Review: Industry Nine's More Affordable 101 Enduro S Wheelset

Sep 25, 2019
by Richard Cunningham  
101s Wheels




Industry Nine's hand-built wheels are known as much for their sound as they are for their mix of stunning looks and durability. Oh, and they cost a pretty penny too. Today, the North Carolina wheelsmiths officially release the 101 - their first value-priced range wheelset. Industry Nine's 101 wheelsets are built around their newest hubs by the same name, which use conventional J-bend spokes and feature a six-pawl freehub ratchet with four degrees of engagement. PB has been riding the 101 Enduro S wheels for some time, so we're happy to break the news.

Meet Industry Nine's New Wheels

If you have been lusting after a pair of I-Nine 310c wheels with multi-colored spokes and are having a hard time saving up the $2,800 asking price, the 101 wheelset can deliver almost all of the performance of that custom 310c build for a much more affordable $750.


101 Wheel Details

Rim: Aluminum, 28 hole 20mm profile
Inner width: 101 Trail - 27mm, 101 Enduro S - 30.5mm
Hub: Aluminum 101, standard, Boost and Super Boost Plus widths
Freehub: 4° engagement, SRAM XD, Standard, or Shimano MicroSpline
Rotors: 6-bolt or Centerlock (6-Bolt only - SBP)
Spokes: Sapim Race J-bend, 3X lacing, Aluminum nipples
Weight (pair): Enduro S: 27.5" - 1700g, 29" - 1900g. Trail: 27.5" - 1650g, 29" - 1900g
MSRP: $750 USD
Built in: Asheville, NC
Contact: Industry Nine




Yes, that's for the pair. The 101 wheelset requires you to make some incremental sacrifices, like suffering with "only" four degrees of engagement (Hydra hubs engage at 0.52 degrees), and you'll have to settle on black, stainless steel Sapim Race J-bend spokes instead of Industry Nine's rainbow anodized aluminum offerings.

What you do get, is one of the best builds in the business, your choice of a 27-millimeter or a 30.5 millimeter inner width rims with the race-winning Industry Nine profile, a lightning-fast freehub and a durable tubeless wheelset that weighs about the same as most carbon offerings. Oh, and you get to hear that signature I-Nine whine while you are coasting.

101 Enduro S Key Features

From this point we'll concentrate on the review of the 101 Enduro S wheels. Industry Nine's crew has

101 hubset
Industry Nine released its 101 hubset earlier this year. It supports all contemporary freehubs from Shimano and SRAM, as well as 6-bolt and Centerlock brake rotors. I-Nine photo


fine tuned their building process, so we'll consider that golden and give them the nod for the 101's conservative ethos. All other components being equal, wheels made with steel J-bend spokes laced in a three-cross pattern have risen to the top of every comparison test for longevity. 101 Enduro S wheels use 28 of them each, with medium-height hub flanges that create a stronger bracing angle and help even out the left and right-side spoke tension. Industry Nine conspicuously ignores offset rim drilling and non-standard hub designs, relying upon experienced hands to build in proper spoke tension and trueness - backed up by a two year warranty.

101s Wheels


Wide rims: The Enduro S rim width and profile are also conservatively crafted. Its 30.5 millimeter inner width is just right for popular 2.3 to 2.5 inch tire sizes, and I agree with Industry Nine's choice of a 20-millimeter thick profile as a good balance between strength and compliance for aluminum rims. The rim flanges are a little thin for my tastes, which suggests that the extrusion may suffer minor dents should you need to carry speed through the boulders.

Easy for tubeless: A smooth plastic rim liner, aided by well-designed ramps guide the beads of troublesome tires up to the rim flanges with ease. They are easy wheels to air up. No need for tire levers or a booster pump.


101s Wheels
Excellent inner rim profile for mounting tubeless tires.


101s Wheels
Even the rim sealing strip and valve stems are pro quality.



101s Wheels



Riding 101 Enduro S Wheels

Rather than wax on about speculative nuances, I'll stick to the basic ride quality and durability of Industry Nine's new Enduro wheels. For starters, I'll repeat how easily I could air up Maxxis WT EXO casing Minion tires to the 30.5-millimeter 101 rims. No need to remove the valve cores, just inflate with a floor pump and the sometimes troublesome Minions trotted up to the rim flanges and snapped into place. I used my normal air pressure: 22 psi in the front and 24 out back with Stan's sealant.


Feel: Honestly, the 101 Enduro S wheels don't jump out with a single superlative - which to me can be an indication that the makers struck a good balance for weight, stiffness and compliance. The 101's feel similar to Ibis's carbon wheels - lightweight, quick steering, but mostly invisible because they feel right, and thus don't do anything that deflects the rider's attention from the task at hand.

Technical performance: I experienced no burped sealant and only a few rim-induced casing cuts

101s Wheels


while I tried to beat the 101 rims up over San Diego's granite boulders. Talking stiffness, the wheels definitely feel trustworthy in rough corners and down choppy lines. I expect lightweight aluminum wheels to flex a bit when jumping into rock gardens that I intended to double over. (I missed more than my share during this review.) I can say that some lateral flex was apparent, but not enough for concern. So far, the spoke tension is close to as-new, with the rear wheel showing some small dents and a millimeter or less of side play, which I may attend to when I switch the 101s to my next bike. Bottom line is that they are holding up very well.



Pros

+ Super fast engagement, great sound
+ Weight and feel of a good carbon wheelset
+ Durable, conservative build from world class wheelsmiths



Cons

- May be a little light for aggressive enduro types.
- Many options at this price point.




