Review: Gulo Composites' GMX-25 Carbon Spoked Wheelset

Nov 11, 2020
by Daniel Sapp  

If you haven't heard of Gulo Composites, you're probably not alone. Based in Brevard, North Carolina, the brand is a new fish in the sea of mountain bike wheels, with a unique design that uses specially braided carbon spokes.

Why a carbon spoke? Gulo's team believes their house-made carbon spokes offer a beneficial blend of strength and durability, minimal weight, and stiffness. The spokes are triaxially braided, with a combination of different fibers, to give an impact resistance Gulo claim is better than that of any steel spoke on the market.

The owner of the company, David Keir Watkins, is well versed in carbon fibers and composites. Watkins has always been intrigued by the creativity found in manufacturing and started KEIR Manufacturing, Gulo's parent company, when he was fresh out of college.
GMX-25 Details

• Size: 29"
• Intended Use: XC
• Hub: 24h; 6 pawls, 2 phase, 27 tooth drive ring, 6.6* engagement
• Driver options: SRAM XD, Microspline, HG
• 25mm Internal / 31mm external
• Weight: 1290 grams; 595f, 695r - with tape/valves (confirmed)
• 100kg / 220lb rider weight limit
• MSRP: $2,525 USD (as tested)
www.gulocomposites.com

Over the years, his company has been defined by the evolution of what he calls experimental problem solving, rooted in an environment that focuses on small details and collaborations. At a composites conference a few years back he had the idea to develop a better bicycle spoke, so in 2017 ideas were put into motion, and Gulo Composites was born.

Gulo has a variety of road, mountain, and gravel wheelsets. For mountain wheelsets, there are three options, the XC Race GMX-25, Downcountry GMD-27, and Enduro GME-30. I've spent the last few months on the GMX-25, which weigh a scant 1,290 grams, with tape and valves, and sell for a whopping $2,525 USD.



Design

All of the wheels in Gulo's line use the same design, which is based around those aforementioned braided carbon spokes. The spoke is composed of carbon, adhesives, graphene, resins, and aviation-grade alloys, all developed in-house by Gulo. Each spoke weighs about 2.9 grams. Gulo is reasonably protective about their braiding system but, since I'll be visiting the factory in the near future to get a closer look at the manufacturing, we'll have a more comprehensive run-down of the process then.

On each wheel, 24 spokes tie into Gulo's specially drilled hub. The hubs have 6 pawls, which operate in 2 phases, meaning 3 are engaged at a time. This mates to a 27 tooth drive ring to give 6.6 degrees of engagement. The hub only works with Gulo's spokes and vice versa. The spokes leave the specially drilled hub and enter the specially drilled rim at a natural and direct angle to reduce stress.

The rims are also designed by Gulo, and have a 25mm internal and 30mm external width, with a claimed weight of 360g. Everything together builds out to be 1290g for the set, with an XD driver, according to my scale. This includes valves and rim tape.

The wheels carry a five year warranty on the spokes, no questions asked. Rims are also covered five years for manufacturing defects/normal wear and tear. They aren't covered for poor line selection or crashing but there is a crash replacement option for $350 which includes the price of a rebuild by Gulo. Hubs are covered by a two year limited warranty. If a rider develops what Gulo deems to be abmormal bearing wear or play in the first year of use they'll fix the hubs free of charge and if it's outside that window, they'll service them for free at the cost of materials. All of this applies to the original, registered owner only.

The carbon spokes are bonded to aluminum ferrules on each end. Spokes must be trued using a combination of wrenches to prevent the spoke from twisting, its only claimed weakness.

Performance

The wheels are quick to accelerate, as one would expect a sub-1,300g set of XC race wheel wheels to be, and they feel nimble and light through and over varied terrain with no hesitations when it comes to putting down power. Stiffness and responsiveness are excellent. The overall ride quality the wheels give is different from an alloy spoked wheel. It's more damped and smoother, remarkably similar to the ride feel of the BERD wheels I tested months back.

