Review: Guerrilla Gravity Smash

Jun 25, 2018
by Mike Levy  
And now for something a bit different than the carbon machines that get most of our attention and often cost twice as much. Guerrilla Gravity is a relatively small outfit that calls Denver, Colorado, home, and that's also where their aluminum frames are manufactured. There's no carbon in their catalog - only aluminum and steel - and they're unabashedly proud of their US-made way of doing business, an approach that recently birthed the Smash, a 140mm-travel 29er that's designed to go all the places and through all the things.

''The Smash was designed with versatility in mind,'' says their website, and the bike's all-around-ness is boosted by two suspension modes, room for a bottle in the frame, and compatibility with either an air or coil-sprung shock that buyers can choose when they order the bike directly off Guerrilla Gravity's website.
Guerrilla Gravity Smash

Intended use: trail / enduro
Travel: 140mm
Fork travel: 140mm
Wheel size: 29''
Frame construction: aluminum, US-made
Head angle: 66°
Reach: 465mm (med, tested)
Two suspension modes: 'Crush' or 'Plush'
Sizes: S, M (tested), L, XL
Weight: 30.1lb / 13.7 kg
Price: $3,995 USD (as tested)
Frame only w/ shock: $1,995 - $2,965 USD (depending on shock)
More info: www.ridegg.com

You can pick up a complete, US-made Smash for $2,995, $3,995, or $4,995 USD depending on the built kit you choose, and their online configurator even lets you pick from a bunch of different frame and decal colors. It also lets you mix and match components as required, or even assemble a mostly custom build from a bare frame. My test Smash was put together with a slightly modified 'Ride 1' kit that added up to $3,995 USD and 30.1lb.

bigquotesThe Smash belongs on your shortlist if you don't give a toss about carbon but maybe give a toss about US-made goods, and if you're looking for a big-wheeled rig that's more versatile than single-minded. Mike Levy






Guerrilla Gravity
Guerrilla Gravity is a relatively small operation compared to some of the more well-known brands.
Mike Kazimer photo

Construction and Features

It's no surprise to see that the 140mm-travel Smash sports some pretty similar lines to Guerrilla Gravity's longer-legged, smaller-wheeled Megatrail - it's essentially a 29'' wheeled version of that bike, and as such, it has many of the same features, including the swoopy looking lines. The bike's toptube curves upwards as it makes its way back from the full-length 1.5'' headtube, and while my crotch says ''Please, no,'' it's shaped that way to make room for a water bottle that sits ahead of the shock mount.

Guerrilla Gravity Smash review
Guerrilla Gravity Smash review
The theme is 'straightforward,' with external routing, a threaded bottom bracket shell, and no (admittedly clever) trapdoor downtubes or keyed headsets to prevent forks from turning too far.


There's also a set of ISCG 05 chain guide tabs, as there should be, and a threaded bottom bracket, too. Riders who like big meat can fit a 29'' x 2.5'' wide tire in the back of the Smash, so while it's not quite plus-sized compatible, there's plenty of real estate for proper tires.

Cable routing is mostly external for the same reason that the bottom bracket shell has threads in it - ease of use - but you can run an internally routed dropper post thanks to a port near the bottom of the seattube.


Guerrilla Gravity Smash review
If you prefer protection, the Smash is ready for a bash guard or full-sized chain guide.


Pretty straightforward stuff all around, which also kinda sums up Guerrilla Gravity as a whole. They do include one bit of strap-on cleverness, though: There's a slotted piece just below the rocker link pivot that you can slide a strap through to carry a spare tube, some levers, or some S'mores Pop-Tarts if that's how you roll. Guerrilla Gravity calls this ''Necessities Under the Saddle,'' or 'NUTS' for short.

bigquotesSometimes people get hung up on frame materials and can't see the forest for the trees. Our advice is to evaluate the bikes based on ride qualities. Will Montague, Guerrilla Gravity President

Guerrilla Gravity Smash review
Guerrilla Gravity Smash review
What started years ago with riders using ski straps to attach tools and spares to their bike has become part of the Smash's frame design.




Geometry & Sizing

If you were comparing travel with geometry, the Smash's numbers look pretty aggressive for its 140mm, but we're probably at the point now where those two things aren't as intertwined as they once were. The Smash's 465mm reach number for a medium-sized frame is lengthy - the large Rallon I was on recently is 455mm - but we're also now in a time when you can't make a sweeping statement like, ''I ride a medium,'' because, well, what the hell is a medium in 2018? For Guerrilla Gravity, it's quite roomy, so look at the numbers before you pull the trigger; they recommend you be somewhere in the neighborhood of 5'8" to 6'0" for their medium-sized Smash.

The bike's head angle sits at 66-degrees with a 140mm-travel fork, but it's said to play nice with up to 160mm if you're looking for more cushion up front. Don't forget that for every 10mm of travel of add, you'll be backing the head angle off by around 0.4° as well.

Steep seattube angles are key when you're looking at a long reach and relaxed front-end, so it's good to see the Smash's sitting at 75.8°. Other numbers include a 1,245mm wheelbase and a 429mm rear-end, the latter being the same across their sizing range.
GG Smasher geometry




Guerrilla Gravity Smash review
Guerrilla Gravity uses a Horst Link layout for the Smash's 140mm of travel.


Suspension Design

With a Horst Link layout controlling the bike's 140mm of travel, there's not much to get wound up about when it comes to the back of the Smash. Again, that kinda sums up a lot about Guerrilla Gravity, though, as the vibe is far more 'Just ride the damn bike,' than the 'Look at this cool thing we're doing that's better than that other thing.'

The main pivot is located a hair above the stock chainring, and the shock is driven by the seatstays rather than the anodized black linkage that adds rigidity to the back end. There are two suspension settings, too, with a flip-chip at the aft shock mount that lets the rider choose between 'Crush' and 'Plush' modes without noticeably tweaking the bike's geometry.

So, while staying at 140mm, the idea between the two settings is to let the bike be dialed-in for the style of rider that will be on it: ''Crush Mode has a more supportive mid-stroke for flow trails and all day trail rides, while Plush Mode is softest off the top, making it the go-to for plowing into rocks at mach-chicken,'' they explain.
Guerrilla Gravity Smash review
The two suspension modes let riders choose between a more forgiving feel or a more supportive, poppier ride.

Guerrilla Gravity says that coil-sprung shocks took precedence when they were penning the Smash's rear-end, but also that an air-sprung damper will work well for a lighter duty trail bike setup. That's the route I took when I spec'd my test bike on their website, with a RockShox Super Deluxe RC3 bolted onto the bike. I know that coils are cool and offer their own advantages, but the near infinite adjustability and, to a far lesser extent, the weight savings of an air spring, will almost always win me over when it comes to this travel bracket.


Specifications

Specifications
Release Date 2018
Price $3995
Travel 140
Rear Shock RockShox Super Deluxe RC3
Fork RockShox Pike RC w/ 140 mm Travel
Headset FSA DX Pro
Cassette e13 TRS Plus 9-46t
Crankarms Race Face Aeffect
Rear Derailleur SRAM GX
Chain SRAM GX
Shifter Pods SRAM GX
Handlebar Race Face Turbine
Stem Race Face Aeffect R
Grips SDG Slater Lock-On
Brakes SRAM Code R 180/200mm
Wheelset DT Swiss M 1900 i30
Tires Maxxis 2.3 DHF & DHR II 3C/EXO/TR
Seat GG Custom SDG Fly Mtn
Seatpost KS LEV Integra



Guerrilla Gravity Smash review










Test Bike Setup

This is the second bike in a row I've had in that was born from an online configurator. The first was the decidedly more Gucci-sped Orbea Rallon, but I took the opposite tactic with the Smash by looking at what doesn't matter and trying to keep the price tag somewhat reasonable. Yes, $3,995 USD is still a buttload of dollars, but it's half the cost of many other bikes I spend my time on. Hopefully it's not half the bike, though.

