Review: Hunt's Trail Wide Wheels Deliver Great Performance & Value

Nov 22, 2019
by David Arthur  


Hunt is a small British company that has become quite popular in a relatively short amount of time. They have been specializing in smartly designed and affordably priced wheels for the road and gravel markets for a couple of years now, and last year branched out into the mountain bike market. Keen to see what they’re all about, we called in the Trail Wide 29” wheels for review.

The Trail Wide was launched last year, along with the Enduro Wide and XC Wide. As the name suggests, these are wide wheels, each with a dedicated width and spoke lacing to suit the demands of the intended usage. The Trail Wide is available in 27.5” and 29” and has a 30mm internal width aluminum rim running on the company’s own hubs, and come tubeless-ready with tape and valves pre-installed.

Hunt Trail Wide Wheels
• 30mm internal rim width
• 6069 aluminum rims
• 4.3° RapidEngage hubs
• 27.5" or 29" options
• 28F / 32R Spoke Count
• Triple butted (2.2-1.6-2.0) PSR reinforced Pillar Spokes
• Weight: 1,832g (29" actual weight)
• MSRP: $449 USD / £349
www.huntbikewheels.com
They can be ordered direct from Hunt's website with a choice of SRAM XD, HG or new Shimano Microspline-compatible freehubs, Boost or Super Boost, and in the box are included spare spokes and spoke key. A nice touch. Hunt also offers free worldwide shopping on wheels.

Hunt Trail Wide 29er wheels

Hunt Trail Wide 29er wheels
Novatec aluminum hubs spin on Japanese EXO oversized double sealed bearings
Hunt Trail Wide 29er wheels
A 30mm internal rim width is intended for tires between 2.35 and 2.6"


Picking the right wheelset is all about assessing the type of riding you do and the demands you place on your kit. It’s often a fine balance between maintaining low weight with enough ruggedness to not fail when you’re miles from home. The Trail Wide isn’t quite as beefy as the tougher Enduro Wide wheelset, nor is the rim as wide (30mm versus 33.3mm) but they are made from the same 6069 aluminum with a welded construction, and using 28 spokes in the front wheel and 32 in the back as opposed to 32 front and 36 rear. Spokes are triple-butted Pillar PSRs with alloy nipples. Those subtle differences help to trim the weight; the 29” wheels pictured weighing 1,832g on my scales (1,022g rear, 810g front).

Hunt reckons the use of triple-butted spokes contributes greatly to the cost of the wheels, but it's worth it as it adds strength and helps to reduce weight when compared to lesser quality spokes. The rims are tubeless-ready using an H-lock bead, and come with tape and valves pre-installed - the company will even fit tires for you if you want a wheelset that is truly ready to ride from the box.

Novatec aluminum hubs spin on Japanese EZO oversized double sealed bearings, while a RapidEngage freehub provides a speedy 4.3º engagement angle with six pawls for quick pickup when getting on the gas. You can choose from SRAM XD, Shimano HG or the newer Microspline freehubs. Disc rotors are attached using the 6-bolt standard and you can choose Boost or Super Boost spacing. Since I had requested Boost hub spacing there was no fiddling with end caps to worry about, so it was a case of slapping on an SRAM cassette to the XD driver and fitting the wheels to the bike.


Hunt Trail Wide 29er wheels
All bearings are still running smoothly after months of hard use.
Hunt Trail Wide 29er wheels
The work-hardened shot-peened finish on the rims looks smart


Setup

Tubeless setup was mostly good. A set of Maxxis tires inflated the first time with a regular track pump and I was out on the trail in no time. A set of Specialized tires proved a bigger challenge and required a couple of extra layers of tape and a tubeless inflator to get the bead to pop into place on the rim. That's less the fault of Hunt and more an issue around a lack of a clear tubeless standard in the industry; while tubeless is much easier than it was 10-15 years go, there's still room for improvement. With the tires installed there were no issues with the bead popping off through punctures or heavy landings. The H-Lock bead seat has raised bead locks on either side of the channel designed to lock the tire in place. It works - the tires stayed glued to the rims during use. Even when I had a puncture the beads stayed locked into the rims.


hunt trail wide


Performance

There is a lot to like about Hunt’s Trail Wide wheelset when you take into account the specification and the price. But does the performance live up to expectations? I’ve been testing the wheels over several months on a Specialized Stumpjumper EVO and my riding has included all my local trails, largely a mixture of loamy singletrack with a few rocks thrown in to keep you on your toes, and a week in Andorra that was spent scaring myself silly in the Vallnord bike park, and also exploring the stunning natural singletrack hidden in the surrounding mountains with 15km long descents a taste of the stunning ride on offer there. Book a holiday there, you won't regret it.

Back to the wheels. For many people, weight is a key concern and is often the primary reason for an upgrade. The holy grail would be a seriously lightweight wheel with the strength of a downhill wheelset, but until that wish is delivered, it’s a question of compromise. The Trail Wide’s hit a pretty decent sweet spot and compare well to the competition, more so when you factor in the low price. The weight is comparable to other aluminum wheels and in some cases is lighter than carbon.

They certainly saved a load of weight compared to the aluminum Roval Traverse wheelset they replaced on my bike. On the trail, I noticed the change immediately. The bike felt snappier and faster, easier to get up to speed and livelier in the turns. It shows just how important wheels are to the way a bike rides, and especially on many entry- to mid-range bikes that are hobbled by lumpen wheels.

hunt trail wide

It’s really tricky to talk about compliance and stiffness when you’ve got a couple of inches of suspension and fat low-pressure tires, and outside of a laboratory in the real world with all its pesky variables, but I’d say the Trail Wides have a nice muted feel on the trail that holds back some of the vibrations from passing through to the contact points. They don’t have the pingy feel I’ve experienced with some carbon wheels I’ve ridden in the past. They are very assured though, and go about their business with little fuss or drama. And then you remember the price, which becomes increasingly astonishing the more you ride the wheels.

The freehub makes a satisfying noise when freewheeling, just enough to alert walkers to your presence if riding a shared access path on the way to the trails. Stamping on the pedals reveals near-instant engagement too. It’s funny talking about freehub engagement because these days most wheels are of such a high-quality that determining minute differences in engagement response is tricky. Unless the freehub is doing something janky, you’re not going to notice anything out of the ordinary.

The wheels look good too. A plain black finish and understated decals ensure they’ll look fine on any bike, from the cheapest to the most bling. They’re not chintzy or loud like some wheels with overbearing graphics, and I like that. The rims are shot-peened for durability and they are still looking good for the most part, though there are a few scratches where rocks or other impacts have sliced through to the metal. Bearing durability and spoke tension has been fine after several months of riding through all trail conditions, the wheels are still spinning as smoothly as when I pulled them out of their packaging and the spokes are still straight and the wheels true. I love the attention to detail in supplying not only spare spokes but a decent spoke key too. But I’m happy I’ve been able to leave them both in the packaging. At this price and with this sort of performance they make a very good upgrade over some cheaper stock wheels.