Pinkbike's Take:

bigquotesThere are a lot of good wheels in the $750 price range, but not very many of them come from the likes of Industry Nine. Industry Nine's 101 Enduro S wheels deliver that pro feel and performance we expect from a world class builder, and they come with the assurance that the makers will back up your purchase should you need a repair or a rebuild down the road. That's a good thing, because you'll want to keep these wheels for a while.RC






234 Comments

  • 176 26
 1.5 world country dweller here.
-noticing "affordable"
-clicks on article
-finds price
-re-read the price
-loled.
  • 12 10
 Yes me too... ouch!
  • 28 23
 Not affordable at all.
Roval Traverse aluminum are $560
If you still have Non boost , you are in luck because they have carbon wheels in clearance for less than $700
  • 81 2
 I think affordable is meant in relation to the other Industry nine wheelsets????
  • 47 6
 I-9 has typically made stuff in house in America. 750 is cheap for a US built wheel. Think only bontrager is doing cheaper. Hope these show up on some builds for next year. I imagine brands like GG and Alchemy have been asking I9 for a cheaper option.
  • 27 14
 Because if Pinkbike tells you it’s affordable, then it must be true.
  • 8 3
 -opened an explanatory dictionary on the word affordable -re-read the price again
  • 9 5
 @endurocat: Roval Traverse are 650$ and weigh 1830g for 27,5 (these I9s 1700g). rovalcomponents.com/collections/trail/products/2019-traverse
  • 35 2
 If 750 is affordable. That makes HOPE STAN combo for thrift shop riders.
  • 3 7
flag jorgeposada (Sep 25, 2019 at 6:11) (Below Threshold)
 Good cheaper option but those strait pull aluminum spokes are the shiz. Good option for people who case everything and need to replace alot of spokes.
  • 7 2
 @bulletbassman: Bontrager offers aluminum wheels made by Formula in Taiwan.
  • 2 5
 @coregrind: lol who told you this?
  • 2 0
 @jorgeposada: I have had 2 x different bikes Bonti wheels rims crack in the rim well already ... this was a few years ago, so I can only assume this is no longer an issue ... I just do not feel the need to spend any money on their wheels to find out though
  • 1 2
 @coregrind: Was pretty sure the current line series was US made but maybe it's just the hubs and carbon offerings.
  • 7 0
 @TheBearDen:
@bulletbassman: On the Line XXX, the hub is DT Swiss with the rim likely produced in house in WI. The Rapid Drive hub on the Comp/Elite/Pro level is made in Taiwan. The rim for Line Pro and Line Carbon is made in Taiwan, just like the aluminum offerings. I have many sets of the carbon Line Pro 30 wheels, with great results from each of them, but all have arrived in boxes with Formula Engineering Inc. listed as the manufacturer and “Made in Taiwan” decals on the rims.
  • 6 1
 Affordable just like UK housing market claims to be "affordable"
  • 46 10
 What does everyone want? Free wheels? This price isn't all that unreasonable considering the quality.
  • 3 0
 @coregrind: Cool, thanks for the correction.
  • 7 5
 @chyu: Hope/Stans combo isn't nearly as good as an i9 wheel. I had the Hope/Stans combo on my old bike. It's nice -- but i9 is another level. Lighter, stiffer, smoother rolling -- it out-performs Hope/Stans in every way.
  • 5 0
 @endurocat: Where did you see the carbons for sale at $700?
  • 15 1
 Lol I actually can't imagine dropping $750 on a wheelset and thinking "wow this is affordable".
  • 3 0
 @bulletbassman: They come on the bikes from Revel
  • 6 4
 @endurocat:
Roval traverse wheels are also absolute trash, I wouldn't pay even half the RRP for them.
  • 4 0
 @kdstones: That is because mountain biking really isn't that affordable in general.

In the end nothing matters though. Some riders can throw down riding a shopping cart, and others will throw dollars at their bikes thinking it will make them better at riding.
  • 22 2
 I think folks are wrong saying these aren’t affordable. I make under the median income for my area (closer to the average with OT) and I could budget for these.

Also - I work in a large machine shop and I honestly don’t think any of these manufacturers are getting rich off their products, regardless of the price. Especially US manufacturers. $700 a pop sounds about right to me.
  • 2 0
 @HairyLegs: It really can happen to any rim, imperfections occur. Haven't blown up a wheel in year, famous last words. Few months back my buddy exploded a high end carbon rim and it sounded like a buckshot. 30 people saw it and I have it on gopro. It literally just caved in on this pretty mellow G-out.
  • 4 7
 @SlodownU: Stinkbike LIES!
  • 1 0
 @Davichin: Then you can purchase the Carbon Roval SL , plus $40 for Specialized's Boostinator.
Still , cheaper than these set.
  • 1 0
 @gcavy1: Just saw them at their site this morning.
  • 2 1
 @bulletbassman: They might build them in the US but the rims aren’t made in the US. Not sure about the hubs.
  • 2 0
 @sam264: Try to put thru a warranty on Industry 9
With Rovals, any Specialized dealer will take them in. It's in their franchise contract
  • 1 1
 @gcavy1: They're 650b and non boost but the two options are at the bottom. $625 for Roval Carbon Fattie SL and shimano spline (not 12 speed) and $750 for the ones with the xd driver.
Cheaper to buy the cheaper one and buy xd driver alone, since it's just a DT Swiss 350 essentially.
www.eriksbikeshop.com/roval-fattie-sl/Search