Durability is what everyone, including myself, has been curious about. After a couple of months of riding on the rough and rocky trails located a short pedal from my back door, I noticed the rear wheel had a big hop in it. On inspection, I noticed that some of the spokes had started to back out. Typically that's not a big deal, but with these wheels you can't just crank things down trailside. Instead, you have to pull the tire and rim tape off, hold the spoke with one tool and tighten the head with another, which is a little frustrating to say the least.

I contacted the Gulo team, and they told me they were aware of the issue and had switched up the way they prep spokes and build wheels a couple of times since I had received my set. "Without getting too far into the weeds, the issue with nipples coming loose is due to the stiff nature of our spoke combined with the stiff carbon rims. It is worse on the road wheels but still pops up from time to time on the MTB wheels. Our current spoke prep is a pre-applied solution similar to Nylok - that's the blue stuff on your rotor bolts."

After having the updated spoke prep applied to my test wheels, I've put in another few months of riding with zero issues. I've ridden in all conditions, wheelie hucked drops into rocks, and they've held strong. At this point, I can't find any quibbles outside of the issue with the spokes loosening up, which seems to have been completely resolved.

Price & Weight Comparisons

At 1,290g, the GMX-25 is a light wheelset, no doubt, albeit expensive at $2,525 USD and with a proprietary system, 220lb weight limit, and a five year warranty on spokes and rims, two years for hubs. There are a number of other wheelsets in the same realm of "really fancy and expensive and light with proprietary technology" that I've ridden lately. The most similar riding wheels are Atomik's BERD XC33 wheelset. The spokes are one of a kind yet several different and more common hubs can be adapted to work with them. The Atomik wheelset weighs in at 70g more (1,360g) and sells for $2,150, as I rode them with a DT Swiss 240 hub.

Bontrager's Kovee XXX sells for $2,399, also weighs 1,290g, and has a DT Swiss 240s hub system with no rider weight limit. These wheels also have a lifetime warranty. Another popular system wheel, Industry Nine's Ultralight 280c Carbon, weighs a bit more at 1,450g and also has a unique system spoke and hub and a 210lb rider weight limit. These wheels sell starting at $2,250 and have a lifetime warranty.




Pros

+ Great ride quality
+ Lightweight
+ Stiff and responsive

Cons

- System wheels and very rare components
- Still not completely proven technology
- Extremely expensive



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesI had my doubts about carbon spoked wheels, but they've been largely abated during the period I had Gulo's GMX-25 wheels on test. They perform as advertised and are one of the lightest and stiffest wheelsets one could buy and, the ride quality is top-notch. I do hesitate to recommend them to anyone other than a weight connoisseur or someone with a spare wheelset since every component of the system is proprietary. Finding replacement parts, depending on locale, could be challenging should the need arise.

I think it's incredibly cool to see people from outside the bike industry bringing a fresh set of eyes and ideas to the table, and believe this kind of innovation can drive a lot of the products we see in the future.
Daniel Sapp



125 Comments

  • 135 16
 $2500 carbon spoke wheels!?! Sounds good to me. I’m stoked on anything that’s not an ebike these days.
  • 38 4
 I went to a lift assist nine park Sunday. There was an eBike in line.
  • 3 2
 @rburroughs4: did yah gawk?
  • 19 2
 @brytar: I couldn’t comprehend why I was seeing an eBike being put on the lift... or why the owner paid for the lift ticket (and the eBike)
  • 6 3
 @rburroughs4: He probably pedals to the hill and wants to save battery for the trip home. Or he is just a lazy ass.
  • 29 1
 @lake-st: MAte of mine has done it, because it's his only bike and he wants the social aspect of being in the uplift van talking crap, abusing eachother etc... It's also about the banter, not just the riding. If he's not involved in that, he may as well just go on his own.
  • 14 1
 @rburroughs4: because sometimes you just want to be with your friends
  • 15 1
 The guy on the ebike at the closed Crested Butte bike park really made me envious as I was slogging up the road. That is a perfect scenario for one. Ebike sticking it to Vail for closing up the park!
  • 33 0
 "100kg / 220lb rider weight limit"

