike with a 200mm dropper post.
  • 2 0
 @icthus13: That might be true, but Europe is kind of big and goes from ocean up to 4800m in the alpes and even higher in the Kaukasus.. I just didn't get that part haha
  • 7 2
 Sounds like the 9Point8 lightweight post is still the way to go. It's a shame that they don't get more attention for that thing.
  • 3 1
 Too bad reliability issue on some of their earlier batch tarnish reputation of the FallLine R. Even if it's fixed already, the word is already out online that it's not a reliable seat-post.
  • 5 0
 @Hexsense: I've had one for five years now and no problems, and it is easy to do your own service at home
  • 5 0
 My 9point8 has worked perfectly for over two years now. And as mentioned, working on it is simple, unlike others which require your LBS to service every year or two. Yes, they are lighter than most and have infinite adjustment. The only negative was getting the cable connection right on initial install.
  • 3 0
 @Malamute2: Mine's (regular Fall line, not the lightweight "R") on year 3 without issue. Plus, the light action on the trigger makes it such a joy to use. My PNW feels like it takes about three or four times the thumb pressure to activate.
  • 3 0
 There are so few options for good 27.2mm dropper posts. I don’t think this mechanism would last under my sizeable rear in the long term, but I’m far from the majority of users in its target market.
  • 2 0
 “Hardened Steel Balls” gaalee ,sounds a little brutal but anyway,
Daniel Sapp I’m kinda curious, what do South Florida locals have in common with Europe and weight weenies? As a south Fl native I’m def confused on this comment, but I’m hoping maybe you know about some super sick trails on some secret hidden mountain somewhere and yer just itching to tell us “locals” allll about it Drool
  • 4 0
 @Crankhed
You know, I just remember a segment of the Markham Park/Virginia Key audience as a blend of very normal and very special. You know, the very special kind that builds a bike off of a sheet of weights rather than practicality because of the "lighter is always faster" mindset? A no-name hardtail with a crack in the top tube, second-hand lefty, carbon-spoke wheels, piece of carbon for a saddle, chopped bars, and something else that makes you go "why?"?

I will say, Florida has some surprisingly fun riding in places. I'm probably not going to abandon my dugout here in Western NC for it but, it's a good time if you know where to go - Shoot me a DM when you find that hidden mountain that isn't a capped landfill!
  • 1 0
 @danielsapp: Europe is a bloody continent formed of 44 countries with wildly different cultures, gotta be more specific
  • 4 0
 Had 2 fox transfers and both stopped working after less than 12 months in wet/muddy conditions.

Oneup V2 has been flawless and its half the price.
  • 5 0
 Welcome back Daniel Sapp. I've been wondering if you stopped writing.
  • 7 0
 Just been living a pretty good dad-life. I write dates on bottles and make grocery lists daily now...words about bikes, a little more infrequently.
  • 2 0
 I dunno, I think I'd miss the infinite adjustment. I rarely use the full extension when using my dropper post. Most of the time I'm just dropping an inch or so to get through the techier sections of the trail.
  • 1 0
 Amazed someone didn't say this earlier. I've been racing XC for decades and the ability to drop the post about an inch for flat twisty sections and still hammer the pedals seated is vital in my area.
  • 1 0
 Very solid review. My SL works super well on my road bike for getting out of the way on steep twisties or when I hit the dirt. Not sure I’d put it on any of my mtbs because of the two position system and I already have Bike Yokes.
  • 5 1
 "allow" a little saddle angular play. That's not a feature, guys.
  • 1 1
 This seems like an okay product, especially for a gravel bike that might see some singletrack. A little pricey for what it is…..

The seat clamp hardware looks waaaay better than the new Transfer posts. Those can’t be adjusted enough to get a lot of saddle models level on modern (steep seat angle) frames.

All around meh for Fox droppers these day.
All around
  • 2 2
 I got a transfer with a new bike about two and a half years ago. It worked flawlessly for this period but now it needs a service as its not working as it should and that apparently is going to cost me 100 quid. How is it that a service costs the same as 30% of the purchase price. My son has a brand x post on his bike which has worked flawlessly for 3 years, still doesnt need a service and only cost 120 quid.
  • 2 0
 Well you can try servicing the Transfer yourself, there are walk-throughs online. But it seems like a pretty serious job, and ends up making $100 seem like a decent service price.

But it would be nice if they had a simple service you could do yourself.
  • 1 0
 @bishopsmike: I just wish you could undo the collar at the top of the post so you could clean under the dust seal. That will prolong the stanchions.
  • 1 0
 Judging by the photo the collar with the dust seal can be undone. Excellent.
  • 1 3
 @iamamodel: definitely! Stupid design by Fox.
  • 3 0
 Remember when we used to see cross sections of items cut in half.... that was the birth of cool
  • 3 0
 "The seals on the Transfer SL don't have to be robust because they're only keeping out dirt."

