Powered by Outside

Review: Galfer Shark Disc Rotors

Oct 13, 2022
by Mike Kazimer  
photo

Remember Shark Bites? They were the colorful fruit snacks the cool kids brought to school in the '90s, gleefully chomping the heads off miniature hammerhead and great white sharks while those of us stuck with hot lunch poked at our mystery meat. That doesn't have anything to do with this review of Galfer's latest rotors, other than the fact that most of my shark-related memories seem to revolve around those gummy snacks...

First seen between the tape on the World Cup DH and EWS circuits, the Shark Disc rotors are made in Spain, where they're laser cut from stainless steel. The unique shape is claimed to offer a lower operating temperature and improved braking power compared to other options on the market.
Shark Disc Details

• Thickness: 2.0mm
• Material: steel
• Sizes: 180, 203, 223mm
• 6-bolt only
• Weight: 180 grams (203mm, 6-bolt)
• MSRP: $95 - $131 USD
galfer.eu/bike

The 'Shark' moniker comes from the fins that extend underneath the braking surface, where they're intended to act as heat sinks to further aid in cooling. The rotors are 2 millimeters thick, keeping in line with the trend towards thicker rotors that has been gaining momentum recently. For example, SRAM's HS2 rotors are 2 mm thick, up from the 1.85 mm thickness of their previous Centerline rotors. TRP has rotors that are 2.3mm thick in their lineup, and Magura has had 2.0 mm rotors in their catalog for decades.

The idea is that more material allows for better heat dissipation, and makes the rotors less likely to warp under high temperatures. They're also a little less likely to bend when you slip off a skinny or smack into a poorly placed rock.

Along with the increased thickness and shark fins, Galfer went all-out with the laser cutter and zapped out 324 holes and 27 larger cutouts to help with air flow and clearing dust, mud, or water from the braking surface. All those holes also help shave weight, although rotors aren't that high on my list of places I'm worried about a few extra grams. The 203mm rotor weighs in at 180 grams, 20 grams lighter than a 200 mm SRAM HS2 rotor. There's also a circular cutout near the 6 mounting holes that can be used to hold a speed sensor magnet for riders on e-bikes.


photo
Those extensions underneath the braking service are what give the Shark Disc its name.
photo
The rotors are 2 mm thick, and are available in 180, 203, and 223 mm diameters.


Performance

I tested the Shark Disc rotors on several different bikes, all with SRAM's Code RSC brakes and metallic pads. I'd already been running 2.0 mm thick HS2 rotors, so there was no need to re-set the caliper pistons to gain clearance for the Galfer rotors. That'll likely be necessary if you're bumping up from a 1.8 mm rotor, but the process shouldn't take more than a few minutes. If you're going to be replacing your pads at the same time, twisting a flat head screwdriver between the old pads should push the pistons all the way back in, or if the pads are out a plastic tire lever can be used to make sure they pistons are fully retracted.

Compared to the HS2 rotors, the Shark Discs do have a slightly grabbier initial bite (no pun intended), which will be appreciated by riders looking for a little extra 'oomph' from their brakes. Even though the width is nearly identical to the HS2, the Shark Disc's design allows it to grab on more tenaciously when the pads first contact it - it's similar to the difference in initial feel between metallic and organic brake pads.

The rotors have remained quiet and consistent on long, steep and extra dusty descents, including ones that require prolonged bouts of very heavy braking. The conditions this summer have been extremely dry, but on the few occasions I did ride try the Shark Discs in the rain they'd make a little noise until the water cleared and then remained silent after that – I never found them to be overly loud.

photo




Pros

+ Strong initial bite, consistent performance
+ Unique look
Cons

- Pricey




Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesThe biggest hurdle for riders interested in these rotors is going to be the price – at $119 USD for the 203 mm version they're twice as much as SRAM's HS2 rotors. They do look cool, so there's that, and they are slightly grabbier, but that's still a hefty price tag for a piece of steel. Price aside, they do work very well, and could be a good upgrade for riders who want something to make their bike stand out from the crowd.  Mike Kazimer





Author Info:
mikekazimer avatar

Member since Feb 1, 2009
1,762 articles

184 Comments
  • 289 6
 I stopped instantly when I saw the price.
  • 81 2
 Those Sharks sure take a huge bite out of your pocket and wallet!
  • 16 2
 had to scroll back up, missed that part...damn! yeah, that's way too much
  • 66 1
 @CSharp: how gillable do they think we are?
  • 14 2
 @bishopsmike: Magura 2mm rotors £20 UK prices. You could but a XT two pot with the change.
  • 17 0
 ''+ Strong initial bite'' ... how clever
  • 14 1
 Should be a caviar rotor at that price.
  • 6 7
 @nozes: Same as the sticker shock with Santa Cruz and all Ebikes?