Rules out half of pinkbikers.
  • 11 2
 @in2falling: Only those over age 30. The tubby young ones are still in the 180lb range. Give 'em more time at the keyboard.
  • 4 0
 @in2falling: You're being generous.
  • 1 1
 @Noeserd: Yes! that's a wonderful reason. I wish I could be with my friends right now...
  • 4 0
 @in2falling: yes, a little confused (as someone well above 220) if they're so much stronger why do they put a weight limit on the wheel set. Also does this fall under their "no questions asked" replacement policy?

Customer: "I'd like you to replace the carbon spokes that I broke"
Manufacturer: "Sure - but first I need to ask how fat are you? "
  • 1 0
 @plyawn: If they’re really strong by nature, the manufacturer can build them even lighter weight. Hopefully, at least.
  • 30 1
 @plyawn: Nah, Gotta think creatively on how to deny warranty, like a couple of the lovely warranty techs out there. Here, I'll show you how:

"Hi, I broke my wheel under warranty." - You
"Certainly sir. I just need to fill out the claim form. Do you mind me asking your weight?" - W
"Excuse me? Odd question. I don't really want to discuss my weight. I've been going through a difficult time during lockdown." - You
"I'm sorry sir. It's just that we have a rider weight limit on our frames." - W
"Let me go check." - You
......"...224lbs" - You
"ooohhh...so that exceeds our 220lb maximum rider weight limit sir" - W
"HOLD ON! I'll be right back." - You
"....219" - You
"Sir, you lost 5 lbs?" - W
"Took my work boots off" - You
"Oh....ok. Well that's great. let me just keep filling this out. Do you have a spare wheelset to ride in the meantime?" - W
"Yep. Out in the gear shed." - You
"Got any shiny new bits?" - W
"Nah, just my old stuff." - You
"You ride with a pack or are you strapping your stuff to your bike?" - W
"Pack." - You
"Oh...I'm sorry sir. You're still ineligible. Management just told me we go off your fully dressed weight. I'm going to need to see you in a helmet (Safety First) and riding kit standing on the scale" - W
"FOKKKK!! Be right back." - You
"......202 lbs" - You
"Oh...terribly sorry sir. We're going to have to deny the claim." - V
"FOKKKK!!! Stupid clipless shoes" - You
"Clips sir. They're called clips. Have a good day." - W
  • 2 2
 @blowmyfuse: This should go down in PinkBike as the soon-to-be-most-upvoted comment since the Stevie Smith article.
  • 3 0
 @rosemarywheel: you must be new here. PB minions hate me. Beer
  • 3 0
 @rburroughs4: this reminds me of a time I was scoffed at for having a dropper post on my '11 demo.
  • 2 1
 @blowmyfuse: As in the moderators? I am kinda new, I guess. And Beer is my favorite PinkBIke emoji!!
  • 1 0
 @rburroughs4: cause you can start at the top and go few mountains further
  • 1 0
 @azdog: did they not open evolution this year?
  • 1 0
 @rburroughs4: because some people just wanna watch the world burn!
  • 42 0
 Nah, I’m waiting for a wheelset that uses spider webs as spokes.
  • 5 0
 Agreed! Tioga should bring back the Tension Disc in 29'er.
  • 2 0
 @estelja:
Yea that was the business when getting air in a crosswind!!! Lol
  • 23 0
 I will see somebody on a brand new Yeti getting out of a Sprinter getting ready to crush Hard Times with these very soon.
  • 1 0
 Full send!
  • 9 0
 weaving in between out of state vegetative "hikers" in full Patagonia puffer jacket, skinny jeans kit & Doc Martens. Most likely with the topping of a saggy, back of head beanie on Powerline & stupid dog walkers and newbie parents letting their kids and dogs splash in the foamy stream below the septic treatment tank Beer
  • 2 0
 GET READY TO SEND DOWDY DRAW BOYS
  • 3 0
 @tempest3070: centennial cone doesn't stand a chance
  • 2 0
 If they crush it, and have fun, then what's the issue?
  • 2 0
 I bet they almost make it half way up the jim branch rock garden!
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: wait, that stream is downstream of what? Maybe those spots on my eldest I should get checked out.
  • 1 0
 @slayersxc17: but seriously...isn't that the most disgusting thing? Watching people a 100 yards downstream from that septic treatment facility for the campground letting their dogs and kids splash around like they're in a Coors Light commercial. Very confused
  • 1 0
 @muumuu: love the reference for us CO folks!
  • 16 0
 Or you could buy 12 and a 1/2 bar aligners.
  • 8 0
 Braiding of fibres isn't particular new, isn't it? They cover pulltruded tubes with it too. I wouldn't be surprised if these actually are pulltruded tubes there, which are common and affordable/cheap. I get that a braid provides better impact resistance than a UD composite but regular steel spokes aren't even subject to such extreme impacts that they can't handle it, can they? In the odd unfortunate case you do damage a spoke because of a stick etc a spoke isn't even that hard to replace. Biggest worry isn't so much the spoke though as the pulling force on both hub and rim is an order of magnitude bigger than the lateral force on the spoke. So I'd say in such a case the rim is the critical component as the spoke pulls it out of plane so you're more likely to damage that one, rather than the spoke.
  • 6 0
 Agreed, and what are these wheels doing to prevent galvanic corrosion of the aluminum end of each rim side spoke? This is one of the biggest failure points I've seen on carbon/tubless combo wheels, alloy nipples turning to dust inside the rim in a matter of a single ride season.
  • 2 0
 @dorkbike: zinc anodes all round!!!
  • 4 0
 @dorkbike: couldn't help read this as