Here it is directly from Specialized, but no freehub.
www.specialized.com/us/en/roval-traverse-sl-fattie-650b/p/130792?color=218742-130792
  • 3 1
 $650 retail is a really solid value for a USA-made boutique-quality product, thats backed by proven premium customer service.
  • 1 0
 @Gimli: True, and I'll add I purchased a set from them that I would thrash on a hardtail and I trued them exactly zero times in 5 years. After they have made some tweaks to the bearings and free hubs (~7 years ago) they are the finest set of wheels I've ever owned. You have to factor in how long they last in affordability.
  • 1 0
 @coregrind: everything trek and bontrager is made by giant in their huge factory in Taiwan so you’re not wrong on that one! It’s great when you have trek snobs who won’t buy giant bikes even though they are the same materials and builders.
  • 2 0
 @TheR: but hope are from the UK so must be good.
  • 1 0
 Now now, what’s with the negativity ????@endurocat:
  • 1 1
 @crazy9: Never said Hope wasn’t good. They’re good hubs. i9 is just better.
  • 1 1
 @Rucker10:
Have you factored in other people's payments?
Alimony
School
Mortgage
Retirement
Car
Food
Diapers
Children in general
  • 2 0
 More Affordable - like a BMW is more affordable than a Porsche.
  • 1 0
 Lol i can buy ex1501 set for 600 euro
  • 6 0
 @Ian713: Yeah, it almost sounds like what is and isn't affordable is a dynamic term.

Having said that, the going argument here is that some chinese made bullshit that costs $500 is somehow dramatically more within reach than something for $700. If $200 is really the difference between putting shoes on your kids feet I dunno what the hell you're doing mountain biking.
  • 1 0
 @Rucker10: Fair enough
  • 75 2
 The comment section is actualy more usefull than article in case you are looking for affordable wheelset
  • 3 1
 Hope every time!
  • 53 7
 Affordable? I don't get it. You can get a set of DT EX511 on 350 hubs for less then $500.
  • 26 3
 those $250 extra are for the 250 grams saved
  • 13 1
 Yep, but add some work... I lace my wheels myself, have used five EX511, both 29 and 27.5, they are awesome! Not particularly light, but strong as hell! Also like the washers under the nippels, gives a very nice look and improved stress distribution.

If you want a prebuilt wheel set with EX511 you'll basically need to buy a DT swiss Spline one 1500, which has an MSRP of 1'100 euros! The rim only costs around 80$ though.

Also, a set of decent spokes are 30-40$ per wheel...
  • 15 5
 or the Hunt Trail/Enduro Wide for 400
  • 7 2
 @Leicester: I got a pair of EX511's on Hope Pro4 hubs for €600 delivered to my door pre-built from a bike shop in Germany. They've been bombproof and were handbuilt, no need to spend €1100...
  • 10 2
 I use Halo Vortex wheels which are seriously well priced. Probably too well priced to be honest. Nice and wide, burly, decent engagement, £420...
  • 6 1
 @f00bar: so that makes a 250 gram Burger possible before riding?! Take all my money!!!
  • 4 0
 @podderz: this guy gets it!
  • 1 0
 @Leicester: Ill second that on the strength.
  • 1 0
 @wowbagger: I've been tempted to try those wheels but there aren't enough reviews or comments in forums regarding their performance.
  • 4 1
 @PabloMoll: here's one of the reviews - www.mbr.co.uk/reviews/wheelsets/hunt-wheels-trailwide - when you go to the website of the Hunt Trail Wide wheels (probably their other sets too) there are some other reviews to be found there, all rather positive.

From my personal experience (4 months in) I can tell you this: they come all set up for tubeless, literally (valve) plug-and-play, with 4 spare spokes. The hubs are rather loud, I found it a bit annoying at first but some like it and I got used to it and don't even hear it anymore.
I do have some dings in the rims so they're not as strong as some other rims, BUT this is mainly due to me using too light a casing of the tires for the riding I do AND they still hold air perfectly (still tubeless) and run true.
I was using the DT Swiss XM481 rims before which didn't have so much as a scratch after 2 years but they were a bit heavier so there's always a tradeoff to be expected.

I'd recommend them, really good value wheelset.
  • 3 0
 @wowbagger: A bit heavy(er), though... Depends on your priorities. I think wheels are one of the parts where saving weight makes the most sense, depending on your riding. Since I tend to go uphill before going downhill, I always look for light(er) wheels and I9 don't disappoint. I have had I9 Enduro (with Torch hubs) for the last 4 seasons and can't say enough good things about them.
  • 2 0
 Really? Where? Do you have a link?
  • 3 2
 @cool3: you're right, wheels are the first place to count grams, and yes they're 100g heavier. still 1750g for a wide trail wheelset is perfectly fine in my book and spending double the money for saving 100g is something i'm just not up for.
  • 5 0
 Then get a set of DT EX511 on 350 hubs. They acknowledged there are many more options in the "affordable" category and addressed it as a con.
  • 1 0
 @f00bar: A dollar-per-gram would be a great value in many commodities, no? ????
  • 5 0
 For my last few bikes i've built Dt Ex471 rims onto Novatec Hubs. Total cost of about $235 US. I usually don't spend much time reading wheel reviews anymore. I've never had an issue with the rims or hubs. I think even the cheapest aftermarket Novatec hubs are better then the ones that come on bikes at even GX level builds.
  • 1 1
 @f00bar: for an enduro wheel I don’t really care about much other than price and longevity. Anything with 28 spokes for the rear is a hard pass. My current bike came with 28 front and rear, the front has been fine and the rear was bad within one tires worth of use.
  • 1 0
 @PabloMoll: same here! Waiting desesperatly for a review of the carbon impact wheelset or at least of the updated alloy sets.
  • 1 0
 @cool3: Bit heavy, but 250 gm less than the Bonti Line comps I had, I notice the difference.
  • 2 0
 @panaphonic:
I have many similar such wheelsets...Novatec/Spank is a favourite combination.
  • 2 0
 @Konyp $500? Where the hell did you find that deal? I just bought a set of DT EX511 on 350 hubs for $650 + $78 for the 36t ratchet after returning my I9 101 wheels.
  • 2 0
 @silentbutdeadly: Yeah people don't seem to like having Novatec hubs on their bikes but when I can get a new hub for 43USD I do it. I've never worn out bearings or freehub body on a Novatec so I will stick with them. It also makes it cheap to have a spare wheelset, not that i've needed one with EX471s.
  • 1 0
 @Leicester: i can buy ex1501 set for 600 euro Big Grin i9 sucks about price
  • 31 7
 "The 101's feel similar to Ibis's carbon wheels - lightweight, quick steering, but mostly invisible because they feel right and thus, don't do anything that deflects the rider's attention from the task at hand."