Pros

+ Wide and strong rims
+ Smooth and quick engaging hubs
+ Low price
Cons

- Some tubeless installation issues
- Might have to wait until they're in stock



Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesFor trail riders or enduro racers who are light on their equipment looking to trim weight, the Hunt Trail Wide is a very good wheelset that is strong, light and durable. They’re ideal for hitting up trail centers every weekend, backcountry adventures into the unknown, or a week of pure descending in the mountains or bike park. Heavier or harder riders might lean towards the tough Enduro Wide wheelset, but for me, the Trail Wides hit the sweet spot of performance and price.David Arthur








173 Comments

  • 27 1
 I've had them for half a year and my experience is very similar.

*) come tubeless ready and sometimes it can be tricky to inflate without compressor (no difference to my other wheels though)
*) they are light and strong with a good pickup
*) the freehub is quite loud (some like it, I didn't but got used to it now I don't notice it anymore)
*) they do dent a tad easier than other rims when you really go to town on rocky trails but they still run true and hold air
*) other than that they just work and I don't notice them which is kinda what I'm looking for in a wheelset

To give you an idea where I found the limits of my setup, here's the trail I got the dents and completely wrecked my Minion EXO rear tire: www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvoBcRFRTzA
For reference: I am 80kg geared up and I have since switched to a Minion DD rear tire, now it works like a charm.
  • 5 0
 oh and I'm running them on a Canyon Spectral 160/150.
Not only (but especially when) considering the price this is a really good wheelset for trailriding. I'm sure there are things you can measure that make other wheelsets better but I honestly don't know what other wheelsets could offer for me to want to pay more for them.
  • 1 0
 @wowbagger: what yould you Pick?
The BC Loamer or the Hunt?

When my stock Roval set breaks Im thinking about these two but cant really decide.

The Funworks AM Ride is also light and "cheap"
  • 5 0
 @NotNamed: can't comment on the BC Loamer (had them on the shortlist but couldn't find reviews or opinions..) nor the funworks, sorry.
What I can say is: from my experience so far I'd buy Hunt again.
  • 1 0
 When you say they dent, would you compare it to another rim brand?
  • 4 0
 @mae-fr: yes, my DT Swiss XM481 were definitely stronger
  • 1 0
 @wowbagger: thanks, seems like a good rim for trail/enduro, I know the XM481 and they can handle tough treatment.
  • 2 0
 Definitely a soft rim, second ride out on the full suspension bike big dent in the rear on a small rock section which i have run over countless times on the hardtail with spank, stans flow ex and even crank bros iodine never having issues!! Tyre flatted and was holding air but any pressure in the area lost air had to straighten with a spanner and hammer and now near back to normal crap really as they say there designed to be able to run soft pressures wont be buying again or recommending to anyone.
  • 2 0
 @mae-fr: indeed, those 481s are ridiculously strong and not even that heavy, I think they weigh about the same as the Stans Flow MK1. I had them for 2 years, normal EXO casing, did have some nasty hucks and they were running perfectly true and looked like new when I sold the bike.. on a 29er no less (now I'm running 27.5) so that's even more impressive.
So yeah, once these Hunt rims are on their way out I guess I'll replace them with the 481s Smile
  • 3 0
 For Canadian's or British Columbian's looking for a local aluminum option, check out Tairin Wheels. Built in Vancouver, they design and build their own wheels including their own 96 tooth (3.75 degree engagement) hubs. All for very good prices.

www.tairinwheels.ca
  • 2 0
 @islandforlife: Tairin seem to me to be a great option. And they have great warranty coverage too, if memory serves correctly.
  • 1 0
 lightweight? isnt the claimed weight 1832g? doesnt seem light to me.. thats more than mf WeAreOne wheels weigh
  • 1 0
 @wowbagger: FWIW they make an even stronger and slightly heavier version in the ex511
  • 1 0
 @wowbagger: cheers I'll Take that into consideration Smile
  • 1 0
 @brodie001: I came very close to buying the enduro wheels, but heard from a few people how soft they are.
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: nice looking sight, good info. Thanks
  • 1 0
 I always thought tubeless ready meant they needed tape and stems, similar to how clipless means you need clips.
  • 1 0
 @iantmcg: Yes tubeless ready is a bit of an older standard now.. because it basically means the rims are of a standard that are made to handle a tubeless set-up. Which is common now... but wasn't so common maybe 5 years ago? May come with tape and valves... may come with just tape.. may not come with either.
  • 2 1
 @islandforlife: not sure of there are many rims that can't be made tubeless ready with the right tape. Tape can make any time tubeless.

Tubeless ready is more about the tire, because tape can't do a damn thing to make a tire air tight. Many tires that are not tubeless ready and not UST will weep endlessly thought the sidewall, and no amount of sealant will help.
  • 2 1
 @privateer-wheels: Some of the older rim profiles would be really hard to get a tire to seat tubeless.. the older rims definitely had to be done ghetto tubeless style... tubeless ready tires or not.
  • 2 0
 @friendlyfoe @wowbagger DT Swiss make an even stronger and heavier version in the fr560

The xm481/ex511/fr560 are all fantastic. It just depends on your particular needs.
  • 2 0
 @metaam @brodie001 @wowbagger @privateer-wheels
Hey,
Thanks for all the feedback, as a young brand we're always listening to riders as it's simply the best way to improve.

First off, I'd like to apologise for those who have had issues with our rims and would like to assure them we will do everything we can do to keep them happy and enjoying trails. Depending on the situation, that may be warranty replacement or a 40% crash discount on rim pricing (which we aim to rebuild within 7 working days).

Learning from rider experiences, we have been looking at our range and how we can better serve riders. One such step is bringing impact testing in-house, so we can prototype and test much quicker. It will be a continual improvement process, as we are not happy unless we can create products riders are happy and confident riding.

If you do have any suggestions or feedback, please do get in touch with us at support@huntbikewheels.com
  • 25 10
 screw those novatec hubs, they are a shit foundation for a wheel.
My friend had some Novatec's on her hightower that had bulging hub shell for large freehub interface that stood the test of time; that in mind I bought a novatec hub that looks like the one in this wheel and it only lasted a month or so before the xd freehub body blew up from normal use. I tried to get novatec to replace it but they seem to have no support in USA. I contacted their head office and they said they were sending me one but never did and wouldn't respond any more. They are cheap pieces of junk which i regret trying to use to save money. if you are looking for quality wheels look elsewhere.

Also, 30mm internal rim isn't wide unless your a grape smuggling type. I was running i29mm rims in 2008, going to i34 rims was a huge improvment in tire stability even with undersized "2.3" like maxxis makes.
  • 2 0
 My Novatec back hub has a crappy three pawl arrangement, with each pawl both retained and sprung by a cheap metal band. Also the ratchet ring slides very easily out of the slightly mangled notches inside the hub shell. Crunch crunch crack ping jump skip slip crack bang. Terrible design. Would not recommend. These hubs are different but still, I wouldn’t take the risk with so many great options about.
  • 49 0
 Hey,
Thanks for the feedback. Really sorry to hear about the experience you've had with Novatec.

