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Review: ION's Wet Weather Shelter Jersey and Scrub Pants

Apr 27, 2022
by Henry Quinney  
Next up in our new gear round-up are the latest winter offerings from ION. This features the Shelter BAT jersey and their Scrub AMP BAT pants, both of which are made with changeable conditions in mind.



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The Shelter BAT (body amplify technology) jersey is made with wet days in mind. If you’re somebody that often finds fully waterproof outerwear just a bit too much during anything but downpours then this could be just the thing.

It’s a jersey that is a little thicker than you might expect and is coated with a PFC-free coating to stop it from absorbing water. This should hopefully keep you warmer and drier for longer.
Shelter BAT Jersey Details
• Stretchy softshell fabric
• Water and moisture resistant
• Great in changing conditions
• Lens wipe
• $120 USD

www.ion-products.com

Personally, I’m somebody that tends to resist waterproof jackets for anything other than when it's actively pouring rain. I have a tendency to overheat, so in showers or light rain I’d often prefer to just get wet. In these conditions, I’ve been using the Shelter BAT jersey and it suits my needs very well.

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The jersey is designed to be worn as outerwear and not underneath a jacket. It’s got a water resistant coating that really helps to stop the material from becoming saturated with moisture. Over the last few months of riding in Squamish it’s been perfect, and I would say it offers enough warmth to negate the need for a base layer.

It breathes adequately, too. The stretchy material was comfortable and the inside of the jersey, which almost has a fleece-like texture, is very comfortable against your skin. I tested a size large and would say that it came true to size.

The jersey has some nice features, too. Most notably the elastic around the wrists and hem and the goggle cleaner by the waist. The elastic cuff prevents mud from being slung off your tires and finding its way underneath the garment. However, one thing I would say is that the cut of the collar wasn’t quite to my taste. Its square edges just looked a little odd to me and I think a more conventional cut would look better.
Henry Quinney
Location: Squamish, BC, Canada
Age: 29
Height: 6' / 183 cm
Inseam: 32" / 82 cm
Weight: 183 lbs / 83 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None

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All in all, I really like this jersey. Although it isn’t inexpensive, the material does feel relatively durable and I would hope to get a few years out of it. If worn in the right conditions, it’ll keep you warmer and more comfortable - which is something that might just be worth your investment. It's similar to Race Face's Conspiracy jersey. Both are stretchy jerseys made for wet weather. If I had to compare the two I would say I prefer the features of the ION, particularly the elastic collars on the arm and waist, but the fit (and collar) of the Race Face. While a wet weather-specific jersey might seem like a needless luxury they're definitely worth considering for winter riding in wetter climates.

They will get wet, and can only really shrug off showers, but you will stay warm and comfortable even in surprisingly heavy downpours, almost similar to how a wetsuit works. In most situations, especially if you're pedaling or working hard, I find them to be my preference over a typical waterproof jacket.



Pros

+ Thick, stretchy material for cold rides
+ You'll stay warm and comfortable, if not dry
+ Goggle cleaner and elastic cuffs

Cons

- Collar is a strange shape



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The Scrub pant is there to be a breathable and well fitting garment that has a handful of subtle features to help it stand out. The pant, which also comes in plain black as opposed to the multi-panelled chainsaw trouser colorway that we tested, also features the BAT technology.

For the trouser, that means lots of separate panels. Some of these panels feature Cordura fabric for abrasion resistance, others are more elastic and some, for instance the ones behind the knee, are meshed for extra breathability.

Scrub Pant Details
• Six sizes - XS - XXL
• Stretch and mesh panels to provide comfort
• Codura inserts
• Padded pocket for phone
• $180 USD
www.ion-products.com
There is also an additional protective panel around the inside of the right leg to stop you from catching your clothing on your drivetrain. Personally, if my trouser is in my chain then I would suggest the fit is wrong, but it may well be useful for some people.

The trouser has quite a long and slender cut. The size large pants we received for testing was a little too big for me. However, if you’re somebody who is tall yet slim these could be a good fit. I would say they fit in terms of width, but were just a little too long around the ankle.

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The pants have a padded pocket-in-a-pocket for your phone or keys. There is also plenty of adjustment on the waist to help you fine tune your fit. I would say that the fit is probably going to suit people who have long legs compared to their waist size.

The pants breathe well and are a nice thickness to be worn throughout most of the year, especially with the mesh parts. The stretch panels and waist adjustment should help ensure a good fit and seems like a good approach. The black model certainly looks more subtle than the brown ones I received. I can’t personally say I was a fan of the patchwork quilt look, but that’s not to say others won’t like it.