Guerrilla Gravity's configurator lets you choose eight different colors that run from the no extra charge of my test bike's raw finish, to a few options that add another $295 USD to the bill. There are four decal colors to pick from, too, so that gives you thirty-two different combos. You can also pick a Push ElevenSix shock for an extra $795 USD if you want a US-made damper to match you US-made frame, and there are other options to upgrade or downgrade throughout the spec. This lets riders go big where they need or want to - say, Zee brakes if your type of ''in shape'' is round, or a 150 to 160mm fork if your trails call for it - so you can make your money count where it needs to.

n a
Mike Levy
Location: Squamish, BC, Canada
Age: 37
Height: 5'10
Inseam: 33.5"
Weight: 168lbs
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @killed_by_death

Climbing

140mm of travel isn't quite enduro territory, where it's largely deemed to be just fine if a bike climbs like a slug up a salt-covered pole, but it's also more millimeters than most properly sporty trail bikes. The Smash sits in a bit of an ambiguous, non-category category, but one thing's for sure: It's a surprisingly great climber in most situations. Maybe it's the raw aluminum finish that, at least to me, has more of an air of ''Let's session jumps all day,'' rather than ''Let's do that huge climb today!'' but I just didn't expect much from the Smash on the ascents.

Maybe I'm just a pessimist? Either way, the Smash defied my expectations.


Guerrilla Gravity Smash review
Efficiency and traction are key to climbing success, and the Smash has plenty of both.


Starting at 30-percent sag showed that the RockShox shock's cheater switch wouldn't be called on too often. The go-mode is firm enough to feel like it's making a difference when you need to believe that it really is helping you, those times when you're completely blown, near bonked, and just need to cover some ground before you die in the forest completely alone. We've all been there. But I pretty much never touched switch unless I thought I might die, so yeah, the Smash is efficient. Increasing the sag by an extra 5-percent is an option for that same reason, too, which can help with both traction and comfort if your climbs are rooty, rough and/or full of ledges and steps.

And on those ledge-filled, low-traction kinda climbs, the Smash usually managed to find some traction regardless. The meaty tires on wide rims with not many psi inside them is obviously a factor here, and the package just kept devouring tricky climb after tricky climb. It's not a massive bike compared to some of today's examples, and the 66-degree head angle is a safe, not too slack but and too steep number, but the Smash still has a big feel to it on tight switchbacks. Set up wide and turn in to get the most out of those cramped corners and plan ahead like you should be doing anyway. But also plan even a bit farther ahead. That killer traction, along with the steep set angle, is what gives the Smash a passing grade on properly technical pitches that often require a handful of tries before either giving up on it or getting up it.
Guerrilla Gravity Smash review
It's a quick enough bike that a few PRs were smashed while on it (sorry), but tight corners require patience.

The Smash doesn't just climb as well as a 30.1lb, 140mm-travel bike needs to; it's actually an above par performer.


Descending

Big wheels and a bit less travel might be the new all-mountain recipe but, as I said above, it's also that middle ground that doesn't really slot into any specific category. And that probably doesn't matter, besides underlining how "cycling journalists" always feel the need to classify bikes, including myself. But much like how Netflix has made documentaries relevant and cool, it's bikes like the Smash that are going to make not too long-travel but not too short-travel setups relevant and cool, largely because many riders will be better served with the Smash's well-sorted 140mm than they might be with an extra 20mm tacked on.

The Smash could be the 'Making a Murderer' of our dirty world, but with fun and singletrack replacing the murdering and body disposal.


Guerrilla Gravity Smash review
The Smash proved to be just as quick over rough ground as bikes with 20mm more cushioning, but it's more tiring to ride at that pace than an enduro bike.


The Smash is able to go head-to-head with of a lot of 160mm-travel bikes, with timed laps proving that it's just as quick on most descents as anything with more travel and slacker angles. If I'm honest, I'm not a big believer in timed comparisons as there are just so many variables, and us humans want to just look at the result and use that to decide if something is better or worse. Regardless, it's something that the Smash can more than hold its own, and some of the times were put down on seriously steep, difficult trails. It just tells me that Guerrilla Gravity has wrung every bit out of the bike's suspension, and backed it up with great handling.

If there was a bike that deserved to be 'over forked,' it's probably the Smash - because the back of the bike isn't about to slow anyone down, the front-end can see a lot of pressure. If you're considering a Smash, also consider jumping up in fork travel when you're configuring your bike on Guerrilla Gravity's website - a 150mm-travel MRP Ribbon only requires an extra $50 USD.


Guerrilla Gravity Smash review
This is a jack of all trades kinda bike that can be ridden harder than its travel and geometry might have you assume.


The ride isn't as forgiving as a 160mm bike, of course, so while the Smash can be ridden just as quickly as anything else with a bit more travel, it's going to take a bit more out of you over the long-run. But the bike's Horst Link system literally gives me nothing to moan about; it's relatively supple off the top, offers more than enough support, and there's plenty of ramp-up to keep the shock from clanging off the end of its stoke. And it's efficient to boot, which definitely adds to the Smash's ability to really cover ground on descents that are closer to being level than pointing straight down.

I'd describe the handling as being middle of the road, without the low-speed clumsiness that can sometimes come from combining longer numbers with tight trails and tight corners, but also being happy at speeds that would make a trail bike feel nervous. That said, it's not a purebred corner carver, although running 35-percent sag sure as hell helps that cause. Instead, the steering has a bit more of an on-point way about it that's just the ticket for a rider who likes technical trails that call for skill over the balls it takes to try and 'bar drag through a banked corner.


Guerrilla Gravity Smash review
The more forgiving Plush suspension setting was the go-to for most of the test.


And while it can be ridden as quickly as a true enduro rig in a lot of settings, there are times when the slightly quicker handling will remind you that no, you're not on an EWS-focused machine. It also takes more out of your body on really rough, steep stuff, but that's to be expected as it's not all that fair to rate it directly against slacker, 160mm-travel bikes. Besides, the Smash would win as soon as we started talking about what type of bike is more fun.

The Smash's two suspension modes, referred to as 'Plush' and 'Crush,' are interesting in that there's essentially no change to the Smash's geometry between the two, which isn't usually how it's done. Not being a fan of adjustable geometry, and far preferring to get used to how a bike handles and learning how to get the most out of it, I like how Guerrilla Gravity has essentially isolated the change in suspension action.

There's a noticeable difference between the two modes, with 'Crush' offering the more supportive, firmer feel as advertised. It's best suited to berm-infested trails, or the type of terrain where pumping can trump pedaling. It delivers more 'pop' for the same reason - there's more mid-stroke support to push against. It's also not as supple on the small, high-frequency stuff, so it's not a stretch to assume that more traction will come from the 'Plush' mode, along with more forgiveness.

It's not like the softer of the two settings steals the bike's playfulness, either, and it's a sporty feeling ride to begin with, so the very large majority of the time on the Smash was spent in the 'Plush' setting.
Guerrilla Gravity Smash review





Technical Report

BikeYoke Revive Dropper Post: It's taken years, but I'm finally done assuming that every dropper post I'm using is mere seconds away from failing in one way or another. Pretty much every brand has gotten their shit together on the reliability front, and relative newcomer BikeYoke seems to have nailed it right out of the gate. RC came away impressed when he reviewed the Revive awhile ago, and I can say the same about the one on the Smash.


Guerrilla Gravity Smash review
Guerrilla Gravity Smash review
The Revive dropper and mixed drivetrain were flawless.