We work closely with all our suppliers to develop product we're proud of, in this case upgrading our with EZO bearings and better seals. We have tested extensively and found they offer excellent pickup, strength and durability. However, if something were to going wrong we try to offer an 'above and beyond' service to keep you out on the trails. We have stock of all replacement parts needed, offer 40% crash replacement and a very open warranty policy.

We are welcome any feedback and will always keep listening to riders like yourself.
  • 10 1
 Grape smuggling type?? Which is exactly what ?
  • 1 0
 I'm sure it's easier dealing with Hunt than Whyte or Novatec to get replacement parts or details regarding the hubs. I had Novatec hubs on my stock wheelset, and the front is still going strong, but the rear was a constant issue for two years.

•Broken pawls, scratching internal drive
•Multiple instances of bearing failure, even after replacing with quality bearings
•Finally, the xD shell snapped, bending my axle, and seizing my wheel in my frame
  • 1 0
 @HuntBikeWheels:

Quite certainly your company would be more responsive and quick to repair or replace broken parts.
I suppose there is the chance that my hub was the exception rather than the rule... I'm heavier than most at 90kg/195#

The reason for my bitter warning is i'm frustrated by time off the bike due to low quality parts breaking.
lots of people on a trip or trying to keep up training / sanity do not have an extra wheel ready on hand and if there is a hub part failure will sadly be out of commission for a week if your lucky, or more.

Considering that good hubs can last a very long time under strenuous use, and a failed hub spells big problems, i dont think it is a good place to pinch pennies.

I think the issue was the freehub body itself. there doesnt seem to be a lot of or quality material keeping the pawls from blowing out the freehub. The bearings, axle, seals and hubshell seemed fine, I also really liked the amount of engagement in a economy hub.

i try to be an optimist, but the rule CHEAP, LIGHT, STRONG - PICK TWO still applies it seems.
  • 2 0
 @jjhobbs: He means XC racers who wear lycra
  • 2 0
 @getsomesy I can understand what you say, but I can't full agree. I have been through the Novatec hype of ”cheap and good” and I can tell you this: they make cheap and affordable hubs and they also make hubs that are not that cheap but still a very good deal compared to the boutique brands out there. So if you are getting their most basic industrial bearing hubs that probably are also specced as OEM on a lot of bikes, you are not getting something else than mediocrity. But if you buy their upper end ones, those will rock you boat. I mean, their best rear hub with the cantilever engagement system is nothing short of spectacular, but they are pretty hard to find. I am suspecting bands like Race Face make their hubs over there and use the same technology under a different name, so Novatec is busy making hubs for their customers and are less focused on selling their own stuff. It is only my suspicion and I could be wrong. I would buy one of those upper echelon hubs in this very second if I found one that fits my set-up. Smile

Cheers!
  • 2 0
 @Maxipedia: the Cantaliever freehub thing... that is what i meant by the hub with bulging hub shell. those seem to be fine hubs in my experience.. They were OEM on some of santa cruz wheels. the other type of 148mm hub they made is the type i had failure with and that seems to be in hunts wheels. it had nothing to do with the bearings there was no slop there, it was the freehub system that was the issue.
funny that you cant agree, seeing as were saying the same thing different ways and a number of people are echoing my expereince themselfs.
  • 2 0
 The Factor hubs are sweet so it’s not that Novatec doesn’t make any good hubs... but these rear ones look very much like my Nukeproof one that has proven to be not very good. Looking at it from the other side, they are cheap so what should I expect?
I have heard and experienced mediocrity from Novatec but as you say, their top end hubs are not popular because at the price they sell for there are a lot of options from brand names.
  • 2 0
 I have also had a Novatec hub ruin a ride. The entire freehub mechanism was press fit into the hub and started rotating. I looked at the drawings on their website and yep it wasn't pinned or anything , just depended on friction fit. No longer remember what model they were they came on a Light Bicycle rim set and were just the house brand novatecs they were selling that day. I know they make many models but when a hub fails 2 hours into a 6 hour ride, I'm done with that brand.
  • 1 0
 @HuntBikeWheels: agree. Novatech hubs come on the largest majority of the Kona bikes in our shop. Terrible results.
  • 4 0
 Not exactly "the companies own hubs" as the article states.

I wish PB/companies would be more transparent about this. I don't have an issue with catalog products per se, but when they are passing it off as "their own design" when they basically just called out bearing spec and put logos on it doesn't give the best brand impression.
  • 1 0
 Novatec do make some good hubs, I'm sure of that. Perhaps these ones that Hunt use are the good ones.
  • 2 0
 I work for Novatec. You can call the office from 9-5 EST at (706)408-0139 We cover all our hubs for 2 years from the original date of purchase, including these. If you look on our website, Novatecusa.net you will quickly find a customer service inquiry page, warranty submission page, and other avenues of reaching out to us.
  • 2 0
 @TheMotoGiveth:
Hmm pretty sure i submitted a warranty through you the service request form with PoP, didnt get a reply, and then called, emailed on June 3: "Your message wasn't delivered to customerservice@www.novatecusa.net because the address couldn't be found, or is unable to receive mail."
figured novatecusa was just a shell with nothing under it.

I will try again though, thanks for saying so.
  • 1 0
 I’ve been running some novatec for two years now and they felt like they wasn’t going to last long from day one, occasional slip and weird noises but somehow they’re still working. Definitely wouldn’t recommend though.
  • 4 0
 @getsomesy: There shouldn't be a www in the email address I'm guessing.
  • 2 0
 Getting parts for Novatec hubs in America is like pulling teeth...and so many companies rebrand Novatec hubs too. I had a set of FSA wheels (made by Novatec) that needed a freehub. It was actually cheaper for me to buy an entirely new hub from one of the eBay importers and just scavenge parts off said new hub, than trying to buy just the freehub through a Novatec parts dealer (located in Europe).
  • 1 0
 @markinator: Good catch! my mistake!
Still no call back or response to my warranty submission though.
  • 2 0
 @bikefoole:
Thanks for the feedback, sorry to hear of your previous experience with Novatec.

To be completely open, they did face some issues with the previous generation hub, however have since made a number of changes to improve the quality and durability of their hubs.

Like a number of manufacturers, Novatec make a wide range of products from entry to high end hubs. We only use hubs we have tested ourselves and can assure you we are a fussy bunch. The updated 3° hub is the one we have been running for a while now and found them to be very reliable whilst providing a rapid pick up.

If you were to ever face a problem we stand by all our products with a 3 year warranty and as riders ourselves always aim to provide the service we'd expect.