WON"T SOMEONE THINK OF THE GALVANIC CORROSION ? ! ! !

good point htough
  • 1 0
 @plyawn: I believe some companies have, like Shimano and Durby Rims.....I'm sure there are more. They drill 2 or 3 tiny breather holes equally spaced through the rim sidewall to help the inside of the rim "breath" and prevent moisture building up.
  • 11 0
 ... or buy a pair of very comparable Newmen ADVANCED SL X.A.25 for just 1400 €.

extra plus: standard spokes
  • 1 0
 Or just but a new bike. Or a nice used one...
  • 8 0
 given that carbon has shown time and time again its impact resistance is not so great and as spokes are pretty much always under tensile load berds spokes make alot more sense to me, i have boats that use the same sort of aramid dyneema fibres and the breaking load on those things are crazy high for their weight!!
  • 6 1
 We use Dyneema lifting gear on our larger 3 ton plus ROVs at work, they spend their life under sea water and i've never even seen them fray at all. We only swap them out every couple of years as a just in case measure.
  • 25 0
 I replaced my coracoclavicular ligaments for dyneema a couple days ago, review soon
  • 27 0
 @iiman: Props for doing that yourself, must have been tricky
  • 2 0
 @Shiny-side-up: We used the PSR version of Dyneema on a 12-ton crane at a previous job, in and out of seawater every day. The lines saw some abrasion abuse in normal use, so part of the acceptance testing was to basically deliberately fray them until they failed a pull test.

Lesson was they can be ugly with wear and still full strength. A few of the tests, I couldn't believe it passed. In terms of strength, heat is much worse than abrasion.
The customer ended up replacing them way more frequently then necessary just because they look so ratty (and on a ship, that's saying a lot)
  • 1 0
 Did a set of the Berd Dyneema spokes on my gravel bike this season as an excuse to do something "exotic." The ride quality is in another realm entirely than steel, and nice components made for a three pound lighter wheelset than the bike came with. Sure, they sketched me out a little bit while I was building them, and maybe on the first ride or two, but once the tensioning was sorted out, I haven't given them a second thought.