Galfer rotors are great and I don't mind paying extra for Spanish-made steel. GalferUSA also usually has a hefty sale in November.
  • 26 0
 @suspended-flesh: does the sale coincide with Shark Week?
  • 2 0
 Exactly
  • 2 0
 that would not be the case with SRAM Guide brakes
  • 2 0
 @bikerdre: shark chum
  • 2 0
 @suspended-flesh: yep, living in Santa Cruz is brutal
  • 7 0
 So, uh, $340 a disc in Australia then
  • 17 0
 @SoddenDeath:

0ߤ↋$

Fixed that for you!
  • 9 0
 I’m going to make some love rotors just so people
Can stop in the name of love
  • 3 0
 @bishopsmike: have you met us?
  • 2 0
 @Chondog94: Yep - I did it myself. My rent was $150 back then, though. I've also owned 3 SC bikes but the prices for both have reached absurd levels.
  • 2 0
 Buddy, I bought them last week, tested today and I can confirm that the difference on my previous SRAM stuff is enormous. I am using them with my new HOPE Tech4 V4 brake set on heavy e-bike where the breaking on long downhill ride easy becomes an issue. Price? Yeah, it is important but much more important is to have speed under control...
  • 1 0
 @zokinjo: Why take "Breaks" on long DH's
  • 1 0
 @likeittacky: Why take brakes period Wink
  • 1 0
 @likeittacky: Hahahahaah... I didnt even think about it... hahahaha... Will try this technique today afternoon... Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @CSharp: Do you need brakes for uphill? Big Grin Big Grin Big Grin Big Grin
  • 248 2
 Quite some comments about price. Do note that these are sharks, and lasers may have been involved. Be thankful they're not... one million dollars.
  • 9 0
 At the rate inflation is going I wouldn’t be surprised if they cost $1m in a few years
  • 32 1
 but are we sure those are not ill-tempered sea bass?
  • 9 0
 It would be a better value if they at least threw in a free bag of Shhhhh with my name on it!
  • 5 11
flag likeittacky (Oct 13, 2022 at 17:49) (Below Threshold)
 Were you on the Alex Jones Jury?
  • 7 0
 Yeah baby yeah!
  • 2 0
 Oh behave!
  • 71 10
 That'll slice up some luddite roadies nicely in any kind of group crash situation.
  • 44 1
 Luddite roadies don't ride discs,you know...
  • 28 97
flag GreyJay (Oct 13, 2022 at 9:24) (Below Threshold)
 why do we consistently show disrespect to roadies and XC here?
  • 114 8
 @GreyJay: Because we can?
  • 38 6
 @GreyJay: because some people just have to go for the low hanging fruit as they can’t manage anything higher.
  • 45 0
 @GreyJay: actually I think XC gets some respect, roadies who are afraid of discs, eh…
  • 63 2
 @cypher74: When you get older, low hanging fruit is all you have left
  • 12 4
 @GreyJay: why? You a roadie?
  • 6 17
flag SATN-XC (Oct 13, 2022 at 9:56) (Below Threshold)
 @GreyJay: not offended, XC likes to party too....roadies can go home though Smile
  • 5 0
 @DizzyNinja: for reals, and they get lower every year, sigh.
  • 13 23
flag Mtn-Goat-13 FL (Oct 13, 2022 at 10:08) (Below Threshold)
 @GreyJay: I hear ya my man and yet - I simply wanna puke when I see the lycra, pinocchio shoes, robot glasses, watermelon helmets and speedo-crotches. I am trying to get help, but the (faux) hate just wells right up - can't stop it, and I wanna throw punches but I don't. I guess it just looks so alien and having tried both road & XC but feeling dopey & dorked out instead of rad it's just so much more fun to rag on it. To wit: I have lots of roadie / XC buds too and they get the full on wall of my disrepect & bile about it too, esp when they are in full tilt kit, so - no actual disrespect. It just looks stupid to many of us. Also - I don't mind being fully bashed by words on the screen here to b/c that's all it is. Have at it and shred me back. There - that's a lot more fun.
  • 9 1
 @Mtn-Goat-13: What looks dumber: a roadie in full kit, or a bro who can't ride his bike?