We're always listening to riders and wanting to provide the best products we can, so any feedback please do let us know.
  • 13 0
 Hunt wheels seem to get universally great reviews in the UK press but in my very small anecdotal experience (me and a friend) the reality hasn't matched the hype. I bought a pair for my CX bike and I've never had a pair of wheels go out of true so quickly. They were like bananas after 2 months of not very intense riding and the spokes were unbelievably loose. My mate bought a pair for his road bike and had the opposite problem. Over tensioned spokes snapped on two separate rides in their first month of use(once necessitating a £40 cab ride home). I won't be putting these on my mountain bikes.
  • 2 0
 indeed!! even the comments and user praise are "wahooish" like everything is somehow perfect and don't you dare say it otherwise - I've noticed that too specially on the roady/cx scene.
  • 5 0
 @t-stoff: i see it differently - i read all the reviews i could find before i bought them in spring and none of them said "they are perfect", just that they simply work well without any hustle. i remember MBR saying the 1501s are better but it's hard to justify more than twice the price.
and that's spot on for me. i'm not going to throw 2k wheels on my 2.5k bike, I just want something reasonably light that will keep spinning for a year or two without me having to touch it.
  • 7 0
 I've used novatec hubs once before on a set of JRA wheels. Never again. They're just a constant ball ache
  • 1 0
 Yep, rims are ding central. I’ve never seen such a soft rim before ding so easily under a relatively light rider.
  • 1 0
 @wowbagger: I'm not criticizing your choice, I do the same read a lot before buying - and you don't need to spend 2.5 k on a wheelset, there's tons to choose from and lot's of discontinued sales around the web.
I was in the market for a wheelset for my road bike and noticed that somehow there's was these huge crowd saying awesome things about these brand, one to put shame most brands devoted fan base - probably not the Wahoo ones ;D that's all.
  • 4 2
 @wowbagger: buy a hope wheelset.....job done!
  • 1 0
 @t-stoff: ok I'm not following anything road-related so there's definitely a blindspot i can't comment on Smile

@marko369 no need Big Grin got a well-running wheelset for now. maybe sometime in the future. do they offer a wide-rimmed, sub 1800g wheelset for less than 500 bucks?
  • 2 0
 @irishkiwimadman: Exactly the same experience. Had a pair or JRA wheels and the Novatec Freehub body is so soft it made switching cassettes near impossible.
  • 4 0
 @jaspersdog: Quality control is lacking some hubs last a day others a yr maybe, the pocket where the pawl sits cracks pawl fails and can lockup your wheel.

Just get a DT Swiss lots of parts available but you wont need them.

Using shitty hubs to build good wheels doesn't work.
  • 1 0
 There's definitely a lot of hype over the Hunt stuff for gravel biking too. On one FB Gravel group I follow you could be mistaken for thinking that they're the only option available at the lower end of the market whenever anyone asks for recommendations. I like that you get a few spare spokes and a spoke key with each wheelset though and they can fit and tubeless your tyres if you buy them at the same time which is probably useful for some.
  • 1 0
 Man....I need better wheels on my Kona Process 153SE. Every time I read a review of Hunt, I think they sound perfect. My stock hubs engage so slow and the rim profile is only 25mm. Would love a bit wider rim and quick engagement without having to buy wheels that cost almost as much as my bike.

So, what else is at a similar price to the Hunt's with quicker than OE engagement in 27/5?
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: you could see if Superstar Components have a good set available - I had one of theirs (I think Pacenti on their own hubs which are - or were back then - Novatec hubs, just as the ones on the Hunt Wheels) a few seasons ago and they were very good too..
Other than that, for that kind of money, I don't know that much, maybe someone else does. I was tempted to get Newmen wheels which are said to be brilliant if a bit stiff but those cost nearly twice as much.

If you have a good wheelbuilder at hand - which I don't - I'd see what a set of DT 350 hubs laced to some XM481 wheels would cost, I don't know if they'll be quite as light as the Hunt wheels but they should last forever..
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: If there's anything, I've not heard it. Bontrager has some carbon ones but I think they're more expensive.
  • 1 0
 @wowbagger: Superstar's new hubs are worth a look, they're made by superstar in house now. They have some deals on wheels atm so worth a look.

Hope stuff is another solid option.

Might find some Black Friday deals too.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: was considering these wheels but managed to find a set of Raceface Turbines for similar money in a sale. They have 120 point engagement. Have a shop around.
  • 1 0
 wheels need retrued after broken in.
Basically every aluminum wheel ever, even ones meticulously built by skilled builders, will need /should be retensioned after a break in period because the rim and spokes maybe will settle into their seats and the rim will wear in from flexing.
it should also probably be done to carbon wheels, but seems to be less critical/ noticable as the rim doesnt deform as much, still spoke tension will likely drop unevenly.

I think the soft aluminum rim proponents in the industry are full of BS. Harder aluminum dents less, which is better IMO.

@jjhobbs Grape smugglers = Lycra wearing types / road bikers
  • 1 0
 @getsomesy: Back in the day of truly archaic bike and rock bashing, soft rims saved dollars because you could stuff a DH tube in and wobble all day long. Harder rims would split and crack, moreso from the ass hattery that we did and the bad tire/tube/rim tech....but they cost a fortune. D321's come to mind as the most likely to stay true but split.
Sun/Ringle Singletrack rims took it too freaking far in the end though. I peeled tires off of those stupid things after a few good whacks.

The "basic" SX25 WTB rims on my bike have held up running DD casing Minions for the better part of a year and I don't know that I got 3 months out of any rim back in the day except a Rhyno Lite. And you had to have metal tire levers or a meaty flathead screwdriver for install... hah

Tech has gotten so much better almost regardless of the price point. But the price points have gotten pretty absurd for something covered in a thin sheath of rubber.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: i started hucking in 03' which i'm pretty sure qualifies as back in the day.
I agree with you about rhyno lites - they were a harder rim though.

ringle mtx and dt swiss rims were soft. i think they made up the soft rim bs but it was just marketing conjecture.

mavic rims were hard durable and well regarded. alex rims like supra b were also hard. the hard rims always withstood more of a beating than the soft ones. i'd rather and i think most people would, rather have a rim survive than a friggin inner tube. If you case something really hard and crack a strong hard rear rim a little bit then so be it, hopefully that is quite rare for your sake and that of the landings.

tough guys have always changed tires without levers x-D

the current crop of soft aluminum wheels also dent easily, which sucks especially since they are like 90$
  • 1 0
 @wowbagger:

Less than 1800g for sub 500 bucks, do you ride 20” wheels? Not sure 1800g is considered reasonably light, it’s xc light.

Enve M730 and Industry 9 seem to be THE dream build on here, 1851g according to Enve website and over $2500.......think your dreaming.