The carbon concept is cool, but that's another $1000+ over a set of "string" wheels. And these appear to have a lot more limited an application...
  • 2 0
 Dyneema(ultra high molecular weight polyethyene) has a tendency to creep (stretch) when left under constant load. Or swell in diameter with dirt intrution (which would change it's length).....As such in a wheel this could prove problematic over time or require significant maintenance...There may be methods around this...Not familiar enough about the berds to say if they have employed them....but these are tricky challenges that need to be overcome.

That stated I'd personally welcome back a 29" tioga disc drive. ;o)
  • 1 0
 Another advantage of those string spokes is you can easily carry a spare.
  • 1 0
 @Mikevdv: excellent information there. I think dyneema also isn't great at cyclic loading: if the fibers rub against each other they can damage each other and reduce the overall wire/cable/spoke strength, which then leads to further internal abrasion and eventually failure. and spokes definitely would fall into that cyclic loading usage pattern.
  • 1 0
 @mtb-sf: another disadvantage is you can't easily replace that spare without removing the tire and rim tape/strip.
  • 1 0
 @Weens: yeah, heat is the main thing. in rock climbing, dyneema slings come with a few caveats such as "don't make a prussik with them" because sliding the prussik along the main (nylon) can easily make enough heat to destroy the sling's strength. and the creep factor combined with the overall slipperiness makes knots a sketchy prospect at best.
  • 6 0
 "given that carbon has shown time and time again its impact resistance is not so great"

the myth that modern carbon fiber reinforced plastics are fragile should be done & dead. it's been almost ten years since that great vid from Santa Cruz of trying to break their carbon frames, and the composites have only gotten better since.
  • 4 0
 @just6979: True, Danny Mac hucking a pair of reserve wheels down some stairs with no tires on them should be enough for anybody to get over that nonsense
  • 2 0
 @iiman:

Did you use spell check for that? Props if you didn’t ????
  • 10 0
 textile spokes, lighter, more maximum rider weight, leighter wheelset, half price:

pirope.net/produkte/mountainbike
  • 2 0
 And you can actually carry a spare
  • 9 0
 $2 per gram, that's a sweet deal compared to other addictive substances...
  • 8 0
 Several hours in and still no mention of dentistry
  • 6 0
 All dentists know string spokes are superior. The spare spoke in your pack can also be used as floss after your mid-ride snack.
  • 3 1
 It might just be me on this one, but I never finished a ride and thought how I wished my steel spokes were lighter, stiffer and cost more to replace, but then again I'm not a pro racer. Don't get me wrong, this is awesome cool tech, but is this really needed tech? This reminds me of the Tioga Disc Drive wheel, while exotic and expensive, was it needed, even for John Tomac in the 80's? I hope the best for Gulo Composites.
  • 4 0
 1% of the stuff featured on here is "needed", might as well ask if bikes in general are really needed. It's pretty clear this is not a product for anyone whose scope of interest doesn't exceed the bare minimum, rather they're for someone interested in the exceptional.
  • 2 0
 I can say with 100% certainty that I’ve wished for lighter,stiffer, more durable parts on many different bikes I’ve ridden. I’m no pro racer either. But I can tell when a bike, particularly the wheels, are low quality. You can call it being too used to the expensive stuff but once you have experienced nice equipment it’s just more fun to ride.
  • 1 0
 @HurricaneCycles: please note that I was specifically talking about steel spokes only. I've built and ridden many high quality alloy steel wheels and steel spokes are hard to beat in many ways.
  • 1 0
 @dorkbike: ah! I agreee. I thought you were just talking about the concept of lighter/stronger.
  • 3 0
 I love innovation, and this is really cool, but honestly it makes 0 sense to buy them. How do we balance supporting new companies doing new ideas, support their R&D, but being practical at the same time?
  • 2 0
 Some people have enough disposable income that they can support innovation like this and still consider it practical.
  • 1 1
 you are literally becoming part of their R&D, and paying to do so. They couldn't get something production ready for testing.