That's the takeaway folks. No matter how much deep down we really want those carbonium rims to impress the plebs at the trailhead, they absolutely are not worth thrice as much.

*Looks at Ibis/Zipp/Nextie/insert carbon wheel of your desire here*

*Lusts*

*Looks into wallet, dodging moths*

*Buys sensible alloy rims*

*Sends it into a border field with a grin and not a care in the world*

The end
  • 11 0
 “Sends it into a boulder field with a grin and not a care in the world”
Nirvana equivalent for mtbers :’)
  • 12 11
 I'll tell you though, with 29" wheels and rides that require 3000' or more of climbing to get to the goods, having the lightest wheelset possible is beneficial. Carbon allows for a durable and decently lightweight wheel. Aluminum just can't do it.

That being said, I'll be building a set of EX511s for Enduro Racing due to Aluminum's resiliency and affordability. I'd rather smash the daylights out of them vs my SC Reserve 30s...
  • 6 0
 @mtbgeartech: eh, ive done 1700m/5500ft climbs on my meta 29 with alloy e13 wheels and SG casings this year without problems (and I’m in much worse shape than last year). If you’re racing, yeah maybe, but just look how many of the factory enduro guys still run alloy wheels.
  • 7 0
 @Upduro: Oh for sure, I'm no factory enduro guy though. I'm a slightly overweight 44 year old dad with minimal time to ride. I need all the help I can get! LOL. I suppose I could run a heavier wheelset if I lost 5-10kg... ????
  • 2 0
 I will say this... I did get to do a few laps on the Zipp wheels the other day... The difference between them and my stock Bontrager wheels was noticed on the first few pedal strokes.. Definitely accelerated quicker... Plus a little more nimble in the air... And they did take the edge off the braking bumps that were forming up.. But, at $2000, they aren't really in my budget...
  • 1 1
 With 26", and especially on 29 inch, I couldn't keep aluminum wheels true. It seemed like every 3rd ride I was digging out the spoke wrench. I put the cheapest chinese carbon rims on my bike and never trued them again. They are more expensive, now than in the past, but the cheap chineseium carbon is also better (just don't get nextie hubs). You can get them with decent Bitex hubs for $600, and they probably ride better than these i9s and the rims are more durable, but the hubs probably not.
  • 1 1
 @mtbgeartech: how does getting stuck 3000' above the valley with a shattered rim work out?
  • 4 0
 @knarrr: Not sure, Never happened to me. In Utah I did dent a Spank rim so badly that it wouldn't hold air or the tire and it split when trying to bend the bead back so that sucked.
  • 3 0
 @mtbgeartech: I hit my aluminum rims with a high tem heat gun (400 degrees, I think) from work before bending it back and that seemed to help
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Didn't have that luxury out on the trail. I was just trying to get it to hold the bead so I could roll back down to the car.
  • 10 0
 @kiwikonadude: Carbon doesn't have to be 3X the cost. You can buy We Are One Movement wheelsets right now for $1000. That's only $250 more for a carbon wheelset that was made in Canada, coincidentally with the exact same I9 101 hubs, and weighs 250 grams less.

It's hard to say no to something like that, especially when I get to "impress the plebs at the trailhead". And after you destroy your wheel sending it into a boulder field, We Are One will replace your carbon wheel at no cost under their "no questions asked" warranty policy. Can't say the same for the alu rim you would destroy doing the same thing.
  • 2 1
 I’ve always had a hard time with the idea of spending an extra grand on carbon wheels to save 100 grams per rim, just to put on tires that weigh over 1,000 grams especially when the best carbon wheels are built to feel like aluminum in terms of flex. These i9s look good to me. Great hubs, good rims that are cheap and easy to replace.
  • 2 1
 @mtbgeartech: if 3000’ of climbing is a struggle with alloy wheels, it’s not the wheels that are to blame.
  • 3 1
 @pcledrew: a 3000 foot climb is tough no matter what wheel set you're running
  • 1 1
 @Hayek: I'm sure those are great wheels, but that is still a 33% cost increase over these, and double the cost if other quality aluminum options.
  • 1 0
 @pacificnorthwet: You're right that they're 33% more, but my response was to the comments echoing the conventional wisdom that carbon wheelsets are 300%. You're right that in the case of WAO wheels there's a 33% premium, but the logic that good carbon wheels command a 300% premium is off by nearly an order of magnitude.