If you do find what your looking for, gimme a shout please pal
  • 1 0
 @marko369:
Hunts 29ers are close to 1800g (my 275s are 1750 so that's what i was referring to)
Newmen SL A 30 in 29 are 1760g
BC costing ~700
BC Loamer are 1760g in 29 and cost 400

That's just off the top of my head - there must be lots of other options
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: Hope pro 4 with WTB asymmetric or DT Swiss rims in your preferred size and width don’t skimp on the spokes.
  • 1 0
 @marko369: Yup, this! I've been using Hope hubs on various rims /bikes for years with ZERO issues!
  • 2 0
 @ridestuff: I've killed a hope SS hub, sent it back they couldn't figure out why.
Hopes have low engagment and really narrow spoke bracing angle, which sucks.
  • 1 0
 @getsomesy: pro 4 is something like 45 points of engagement, which isn’t bad for something that was designed to never slip and last for years. DT is 54 with the £80 ratchet upgrade from something like 20.
  • 1 0
 @getsomesy: "wheels need TO BE retrued after BEING broken in" That's the job of the stress relief phase of the building, back when people knew how to build wheels and put verbs in their sentences.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: I used to know 3 very good wheel builders locally & they helped me a ton. One used to get mad at me and scream "What the hell are you doing? Learn to ride!" So I took him to the ORV park that I rode at near my college campus and he got hooked on pinning it through gnarly stuff....and split his Deemax. Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: My point was clear, you pedantic turd.
If you think that stress relieving a wheel in a shop is going to break in/ bed it in to a consistent state of tension as much as riding gnar for 20 hours, you are wrong.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Yeah and Hadleys are 72p I9 Torch are 120p I9, Hydra are 690p, and Onyx hubs are infinite.
Hopes and DT only have quick engagement if they are compared to utter shit; they are far from top shelf hubs and cost far more than they are worth.
  • 1 0
 @getsomesy: I can’t speak for DT but I know hope like to make things that last I’m sure they’re more than capable of making high engagement hubs if that’s what they wanted.
  • 2 0
 Wasn't expecting the word pedantic to be thrown around in here...like some sort of verbal trident!!!
  • 9 0
 Hate to be that guy...But
my experience with hunt wheels in the past few years has been nothing but terrible, At my work we have never seen so many wheels brought in for freehub servicing/ replacement.
we are not a hunt dealer and have found that the customer service at hunt is aweful, being sent the wrong parts on 3 seperate occasions.
Maybe the customers of leeds have had bad luck but it seems to be an issue to us.

keep this in mind folks.
cheers
  • 3 1
 Hey @rivet-team ,
Really sorry to hear about your experience of our Customer Service. We always aim to go above and beyond in serving riders, but in this case have clearly let you down.

We are always working on ways to improve, one of which being new ways to identify and ship the correct items as we know any delays keep riders off the trails.

Although we hope it's not needed, all of our freehubs are covered by a three year warranty.
  • 6 0
 I’m running Hunt wheels and am a fan. I think any disappointment in the strength of these comes down to expectations. I bought the trail wide wheels and ended up with a small flat spot in the rear. I honestly felt like the terrain I was riding matched their description for the intention of the trail wide wheels and I only weight 72kg fully kitted.

I contacted Hunt about it and they were fantastic with their support and offered a replacement enduro wide rear wheel Instead. It’s been great and since then.

For the price, quality and support - you can’t do much better.
  • 5 0
 Hunts customer service is great and my wheels are still 'going round' after nearly a year, however....Unfortunately, the rims dent very easily, especially the Trail wides. In my opinion they are not suitable for the style of riding they are marketed for. I ended up with about 6 dents in the rear wheel after a few rides in the Surrey hills... Thankfully Hunt stand by their product and provided me with an Endurowide rear wheel as a replacement. The Enduro wide has been better, but I have only ever run it with Cushcore and have still managed to dent the rim in a couple of places. Its still running fairly true and the tyre still seals, but I cant imagine how these could be run by the EWS riders for any prolonged period of time...
  • 1 0
 I'll add a little more detail for reference... I'm 72kg kitted, riding a Transition Sentinel, 22psi in the rear with Cushcore, dented both Trail and Enduro wide rims. Previously I ran a set of E13 TRSR wheels for 3 years, zero dents...
  • 5 0
 No at RC hubs are not garbage. They’re actually more a waste of material, they become garbage as they age.

D Ed hey wound anyone choose the lowest quality component to be placed in the most important and hardest to location to replace?

Choose good hubs, quality spokes, decent rims, consider the rims expendable, spokes reusable, and hubs rebuildable.

Hunt has their build choice backwards, but they have their market: dumb people.
  • 10 3
 I hear they dent super easily from all my friends who ran/run them - not mentioned here...
  • 4 0
 Really? I've heard nothing of the sort.
  • 16 0
 heard this about every ally rim there is, maybe put some more air in the tyres?
  • 1 0
 I wouldn't say super easily but I can confirm that my XM481s were stronger. That being said, even with the odd dent they run true and hold air perfectly.
  • 1 0
 With that weight that´s something I´d expect... all alloy rims can get dents but some are more likely!
  • 1 0
 @nojzilla: mavic deemax don't dent. they dent the earth. These ones i've had for years. My favorite silver ones Smile

images.app.goo.gl/UrR1ti3JM1SC96pv6
  • 6 0
 @milanboez: I hear from you that all of your friends, that you have heard from, have told you to tell others here, what you have heard, that there is a dent epidemic, highly associated with these rims. Or so i've heard..
  • 1 0
 that price and weight must come from somewhere. Cant put super light hubs below 700e
  • 3 1
 Agreed. Had a set on my other half’s bike & she’s not exactly Rachel Atherton & the rear wheel is a mess.

2 other friends running trail wides and all are covered in dings. They are super soft alloy. If you want tough and light, go with DT Swiss, but you have to pay for the privilege
  • 3 0
 @nojzilla: I agree. Dent comments should always be accompanied with air pressure details.
Every rim will dent enetually if you ride in rock gardens with sub 20 psi. That low air pressure trend came with +size wheels. +size wheels died but low psi trend stayed....
  • 2 0
 Dented both trail and enduro rear wheels within a few rides, trail is dead but enduro still holds air.
Yeah, like soft French cheese. Hardtail with ~30psi DD tyre.
  • 1 0
 @HuckersNeck: or Newman, they're even a bit cheaper.
  • 1 0
 @Pedal-Bin: Never? CTRL+F "dent" in this thread.
  • 4 1
 I have dented my Enduro Wides several times and i did so on my DT swiss. To say easily is hard because every impact is different.
  • 2 0
 @gapos999: There's heaps of variability in pressure gauge accuracy, so even that doesn't help all that much. I say if you're banging your rim into rocks you don't have enough air in your tyres. But I'm old fashioned like that.
  • 1 0
 @markinator: spot on mate!!!
  • 1 0
 @gapos999: They are supported riders so they aren't in a position to say anything negative publicly. Of course they've ran plenty of other rims so 'dent easily' is compared to other rims (say DT EX471/511) of similar weight/intended use. The rim is very shallow so you can see, structurally, how this would be the case. A few people supported by Hunt have been sent the DH rims for this reason.
  • 4 0
 I have enduro wides that I'm wheely happy with. I managed to destroy a rim (my own fault, too low tire pressure) but Hunt can provide spares without much hassle. Everything spins freely and hubs are still clean internally after more than a season. As many will mention, they are perhaps not the most resilient rims out there but the wheels are still definitely worth it in my opinion.
  • 2 0
 Same here. I have the Enduro Wides and have dented as well but I also give them a beating, just the same as my DT Swisses.
  • 4 0
 What do you mean "oversize bearings"? There is a 12mm axle on the inside and a freehub body of constant size on the outside. Two unmoving constraints in every hub. There is a maximum sized cartridge bearing that most hubs use and it just can't get any over size from there.