Most roadies (that I know) are all on discs now, except the ones who don't want to spend money on a new bike (me). But my enduro bike has 220/203 HS2 combo, which feels nice.
  • 19 36
flag thenotoriousmic (Oct 13, 2022 at 10:47) (Below Threshold)
 @GreyJay: basically roadies are all sub human scum that at a grassroots level are out clogging the highways on big group rides causing people to die because they’re stuck in the traffic and didn’t make it to hospital in time for their appointment or plunging whole families into poverty because someone got sacked for turning up to work 8 hours late for the same reason and at the highest level the cheating has got so extreme people are doing roadside blood transfusions or dying in a mass casualty event pile ups because someone in that pack of bastards hasn’t got the common decency to learn how to bunny hop a curb. It’s a joke of a sport.

XC riders are basically dirt roadies with empathy and without the constant need for attention. They go to a quiet parts of the woods to see who’s best at pedalling where they’re not bothering anyone instead of doing it on public roads. How can you hate someone for that?
  • 2 1
 @JSTootell: Technically, they're probably worse for aerodynamic drag than tucked up rim brakes, and heavier by a bit I'd assume. I haven't owned a road bike in almost 15 years and even when I did I never wore spandex, but I'd assume IF you were real serious about those kinds of things and did the whole shebang, you'd probably want to eliminate as much drag and weight as possible.
  • 6 6
 @JSTootell: Those do not equate: roadie in kit does not thus conjue a kitted bro-noob without skills. But lets just run w/ that - sure, that's dopey too so have at it my man - stab away and have some fun. Anyone here that's offended by shit-talking is on the wrong page and needs mommy. It's all just words on a screen - lay it on. IMO, the DH or MTB kit generally is fresher and can be worn in public without ridicule if you must inquire (imo). Its just fun to say crap sometimes - and I mostly don't - but too many people take words on a flashing screen too seriously (ie the Righteous Downvote Mob) w/ that indignant butt-pucker for opinions that makes the gnarliest whiteknuckle drop seem soft.

I'm also on 220/203 and gotta say...sooo much better. Tempted to even run 220/220...
  • 6 1
 @GreyJay:
"Banter:
The magnificent art of using word play, opinions, exaggeration, irony, sarcasm, and other comedic themes to (playfully) humiliate, make fun of, and laugh at your friends. This word is most commonly used in Britain, but 'Banter' is used around the world.
Joe: Your dick is so small!
Steven: Your mum didn't seem to mind it last night"
  • 3 1
 @Mac1987: and just for the bants. Nobody really hates roadies but it’s not like that’s going to stop us taking the piss.
  • 18 2
 We must laugh at them because they are incapable of doing so themselves.
  • 2 0
 @GreyJay: to clarify my comment, I meant to disparage those roadies who are luddites and unwilling to embrace any new technology.
I was not implying that all roadies are luddites.
Some of the biggest bike tech nerds I know are road bikers.
  • 4 3
 @Mtn-Goat-13: could it be that the feeling you’re experiencing after gazing at toned men in skintight kit is not actually loathing but unwelcome pangs of attraction, and the anger you feel is actually towards yourself and your repressed desires? Just spitballing here; might be way off base, but if the Pinocchio shoe fits…
BTW, this is addressed not to you specifically, but to all men who experience instant and unconscious “anger” when roadies are mentioned. Something like 10% of us feel this way according to statistics
  • 4 0
 It’ll slice your blubbery British body when you fall off your ebike too….
  • 1 0
 @GreyJay: it´s a tough love you know, like picking on your friends
  • 49 0
 Suggestion for an article: Repeat timed runs on a steep hill to test different rotors with an infrared thermometer. Be curious to know if all the fancy rotors actually do anything to improve cooling.
  • 9 0
 This is a great idea! For extra effect run the test at night for the full Le Mans style glowing brakes (only kidding)!.
  • 2 0
 No way you'd get consistent results with anything but those ridiculous Ashima ultralight things-that-shouldn't-be-called-brake-rotor. Would still be fun though.
  • 4 0
 I'd like to see thermal imaging. I have a suspicion that rotors with more arms dissipate heat toward the hub more effectively, but my only evidence for it is the specific way a Magura Storm HC (6 arms) discolors.
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: That would be cool.
  • 1 0
 @tcmtnbikr: yes! Like that, with a couple popular rotors side by side on screen.
  • 5 0
 Or make a test bench with a motor and some 3D printed parts so we can have useful results. It's like a day of work, I don't know if they can spend that much on an article.
  • 32 5
 That's basically the price of a sheet 4'x8' of 304 stainless in similar thickness, bought in the US at manufacturing volume. That's an insane markup, I recognize they probably go through some finishing after cutting but again fairly automated processes, I can't see why these cost so much more than a regular rotor....
  • 40 2
 There's always a business case to be made for marketing your product as high-end, doubling the price, and selling significantly less individual units. Top line revenue often remains the same as a more commoditized pricing approach, but profits are significantly higher as you are radically increasing your margin on less pieces manufactured, handled and shipped.