Rim material aside though, for the exact same hubs on the WAO and i9 wheelsets, one comes with a lifetime warranty. That alone may be worth the 33% premium in my opinion.
  • 2 0
 @Hayek: Yeah, carbon doesn't have to cost what a lot of people claim. Between the weight reduction, the warranty, and the fact that they are made in Canada the We Are One wheels are honestly is a fair bit of value for the extra coin. I can't afford the up front coat of more than a decent set of aluminum wheels, but they just might be worth it in the long run for those that can afford it.
  • 1 0
 @Hayek: Agree with you. Depends how you look at the figures, the alloy are 25% cheaper than the carbons making the lifetime warranty sound even more impressive. Figures or percentages can easily be skewed to anyone’s advantage.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: it’s more contextual based on grade than anything. But honestly if anyone is finding that elevation to be a significant challenge, they need to work on fitness rather than spending $$.
  • 1 0
 @pcledrew: It's not a struggle, it's nicer with lighter wheels. It must suck to have to drag all that ego around on your rides.
  • 1 0
 @mtbgeartech: yeah that’s what it is. Ego. Yup.
  • 19 0
 Pros

+ Super fast engagement, great sound


NEED AUDIO OF HUB RATCHET SOUNDS WITH EVERY WHEEL SET REVIEW PLEASE.

#NOISEMATTERS

Otherwise, I'll buy more Onyx because I already know what silence sounds like.
  • 4 1
 #ifitstooloudyouretooold
  • 1 0
 NOBL got you covered on that one-o-one.
youtu.be/mIsPa2qRrbw
  • 1 0
 @vw4ever: But is has to be #LOUDAF - I can't tolerate a mild sound. I'd like to hear what I'm buying - like an exhaust system.
  • 15 1
 I have the I9 Pillar carbon Enduro 275 Wheelset. I was lucky enough to pick this up through Knolly with my bike purchase. At 1400g, they are an amazing light Wheelset. I've ridden them for 2.5 seasons logging over 10,000km from trail rides, epic rides, and quite a few enduro races. Finally cracked the rear rim. A couple things from this experience:

1. Put on an alloy rear rim (SRAM Roam) while pursuing warranty - trail feel was immediately more harsh and way more negative feedback, yet also more flex when cornering hard. I didn't think it would be so noticeable.

2. i9 Warranty - Got an RA number in a day. Sent to i9. They had rebuilt in 48 hours. In the interim, I also decided to order a new Knolly with 157Trail spacing and called i9. They stopped the build and for $100 rebuilt the hub from 142 to 157Trail and new bearings and then rebuilt the wheel on a new no-cost rim. I had the wheel back in Canada in less than 10 days and some replacement bearings for my front hub.
  • 3 1
 I9 is the shit.
  • 13 2
 We feel these are the best wheels for the price on the planet and have been quietly building bikes with them for months. Tip of the hat to our friends at i9 for making such a great wheelset. Cheers!
  • 10 0
 Where on earth are people getting these sub $800 wheel sets with DT 350 hubs, good rims, and solid spokes? I’m looking at Canadian $ MSRP for both prebuilt and custom wheel sets and frankly $995CAD seems pretty reasonable for these I9 wheels.

Or is Pinkbike’s commenting audience just a bunch of poor people who haven’t shopped for any new gear since they last bought a 26” wheel bike like, 15 years ago?

This stuff isn’t cheap. Outside isn’t actually free. Stop pretending otherwise.
  • 1 1
 Exactly. I'm in the market for a near rear at the moment and these seem like pretty good value. I'm looking at $360 cad + the price of a rear hub for an ex511 build for one wheel. Pre built with good quality hubs and rims aren't any cheaper. Lots of people comparing against online clearout and discounted wheels too.
  • 2 0
 Honestly, There are a lot of shops that will build these for you cheap. Hell, contact some guys on PB buy sell, and you'll get a great deal on hand made wheels of your choice.

Colorado Cyclist will build you a DT 350, DT Comp, XM 481 or EX 511 set for about $700 (last I checked), and about $1000 for 240 hubs.
  • 3 0
 People that can afford these rims are too busy working to make comments in the comment section.
  • 1 0
 @drpheta: so basically the same price as these then
  • 3 0
 @kingtut87: from Colorado cyclist, but I had my 350, xm 481 wheels built for 400 locally.
  • 9 1
 For a hundred less I got ex511 laced to hope hubs with cx Ray spokes. Feel like going custom is the best route for the best alloy wheels to be honest although the top of the line offerings are lust worthy from I 9 even if just for the sound of hydra freehub ????
  • 6 3
 I got a brand new set of Ex511 on pro4s for £280
  • 5 0
 @pigman65: Where from? That's a great deal!
  • 3 0
 Just shoeing off now @pigman65:
  • 8 1
 "Oh, and you get to hear that signature I-Nine whine while you are coasting."

Am I the only one who'd like silent wheels? We spend all this time and money making our bikes quieter with narrow wide chainrings, clutch mechs, improved chainstay protectors and quieter cable routing... and then we strap a p1ssed off mega-mosquito on the back axle!