I like the triple butted spoke. Good design there. Can't say the same about that rim profile. Can't say I would ever buy a Novatec product.

These wheels look good for light users on a budget. There's definitely a place for them.
  • 3 1
 Sure they can. The thru axle is 12mm, which is the inside diameter (ID) of the hub axle. The outside diameter (OD) of the hub axle (not to be confused with the thru axle) can be any size, 15mm, 17mm, etc. This axle OD, is generally the ID of the bearing. fatter the axle, the larger the bearing will usually be, which is then reflected by a larger hub shell.

The bearings in these hubs are actually the same you would find in a stock set of Project 321 hubs. They are REALLY good - like as good as DT Swiss or King, in my opinion. And superior to the Enduro bearings you find in many hubs.

Novatec makes a wide gamut of products. The entry level and mid tier stuff is bland, you're right. Their highest end hubs however (and rims), perform as well as almost any other ultra high end hub, without the eye-watering price tag. Matter of fact, their highest end hub, the 601/602 hubs, have quite a few Crankworx and EWS podiums in the last 1-2 years alone. Two riders just rode RedBull Rampage on Novatec wheels with these hubs as well. There's some big name riders using them with great success. Also a good contingent of US racers on them in North Carolina and Virginia, as they have boots on the ground in Virginia.

Check out Factor components - that's the offshoot of Novatec that they use to market the high end hubs.
  • 1 0
 I should also point out that their highest end hubs have 3 degrees of engagement, or 120 points of engagement. Similar to an Industry Nine Torch.
  • 1 0
 And by Virginia I mean Georgia.
  • 3 0
 My experience with Hunts "4 season" disk road wheels led me to buy the "Enduro Wide" wheels for my MTB.
The road wheels are coming into their 3rd season and have covered c. 10k km although I'm on the 3rd rear tyre I have not had a single issue with the wheel set and they still run as true as the day I bought them.
The MTB wheels survived a week of rocky Enduro/DH riding in the South of Spain and a long weekend in the Ligurian Alps, numerous rides around the peak district, Hamsterley, Revo etc. Unfortunately my new bike is boost spacing so these have now been resigned to my spare wheels (using adapters for boost) Come on Hunt!!
I am a big fan of the other British component/wheel set provider, their hubs are excellent but the rims are made of cheese!

Considering these are in effect budget wheels, I think they are pretty damn good for the price.

One consideration, as with most things, there is a recommended maximum weight for Hunts wheels (as others) at 115kg fully loaded my choice was a little limited. I wouldn't dream of buying the lightest wheels available as they wouldn't last me a ride. Dare I suggest this may have been the case for the problems mentioned above.
  • 3 0
 Bought a set of enduro wheels back in April and they are still running freely after zero care so far this year. The rims also look as good as new and this is after 500+ miles of mixed trail/bike park riding. I went with the enduro over the trail as i wanted the extra strength/security that the wider wheel with more spokes offers. There is a trade off in weight but its not something im that bothered about
  • 3 0
 I started looking at these wheels about a month ago, one night about a week ago as I was about to pull the trigger, the price went up for US customers by $60. Price went from $389 to $449, at that price, they are not a good deal. As others have echoed here and in other reviews, a quality set of rims, hubs, and spokes can be had for too close to that price. I was able to find a local builder to get some Straight Pull DT350s, laced to some XM481s for about $500USD. And, the bonus is that they are lighter. I think that if Hunt wanted to remain competitive in the US market, they just shot themselves in the foot. And, to US customers, it seems like you are screwing only us. As, the GBP pricing only went up 10GBP, £339 to £349. So, US customers got a 15.5% increase, while British customers got a 2.8%? No thanks.
  • 2 0
 Customer service and backup is brilliant!! Wheels engage really quick and the freehub sound is spot on. You can actually have a conversation whilst spinning!! Wouldn’t recommend the TrailWides if you like to get rowdy, but get the EnduroWides instead. Recently got some of the carbon wheels for my Geometron and they are super strong, very impressed!
  • 2 0
 @Huntbikewheels: Now I'm curious, do triple butted spokes add that much to the price of the wheel as mentioned in the article? I prefer to lace my wheels using DT Alpine III spokes which are tripple butted. Even if they're twice as expensive as plain gauge spokes it adds relatively little compared to the costs of the hub (and freehub body if you take that separately) and the rim. It always felt like a no brainer as it may add about 9g of weight close to the hub (compared to DT Competition double butted spokes) but they just don't break. Or are these more expensive to build in the factory? They're quite snug in the spoke holes in the hub which may not work nice with the wheel building machine, but I don't know much about that.
  • 2 0
 I'm still running standard hub spacing and have a few wheelsets sitting around but I will seriously consider these in the future. It's nice to see a company with an affordable, high-quality wheelset that also ensures you get the "whole package" (extra spokes, spoke wrench, fully tubeless ready out of the box, willing to put tires on before shipping them out).
  • 2 0
 My Trek has 40mm rims, with 2.8 Maxxis Rekon+ would I be able to ride on some 2.6 tires from Maxxis? I feel like the tires are slightly too 'heavy' maybe sizing down will help a bit? I'm set up tubeless aswell. Thanks in advance
  • 2 0
 Curious myself. I have RF Arc 40 with 2.8 DHF and 2.8 Rekon and would not mind trying 2.6, but figured 40mm id is a bit much for those. Or?
  • 2 0
 I've got the the enduro wides with maxis minions on a 27.5 2018 Capra CF Pro and think they're pretty awesome. Even with a huck norris in the rear I still somehow managed to slightly ding the rim but the h-lock is still holding strong. I'll blame bike park wales Smile I'd definitely buy these again. I love the pro yet understated graphics too.
  • 2 0
 I have some novatec factor hubs and have outlasted my i9 hubs. and are still going strong. I would not hesitate to buy these hunt wheels for the price. I know novatec make some cheaper hubs but also make some nice high end ones.
  • 2 0
 4 months in with the trailwides, and that includes 2 weeks downhilling in the Alps, and a really wet and muddy British/yorkshire summer and they're like new bar one small dent from an accidental gap to rock garden. Love mine, and all the more for the price. They've done a lot better than the arc and 'not sure what' hubs that came on with my 5010.
  • 3 0
 If they do the job and can last, it`s a bargain. And aesthetically they are simple as I like, not flashy, and without ugly graphics. Wonder if they sell the rims apart...
  • 1 0
 Hey @softsteel ,
Thanks for the kind words! Just to let you know we do offer all of our alloy rims separate too - www.huntbikewheels.com/collections/rims
  • 2 0
 @HuntBikeWheels: Thanks. I didn`t see you`re from UK. Cool ;-)
I`m used to Velocity P35 rims or Blunt35 as they call them now, laced with Aivee french hubs.
Your rims tend to be a good alternative in case mine break one day.
One regreat: we can`t see the inner profile of your rim on the website, the inner cut I mean... soon visuable hopefully!
Cheers from France!!
  • 4 1
 Was interested until I read Novatec. Ask Santa Cruz how many of them they had to replace with DT Swiss 370 the year they made them standard spec on their most popular builds.
  • 1 0
 SO MANY
  • 1 0
 I purchased a pair of these for my Ibis Ripley and have been riding/abusing them in Colorado with no problems for the past 6 months. Relatively lightweight and solid wheels for the price, especially if you're at the lighter end of the weight spectrum (I'm 150 lbs, 155-160 with gear).
  • 2 0
 Hunt's customer service is great. Mailman decided to drag wheel package across the warehouse floor and Hunt covered the truing in my LBS. I'll be throwing my money at their way in the future
  • 1 0
 I've had Hunt Enduro wide wheels for well over a year now, and have done roughly 6-7000km on them, with a variety of bikepacking, trail, and enduro riding (all on a hardtail).