It's a worthwhile strategy for an aftermarket solutions provider - the vast majority of people will ride what comes spec'd on their bike, and replace with OEM rotors from their service shop when it's time to do so. But there is a smaller market of enthusiasts and tinkerers who like to hand-select individual components, and are willing to spend $ to achieve incremental or style gains. These rotors are definitively targeted at the latter group. Smile
  • 8 0
 I assume there's some heat treating that occurs, not to justify the price... But, yeah they probably get a 10'x20' sheet of S.S, and throw it on the laser table and then some hand finishing or some type of surface treatment/deburring when it's done. The rent is too damn high.
  • 12 1
 More holes means more working time for the laser cutter
  • 30 2
 You must be new. In this sport things are priced according to what people aged between 45 to 65 are willing to pay not how much something costs to manufacture. That’s why they sell frames made by little old Chinese ladies for next to nothing for five grand.
  • 4 0
 As @KJP1230 says - value based pricing model - charge what it's worth to the customer, not cost plus margin.
  • 1 0
 There is a reason why markup is so high on so many cars at dealerships: people are paying.

Supply and demand; if people are willing to pay, then companies are stupid not to charge.
  • 6 0
 I'm 45, and I have a lot of disc brake bikes.

I buy my rotors from Shimano directly through EP.

I fell like more than $25 is too much for a bike rotor. I just bought new front pads and rotors for my wife's Hyundai, OEM quality, It was $160 from Rock Auto.

Totally unrelated, and apples to oranges, but those rotors are, cast, heat/cyro treated, machined and coated.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: yep and this 58 year old knows when someone is yanking the chain on pricing - the adage of if it looks like it is - well these look a little to riddled with holes - I’ve cracked discs on my motorbikes and the the extra air in the holes is added back on the fins………..in metal
  • 1 0
 I had the Hope rotors with lightning bolt laser cuts - who remembers those?
  • 25 1
 $120 for a single rotor?

Drilling holes must be expensive!

PB conclusion: "for riders looking to have their bike stand out from the crowd" .. while sitting still Wink
  • 16 0
 Not even drilling holes. Laser cut. I used to work as a project manager for a local production facility, and laser cutting was one of our most affordable options.

I won’t throw numbers out because without having facts on hand that would just be a dick move, but their profit margins must be alright on these…
  • 2 0
 the logical answer would be this is an economies of scale thing and the 2 big S companies produce and sell many more rotors.
  • 3 0
 @aks2017: I know that at my working, working with carbon fiber, they have been trying to go from grit blasting holes to drilling holes to laser cutting holes. So my anecdotal evidence is lasers are cheaper.
  • 2 0
 @aks2017: I'm pretty much sure that you can't get this finish with laser. They are cutting with water most probably
  • 3 0
 @pakleni: in the 5th paragraph of the article it states that they are laser cutting. Finish does look excellent.

Waterjet would definitely be slower… especially with those holes lol.
  • 14 0
 @aks2017: As someone who also has worked as a project manager for multiple manufacturing facilities I have some thoughts... You are absolutely correct if they are able to purchase pre-ground sheet, laser them out, and be done with it. Where my mind goes is warpage during the laser cutting process since rotors need precision thickness but they also need to be really flat. This may mean that they purchase stock that thicker than 2.0mm and then grind it down after cutting. Laser cutting is definitely cheap but surface grinding isn't when done individually like that. That in combination with the economy of scale argument, this makes the pricing look more justifiable in my mind. That said, I ain't paying $120 for a rotor lol.
  • 6 0
 @millsr4: 100 percent. I had a project in 1/8” 5052 (obviously comparing apples and oranges) and it had maybe 80-100? 1/4” holes laser cut in a plate roughly 16”x16”, and fighting warping was a challenge.