Big brain time, if mtb keeps using riders as charged guinea pigs, riders are going to continue to be skeptical with every part of "innovation" that is marketed at us.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: Some of those people with that disposable income are willing to be a bit of a guinea pig, if it can help spur innovation. Free market (mostly), and all that.
  • 4 0
 “They aren't covered for poor line selection or crashing”

What happens if the best line choice option breaks my wheel, and I somehow manage to ride it out???
  • 4 0
 Then they're covered, duh?
  • 1 0
 @mllachance: "well if I took the same line I would have dodged the rock, claim denied."
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: then it's obviously not the same line if you went around the rock, duh
  • 1 0
 @mllachance: vertical dodge, claim denied
  • 2 0
 @RonSauce: has anyone ever said you should work in customer service? you're a natural
  • 3 0
 I'll just say this. I just got the S-works epic evo with the new Roval team sl wheels. They weigh 1240g, 29mm inside width, with a 265lb weight limit... Same price... 2yr crash replacement warranty.
  • 2 1
 Somehow a 100kg rider limit doesn't instill confidence, especially at this price and with all proprietary parts. But it might be interesting for the 'weight connoisseur' (great eufemism) that already has a €8,000 road bike with full lightweight integrated proprietary aero parts.
  • 10 0
 How heavy is your avg XC racer as this is what these wheels are made for?
  • 6 0
 I'm all for the availability of parts with a rider weight limit - I don't need the same amount of material as a rider twice my weight or a WC racer! Lighter options for us beanpoles is always good - even if I'll never afford these particular ones....
  • 3 0
 meh doesn't bother me as it is reasonable and these are super light XC wheels. Been riding Iron Cross wheelset for over 3k miles with rider limit of 190lbs and I'm typically just under 200 no probs.
  • 1 0
 I think a lot of wheels, including aluminum have similar rider weight limits. DT Swiss quotes a 286lb weight limit including the bike on even their Enduro wheels.
  • 1 0
 @Maestroman87: same on Mavic wheels...a sort of legal mention more than a real world stuff.
  • 3 0
 @Imabigboy82: they're really going to miss out on the huge "fat XC racer" market.
  • 5 0
 Tag your Dentists! They'd be all over this.
  • 1 0
 I dig the hub/spoke design with the ability to put a small allen key in the hub-end of the spoke to turn it.

This may be of interest to folks trying to do other methods of fiber-spoke bonding methods. The rim end of the fiber spoke could be the stationary part, with the adjustment end being at the hub.
  • 1 0
 "to give an impact resistance Gulo claim is better than that of any steel spoke on the market."

That's great, but is impact resistance really a large concern for spokes? Certainly some spoke breakages are from a stick or something hitting them, but it's probably not a significant but I would think consistent tensile strength and consistent elastic stretch are the major factors for a spoke.
  • 1 0
 Love high-end wheels. Unfortunately at 215# XC wheels feel like noodles after a bit of riding. Pretty soon I'm tensioning them, checking my frame and over-inflating my tires to get the stiff back. 1600 grams is the new light wheels for me.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, not sold on carbon everything. Too much of everything is not all good, especially when it's supposed to hold you up on speed. It may work for road bikes where the forces on compression of the spokes is a lot less, but I can't see the resin holding up over time with repeated harsh compression on one end and might not have any strain on the opposing end. Carbon rims with stainless double butted spokes have worked great and it's 3-5x cheaper! Build the wheels right with slightly higher tension and you've got a lightweight strong wheel.
  • 1 0
 Yikes Mavic R-sys comes to mind (www.velonews.com/gear/a-shattering-experience-a-post-recall-r-sys-wheel-failure). I've built a set of wheels using DT-rev stainless steel spokes with 240's and 29 in carbon wheels around 1300g for under $1200.
  • 1 0
 My xc wheelset with 28 Aerolites and Carbonfan 30mm rims is lighter and cost $1000, built by me. If I break a rim it's only $185 for a new one and I can source spokes locally if necessary.