SRAM / Race Face / e13 Drivetrain: The Smash's mixed drivetrain will likely give some riders pause, but it performed perfectly throughout the test. The three-pronged approach includes SRAM's GX gear for the derailleur, shifter, and chain, while the Aeffect crankarms are from Race Face and the 9-46 spread cassette is from e13. In fact, the hybrid GX-based drivetrain clicked through the gears just as well as anything on an $8,000 USD bike would.



Pros

+ Great pedalling performance
+ Versatile, adaptable rear suspension
+ Comfy during all-day epics
Cons

- Happy on rowdy terrain, but not quite as surefooted as a slacker, more forgiving bike
- Ummmm....
- Nope, that's all.


Is this the bike for you?

There's nothing wrong with wanting a high-zoot carbon fiber machine, and I don't feel the slightest bit of shame for lusting after the latest fantastic plastic wünder-bike. But there sure is something about a well-thought-out aluminum bike - and especially one with a raw finish - that gets me just as excited in a different way. Am I the only one that can hear the Smash saying, ''Sure, dude, do whatever you want. I don't have a care in the world,'' or is it just me? Maybe it's just me.

Anyway, the Smash belongs on your shortlist if you don't give a toss about carbon but maybe give a toss about US-made goods, and if you're looking for a big-wheeled rig that's more versatile than single-minded.



Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesThe only difference between this Guerrilla Gravity and most so-called super-bikes is maybe a pound or two and a bunch of carbon. Instead of the Smash being a specific type of bike, it does a damn good job at nearly everything. I'd say that the ideal Smash owner would be the kind of rider who enjoys difficult trails that require a lot of effort to access, or maybe someone who wants to race an enduro on the weekend but doesn't want, or need, an enduro-specific bike. Mike Levy








328 Comments

  • + 302
 Lights out! Guerrilla radio, turn that s*i* up!
  • - 37
flag bizutch (Jun 25, 2018 at 5:13) (Below Threshold)
 how am I the first to upvote?
  • + 19
 \m/ RAGE \m/
  • + 4
 All Hell can't stop us now All Hell can't stop us now All Hell can't stop us now All Hell can't stop us now All Hell can't stop us now
  • + 60
 Good call, time to crank up the Rage in the shop today.
  • + 4
 Slow clap
  • + 16
 Rage Against the Machine have moved onto shilling ebikes for Specialized. I wish I was joking:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=iefJf609Tkg
  • + 1
 It's about the water bottle mount. Nuff said.
  • + 39
 Dammit, I didn't even think of Rage while writing this review. I miss the 90s.
  • + 12
 @mikelevy: thought you worked on Maggie's Farm?
  • + 13
 @mikelevy: Consider Rage, covered by Brass Against. Pretty legit. www.youtube.com/watch?v=0JrlKcoD1Qw
  • + 3
 @boxxerace:

DAMN! Thanks for that. Fantastic!
  • + 1
 @Grmasterd: wow i cannot believe he lost his bike. conspiracy theory on the industry paying them alot to sell ebikes am i right?
  • + 2
 Spot on, as I have been playing a whole hella lot more rage lately.
  • + 1
 agreed
  • + 0
 @gramboh: I think I threw up in my mouth. Frown
  • + 2
 F U I wont do what you tell me. Unless you tell me to go ride this bike.
  • + 1
 Rage with a machine
  • + 3
 @GuerrillaGravity: Dear GG: keep making rad bikes, don't get too big, remember your roots, drink good beer????????????????
  • + 2
 @gramboh: that is some funny shit
  • + 2
 @mikeyb76: Good beer always goes hand in hand with great bikes.
  • + 1
 @boxxerace: f*ck Yeah. Thanks man.
  • + 86
 GG are the most badass looking, no nonsense, fairly priced and corporate and marketing bs free bikes out there, and they'rea blast to ride, thry say. I wan't one so bad! Kudos GG guys, keep it real!
  • - 80
flag jollyXroger (Jun 25, 2018 at 5:33) (Below Threshold)
 Srsly? Would you like some freedom fries with that "Freedom Linkage", sir?
  • - 10
flag Lagr1980 (Jun 25, 2018 at 5:53) (Below Threshold)
 Well, I have another brand in mind as well. Cheers !
  • - 9
flag masonguy (Jun 25, 2018 at 7:24) (Below Threshold)
  • + 21
 @jollyXroger: Yes. Yes, I would, actually.
  • + 10
 @Chadimac22: With Special Sauce!
  • - 25
flag jollyXroger (Jun 25, 2018 at 9:27) (Below Threshold)
 @boxxerace: Sorry, no Special Sauce, but there is some Minuteman Salsa stashed away. Wink
  • - 10
flag mm732 (Jun 25, 2018 at 17:58) (Below Threshold)
 they sell them at REI tho so
  • + 49
 Does not look like a session
  • + 36
 Awesome. Modern geo, reasonable weight, US domestic production from a small company of riders, customizable, relatively inexpensive. GG is doing it right.
  • + 17
 I think the larger point is that it is a bike built in country of origin. I have no problems with my Taiwan made YT (or my Taiwan made Triumph motorcycle), but it is sad to see everything designed in one place and then shipped off to cheaper labor elsewhere. If I had to pay an extra $500 for my YT to have been made in Germany, it would still have been a great deal for a great bike.
  • + 6
 And light! My efffing carbon 150mm enduro bike with carbon wheels, carbon bars, carbon cranks, etc weighs the same!!!
  • + 4
 All great points. A lot of thought went into production and build specs. I really like the ethos of this company and have a few fam members in CO riding GG. I would love to get my hands on one of their bikes to stash in the US to ride when we are there during the summers. Bucket list...
  • + 28
 Only a few more weeks and mine will be ready! Did a demo day with both coil and air shock, for me the coil was vastly superior and went along way to bridging the gap to a 160mm bike (like I currently have). Worth the weight penalty for sure. With a coil the bike eats up rocks like it has more than 140mm but doesn't give up the liveliness that makes it so fun. The best thing is being able to spec your bike as you like, GG will even order things that are not an option on their website and charge you only the difference in price (if you want a part that's cheaper than a listed option then the cost of the bike goes down).
  • + 51
 @kelownakona: LOL no I'm selling the 160mm as I was feeling a little over-biked. I wish I could own every bike!
  • + 9
 @catweasel: don't we all Big Grin
  • + 37
 @kelownakona: wow... are you that a*shole that makes condescending remarks at people who have worked hard in their lives and can afford more than one bike? I bet you take every chance you get to make others feel like shit.
  • + 7
 @kelownakona: get a better job dude!
  • + 6
 @bohns1: Better jobs take more effort that could be spent riding. I'm considering becoming a bike bum. Work part time camp illegally spend rent/mortgage payments on bike parts instead.
  • - 3
 @choppertank3e: heck just steal the bikes just like the homeless dirtbags behind my house!
  • + 1
 @choppertank3e: sounds like a great idea... Then u wake up at 40…!
  • + 8
 @kelownakona: being condescending and sarcastic is not putting life into perspective. He also said "I wish I could own every bike." His reason for selling seems to be for financial and not for environmental. Is there a problem with waste in the bike industry that needs to be addressed? Yes, without question, but you never illustrated that as the reason for your rude comment. I only need and own one bike and would agree the same to be true for most consumers. If you want to further the conversation on the topic, then lets do just that! But being a jerk to people is not the way to have a proper conversation. As for me... my career actually revolves around human waste treatment for the protection of water ways as well as stormwater management and treatment. To say I don't care about the planet is just wrong. One thing I don't give two shits about, is what part of the world someone comes from, because not everyone in the same country thinks the same way. Thanks for, as I said earlier, taking another chance to try and make someone feel like shit, you ignorant, discriminatory twat.
  • + 0
 @BEEner: You call him rude yet you started the name-calling.
  • + 19
 Like a few have said above,put a coil on, the ribbon coil in 150 or 160 and you will be surprised at how much more Smashing you can do on this thing. I had a Capra and to me, the Smash beats it hands down in all categories, including “enduro” races. Plus, as they say, it’s super versatile. Take the air shock and a lighter set of wheels/tires and you have two bikes for your road trip for the space of one.
  • + 4
 Good feedback Hangdogr. Did you ever have any regrets not going with the slightly longer legged, slightly more slack Megatrail?
  • + 7
 @boxxerace: No regrets at all, though if you got the Smash and did have regrets, you can just get the MT seat stays and put on you 27.5 fork and wheels and off you go.
  • + 2
 @hangdogr: can you really do that?
  • + 5
 @GuerrillaGravity: Very cool. Just keeps getting better
  • + 5
 @GuerrillaGravity: this is a winning plan on your part! /value added.
  • + 2
 Plus you can even keep your 29er 160mm fork for the megatrail!! Wink 150/160mm would be good with me in trail mode since the bike is damn low! It would raise the bb just a little bit, change HA and SA of 0.4'' versus the 170mm and wouldn't need a 180mm fork to do so. Smile
  • + 16
 With a little bit of part swapping, GG's can be even more versatile. Coils absolutely change the feel of the bike - I like to have an air canister for flow/jump trails and a coil for chunk, and lengthen out the fork a bit from this spec. It's like having two bikes. And for most of us mere mortals who race in non-pro categories, the recent Enduro podiums in CO/NM show that GG's are plenty race-able - they are popping up all over the amateur podiums!
  • - 2
 There’s never a reason to run air over coil for anything other than weight. More compression damping and less rebound damping. You’re welcome.
  • + 3
 @thenotoriousmic: if you’re winding on compression to prevent bottom out then you’re going to lose the sensation of sensitivity that coil provides over air
  • + 4
 @kleinblake: I think he means if you want a coil shock to feel more poppy and playful like an air shock you can increase compression damping for better support and decrease rebound damping for more pop. Presumably you would only do this on flow trails where the sensitivity isn't as beneficial.
  • + 2
 @dlxah: I agree, I think that's what he means also. What he doesn't know is that I run coil front and rear, 90% of the time. I change over to the air canister for jump trails at the bike park because the switch takes 20 seconds and that keeps my coil the way I like it for most riding. The coil can 'pop' just fine though if need be!
  • + 0
 @dlxah: yep. There’s literally nothing a air shock does that a coil doesn’t do better. My air shocks not been used once this year.
  • + 3
 @thenotoriousmic: What about being set up for different weights of gear or rider? Being able to run more sag while having progressive bottom out protection?
Having an initial hardtail feel on roads and smooth fireroads until the stiction breaks free?
  • + 3
 @choppertank3e: Yes... duh?! Yes you can tune it to do whatever you want. Why do you think absolutely nobody uses air shocks except mountain bikers. Travis pastrana isn’t cramming the air shocks on his moto with little plastic volume spacers.