I could definitely see the cut/grind process as you mention.
  • 2 0
 @aks2017: I bet they laser them then run them through a Timesavers type belt sander/deburr station. www.maverickabrasives.com/blogs/sandpaper-guides/finishing-metal-using-a-timesaver-sander
  • 6 0
 @jonemyers: they double disc grind after laser according to their website. This is a much more precise process than a timesaver.
  • 1 0
 80 Euros here on the old continent, still expensive. And that's including the sales tax. The Galfer USA sales organization has something to think about.
  • 1 1
 Not even drilling. They are laser cut, fast.
  • 2 0
 @skivt27: Galfer is huge in the moto brake world.
  • 12 0
 Technically, the extra thickness isn't for better heat dissipation, but for greater thermal mass. The rotor will be able to absorb more heat energy. Any given braking event will heat the rotor less. However, it will also cool more slowly from a given temperature, again because of the greater thermal mass, greater heat energy at a given temperature. The increased surface area from the extra thickness is minimal.
  • 2 0
 So they're adding thermal mass with thicker rotors, and also drilling a heap of holes to reduce mass to "shave weight"?
  • 2 0
 I came to say the same thing.
Increasing thickness increases thermal mass but only marginally increases heat dissipation. Heat dissipation is mostly tied to surface area (that's what the fins on Shimano brake pads are for). Thicker rotors don't increase the surface area much, so heat dissipation is essentially the same.
  • 13 2
 I run Galfer Wave rotors on a lot of mycustomer bikes and my own. I like them a lot for their performance/looks/fair price. However, one thing that would be nice to know is if these new rotors have less slop/wiggle wiggle in the bolt spacing, but it looks like this test used CL anyways.... With the Wave Rotors if they aren't centered exactly when you tighten the bolts down i've seen them hit the caliper and had to readjust (center) the rotor.
  • 11 0
 Interesting - I used these with 6 bolt hubs as well and didn't run into that issue.
  • 2 1
 @mikekazimer: They must have tighten up the tolerances on these. Thanks for the insight and reply
  • 5 4
 I had this same problem with Galfer waves and also was very unimpressed with the power. I scooped up a 220 when it first came available as found it had no more power than a 200 or 203. The majority of the brake track was holes! Newsflash, a hole provides no friction. A Centerline or HS2 provides more stopping power than equivalent sized Wave rotor. I could care less abut 20g weight savings on my brake rotor.
  • 9 3
 @tcmtnbikr: *couldn't.
  • 8 0
 @efalk1181: A trick if it happens in the future is to hold the rotor twisted clockwise or counterclockwise around center while tightening. This should center it.
  • 1 6
flag efalk1181 (Oct 13, 2022 at 11:25) (Below Threshold)
 @kcy4130: that actually does the opposite and will cause it to be further from true center of the hub, each hole is cut too large giving in that clunk back and forth along with top to bottom of the bolt hole. Therefore to try and be true center to the hub/brake bolt holes you need to try and have equal distance front and back along with top/bottom.
  • 1 0
 @efalk1181 Quick question; Shimano vs 2.0 thick rotors?
  • 2 0
 @pakleni: take it you are asking about Shimano ICE series rotors (other wise their is no comparison with their steel version for heat dissipation Vs 2.0 thick steel)

As for Shimano ICE rotor vs a 2.0 steel cut rotor here are my thoughts and experience with a lot of racing/testing/experiment with various rotors (assuming all else is the same). Also worth noting im 6'1 weight 210-220 lbs with all my gear on. So I generate a lot of heat when using the brakes.

The Shimano ICE rotors which are really cool and unique that they use alloy in the middle of steel are machined very well with tight tolerances/specs and feel more solid then even a thicker (2.0) steel 1 piece rotor. If you mount each rotor to hub and press on the side and you will see what I mean. I attest this to their thick alloy spider that has strong solid rivets (not floating)! As for heat dissipation a 2.0 is about the same as the Shimano ICE with possibly a slight advantage to the shimano. The Shimano does have more surface area then the Galfer which might make it more impressive when you factor that in. I haven't done much testing with the new Sram HS2 rotors which I hope to soon and have some in stock to try. I just wish Shimano made a 223 rotor
  • 6 0
 @efalk1181: It will center it unless the bcd center doesn't match rotor center or if the bolt holes are out of round. Push the top of the rotor to the left and the bottom right and the bcd center will be centered on the hub. It'll be clocked a bit off, the bolt holes will be at their limit in a cw rotation, but that doesn't really matter. A diagram would make it a lot easier to visualize.
  • 1 0
 @efalk1181: have you noticed Galfer rotors wearing faster than typical? I have nearly worn a rotor out of spec with 1 set of Galfer pads.
  • 3 1
 @tcmtnbikr: Using Galfer 220mm wave rotor here, upgraded from their 200mm wave rotor and did notice a significant increase in power, much needed as these are on a 50lb ebike riding fall line trails. No issue with centering with any of the multiple 6 bolt Galfer wave rotors I've tried either. YMMV
  • 3 0
 @kcy4130: yep. Clockwise preloads the disc in the direction of tension , so thats a good thing.
  • 14 2
 tldr;

'Yep, they're steel brake rotors, and work just like steel brake rotors. Oh, and they're extra expensive for 'reasons'.'
  • 7 1
 Agree. Rotors just need to be 1) clean, 2) true, and 3) not have their surfaces mangled from running pads all the way to the metal backing. Beyond that, the difference between rotors is almost entirely marketing budget.
  • 1 0
 @airdonut41: There is an argument to be made for thicker rotors which are less easily bent and might deal a bit better with lots of heat.