(I'm too tight and too much of a weight weenie to buy an Onyx hub.. and I run SRAM so Shimano hubs are out)
  • 5 0
 Unfortunately, 'affordable' is not a universal value in this world. While i9 are to be commended for actually doing it, it is hard from my perspective to see this as affordable. I've had a wheelset built using White Industries hubs, Spank rims and Sapim spokes...in Australia...that cost me less than this...and that wasn't really 'affordable' either.
  • 7 0
 Why are complete wheelsets from manufacturers typically 28 spoke? Seems like most people build with 32 and that's the common drilling for hubs and rims.
  • 1 0
 Manufacturers are trying to save weight. I tried it, and the rim is in the final stages of fatigue failure, and I am a lightweight. About the only thing that isn't cracked is the rim bead- but I got great warranty service! Too light is definitely a problem for aluminum wheelsets. Here I was thinking only carbon will leave splinters everywhere, and my aluminum rim just took out my tubeless tape with sharp little flakes.
  • 1 0
 I went to 28 two years ago. No ragrets.
  • 1 0
 My first foray into 28 will be my last. Never again.
  • 5 0
 I don't know what you are complaining about. $750 for what appears to be a quality wheel set from a custom wheel maker with a great reputation for strong wheels and great customer service, seems more than reasonable. The fact that I can easily get replacement spokes compared to the bespoke alloy models is a big plus too. I want a set!
  • 6 1
 I’ve been on i9s for roughly 9 years. Been the best wheels. I have bashed the hell out of them and they stay true. I’ve also been on other wheelsets.
I’d say for the quality then the price is worth it!
  • 3 1
 I second that. I9 are bombproof if regularly maintained.
  • 5 1
 Loud hubs can p1ss off. The sound of knobby tires on dirt is what I wanna hear. That being said I think the price is quite reasonable, but I would never give I9 / king / hope / any loud hub manufacturer my money. DT are pleasantly quiet, but my next wheels will have Onyx hubs.
  • 5 0
 First things first, I absolutely love i9. BUT, if you want quiet, Onyx are sublime. I would also keep an eye out for new hubs from Box and Tairin Wheels - both have silent hubs coming.
  • 10 3
 I wheelie wish I could afford these
  • 10 0
 That joke fell flat.
  • 3 0
 rim-shot.
  • 4 1
 SuperStar still has some 23mm pair of wheels for 75GBP a pair:

www.superstarcomponents.com/en/essential-wheels-clearance-boost-15148mm.htm
www.superstarcomponents.com/en/essential-wheels-clearance-sale.htm

I got some 27mm wide rims with the switch hubs, for the price it was unbeatable.
  • 5 1
 Been riding weareones agent wheel set for about 2 months now. 101 hubs with lifetime warranty on carbon rims all made in North America. I timed it with a 15% off coupon so picked them up for $850. No ragrets.
  • 2 0
 Yep. We Are One is where it’s at.
  • 6 3
 Have been riding the I9 Enduro trail s for a few years now and they are a fantastic wheelset. However, when I buckled the rear wheel overshooting a jump they were a nightmare to work with on getting the wheel rebuilt. They refused to work with my local shop to order the new rim and spokes. I9 insisted to send the hub to them and have them rebuild the wheel (paying a premium of course). This shop has been building wheels for 30 yrs and I've had many, very nice wheel builds from this place. Ended up taking almost 3 months to get my wheel built because of I9 dragging their feet and fabricating issues. Probably won't ever buy one of their wheels again. That service was pretty terrible.
  • 6 3
 Really sorry to hear about your bad experience. This certainly isn't the level of customer service that we aspire to deliver. Our policy with our S wheelsets is to try and go through a local shop whenever possible to save time and money for the customer. If you want to shoot us an email at sales@industrynine.com we can see what went wrong on our end and hopefully find a way to remedy the situation.
  • 2 0
 @IndustryNineOfficial: you have made some wonderful products that I have truly enjoyed. I will have to agree about jumping through hoops when dealing with your customer service. If your customer service was as good as your products you would be a five-star company.
  • 2 0
 While they are testing this, I'm on a Vzan Extreme (not TR) 19mm internal width, laced to novatec hubs with some stainless steel spokes, running hard on tubeless with schrader valves. It costed me 110 USD.
Of course I don't huck to flats and downhill like a mad man, but I do trails and some little jumps. those are straight as aluminum wheels can get and are doing far more jobs than I would've expected. They are so cheap that I dont care about trashing them. And give 2.4 tires a nice and round profile, perfect for off camber and wet roots.

If I could take these wheels, I would take the trail 29 in the front and the enduro 27,5 at the back.
  • 5 1
 cyclewheelsusa.com/product/industry-nine-101hubs-with-stans-flow-ex3-rims

Save yourselves $150 and get some equally good wheels
  • 7 2
 I'm not sure the word "affordable" means what you think it means.

Just shy of cdn$1000 is hardly a budget oriented price.
  • 5 2
 Compared to other I9 wheels. Read the article.
  • 2 0
 "Inconceivable!!!"
  • 1 0
 I'm not sure you should even use the word affordable and Industry nine in the same sentence. Kind of like an oxymoron to me.
  • 2 0
 I have been riding 101 hubs laced to NOBL 38's on my new bike since June. I bought these hubs with my rims to accommodate a microspline driver. Immediate issue, within days of my first ride, was an end cap on the front hub somehow had some play, which turned out to be an end cap that didn't fit quite right. After working with the local shop in my town, which wasn't great either, I received a warranty end cap weeks later. Now the opposite side end cap is loose and the hub has some play.. again..
  • 3 1
 Fix the 35.5 ID, it's 30.5....i snagged some discounted Enduro S front and trail rear (not the S version, 27mmid) and that combination rocks. Stiff light and compliant. For 850usd.I9 rocks
  • 7 3
 $750 is affordable??? What does that make my $150 euro shimano xt wheelset, complete trash?
  • 18 1
 pretty much
  • 1 0
 Not sure I could say these are truly ‘enduro’ strong. Got a rear in the spring with the hydra hub and the rim has not held up well to normal trail riding and some park laps here in Durango CO. Not horribly disappointed since I got it on sale but not nearly as durable/strong as their more expensive aluminum spoke options. I have a set of 10 year old 26” I9 enduro wheelset that still have held their shape better
  • 4 2
 The system wheels with aluminum spokes are definitely pretty bomb proof! The nice thing about both our Hydra S and now our 101 S wheels is you don't need the proprietary aluminum straight pull spokes so it can be an easier fix for a local shop. If you're still in need of a new rim for the wheels, shoot our service department a line! service@industrynine.com
  • 2 1
 @IndustryNineOfficial: thx for the reply - I have been a bit of a fan boi for awhile, have a couple classic enduro hubs I’ve built as well over the years
  • 1 0
 Was looking for something with a MicroSpline freehub and less harsh than my carbon wheels (that were well reviewed on PB, btw) and bought these at the end of June.