And I don’t know why you’d want that but sure have this climb switch. Haha
  • + 14
 @mikelevy You think this would be too much bike on mellower trails? I ride a lot of mellower trails bit also hit a lot of rowdier, steep, roots and rocks type trails too. Think this would be a good one bike quiver killer type bike? I was thinking of Trail Pistol or Transition Smuggler but maybe this?
  • + 4
 Sorry down voted whoops. The whiskey is good here.
  • + 2
 @schofell84: No worries mate.
  • + 2
 I have a Trail Pistola (140, 130 coil rear) and I ride everything from XC to bike park. Never feels like to much for XC, but pushing the limits at the park. Good rims, rubber, and cush core really allows me to find the limits of the suspension, but the bike eats it up and wants more! I like goin' fast.
  • + 24
 Crush for Greens, Plush for Blacks. Swap modes, not bikes.
  • + 10
 Nah, I don't think it'd be too much. It's far from a Slash or that kind of thing, and way more fun on chill terrain.
  • + 5
 @Yakima9: Nice, I'm back and forth between the Trail Pistol and the SMASH!
  • + 4
 @kcj801: I have a smash. 150 mrp ribbon up front, air can in the back. It does everything very well. It sounds like you ride similar variety of trails to me. Other than the occasional trip to vermont or a bike park, my day to day trails are mellow-ish. Faster rolling tires and crush mode make mellow trails awesome, poppy and playful and the heavy rubber in plush mode makes the big chunk easy.
Much recommend.
  • + 2
 @tims5377: Nice!!! How do you like that Ribbon fork? I've been on a Pike for a few years, and I weigh 250 lbs and ride pretty aggressively. I like the adjustability of my Pike and being able to run volume spacers, etc.
  • + 4
 @kcj801: Well, I came off a RS revelation, so this is worlds better for me. I take forever to get my suspension dialed, so I am not quite there yet, but the adjustability of this thing is awesome. The ramp control cartridge does an awesome job giving you just the right amount of progression. Also it feels super stiff (I'm 220# and ride front heavy (cause I'm bad at bikes)). I would def try it if you go with a GG. It is like $50 more and supports a US business!
  • + 1
 @tims5377: Nice. Sounds good. Thanks for the input.
  • + 14
 “Like difficult trails that take effort to access”. That’s my fav ride and now I want this bike.
  • + 10
 Will echo what everyone says about their bikes. Love my smash and the review is pretty spot on. What I like the most is how awesome the company is. When I call someone picks up the phone and I get instant assistance. Keep it up guys. You’re doing it right.
  • + 3
 Yeah, Bobby at @GuerrillaGravity is always super responsive to all of my questions about putting together a bike even though I won't be able to buy for a little bit. Took my brother on a tour of the shop when he was out in Denver too. These dudes are awesome!
  • + 2
 man I couldn’t agree more w you guys- I was shipping for months and almost pulled the trigger on a Canfield riot (toir) and a trail pistol but kept holding out for a 29” megatrail. The moment it was released I was on the site building her up. The wait was tough but sooo worth it. And for anyone considering this bike go coil and 150 ribbon! Traction for days, gets super rowdy and still has fun on the blues.
  • + 9
 Don't forget to ask about the MRP Hazzard coil!. This thing is going to be a beast with the MRP Ribbon / Hazzard combo.

It's going to be a long 6 weeks until I get mine but I couldn't be any happier about my decision to pick up a Smash.

I literally scoured every single bike out there, tested Intense, Stumpies and SC's and THIS is the bike that I always came back to.
  • + 9
 Can I order it with an angle set to reduce the head tube angle, and a 150 or 160mm fork with reduced offset?

I wanna SBG this thing. It'd be a Sentinel minus 2 or 3 pounds and made in 'merica
  • + 10
 I'm sure they would. I wanted the oneup dropper on mine so I could set the travel and they set up an account with oneup to get it for me, think I even wound up saving $20 Smile
  • + 9
 @catweasel: damn that's a cool company.
  • + 10
 @alexhyland: yeah I'm slightly short in the leg to run a 150mm dropper on a medium, they offered a custom frame option but as I wasn't struggling with the a standover the one up was a simpler solution.
They are a cool company, they do lots of fundraising for local trail builders and build burly alu frames in house. When you factor in the modern geo, fully customisable build no nonsense bikes that fit a water bottle and have a threaded BB, it seems like they based their business model from a pinkbike comments section. Happy to give them my money!
  • + 4
 Yes you can. I think they can order the CC angle sets themselves, but I actually ordered a Works Components one for my Shred Dogg and just had it sent to GG so they could build the bike with it.
  • + 35
 Totally! We can order MRP Ribbons and Fox 36 forks with the reduced offsets and pair them with a Cane Creek Angleset to build your bike the way you want. Hit us up at Bikes@RideGG.com to make this dream a reality.
  • + 5
 @GuerrillaGravity: Ya'll are amazing. When my Scout dies, I will seriously be considering a Smash with this configuration.