Pros

+ Will probably suit tall, thin body types well
+ Lots of tech
+ Padded pocket
+ Breath well thanks to differing panels

Cons

- The Sand colourway looks like a patchwork quilt





Author Info:
henryquinney avatar

Member since Jun 3, 2014
348 articles

73 Comments
  • 107 8
 I'd honestly love to see a "budget mtb gear field test" Like, I have to believe that a large number of us are not even remotely considering $180 pants, but are definitely considering the $40-$60 ones on Amazon. I'm all for spending my hard earned money on components, but when it comes to a pair of pants, I'd really like to see some more affordable options reviewed, even if they're from knockoff brands, idgaf.
  • 6 9
 Commencal has the best priced riding pants that I've seen. $140 Canadian (=$109USD). Didn't fit me but my wife picked up a pair and loves them.
  • 7 0
 @gbeaks33: I just got a set of Nukeproof blackline pants, on CRC for £60 (75 USD apparently). They're pretty lightweight, so more of a summer pant (compared to the Fox Defend pants I already have.) However They are super comfy and materials are just as nice as Fox stuff I have. I like them so much im considering getting another set while they are cheap! Also I would say the fit is better (for me). Only downside to them is the pockets are pretty small.
  • 72 5
 I felt the same way about clothing costs until my girlfriend began sewing, which has taught me quite a bit about what it takes to make clothing. The reality of most clothing costs is based on where and who is sewing it. It takes a human to cut and sew a garment, whether or not they're using industrial machines, this takes a decent amount of time. You want quality stitching? That takes even more time. Clothes that don't cost much are sewn in regions where labor is cheap and compensation isn't what I'd imagine the average mtn biker considers just. Quality technical fabrics are not cheap to buy, especially if you aren't mass producing. So if you want fancy pants that will last and were made by someone who earned a fair wage, $200 shouldn't be a hard pill to swallow. I don't know where Ion's clothing is made, but my point is that your expected price for riding clothing requires someone to get paid jack shit for a job you probably wouldn't want to do. Also, f*ck Amazon, buy your shit somewhere else, it really isn't that hard.
  • 26 2
 @rpdale: I'm sorry but even if I agree with you that we should seek for better quality products that are made in fair conditions, 90% of the technical MTB clothing is made in the same part of the world and is probably worth 1/10 of what it's charged to the consumer.
  • 7 0
 @rpdale: True True. I'm all for knowing more about what it actually takes to make the products we buy and do not want to step on the backs of people being taken advantage of. However, I think its naive to believe that paying more for pants in this case automatically means everyone is getting a fair wage. Could be the same person sewing the $60 amazon pants, only (Insert "premium" company here") puts more money into marketing and more money into CEO's pockets. Guess we all need to do our research if we are interested in quality, fair products. I am willing to pay $200 for high quality pants that will last and supported individuals along the way. It is daunting however to figure out which companies are "the good ones"
  • 9 0
 @gbeaks33: Actually that's a perfect example... Unfortunately the Commencal pants are identical to $60 FORBEMK Mountain bike pants on Amazon, which are already likely an up-priced catalog item from who knows where. So you're paying $50 for that nice little Commencal logo, not for higher quality. Not trying to be critical, but it shows the challenge of actually finding high quality products that you're not over paying for.
  • 4 3
 I’m not saying all the expensive stuff is always better, but I think putting money into quality riding wear is often a better investment than a lot of the upgrades we make to our bikes.
  • 8 0
 @dairydolores, www.pinkbike.com/news/mtb-on-a-budget-where-to-spend-and-where-to-save-on-mountain-bike-clothing-part-1.html -- this article is a good place to start if you're trying to figure out where to spend or save when it comes to MTB apparel. It's true, some items are crazy expensive and may not be worth the price. On the flip side, many of the current mountain bike specific pants are super comfortable, and the fact that they're tailored with a cut designed for riding rather than hiking may make them worth it for some riders.
  • 3 6
 Long Term Review of BezosBrand... By KirbysKustomReviewRegistry. Buy this short sleeve bundle, to stay cool in the summer time. They dry fast, I ride just as fast... and I haven't had an endurbro make fun of me yet. www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08287D781/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1&psc=1

But wait... now its a shoulder season?..... BOOM! Copy & paste above review! www.amazon.com/T-Shirt-Athletic-Essentials-Clothing-Undershirt/dp/B07NWWRWMQ/ref=sr_1_5?crid=1LVGJXLD9ZJ8Z&keywords=quick%2Bdry%2Blong%2Bsleeve&qid=1651075976&sprefix=quick%2Bdry%2Blong%2Bsleeve%2Caps%2C113&sr=8-5&th=1&psc=1
  • 4 0
 @dairydolores yes and no. I've had the same Fox mountain bike jacket and vest for at least 20 years. Worth the money. And bike specific fit is not something to overlook? On the flip side, I've always bought long sleeve paintball jersey's a few years out of current for cheap rather then buying mountain bike jerseys for 2-3 times the price. Or just breathable work out shirts from WallyWorld. The only real bike jerseys I have were gifts! Smile But Chamois, always spend high in the nether region...