What I can't figure out is why they went to alllll this trouble to get special light spokes but then picked heavy components for the rim and hub. Who is this aimed at? Not weight weenies thats for sure.
  • 2 0
 Wait some time, and we'll see this with 50% ou 60% discount....
BTW this wheels recall me this:
www.spinergy.com/content/pbo-spoke-technology
  • 1 0
 It's a shame that spinergy never advanced their hub/rim technology to compete with today's wheelsets. I raced a pair of the xyclone disc wheels back in the late 90's/early 2000's when they first came out. I really liked them back then.
  • 1 0
 @Speedgoat9: Have you looked at their new stuff? It seems like they're back in the game and have a very reasonably priced product. The latest hubs have interchangeable axle sizes and free-hub standards (made by Hadley), and they're making new carbon rims in the USA. I'm about to pull the trigger on a gravel wheel set that's 1475g for $600.
  • 1 0
 My wife has a pair of Spinergy Xyclone wheels on her now ancient bike, the original rear hub bearings failed after a couple of months but the replacements were fine. Well over 10 years old now and have never needed truing/tensioning, but she's not heavy or abusive on gear so you could probably say that about anything.
  • 1 0
 That’s an incredible $ to gram ratio almost 2/1! As someone teetering on the weight limit of these wheels I’m offended. You implied I weigh to much and I read into the whole thing. I’m not fat I’m big boned.
  • 2 0
 Do they make them for BMX? That's the only bike I have which breaks spokes with any regularity.
  • 2 0
 Do you have grind guards to cover the j-bends? The only regular failure i used to see were people grinding through the spokes on rails/walls. If the wheel is well built they shouldn't be regularly failing, even if you ride them hard. Unless BMX'ers are trying to run 28 spoke hubs nowadays.
  • 2 0
 Maybe they should hire someone who understands how to calculate spoke lengths.
  • 2 0
 Call me old fashioned, but if it hits the ground i'll rather use aluminum. DT Swiss 511 until they break.
  • 4 1
 Haven't seen a WC XC race won yet on a set of DT EX511's. You?
  • 1 0
 Aluminum spokes are 1 piece... now we have to mate the ends with aluminum so they can screw in? Not sure why they thought this was ever a good idea.
  • 2 0
 They look like they'll be fun to tension / true. when built up.
  • 1 0
 Steel spokes called, they said Spinergy already tried this 20 years ago with the Spox.
  • 1 0
 wow, 1290 grams. I've never been tempted to spend that much money on a wheelset, but I bet these things are freaking fast.
  • 2 0
 There is a whole lot of un-needed threads on those spokes..
  • 1 0
 ehhh, at that point I might as well purchase Spengle Wheels If i wanted everything to be carbon.
  • 2 2
 “State of the art” spokes......on a 25mm rim. 1998 called and wants their overpriced carbon spoked wheels back. Are they even tubeless?!
  • 1 0
 Looks like a great gravel bike wheel set at that width. MTB? Nah...
  • 1 0
 Interesting, but too effing expensive for something with all proprietary parts and no lifetime warranty.
  • 1 0
 A $100 per mm width, good job they aren't 30mm (that's what she said)
  • 1 0
 Id break them in 5 minutes
  • 1 0
 And useless to me as I'm over the weight limit.
  • 1 0
 enough of the mixed units already!
  • 1 0
 dont worry its only $2.5k
  • 1 0
 Nah Fabric spokes are where its at
  • 1 0
 Cool, but don't see many advantages over bladed spokes.
  • 1 0
 Come again!? They are joking...spokes made of carbon fibre???? WTF!
  • 1 0
 Too expensive; didn't read
  • 1 1
 $2500 wheelset.
$5 valves. ????
  • 1 0
 Wheelset for the 1%
  • 1 2
 Bontrager for the win
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