I love your ethos and clear devotion to giving the customer what they want! I hope you're ready for an influx of demand... cuz this bike looks sweet.
  • + 3
 Love my Megatrail with -1 degree head angle. Bronson and Nomad in one. Cool to have a bike from passionate makers. Another argument for Europe customers: no one want to steal an alloy bike from a brand never heard of. Buy before the tax war gets worse!
  • + 7
 The guys at GG make great bikes. The thing to take away from this is they run good sizing. They don't have smurfs working in engineering. Although I am 6' tall I have a Large Smash with a 35mm stem. My back is so happy. Plus they can do custom sizes a guy nearby is 6'10" or so and got a BIG frame made with 29" on front and 650b in the back. He said it was still less than many factory-made machines cost! I still wish this had the Travel Adjust like The Megatrail offers even though 90% of the time it would be in short made!
  • + 6
 All other bike manufacturers take note! GG is the only one doing it right judging by the overwhelming positive response on here. Or maybe everyone is high today and will start singing the praises of knock blocks, superboost rear ends, long ass Poles and Spec law suits... Or not....
  • + 5
 I have had 3 GG bikes and I have no plans to ride anything else. Pro tip: Buy a SMASH, then buy a the Megatrail seat stays. you can turn the SMASH into a Megatrail! Not that you would want too.....but you want the SMASH and a long travel Enduro rig? now you have both!!!
  • + 1
 Have the seat stays and wheelset. Don't have the longer travel shock yet. Will try.
  • + 3
 Fun tidbit: you can run a Megatrail and Shred Dogg as a 29er. It'll have a high BB and the Megatrail needs to run in Trail Mode with 29x2.3 tires, but it'll work. The Shred Dogg with it's shorter stroke can run 29x2.5 tires without contact.
  • + 10
 @PHeller: The old Meat Pistol!
  • + 6
 @GuerrillaGravity: I need a chart or something to keep track of all the potential pairings.
  • + 2
 This. I ride with a guy using this setup and that bike is the shit.
  • + 7
 @mikelevy You're blur review it said 157lbs, now 168lb 90 days later? Either someone has been lifting legs or cosmic brownies.
  • + 54
 Tim Horton’s.
  • + 5
 @HsawAknow: I don't get the Hortons thing. A co-worker here is a Canukian and he is gaga over the coffee. Brings tins down each time he goes to visit family. Tried it once and couldn't figure out what the fuss was about. Tasted like cheap coffee?
  • + 2
 @Poulsbojohnny: canadians buy in to what tim hortons represents. (small towns, hockey, winter, family etc etc)

the coffee is standard cheap coffee, but it also doesnt help that in most canadian cities (at least the smaller ones) youre never really more than 5 minutes drive from one. in my city of about 100k, we have 12 tim hortons, and you can expect to wait in a line inside or in the drive thru at most times of the day.
  • + 0
 @Poulsbojohnny: cheap coffe, still miles ahead of Starbucks. But it's not about the coffe anyway, it's aboot the donuts!!
  • + 2
 @Poulsbojohnny: Good breakfast sandwhiches, donuts and great customer service. Coffee is fine too for anything not french pressed.
  • + 13
 @Poulsbojohnny: Tim's is a coffee flavoured beverage. I wouldn't call it coffee.
  • + 3
 Mike works for donuts
  • + 13
 @Poulsbojohnny: I once stood in the Tim Horton's line at the Toronto airport on my way back from Canada. The entire time i was convinced i was in the security line. 15 min later i looked over to see there was no line for security and i was waiting in a line for coffee. I was upset.
  • + 6
 @Poulsbojohnny: It's not just you. Tim Horton's is largely Brazilian owned and does all it can to pull on the patriotic heartstrings of Canadians. The product is awful; like tepid dish water. McDonald's coffee is far better. Or make your own. The franchisees are not so happy with the parent company either, and the baked goods are now formulaic and come from mass bakeries that make the product as cheaply as possible.

And on top of it, you have to keep an eye open for people flinging excrement.
  • + 3
 @mikekazimer: Safeway donuts. I assume Levy is a connoisseur, and wouldn't set foot in Tim Ho's. Levy, you're in Squampton, but next time on the North shore, hit up the Safeway at the bottom of Seymour (or the one at Westview) and get a deep fried, glazed croissant with chocolate on top. Seriously the best value donut around.
Then roll into Deep Cove and have a Honey maple icing topped donut. Not the best value, but.....
Then just go and nap.
  • + 4
 @woofer2609: Agreed, the baked goods have gone to shit over the last few years, even before the buyout.
  • + 0
 Thanks for the replies all!

@woofer2609: Safeway doughnuts? Oh hell no. If you haven't had one of these:
www.sluyspoulsbobakery.com

you don't know doughnuts. I've had the Top Pots and King Doughnuts and they are good, but nothing compares to Sluys.
  • + 16
 Only 11lbs in 90 days is nothing when you're eating your feelings.
  • + 12
 @mikelevy: Just think, you'd have to upgrade 9 bikes from NX eagle to XX1 eagle to shave 11lbs in bike weight. You gained $9,000 in weight in the world of SRAM.
  • + 4
 @mikekazimer: is this the source of the comment about if your shape is round you need the Zees? Some of us are over 200 and still look like bean poles. Don’t call me fat for wanting 4-pistons in life Wink
  • + 5
 Had mine since release and still love it, the coil and 160 fork really makes this thing incredible at plowing through rocks, and it's still a damn good climber! I did opt for an angleset to drop the front end a bit further, but I only find that better for the steepest stuff. Rad bike, great company, and reasonably priced. Being 6'4", it's super refreshing to find a bike that actually feels like it fits me (on the XL, also rode the large but felt a bit cramped).

Also, they do have options to go custom, it just increases cost and lead time, which is pretty f*cking cool.
  • + 18
 Yeah I have a feeling that the geo numbers will throw some people off, as it did me, as everyone will be like "I have ridden X sized bike for so many years but this says I should be a Size Down/Up?!"

Main thing is the comparison of Reach and Standover height with the ETT for me. I am considered a disproportionate rider as I am 6' tall, 31" inseam but an Ape Index of 1.5" to 2". All that means is that when I threw a leg over the Medium with a 50mm stem I felt a bit cramped on it, standover was spot on but I just felt a bit too upright. Moving to the Large would be better reach number with a short stubb stem, thinking the 40-50mm range. But here is the kicker, talking with GG about this, they said "Well, you are right. You really are right in-between because of your measurements. For a little bit of an up charge, we can do you an Extra Medium. Basically we put the Mediums Head-tube and Seat-tube on the Top-tube and Down-tube of a Large. This will give you the reach numbers of the Large but the standover height of the Medium."

Seriously, what company do you know that would talk number with you and then offer up a semi-custom ride for a very small fee ($195!). Hell I will give up going with a custom color that costs as much to go with something like that! Hence why they will be having my money shortly for my 40th Bday bike!!!
  • + 5
 @gregnash: I should not have read this. An extra medium medium shredd dogg would be the perfect bike for this short legged, long armed 6 footer.

I am going to go shake the piggy bank again and see what falls out.
  • + 2
 @Doogster:
Dude you and me both!!!! I have to say that GG's customer service has been stellar. Been going back and forth with one of their guys about my build and what not, he has been giving me honest opinions on what I want and really you can have them build up your "dream" bike with whatever components you want, sometimes it an extra charge and sometimes not. Just depends on what they "stock" regularly.