Really good initially - but the rims dinged to the point where they wouldn't seat a tubeless tyre. This was within the first couple of months with a couple of overnighter bikepacking trips and light trail riding on them. Fast forward to now - the hubs have completely fried. The front hub now chews through bearings and has developed a bunch of play. The freehub now clicks when any significant amount of power is put into the pedals and the spokes all came suspiciously loose after my last bikepacking trip.

Enough issues for me to not bother trying to fix them and just upgrade. It was a good experiment, and got the bike rolling - but I won't be looking back.

TLDR soft rims, cheap hubs
  • 2 1
 my point of view, for what it's worth:
I just bought a pair of Trail wide wheelset to replace a e-13 trs/formula hub wheelset wheighing 2060g. I'll use them for am/light enduro in northern france and, enduro races such as cannondale enduro series or mountain of hell/megavalanche few times a year. on my meta 29, I'm +/- 183 lbs geared up.

I hesitated since I've read that rims were soft and that I'll ride them a little bit out of their "trail"range but: 1/ I don't ride with low pressure (tipically 1.8 bars f/r) so I'm pretty far from denting my rims, even on big impacts.

for novatec: as said up there by someone, their hub range goes from ultra entry level to top notch level....I had some rebranded novatec/ride alpha hubs on my '15 meta AM v4 ( d772sb ?) and they were perfect: no play,no baring wear, no issue at all...freaking good rolling performance under frame constraint...well, far better that mavic deemax pro hubs I had just after them on my v4.2...which was a 900€ wheelset.

I've been told that novatec rear hubs primarily fail when the retaining bolt bolt comes loose, due to a lack of locktite (sometime on brand new hubs).
and, finally don't blame novatec to produce a wiiiide range of hubs...blame kona, and some other brands tu pick up a crappy model out of novatec's range and set it on a good bike, intended to ride serious enduro/dh, where it will obviously fail!

as for now, I juste rode them a couple time, so I'm still waiting for a true feedback on them but...damn, this wheelset is only 400€! with good hubs mounted on ezo bearings, astonishing 3° engagment, high end triple butted spokes and only 1823g!
the rims are soft, well, maybe, I'll give them a try and iff necessary will swap them with dt or flow mk3 rims when they are too trashed...
but stop comparing them with wheelsets that cost twice or 3 times more !
  • 1 0
 @HuntBikeWheels: I'm always puzzling about internal with of rims. can you explain why your DH rims have just 26mm internal with while trail has 30mm and enduro 33mm. For me as a mere mortal mountain biker this does not seem logical.
  • 1 0
 Hey @squarewheel
Thanks for the question. Our DH wheel is by far the toughest alloy rim we currently make due to the shape and thickness of the rim. To balance strength and weight, we had to make them narrower, but this also has the added benefits of less area to square edge into rocks etc.

A number of riders on the DH circuit still run 25mm internal rims.

However, we are looking into new rim materials and profiles to bring the strength of the current DH rim to a wider platform. Keep an eye out!
  • 1 0
 @HuntBikeWheels: thank you for your answer.
  • 1 0
 I'm still very pissed off by people who want a wheelset that is cheap, light, wide, stiff, durable...

well, for stiffness and durability, get a paire of hopes ! they cost twice as much and weight as much as a dead donkey (as we say here in france)...

for stiffness and lightness, TUNE makes great wheels...that are expensive...

and for good price, many brands sell crappy chewing gum like whells that gonna cost you kinda like nothing, but gona average 2200g the set...

and so on...
  • 4 0
 Free world wide shipping? Nice one
  • 3 0
 incredible timing, i just put hunt aero 30s on my road bike. great set of wheels for the price. couldn't be happier
  • 2 0
 Hey @flipoffthemonkeys ,
Thanks for the kind words! Enjoy your riding Smile
  • 3 1
 FWIW, i have I9s on my mountain bike(s), (enduro S) - and the rims are dented on both sets. aluminum rims dent, carbon rims snap...
  • 1 0
 I returned my Enduro S, because I heard they were soft, just like my old wtb asym rims. EX511 rims are bomb proof.
  • 2 0
 Could anyone offer a comparison to the Spank wheelsets that can be had for around this price? I really need to replace the tired SLX/Alex wheels on my hardtail.
  • 3 0
 Spank Spike Race 33 is the rear rim on my Reign. No dents and no burps, with dhr2 dd (30psi) and Butcher grid (22-24psi). No tire inserts. 200lbs on old school rocky and rooty tech.

Vibracore 350 on my dh bike haven’t been as good. Small dents, rear won’t true up round anymore. Dhf dh with Cush Core and 24-26psi.
  • 1 0
 I had Spike Race 33s on my main bike for three years. Before that I had Race 28s that replaced Stan’s Flow MK2 rums. My opinion is that the Spank rims were harder and tougher than the Stan’s. The race 28s sealed up easily and held pressure no worries. Never dinged them or anything, then sold them on the bike. The race 33s were a little more difficult to seal tubeless using the same tyres, tape, sealant and track pump. Strong as hell those race 33s were. I did ding the front one on a baby head, but the truth remained and the tyre did not deflate. Then my bike fell off the rack at the freeway speed limit and the front wheel was unaffected. The back wheel went about 3mm out of true. I cannot recommend them enough. Great product for the money you pay. All mine were on hope hubs. I heard the later Spank hubs were a lot more reliable than the rebranded Novatec hubs they originally started with.
  • 3 0
 "Hunt also offers free worldwide shopping on wheels." Free shopping sounds nice!
  • 1 0
 Hi, I have ask in relation to the original stumpee wheels how much weight was decreased for the overall bike? Or if anyone weighed the OEM wheels I would appreciate the results..
  • 2 0
 These look really promising. Nice addition to the market! I imagine we'll see more wheelsets like this in the coming years with more spokes out back vs the front.
  • 2 0
 Hey @sngltrkmnd
Thanks! Appreciate the kind words, with so many other brands out there already doing a great job, we have to work hard to bring something else to the table.