Nuff said.
  • 4 0
 I lowkey forgot Dan Sapp even worked for PB, lol. Glad he's still around!
  • 5 0
 Thanks! Had some family priorities over the last year so I'm a little more infrequent these days but I'm around!
  • 2 0
 I have this post and was just about to send it in to fox because of the play it has in it. Seems like a lot to be by design. Anyone else have one?
  • 3 0
 I have one and a little fore aft play is normal in these posts. It has zero impact on operation.
  • 1 0
 @JoePAz: Thanks. This article was right in the nic of time, I literally had just got a ticket to send it in and was about to take it off and box it up.
  • 1 0
 I was about to do the same thing...like how much play have you got? Mine has a little rotational but plenty fore-aft, almost knocking type play. Works fine and not noticeable when riding. Might wait until the Worlds are on here (Les Gets) and see if Fox will look at it then...
  • 1 0
 Dude on the ancient, coil spring action, no remote, 100mm Gravity Dropper on his actual favorite bike (ti dropbar adventure hardtail) says “whatever.” For those not doing enduro, this seems plenty enough and pretty too.
  • 3 0
 Fox DOSS making a comeback?
  • 2 0
 Best dropper ever. Bomb proof
  • 2 1
 @honda50r: Right? Too bad some of the other comments seem to indicate SRAM/Reverb engineers got involved on this version.
  • 1 0
 I eventually did kill it/need service but BITD I was surprised how much I liked this post.
  • 1 0
 The seals on the dropper don't have to be robust?
Take a look at our new dropper post, what the robust seals have done
youtu.be/REr7c-BwO4w
  • 1 0
 Make it wireless and we can be talking Smile After going AXS and getting used to (almost) cable free cockpit there is no coming back… (weight sucks tho)
  • 2 0
 This reminds me the old ball exploder specialized posts
  • 3 0
 Balls of steel..
  • 2 0
 i get XC riding needing a dropper, but gravel... really???
  • 14 0
 Stupid gravel rider here: I ride my gravel bike on all surfaces, and it's honestly pretty fun to shred tame singletrack on a drop bar bike. A little drop (I only have 60mm) makes it even better. The added bonus is on pavement descents, the drop makes me more aero so I go faster, and on gravel descents, the drop lowers my COG so I can push corners with loose gravel a little harder.

Honestly, I shared your skepticism of a dropper on a gravel bike at first, but now that I have it, I really like it.
  • 1 0
 Absolutely. I have a gravel addict friend, a dropper post has been game changing for him. So much so that it has me considering building a drop bar bike for its versatility. He happily hangs with me on decently technical XC trails.
  • 1 0
 @Lokirides: yep, one of those, I didn't know I needed it things. I have 50mm drop on my road bike (gravel bike but I ride it on the road primarily) and one thing no one talks about is just having a quick way to adjust seat height during longer rides is really nice. 50mm drop for gravel/road descending is about perfect too. droppers on all the bikes...
  • 1 0
 @Lokirides: i get the under biking aspect of gravel bikes, i used to ride a rigid ss bike exclusively to make boring singletrack more fun. i guess people want to go even more hard core now with drop bars and skinny tires - i just never noticed anyone like that on my local trails
  • 2 0
 I recently rode a gravel bike with one. It was a ton a fun. Huge fan.
  • 2 0
 @Ososmash: definitely opens up a lot of possibilities, even with the 50mm drop.
  • 1 0
 Ding ding ding! @Lokirides:
  • 3 0
 @notoutsideceo
You seeing this blasphemy? Smile
  • 1 0
 @combfilter: All these gravel enthusiasts are my people! Thats it...more gravel content coming to PB in 2022!

If any of y'all make it to the front range, I got some wild pirate gravel roads to show you!

Be safe be well,
Incognito Robin
  • 3 1
 Does the csu creak on this also?
  • 1 0
 Down-country dropper posts it's a thing now. If you don't know now you know.
  • 2 0
 50mm travel version is for what exactly???
  • 2 0
 People like me who get zesty on road bikes and just need to get the saddle a little out of the way on descents.
  • 1 0
 Bike Yoke DIVINE SL 31.6 125 drop just 450g
max cut 70mm insert can save around 60g

:P
  • 1 1
 KS Lev Ci is miles ahead of the Transfer SL.

KS weighs them with lever & cable which no one else does.

My 175 drop 31.6mm only weighs 432 grams for instance.
  • 1 0
 My saddle would slip on my KS Ci. Despite proper torque, a dab of friction paste and switching to a metal seat clamp.
  • 5 3
 $566...
  • 5 4
 Top of the line product...
  • 2 2
 @z-man: not really
  • 1 0
 i have my thomson elite since.... 2014.
  • 3 1
 2 position is goofy
  • 1 0
 It's a post that goes up and down. Not seen that before have we?
  • 1 3
 "The seals on the Transfer SL don't have to be robust because they're only keeping out dirt and not preventing air or fluid from escaping."

Is there even another purpose to an suspension seal?
  • 1 0
 They had me at 'hardened steel balls'
  • 1 0
 Hardened steel balls, don't pretend you didn't laugh a bit.
  • 2 2
 Fox needs at least a 125mm and 150mm option.
  • 1 1
 100mm of travel? kind of pathetic
  • 1 0
 Lever picture????
  • 1 2
 Uhm isnt this the old version of the transfer anyway ?
  • 1 0
 Nope its not
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2022. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv42 0.023279
Mobile Version of Website