For me the same is happening, shaking the piggybank, and I was looking for a quote as to what I would be looking at price-wise with an intent to purchase around the beginning of the calendar year. The rep (Bobby) gave me the lowdown on everything, custom Extra Medium will be a 10-12wk lead time vs. normal sizes 6-8wks, and then other custom bits they normally don't stock could possibly add extra time. He quoted me with everything that I wanted and then another with the stuff they stock with a few of the components I REALLY wanted as custom. Price blew me away.

Seriously, this is why we need to support these smaller builders and local companies!!!!
  • + 4
 While I love my Mojo3 I just built up, I'm having regret not picking up a GG Shred Dogg instead. Every time I see one I get jealous of those who own them. Fortunately I'm so hopelessly addicting to building up new bikes that I'll likely pick one up in a few months.
  • + 2
 To relieve some of that anxiety, I would be glad to help by taking a previous steed off your hands... Wink
  • + 4
 @mtbikeaddict: You are beyond generous! I'll send it your way.
  • + 2
 My Shred Dogg is beyond awesome. From swooping flow trails to tight and tricky technical terrain to scary steeps, it just takes it all in stride and puts a smile on my face.
  • + 4
 I demod a Shred Dogg, which shares a lot of the same design aspects as this bike, such as: frame shape, suspension design, etc.

What I liked about the bike was that the thing just ripped! It’s one of those bikes that feels so safe and comfortable going very fast. Some bikes are twitchy and feel unsettled at high speeds; these bikes don’t. They really do like to go fast lol. And at the same time, you could toss the back around so easily when going slow or fast. It rode just about as fun as any bike I’ve ever ridden.

What I didn’t like about the bike was how the top tube gets in your way when riding wheelies. I know it’s shaped higher than many to accommodate the water bottle, but if your really like riding wheelies, it’s just not as easy on this bike from my experience, because your restricted on how far you can move your knees of the top tube side to side.

Really great bike and awesome that it’s aluminum and it seemed to be made rock solid as well.
  • + 5
 I absolutely love doing wheelies, for some reason. I never had any issues on my megatrail.
  • + 1
 It’s something i think I could get used to. Everyone is different, and I hope it’s just me because what the company is built on is awesome. I’ve called and talked to them and emailed a few times and they know their shit and are extremely helpful. It’s amaonf how many bike companies blow you off BEFORE they have your money.

I will definitely look st guerilla gravity for a downhill bike in the future should one arise. Their suspension just rocks.
  • + 2
 @Honduh2000: their DH isn't on the lineup anymore, but a Megatrail with a 170mm fork, in graivty mode, is insanely capable! I rock mine everywhere, even on two wheels!
  • + 6
 Funny, I find GG bikes to be really easy to wheelie. So easy I'm a little suspicious... Why do they wheelie so well @GuerrillaGravity
  • + 8
 @keen515: Because that's what George Washington would have wanted.
  • + 4
 I got my GG last year and love it. It's a bike about riding bikes hard. The couple of people that I know that have gotten one since are now full blown disciples. It's a great bike. They build it for you, so put your order in now. Just remember that people that love bikes are making you a bike. It seems to be the biggest complaint I hear is that there is a wait. It's not like your mailorder company has your bike on hand anyway. They're all back-ordered too. And if not, well the choice is certainly yours. I've had many bikes. This one is awesome.
  • + 7
 Found my next bike and wasn't even looking!
  • + 4
 Cool to get this writeup. I love my GG and you're seeing lots of them around here. Cool dudes, super customizable, local, oh yeah and the bikes are awesome. Whats not to like!
  • + 3
 I love everything about GG and their bikes. Especially this one. If I'm honest though it misses just one thing...lust factor. After I've given my sled a wash I sometimes like to just stand there and look at it. It looks fast and sexy. Call me shallow but that is a factor in my buying decisions. I may still go GG when the time comes though. It just makes sense on so many levels.
  • + 1
 @Dustfarter

But check out that bike with the blue paint job and 11-6 shock. Intimidating how awesome it looks......
  • + 5
 Very nice bike. Too bad the Canadian dollar is sooooo low. Time for an equivalent Canadian manufacturer apart from Devinci Aluminum framed bikes. Aluminum ain't dead.
  • + 2
 My alloy Knolly Warden may have been a bit on the pricey side for an alloy bike but you can definitely build one at a reasonable price and that thing shreds
  • + 6
 On a positive note, NAFTA means there aren't any customs duties when we ship bikes up to Canada.
  • + 2
 @GuerrillaGravity: really? Is that because they're American made? Another online usa retailer told me there would def be taxes and duty extra on a bike or parts ordered from them.

So if you ship to Canada, the price I pay online is the final price? No surprises from the Canadian courier wanting another pile of money?
  • + 2
 @gbeaks33: Get one while NAFTA still exists if you can.....
You will have to pay shipping and GST on top of the advertised price. There is no duty on MOST bike parts, US made or not. Dont forget the US/CAN exchange rate too, thats a bit of a killer right now.
  • + 1
 @shoreboy1866: yeah the Canadian dollar sucks hard right now. Unfortunately even Canadian bike companies seem to base their prices on USD so they're not any more affordable either.
  • + 2
 Banshee!!! GG seems to share Banshee's no BS approach. I'd say that's pretty much your Candian equivalent...
  • + 1
 @babymorox: nah man, can't buy a banshee from a Canadian dealer. I tried a few years ago and most dealers dropped them. They're direct sales in some countries but still have to get them stateside here. I haven't checked in a few years, but that was the story at one point.
  • + 2
 Yeah I looked a bit for their bikes last year and no custom duties but you'll have to pay the taxes you have in your province and since we've got like 15% in Quebec, it turned me off a bit. It's sad cause they really are cheap for a us made bike! Frown

I've got a Quebec handmade frame (xprezo) but someone really want to buy it and I guess I'll sell it but they don't exist anymore so I have to find something else. Frown Wanted a Knolly but won't happen so maybe I'll just finish up with an 29er YT capra. Oh boy, I'll feel bad to ride with an internet bike!! Frown
  • + 1
 @Timo82: Plan a road trip and pick up your bike in person. Ride it, get it dirty and there won't be any issues with the boarder guards!
  • + 2
 @gbeaks33: Well, with the exchange rate being what it is now, at least I'll be able to buy a lot more beer when I visit Whistler this summer.
  • + 2
 @boxxerace: Yeah but that's a bit risky just to save 15%... lol

I was talking about 15% + exchange rate that made it more pricey over here. It ain't thaaatt bad but just not as good as it is for americans + we can't demo one.
  • + 1
 @NWBasser: Still twice the price for a six pack in the otherwise great land of Canada. Twice!
  • + 1
 @Timo82: Don't forget to add on the stupid Canadian import tariff on bikes that even Devinci is opposed to.
  • + 2
 @Timo82: Oops. Forgot about nafta! I guess no tariff on US made bikes. My bad!
  • + 1
 @gbeaks33: The courier wants a brokerage fee. This is often a total rip off and can be avoided. You can srlf broker your own items or negotiate with the courier company.
Like everything else, it pays to do it yourself.
borderbee.com/2014/01/13/how-to-self-clear-your-parcel-with-customs
  • + 1
 @boxxerace: Cripes, that sucks. I feel bad for my Canadian brothers. I guess I'll be bringing my own beer for the trip.
  • + 1
 @Timo82: There are at least a couple over on Vancouver Island that you might be able to try out.
  • + 1
 @NWBasser: I don't know if I would travel 3-4 days by car to test one though. lool
  • + 3
 Mike,

What the hell? The climbing photo clearly shows roots in your way. You must have just balanced on the bike for that shot, right? I didn't think there was such a thing as technical single track climbing any more. Thought it was all uplift, shuttle, or fire road! Wink
  • + 2
 Yeah or the travesty they call "climbing trails" .