There are also combinations of brake/pad/fork/frame/rotor which tend to warble and stick-slip. Changing to a different rotor can help in that case. Doesn't need to be expensive, though.
  • 13 0
 You're gonna need a bigger wallet....
  • 10 0
 Shark bites, awesome snack
  • 8 0
 Yeah that's gonna be a no from me dawg
  • 4 0
 These look really cool, but for this kind of price, I would expect a floating rotor on an aluminum carrier. I think my Magura floating rotor was about $70 for a 203 mm. I love supporting small manufacturers like Galfer, but that price is hard to stomach, similar to a license plate.
  • 6 0
 I was hoping for a new spin on this, but the lack of testing brakes my heart. Think I'll stick with my Storm HC rotors.
  • 2 1
 Next time you need new rotors I’d recommend the SRAM HS2. They offer more power than Magura rotors and are the same width so you can mix and match them.
  • 2 0
 FWIW, I went from Storm HC rotors to the Magura MDR-C rotors and found they were better than the Storms. Heavier, but seemed to be more resistent to warping and deal with heat better. Price wise they're not too bad either, really.
  • 4 1
 Good and short review!
But as with many part reviews, as some have said before, could you have a heavy guy testing them?

If the aim of this rotor is to provide extra heat dissipation, the real benefit is for riders and uses (read : ebikes or tandems) that are already so extreme that conventional 200 or 220 discs are not enough.

In other words, what I'd like to know is if this disc is an answer to those issues?
  • 4 2
 Probably still a better value than SRAM's HS2 rotors... out of the six that I've had, four had so much thickness variation that they were borderline unrideable.

Side note: of all of the standards that people complain about, why are 203mm and 223mm rotors still a thing? It more than doubles the number of possible brake mounts or spacers that you might need.
  • 1 0
 How much variety?
  • 1 0
 yea because Shimano. It's really a pain to find 1.5 mm spacers for 200 mm direct mount forks. Those manufacturers (or at least Sram) should make them easily available.
  • 7 0
 @jzPV: Personally, I think every 203mm or 223mm rotor should come with the washers so you can use standard brake mount adapters.

Also, it's not just forks; there are 200mm post mount frames as well.

I just appreciate the fact that certain component manufacturers think that rotor sizes should go: 160mm, 180mm, 8in, 8in + 20mm, ...
  • 1 0
 Seconded, 2 of the 3 HS2 rotors I have had lock up on one spot of the rotor every revolution. Creeping down rocks is a major roll of the dice like that. I’ll give it to them they do have quite a bit of grab when they bite though
  • 6 0
 Hmm interesting. I got some 220mm HS2 rotors and they've been amazing, no problems
  • 2 0
 I have these, wouldn't buy anything else. They still far cooler on longer descents. Same descents my mates SRam rotors struggle and flex. Brakes stay extremely consistent all day in the Alps in hot weather. Also, they appear to wear much less than any other rotor I have tried. I expect them to last a lot longer than other rotors. So price becomes less of an issue, and benefits become even more a positive.
  • 2 0
 This is a great review. I'd like to see more reviews like this. Relatively inexpensive tuning like rotors, pads, tire compound, tire inserts, can really take a bike to the next level and are deficiencies on most complete bikes at all price points.

Can you please compare a 220/223mm steel rotor against a 203mm ice tech rotor? I'm curious what's the better option as Shimano doesn't make a 223mm ice tech yet.
  • 2 0
 That's an incomplete review of a rotor which promises better heat dissipation. Does it deliver on that promise? Do you get more consistent braking on long descents? Initial bite aside, do these deliver any more stopping power?
  • 4 0
 I remember eating Shark Bites while playing with my Street Shark toy while watching Street Sharks cartoons… the 90s were weird.
  • 1 0
 After playing on your game shark...
  • 5 0
 My Jaws dropped to the floor upon seeing that product
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer
In the highlighted "Details" box it states they're made for 6-bolt only yet the photo shows a combination of 6-bolt plus a centrelock ring. I have wheelsets which use one or the other and have never seen both on one hub. What's going on with the hub/rotor in the photo having what appears to be a double mounting system? Thanks.
  • 4 0
 It looks like an adapter so a 6 bolt rotor can be used on a centerlock hub.
  • 1 1
 centerlock adaptor to make 6 bolt compatible. I feel like they should have the rotor weight, then weight with adaptor for centerlock rotors.
  • 3 0
 Yep, what they said. I'm currently testing a set of wheels that are centerlock only, so I had to use an adaptor to use these rotors.
  • 2 1
 The issue for me isn't the cost-Galfer is a bit of a boutique brand. My beef is with SRAM, who COULD make rotors that don't do the turkey gobble but choose not to. Like Reverb posts (still suck) their rotors are inferior. SRAM knows it, but even when they redesigned their rotors, they just have *less* turkey gobble noise.