We're big believers in different front and rear wheels too, expect to see more of it in our range!
  • 3 0
 Can we get a review on the privateer 161?
  • 1 0
 There would have to be some available first eh?
  • 4 0
 holy shitballs I've never heard of that thing and just looked it up. looks very promising.
  • 4 0
 @wowbagger: They look like they get a lot of things right. Will hopefully have one for my next rig if the reviews come out good.
  • 1 0
 @Mondbiker: They could test a prototype. But then there would be the chance of talking out of all problems.
  • 4 0
 Hey @zyoungson ,
Once we have frames available we'd love for PB to test them. Keep an eye out next year.
Thanks!
  • 5 1
 NOvatec.
  • 5 3
 Good review. These are great wheels - will be the next upgrade on my bike.
  • 1 0
 Hey @DirkPitt74
Thanks! Appreciate the kind words, look forward to seeing you out on the trails Smile
  • 3 0
 Hunt, Mike Hunt.
  • 2 0
 These wheels spin on EZO bearings, not EXO bearings.
  • 1 0
 and there's a 3° engagement, not 4.3 btw!
  • 1 0
 @barth1003: I missed that - the reviewer must have thought he had the 84 Poe hub and not 120 Poe. Maybe they sent me a lower tier hub, as Novatec does make an 84 Poe hub with the same shell.
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels: I think the 84poe was the first generation of wheels. you ca check it out: if there's a "60t" engraved on your rear hub sleeve, then il is a 3° engagment !
  • 1 0
 @barth1003: maybe for Hunt, but for Novatec, the 84 and 120 Poe were relatively the same time. 120 may have in fact come first. The 84 was always a cheaper hub.

The 120 are pretty much bombproof. I have built many sets of them.
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels:strange ! on their website the trail wide es still sold as "3° engagment. I only saw the 4.3° engagment/84 POE in some reviews....since I have the 120 POE version, I feel lucky and won't look any further!
I m' not a huge fan of the loud noise coming from a hub though, I may wipe off oil and replace it with some (not too thick) grease to make them quieter...

I could only judge th stiffness of the rims when enduro races season is on, in april.
  • 1 0
 @barth1003: Yeah, if you have the 120 point engagement (3 degree) then you are good. Those are really quite good, and I haven't seen a single report of failure on them. Pinkbike has reviewed them favorably in at least two wheelsets as well.

I'm not sure what the issue is with the 84poe hubs. Using inferior steel, or maybe not properly heat treated or something?! I think they may have fixed the issue however, in later hubs.

Novatec actually uses a pretty good grease in those hubs stock. You can add a little more, if they were skimpy, but from what I see they are generally fairly liberal with that stuff, and it lasts a while. I have seen a real variation hub to hub however, sound-wise, and I think its the stiffness of the springs that causes the most variance. Some are much stiffer and louder - not sure why. I've had a couple sets come in very quiet. You can definitely try to fill some of the voids, under the springs and such, to quiet the hub down, but try not to go nuts =P. It's pretty easy to do - you just need two 17mm cone wrenched to undo the caps, then just pull the freehub body off and make sure to keep track of the washer that sits between the hubshell and freehub body. They are a bit fiddly going back together as the drive ring doesn't have on-ramps like an I9, so you'll need to use string or a band to get the pawls to compress, and pull it away once they have sat in the drive ring - otherwise they won't fit back in.

I have loads of images of these hubs, including the internals, on my IG - linked in my profile. Feel free to have a look.
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels @barth1003 You're both right! We initially did use the 4.3° hubs, but have since moved to 3° for all current hubs.
  • 2 0
 we need to focus on what everyone actually cares about. How do they sound?
  • 3 0
 Like a dolphin trying to solve a tricky math problem
  • 2 0
 Wheel build was very good, I find the rims great in width and profile.
  • 1 0
 Hey @bigd-64
Thanks! Appreciate the kind words Smile
  • 2 1
 You lost me at novatec. Those hubs are absolute trash.
  • 3 0
 You couldn't be more wrong. They 601/602 hubs are bomber. They have a ton of podiums under great riders.
  • 2 0
 @privateer-wheels: I reckon you'd be one to know given all the sets you build.
  • 2 0
 @sngltrkmnd: that's the truth Smile

The 120 Poe 601/602 hubs (i.e. Factor hubs) are fantastic. I've used them myself too. On a bang for buck basis, they are one of the best hubs out there.
  • 1 0
 Hey @sam264
Thanks for getting in touch, sorry to hear it sounds like you've had a bad experience of Novatec.

To be completely open, they did face some issues with the previous generation hub, however have since made a number of changes to improve the quality and durability of the hub. This updated hub is the one we have been running for a while now and found them to be very reliable whilst providing a rapid pick up.

If you were to ever face a problem we stand by all our products with a 3 year warranty and as riders ourselves always aim to provide the service we'd expect.

We're always listening to riders and wanting to provide the best products we can, so any feedback please do let us know.
  • 1 0
 @HuntBikeWheels:
As I'm just a big dumb human, I can only go off the experiences that I've personally had, however I'm open to second chances. I also appreciate that you guys took the time to reach out. Kudos.
  • 1 0
 @sam264: what am I, chop liver?! Razz
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels: for all I know! Wink
  • 3 3
 Novatec hubs are garbage
  • 1 0
 Really? Because at least two riders at Redbull Rampage were using them. Sam Blenkinsop has podiums on them at Crankworks and several Enduro and and DH races. Agy, Fearon, Zink, and Strait have all been on or are on Novatec wheels. Pinkbike has also done a very favorable review of at least one set of Novatec hubs.

You likely aren't aware they actually have good hubs, not just entry level hubs. Their 601/602 hubs are fantastic. In a blind test, you likely wouldn't be able to tell the difference between an i9 torch and those.
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 Hey @shawnoen
Thanks for getting in touch, sorry to hear it sounds like you've had a bad experience of Novatec.

To be completely open, they did face some issues with the previous generation hub, however have since made a number of changes to improve the quality and durability of the hub. This updated hub is the one we have been running for a while now and found them to be very reliable whilst providing a rapid pick up.

If you were to ever face a problem we stand by all our products with a 3 year warranty and as riders ourselves always aim to provide the service we'd expect.

We're always listening to riders and wanting to provide the best products we can, so any feedback please do let us know.

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