The first time I heard that term I got really excited, until I realized they meant the opposite of what I first assumed.
  • + 8
 It's a sad state of affairs right now when it comes to many (but not all) climbing trails. The trend is to just make it as easy as possible, with is unfortunate.
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: I despise easy climbing trails. Mainly because I ride a 31lb steel hardtail and if the climb is steep and technical, I’m too focused on the trail to notice the weight hahaha.
  • + 4
 I guess the test mule got the bikeyoke revive treatment to replace that KS in the bike spec. Nice choice. After transfer, reverb, Lev and Turbine, it's night and day difference in performance and maintenance.
  • + 6
 Nice down to earth bike here. Numbers look good. Pretty big bike but not bad at 30lbs.
  • + 2
 Stoked on this review! Thanks @mikelevy

Reiterates everything I’ve herd of this bike. Have been torn between a YT Jeffsy and The Smash for some time. This makes it even harder. Haha I’ve ridden both Jeffsy 27 and 29, absolutely love the XL29 CF Pro, haven’t had the opportunity to ride The Smash yet. Looks like I’ll need to prior to pulling the trigger.
  • + 5
 Great ... now my wait is going to be forever when i get to order one! #sarcasm
nice review.
  • + 4
 The guys at GG headquarters are great. Visited a while back and test rode some of their bikes. After I got a tour of the shop.
  • + 2
 I need to do the same as soon as I can get back over to Denver.
  • + 5
 @mikelevy; you did it again! Wher's the video with suspension?! You sneaky PB liar!
  • + 1
 My bad. Again.
  • + 2
 I'm sure GG is a great company, but I tried a Trail Pistol, and I guess new school geometry just isn't for me or my body type (short legs, long torso). My Following feels much better more maneuverability and more intuitive handling in every way. The trail Pistol feels way too long and is much harder to lift the front end. Maybe I would appreciate that if I rode faster more wide open trails, but for New England single track and tech it just doesn't do it for me. I feel like the geometry thing has gone a bit too far for the average bike and biker, personally. Most people would benefit more from increased maneuverability over the massive stability of today's very long and low geometry. It kind of reminds me a bit of the super long travel over-built beasts of the early 2000's when we were in the 'Freeride' heyday. Heavy, too tall, too much travel for a kind riding most people really didn't do (10 foot hucks to flat). Don't get me wrong, we needed a geometry change from back then, but with bikes like the Pole, we really have just gone too far, and I think the pendulum will swing back to what is best for the average rider.
  • + 3
 Consider GGs location on the CO front range though and it starts to make sense. Most of our rides are 1500' straight up then down, and typically not that twisty.
  • + 2
 Interesting take and probably heavily influenced by your local trails as you say.

What confuses me is your take that your long torso doesn't get along with new school geo - having average legs, long torso and super ape arms, I find the new, longer bikes sooo much comfier!

Then again, we're all different with different preferences and different trails so there is no "right or wrong" answer here.
  • + 1
 I just spent 4 days in KT ridind a Trail Pistol and had a blast... The bike was playfull and poppy! Ride what you like Wink
  • + 1
 @dontcoast: I think it may be that because of my short legs, a super steep seat angle is too steep because I don't extend the seat post very much to fit me on the large size frame I typically run. I think a big complaint about slacker seat angles is when you raise them up to much to accommodate long legs, they put you too far over the back wheel. Since I don't raise it that much (I only can run a 125 mm dropper max on my large Following) the slacker seat angle still seems to put me in a good pedaling position, while a super steep seat angle seems to put me too far forward. Because I have a bad lower back, I don't like to be stretched out too much, so I don't need super long reach either. Certainly I agree as zeGG says below, ride what you like, but I do feel like it is good to have a variety of geometries available. That is, some frame designed for agility and some for stability. It just seems right now that any moderate geometry bike is criticized immediately for 'a too slack' seat angle, 'a too short' wheelbase, or 'a too steep' head angle, when for the correct riding style/skill and for the right body type, this 'outdated' geometry may actually be better. I'm sure there are riders out there so skilled at bike handling that could make a 1350 mm wheelbase Pole look more nimble than I make 1170 mm wheelbase Following look, but for the average Joe on the average trail, that bike is going to be a handful on all but the most wide-open trails.
  • + 3
 The GG Shred Dogg with its 27.5 wheels and short travel might work much better for twisty trails. We also have loads of tight trails in Washington and my Shred Dogg maneuvers quite well between all the fir trees.
  • + 1
 @shawndashf1: the difference with shorter legs and bad back totally makes sense! Good point in steep sta being weird for riders w very short inseam, hadn’t considered that
  • + 1
 @shawndashf1: A Medium Pistol is more comparable to a Large Following.
  • + 5
 Nice. A lovely lesser spotted metal bike being reviewed. A breath of fresh air!
  • + 6
 Looks legit! Big up for a small company
  • + 4
 Don't you guys think it's about time Guerrilla Gravity gets their own forum?!
  • + 2
 Haha, right after they put up a YT form. We've been begging for one in the YT 27 and 29 threads but no love.
  • + 2
 Workin' on it!
  • + 2
 @markholloway: OMG! Thank you so much!
  • + 2
 @markholloway: Hell yeah!
  • + 3
 Was fairly set on a Smuggler until I read this review. I assumed a bike named the smash was strictly enduro use only. Sounds like it's kinda right up my alley.
  • + 3
 Probably end up 2 pounds lighter too, My Smuggler was a pig.
  • + 3
 I keep building up this bike on their website. I'm happy with my current bike but the lust is strong... Good looking bike GG!
  • + 6
 Water bottle - check
  • + 1
 How's popping the front end on your Smash? I have an extra medium. (large reach/medium seat tube/head tube). Its good for descending and decent on climbing. Love the short seat tube for being able to get out of the way on the downs.

On thing of note is popping on the front end for a manual takes much for effort than my extra large HD3 or large kona explosif. Curious it would have been easier if I went with the large head tube( a little more stack)? Currently I am 6'1 with a 40mm stem. Could shorten the stem or just get some bars with a little more rise. I had an Ibis ripley ls before. That was easier to manual and bunny hop. I like the steeper seattube angle vs the ripley for seated climbs though.
  • + 6
 I love my SMASH.
  • + 4
 I really want a green one, just so i can call it the Hulk Smash! Big Grin
  • + 3
 looks like a small shop, i wonder what machines are in that shop. what would i need really to make a bike frame?
  • + 2
 They have a couple of HAAS CNC's and I believe they moved into the building next door as well.
  • + 3
 @Yakima9: Correct, the shop picture above is actually about 2 years old. While we still have that same area for frame fab, we did annex the two adjacent units, and yes, one of the annexed units has two new Haas CNC machines cranking out parts.
  • + 2
 I’d be interested in hearing how it compares to a Canfield Riot. Which is a few years older, but still better than most in my opinion.
  • + 4
 Yep - god I wish the bros didn't go out of business.
  • + 4
 How does it compares to Canfield TOIR?
  • + 2
 i live in nz, can't test one or even see one, and at 55 don't really need one , but hell, i really really want one... or a shred dogg. Hey gg, can you send me a sd to test???
  • + 2
 @mikelevy do you feel this bike is most comparable to the Transition Smuggler or Sentinel? The numbers say Smuggler to me, but I haven't ridden the Smash.
  • + 2
 The Smash would be most comparable to the Sentinel, especially if built with a 160mm fork. The Trail Pistol would be most comparable to the Smuggler as both have 120mm rear travel and can take longer forks.
  • + 2
 This is my next bike, as soon as my Spitfire dies. I was hoping the perfect middle finger to Amazon brake-bump makers would come along. Thank you, GG!
  • + 4
 Do these bikes fall under the 10% Aluminum levy?
  • + 3
 good ol boy was just drinkin whiskey and wine..
  • + 3
 No, the tariff tiffs going on at the moment are only on raw material, not goods made from said raw materials.
  • + 1
 @GuerrillaGravity: yeah but the majority of us steel and aluminum is imported and there are tariffs on that now.
  • + 3
 @GuerrillaGravity: At first I was trying to make a joke and then I realized, 'oh shit, this could actually be real'. But as long as you keep the whiskey and maple syrup out of the frame we should be able to get these in Canada 'Tariff Free'. www.fin.gc.ca/activty/consult/cacsap-cmpcaa-eng.asp
  • + 2
 @axelerate: Keeping the syrup out is easy enough, the whiskey not so much. I wonder if they'd make a maple syrup bottle holder for the frame?
  • + 3
 And if you are feeling frisky you can buy different seat stays and make it into a different bike if I am not mistaken
  • + 2
 Yep. With the MegaTrail seat stays you can turn it into the Shred Dog, add the longer stroke shock and now you have the MegaTrail
  • + 6
 If you are feeling frisky you can also race The Good, the Rad, and the Gnarly on a Pedalhead!
  • + 2
 @GuerrillaGravity: always get frisky
  • + 1
 Mike, is it GX 11-speed or 12-speed (Eagle)?