Really happy with the purchase. For USA made, I don't think they expensive.

Hub is quieter than my old wheel set (which I think was DT internals). I pre-treated the hub with the Dumonde Tech Pro-X freehub grease before setting them up just in case.

I've taken some bad lines that I thought for sure would of dented them judging by the sound, but after inspection, no issues.
  • 1 0
 i dont get wheels. You can spend thousands. You can get carbon and fancyness, a thousand pickups.
$750 for the "affordable" option.

Or you can spend £250 on a pair of Hope Hubs, on Spank Rims, fit them and forget about them forever.
  • 1 0
 I ride dirtcomponents.com wheels. They are designed and built in Austin TX by real people! Also, they basically have a price point and a wheel for everyone. Win win styles. Hands down the Rough Country’s are the best Corning wheel I’ve ridden.
-PEACHE$
  • 1 0
 i just built up a set of I9 32H Torch hubs (non-boost) w/2017 Race Face AR24 hoops & Sapim Leader spokes for $520 out the door. i was lucky since both hubs were a Facebook Marketplace purchase for $250, rims were on sale 60% off through Chain Reaction in the UK, & spokes were an eBay package deal. all that being said, these are really nice wheels which i never would've been able to buy new @ full price. the last time i had a new wheelset built was 1998 - the cost for the same 3x straight gauge w/brass spec using Bontrager Maverick rims & Real hubs was $250. inflation has certainly affected the custom wheel building market for sure. these 101s look decent, but i would've gone w/32H instead of 28H based on the Santa Cruz/Race Face OEM fiasco w/so many failures, anyway, i'm sure I9 factored long-term durability into the equation when spec'ing this setup...let's hope so
  • 4 0
 I’m sorry I must have spoke too soon..
  • 3 2
 Do everyone a favour, just buy a set of Hope Fortus wheels. My Pro2's are 5 years old, never missed a beat, never been serviced. My Hope Bulb is 15 years old and is still fine.
  • 3 3
 You have hunt, spank, Raceface, novatec, and DT Swiss that makes cheaper wheelsets then this and they are great with great engagement I probably left out some other companies but these are a little steep knowing you can spend an extra 200-300 for I9 other wheelsets that gives you better spikes and hubs now if these were $400 then I will bow down to affordability these guys just done
  • 4 0
 Affordable wheelset for me = less than 250
I.e. Halo
  • 7 3
 pinkbike need to get off the crack - $750 is not affordable.
  • 1 0
 Wheelset looks great, and price seems reasonable for what it is. I’d have a lot more trust in these hubs than the neo ones on my stans flow team. 28 spikes seems a miss to me, even being a relatively light guy.
  • 3 3
 So I9 commissions a generic hub and a generic rim, laced them up, and puts their name on it. I’m just not sure how that makes it anything speciall.

Kinda reminds me of VW bug owners putting Porsche hubcaps on their beetles.