I guess if you have the cash, these would pair nicely with a set of CODE RSCs.......
  • 3 1
 Oh great, another way I can hurt myself. The shark fins, or whatever they are, remind me of those really pointy caps some big rig drivers and rednecks put on their lug nuts to look intimidating, but come off as compensatory.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer with changing our brake parts on your bike and trying to compare between 2 different sets, what is your bed in procedure? Do you torch your rotors and pads everytime you change or do you just hope for the best by sanding the pads and rotors and cleaning with ISO?
  • 1 0
 You can bed rotors in fairly quickly by pouring clean, cold water over the rotors and caliper and riding around on flat ground pulsing the brakes on and off. As the rotors/pads dry up, add some more water. If you repeat this a few times you'll feel the braking performance gradually increase, and after a few cycles like that you'll generally find that the braking surface of the rotor will be getting more towards the mirror finish you get when they're fully bedded in vs. the dull/even finish of a new rotor. This also helps the pads and rotors bed into each other properly, getting more performance out of them faster (compared to doing random stuff to just prep the rotor or pad surface).

By doing it on flat ground you avoid building up too much heat and potentially glazing your pads.
  • 1 0
 I have these galfer rotors and I find them horrendously loud. Not necessarily from long braking episodes, moreso the spiders (or whatever you call them) are very flexy side to side. Any flex in my wheel or sudden impact sends the rotors side to side with a loud "PING!" impact against my metallic brake pads. I can make it do that by flicking my finger against the rotor with not that much force. I put them on a new bike and couldn't figure out what the sound was doe a while. When these wear out, I'm going back to Shimano. Very distracting.
  • 1 0
 If rotors weren't a wearable item they would perhaps be worth cost...bit considering they will eventually need to be replaced and a Magura Storm rotor offers excellent bite and heat management for 20 quid there is just no point in these rotors except for the rich
  • 1 0
 I have some intend/brakestuff rotors. they also have these small holes all over. they are super expensive but they last forever. Had 300k vertical meters on my last pair before they got stolen with the bike. the were still good for a long time.
my current are on about 150k m and look barely used.
  • 1 0
 Closed holes in a rotor do NOT clear dirt, debris and water. They trap it, decreasing performance and increasing pad and rotor wear. The original Galfer mtb wave rotors from 20-ish years ago did clear debris from the pads and caliper while also drawing air through the caliper for cooling. Still THE best I have used, in wet or dry conditions
  • 1 0
 Sram metallic pads are the worst pads ever made in the face of the earth hehehe. I love how they work in other peoples brakes,but I never managed to get 1 pair to work for me in my Code brakes. They only made turkey noise but no braking power.
  • 1 0
 Why are these so expensive? Is it because of the Shark Fin feature? I don't see it as worthwhile. Stainless has low thermal conductivity meaning it doesn't transfer heat that fast. Using it as a heat sink is not really that efficient. At least not that efficient to warrant such a high cost. Aluminum has much higher thermal conductivity (and lighter), hence the two piece rotor designs that are often used in MTB and motorsports. Why not take half those holes and slots out, regain some heat capacity, and sell a reasonable priced rotor? This is quite a gimmick IMO.
  • 6 2
 Will they make a resin only version? That's what everyone wants, right?
  • 4 3
 This is sarcasm, in case it wasn't clear.
  • 4 0
 But will it slice carrots and celery?
  • 4 0
 Galfer wave 1 pc. 2.0 mm ebike rotors are half the price and amazing.
  • 1 0
 so in a somewhat related story....an overly machined sram HS2 brake rotor cut off 1" of my left index finger back in august. Thankfully they were able to reattach it. Watch out those things are dangerous.
  • 1 0
 One time I took a bike off the bike rack and my finger got jammed up in the rotor. I don’t think I’ve ever screamed so hard. It’s possible I would have actually passed out if I had this rotor installed
  • 3 1
 Paying a little extra for a product that is NOT made in China isn't necessarily a bad thing. Is anyone still making disc rotors in North America?
  • 1 0
 Pinkbike, when they send you this stuff and you see the stupid prices, please photocopy your arse and send it to them with the unused product and say Grow Up…