And what length dropper post? (Also, article says BikeYoke dropper, but spec chart says KS LEV...)
  • + 1
 It's an option you have when you buy the bike... go see on their site you'll understand that you can change whatever you want. Wink
  • + 1
 states E13 9X46 cog set
  • + 1
 @cheetamike: OK - does that mean 11 speed then? My point is, stating "GX" in the article is not specific enough, since there are two flavors of GC -- 11 speed and 12 speed.
  • + 2
 @MtbSince84: If they don't write Eagle then it is 11 and not 12 speed... E13 + gx der. and shifter = 11 speed, yes.
  • + 3
 Trail pistol is in my top 5. Seems like GG is consistently badass.
  • + 1
 @GuerrillaGravity It uses a standard Length and Stroke shock right? Not a common eye to eye and weird stroke like Trek has been doing with their Slashed and Remedies?
  • + 1
 They are updated to metric sizes, but my MT will be a 230 x 65 IIRC
  • + 3
 The Smash and Shred Dogg use 230x57.5, Megatrail uses 230x65, and the Trail Pistol uses 210x50.
  • + 2
 I don't recall any reviews of enduro bikes ever using "climbs like a slug up a salt-covered pole..."
  • + 3
 If the 160mm fork as put onto that bike, it would cruise over anything
  • + 10
 I have it with a 160 mm MRP Ribbon Coil, and an Ohlins TTX22M in the rear. I can tell tell you that coming off a 170/160 27.5 to the smash is so much different. The Smash with the 160 fork rides so much better than my 170/160 27.5 on rough terrain, and is pretty much just as snappy and playful. It’s a beast, and I take it from enduro races, to lift DH, to trail riding and it’s faster than any bike I’ve been on.
  • + 5
 @Clifflane3: I have a Trail Pistola and came off a 170/165 rig as well and I am not missing anything!
  • + 3
 @Clifflane3: I'm stoked, mine should be here any day now with Fox front & rear. Ready to rip!
  • + 2
 I have a medium and large Smash available to demo in the Quebec City area. PM for more info!
  • + 2
 would have loved a comparison with this vs something like the riot, or maybe the knolly fugitive in the near future...
  • + 1
 If I was going to get a 'shorter travel' bike, this would be it. Unfortunately I've got a bug for the big sh!t at the moment so the smash probably won't happen :'(
  • + 6
 You might want to get that checked out
  • + 4
 You have it backwards. 160 fork my friend up front. Coil rear, and if you really have a “bug for big sh!t” then coil up front and put a slacking headset on. I gurantee you it’s more than enough.
  • + 2
 Not to make this political, but is the bike made with Canadian or US aluminum? Because tariffs.
  • + 2
 bah... it's probably all Brasilian bauxite anyway!
  • + 1
 I don't know, but hopefully the increased raw material costs don't impact them too badly. They're a really great company.
  • + 2
 This might be my next bike once my process 134 goes kaput. That's a ways in the future though, so who knows.
  • + 2
 hahaha. If the process is anything like my Four, you'll be riding it for a long time...
  • + 4
 Becky, lemme smash!
  • + 3
 Looking forward to demoing one in August while I’m in Fort Collins!
  • + 2
 Rode my Megatrail for the second time today. It continues to impress. It wants to go fast up or down.
  • + 3
 Seat tube length? Us long torso short leg people want to know...
  • + 3
 GG will make you a large frame with a medium seat tube if you like or whatever combo you need for the bike to fit. No problem.
  • + 4
 Seat Tube Height SM16.5" MD18" LG19.5" XL21"
Max dropper insertion: 240 mm

Was looking at the specs this morning and came across the stats ridegg.com/thesmash
  • + 3
 @vikb: Nice! Just sent them a mail asking, take my money!
  • + 2
 @boxxerace: Found it on their website too. Gimme that medium reach with the 16.5" seat tube!
  • + 1
 ski straps to attach spare bits? to young to remember the name alfredo binda apparently...toe clip straps. toe clip straps
  • + 1
 Mike, you can also order it with Ribbon 46mm offset. I may fill the gap to have racing rig too.
  • + 2
 Smash vs Sentinel vs Ripmo anyone ridden all 3?
  • + 1
 Great review, I'm 6'6" and love my smash. I have a 160/130 lyric up front on mine.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy what bottle cage is that ?? and what trails at Vedder did you guys shred it on ??
  • + 2
 MSW AC-110
  • + 3
 available in UK?
  • + 1
 @catweasel: £2700 for the base model is not bad. If I didn't have my heart set on a Cotic as my next bike (way in the distant future unfortunately) I would be considering it very seriously.
  • + 5
 @alexhyland: lived in Sheffield for a decade so I can get behind a cotic purchase. I live 20 mins from GG now, so they are literally my LBS
  • + 1
 Such a comprehensive review but no mention of the 3mm offset rear end?
  • + 1
 For those who on a smash, how long was the wait until delivery?
  • + 1
 6 weeks "ish" I ordered mine in the middle of winter though.

Pretty sure they list the current lead time on their website for each frame/size.
  • + 1
 Remind me Guerilla Radio.
  • + 0
 That toptube is entirely Pinkbikes fault
  • + 0
 ..no european distributor
  • + 1
 Why though? Isn't Nicolai filling that market niche in Europe already?
  • + 1
 @jollyXroger: your right -we have raw alu bikes too -what was i thinking
  • + 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: *expensive not-made-in-asia raw alu bikes Wink
  • + 11
 @jollyXroger: For US buyers GG is nowhere near as expensive as nicolai for EU buyers.
  • + 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: One other, and cheaper EU brand came to mind. www.mdebikes.com

Maybe @paulaston could do a review of Damper 29?
  • - 3
 @optimumnotmaximum: Correct & even more expensive with Nicolai for US buyers...Uuuugh! It was a tough choice. GG is a nice bike and company having met them in Texas before, but I'd argue it's not as nearly as versatile and well engineered as a G13 or G16. #MakeAlBikesGreatAgain!
  • + 0
 A water bottle that broke camel's back
  • + 0
 Standard 51 fork offset?
  • + 3
 They will do it with whatever offset you want - or so I hear.
  • + 0
 It’s a trail bike
  • - 3
 just risking stuff to fall off the frame...pack it!
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