$750 for a pawl hub and aluminum rims, meh.
  • 2 0
 They didn't commission anything. They still machine every part of the 101 in house. American made hub, hand built in their factory in Nc sounds pretty good to me.
  • 2 0
 Richard, it'd be nice if you added information about location or locations of manufacturing, not just where the wheels are built, which can only include assembly. Thanks. Smile
  • 1 0
 Nice set of hubs 300 to 400$ for the pair.
Decent rims 150 $ each so 300$ pair.
Spokes 1.50 each about 80$
Labour 100$
These are hand built made in USA wheels for less than I can get a set built.
Yep affordable.
  • 2 0
 Think that’s the first time I’ve ever read “a little light” in the cons section of a wheelset review.
  • 5 1
 for only $750 USD...
  • 3 2
 Lol affordable!? I’ll stick with my Halo Vortex wheelset for £200 less. They’re asymmetric, 35mm wide internally and tough as nails.. even with teeny tyre pressures.
  • 7 2
 Read the price wrong! They’re £300 more! The aspiring dentist’s wheelset. Gateway wheels
  • 2 1
 Let's not forget the Newmen SL A.30 Wheelset. Lighter, and at a similar price point, tricky to get in the States too so you'll have added cool factor.
  • 2 0
 So I am in the market for a new wheelset. What is better. Cheap carbon or affordable aluminum?
  • 2 0
 Depends on what you want out of your wheelset. If you want light, stiff, less truing (in my experience), no dents and a bit of a bling factor then go with something carbon. If those are not important to you then I'd focus more on the hub than the wheel actually. A light hub that has a good track record of reliability and decent engagement could be more important than the rim material. A DT350 for example with a 54T is a great all-arounder.
  • 2 0
 Steel is real! Eh, maybe not in this instance.
  • 2 0
 I’ve only had one small warranty issue which they resolved quickly without any hassle.
  • 2 2
 Bitex hubs laced to whatever rims you want is all you need. Solid hub, plenty of POE, awesome reviews and in my experience bombproof. Get a whole custom wheelset built for less than 5 hundo
  • 3 1
 Can someone tell us if these wheels are manufactured AND assembled in the US?
  • 2 0
 Article says made in Asheville
  • 1 0
 @elijahhume: That is the main selling point for me. If I was buying.
  • 3 1
 Weird, the review comes out right as the email blasts from I9 show up in my inbox.
  • 1 1
 i9’s are worth the extra cash in my opinion. I’ve been riding a second hand pair of the old 24mm width for a year and only dented the rear wheel on a 20ft gap to hard case on a log. Super bomber and super reliable.
  • 2 0
 That was a great random ass jump to comparing an i9 aluminum wheel to Ibis carbon wheels...
  • 2 2
 $500.00 use to be the beez neez of wheel builds in the mid 90's - early 2000's. But some DT Swiss rims and the hub of your choice for the same price = better wheel set for the money !
  • 1 0
 OLD Hope bulbs with a double wide rear and single track front. 3000+ whistler laps and still fine.
But you could spend a fortune if you want to.
  • 3 1
 So about the same prices as some DT EX1501 in the uk then.
  • 1 3
 But lighter.
  • 4 1
 Lol "affordable"
  • 1 1
 Wonder how they compare to RaceFace Turbine R wheel set? I would assume they are quite similar? Anyone at PB got any input on that question?
  • 1 0
 i'd venture a guess that the RF Turbines have quality rims, but mediocre hubs. even though the Vaults look cool, Easton is infamous for cutting corners in the hub manufacturing dept.
  • 1 1
 These are one of the few options if you are like me and run Shimano 12 speed. I'm currently on DT swiss but would like a nice I9 setup.
  • 1 0
 classicRC>the extrusion may suffer minor dents should you need to carry speed through the boulders/classicRC>
  • 2 1
 Is it me or did they eff up the lacing on that front wheel? Look at the closeup pic of the front hub.
  • 2 1
 I had a set of Flow MK2 wheels build on Hope Pro4 hubs this summer for under $600.
  • 2 0
 30.5 not 35.5
  • 8 7
 Affordable to who exactly, dudes who ride Yeti's?
  • 52 7
 Dudes who have jobs
  • 10 2
 @hubsession: LOL Right? $750 isn't that crazy. Hubs are what cost so much and i9 is quite proud of their hubs. I just got a SC Hightower with the Reserve rims on i9 Hydra hubs. They are really good but do they make me a better rider than my other wheelset with DT350s? Nope.
  • 5 6
 @hubsession: perfect response!
  • 1 0
 @mtbgeartech: I think it's pretty crazy for wheels..
I have a good job but 750 would still take some saving
  • 1 0
 @nordland071285: it's all relative I suppose. For a fairly premium wheelset this isn't too outrageous. when you put it next to the $1,000 We Are One Agent wheelset it does look fairly High considering it's aluminum.
  • 3 3
 How do you change spokes when there's no hole to insert the nipple from above ( inside the rim)?
  • 12 1
 You remove the tubeless rim strip. The holes are under there.
  • 3 1
 28 hole! No Thanks!
  • 1 0
 Ditto
  • 1 1
 First, $750 isn't that affordable. Second, as a fatty, I disapprove of this 28 spoke message.
  • 1 0
 Hope Tech Enduros, best 300 quid you'll ever spend. Case closed
  • 2 1
 Bontrager pro line 30 carbon wheels
  • 1 0
 Was lookin at Hunt wheels today.
  • 1 0
 Not gonna lie, I got baited by the title.
  • 1 0
 The new xtr hubs are dope
  • 2 1
 I see a lot of people on the hill with more money than sense/skill.
  • 1 0
 pick a price point and be a dick about it, is my strategy.
  • 1 0
 I love how the title changed to “More Affordable”
  • 1 0
 'only'
  • 2 1
 To much rolling friction
  • 1 0
 I only use steel wheels
  • 5 6
 750 USD is still too much for a wear and tear part like a wheelset.
  • 27 1
 Which part of a mountain bike is not "wear and tear"?
  • 4 0
 @bishopsmike:

The air in the tires.
  • 2 0
 @ilyamaksimov: I'll agree with the stem.
  • 1 0
 I come from a road racing background although I’ve been riding mountainbikes since 1983. We roadies always looked at wheels as the most important component on a bike. I think less so with mountain bikes but still good wheels are always worthwhile. At the same time as roadies we looked at wheels as being almost disposable. We raced hard and we knew we would crash or hit a pothole or something and destroy a rim in the process. We didn’t cry about it. That was racing. Personally I look at all parts that way. Get the best you can afford and expect wear, tear and sometimes destruction. But you’re right in that spending too much money for something when you will use it up quickly can be silly. Especially when you can buy good hubs and rims separately and build or have built a set of perfectly good wheels.
  • 5 1
 @Someoldfart: As a aggressive mountain bike rider I look at wheels as a critical part to the complete bike. I just cracked some expensive Santa Cruz carbon reserve wheels coming off an 8’ drop to flat at high speed and landed square on the one pointy rock on the trail. Anyway, the fact that I was able to ride off that without crashing even though the tire immediately shredded off the rim was evidence to me that money was well spent. It was even more evident after Santa Cruz sent me a new rear wheel the day after filing the warranty claim. Do I wish they were more “affordable” Hell yes, but man all of the abuse we put our wheels through, I’m glad I had the option to get a strong carbon set.
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