Let’s make Mtb’ing affordable again!
  • 2 0
 BMX Background here: my shins still show the scars of using Sharbites. Odyssey Sharkbite pedals that is.
  • 3 0
 Its not bio-mimicry. Sharks dont use their fins for heat dissipation.
  • 2 3
 I'd think the main advantage would be you could run a smaller rotor and not get fade due to heat. At that price point though you could go two-piece with aluminum to dissipate the heat
  • 2 0
 missed opportunity to bend the fins for better cooling.
  • 2 2
 Bending them so close to the pad tracks might risk fouling some mounts or frames, and the bend might continue into the braking track & there would only a tiny bit left to bend if that was taken into account. The size of the fins make it look like they'll have negligibly useful extra heat transfer. The normal disc 'spokes' will probably conduct more heat, creating slightly thicker or more spokes would probably transfer more heat away.
  • 1 1
 @pipm1: conduct vs transfer. the fins aren't conducting. they are transferring heat from the metal to the air. angling would increase this because more air would move across metal because more air movement across surface area.

shimano does something similar with their aluminum freeza rotors. any pitch would make a difference for not much more manu. money. can be done w a press
  • 1 0
 Sorry, I meant the conduction from the pad track to the metal, i wasn't meaning from the metal to the air. Whether this is the right term or not I can't remember anyway. It isn't much metal so won't achieve anything, I'd imagine the 'slice' in the track would have a greater impact on the feel/bite of the braking than the shark fins - they look like they've just been added to added a bit of structure to the wider than usual 'slice' so that it doesn't break there.
  • 1 0
 I did clean my rotors with acetone, bought new shimano Pads and they work like super new again .
  • 1 0
 So unless you’re willing to spend £120 on rotors sram and magura still make the best rotors?
  • 3 1
 Off topic but... is there an update on Alicia?
  • 4 0
 Update on Alicia:10/12/22
Alicia’s progress may not be fast but she pushes herself every day in therapy. She continues to work on different cognitive functions and low intensity activities.
  • 2 0
 The cost of these rotors has really jumped the shark.
  • 3 0
 Biogimmickry
  • 1 0
 Even some dentists might have something to say about the price of those rotors
  • 1 0
 I bought the some Hope 220 front n rear. They're 2.3mm thick which makes them "harder than a coffin nail"
  • 1 0
 So… keep your regular rotors and buy better pads for less than 1/3 the price of these rotors.
  • 1 0
 I remember oddesey shark bite pedals. I still have the scars on my shins to prove it
  • 1 0
 ok paired with their pads, they are incredible. just saying, stoppies for days.
  • 1 0
 Wheres the 2.3mm option? Looking for alternatives for the trp rotors
  • 1 0
 Do those 2.3mm fit in all brakes or only some ?
  • 1 0
 @Uuno: they fit all brakes but they work best with the TRP's because their calipers are manufactured with longer pistons and more oil so you get a wider range of rotor thickness and heat adaptation. If you use them in other brakes you just have to reset the pistons in the caliper housing and if you have new pads you'll get a bit of rotor rub. But once they are burned in, the 2.3 mm rotors from TRP are bullet proof
  • 1 0
 Why? What's wrong with the trp 2.3mm rotors? Asking as I ordered a pair today. Hope are the only others I'm aware of in 2.3mm.
  • 1 0
 So what would be the better upgrade? Fancy rotors or fancy pads?
  • 1 0
 "GONNA NEED A BIGGER WALLET!"
  • 1 0
 Why bother - I can piss away my MTB $$$ in a multitude of other items.
  • 2 1
 The Galfer rotors that are mostly cut out on the braking surface are shit
  • 1 0
 They must stop without brake-pads, cause I won´t be able to buy pads!
  • 1 0
 Closed holes are also the main cause of “turkey gobble”.
  • 2 2
 In related news.. Outside is now selling NTFs
  • 6 0
 also known as NFTs
  • 2 0
 Where can I get NFT/NTF/TTFNs of Tigger for Piglet please?
  • 3 0
 @pipm1: I've got one available for 740,000 if you act fast.. I hope all NFTs die in a frigid Crypto Winter.
  • 1 0
 Stopped to read this.
  • 1 3
 Those are some ugly a$$ rotors!
Below threshold threads are hidden







Copyright © 2000 - 2024. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.058377
Mobile Version of Website