most times you get what you pay for, but sometimes it makes sense to be frugal...
  • 2 0
 upvote only due the abbreviation idgaf and the content....
  • 3 0
 @Aksel31: You're totally right, the clothing industry as a whole perpetuates this, not to mention produces an insane amount of waste from all the cheap crap that doesn't even sell. I just think it will help if consumers shift their priorities away from "as cheap as possible" to high quality items that are made to last. It's helpful when companies are transparent about the production of their clothing, because yeah, the majority are just getting stuff made for cheap and marking up the prices to meet their brand image. A company like NF is going to make a tiny fraction of what Fox makes on a comparable garment, because I doubt you can find someone to sew for $1 an hour in Vancouver BC.
  • 2 0
 @misteraustin I sitll haven't found budget shorts but stopped buying jerseys as there as so many polyester or nylon sportswear tops available that are identical to mtn biking jerseys. I'd like to see a company such as Zoic do a simple elastic waist short with minimal pockets. Just basically gym shorts but with a little more durable material. I still don't understand why mtn bike shorts need to be so complicated or have so much storage.
  • 1 0
 @tadpoledancer:
Gotta agree with this. Some of the more spendy items I’ve used wind up outlasting the cheaper stuff by enough to at least break even. The latest for me was the POC enduro gloves vs Fox Ranger glove. POC cost more but has taken waaay more abuse than my old fox ranger gloves would have (they fit better too).
  • 1 0
 @st-lupo: haha, the last poc gloves I bought seriously opened up along the finger seam on the very first ride, so can’t say I’ve had the best of luck with them. I think Leatts gloves are super comfy though, and half the price.
  • 1 0
 www.wrangler.com/shop/men-pants

They’re actually really good and have become my go to for cooler weather. Good enough quality to last several seasons.
  • 1 0
 @rpdale: THIS!!!!!! apparel is all HANDMADE, is not made by robots with molds, so why should it be cheaper than components?
good quality, fair working conditions and sustainable materials/production have a price.....
  • 21 0
 I actually kinda like the colorway of the pants.. it reminds me of my Grandma's house.
  • 4 0
 Same here. It was listed as a con but I think the look is the best part.
  • 13 0
 Same here. It reminds me of your grandma’s house
  • 14 0
 They even cut the jersey to look like a trash bag.
  • 5 0
 Ion's website shows these pants with a 34-35 inch inseam in size Large. Only set of riding pants I am aware of with that long of an inseam in standard sizing (not counting 7mesh's rainpants that can be trimmed). Anyone over 5'10, I guess this is the pant for you. No more everything-is-coming-up-milhouse floodpant situations for us tall folks.
  • 9 0
 still blows that its for size 36-38! some of us are tall and skinny!
  • 3 0
 Was gonna say this is the first pant they've reviewed that looked long enough. Still gonna ride up with wear/on the bike. But at least they don't look stupid walking around at the coffee shop afterwards... Smile

Usually I find they only make pants for Costanza. Big and short. OR Kramer. Tall and Skinny. I'm BOTH! and I can never get them to fit my waist AND be long enough...
  • 2 0
 @stiingya: i think im going to try riding in lulu lemon pants next winter. they are extremely long! can buy 36 inseam in like any waist. might need to try some
  • 1 0
 @gbeaks33 and talk folks: I'm with 7mesh and we are updating inseam lengths on our site. Our Men's Glidepath pant (not the trimmable waterproof one) is 34" in Medium, 34.5" Large, 35" XL, and 35.5" XXL. They have a cuff that also makes them work well for people with shorter inseams (definitely speaking from experience on that one!). If taller riders have feedback on how our pants are working for them, or not, we'd love to hear from you directly. Thanks!
  • 2 0
 @tj7mesh: thanks for the info. I'm a 34 waist and a 36 inseam. Plenty of riders are skinnier than me and just as tall. So those won't really work unless I buy something that poorly fits the waist. Not really sure why it's standard to offer longer inseams for people with bigger waistlines. I can't really comment on your pants because I've tried them on and left them at the shop since they don't fit. (with the exception of the trimmable pants...that's a great idea. I don't have the need for fully waterproof riding pants but I like the length options).
  • 2 0
 @gbeaks33: Totally understood. Short riders have the reverse problem - if they select for a larger waist size, the inseams can be much too long. Overall, it's a challenge to fit a huge variety of people with a limited number of sizes. We've been increasing the number of sizes we offer as we grow, and will continue to work on fitting more body types. We hope to get to the point of offering a grid of options where waist and length can vary more.
  • 3 0
 @tj7mesh: hopefully we can see a tall version someday! as im in the same boat of 34" waist by 36" inseam. something fitting that would be sweet! and thanks for coming on here and chatting with tall folks on the subject. we see and appreciate that stuff!
  • 2 0
 @gbeaks33: i tried on some lulu lemon pants in 34/36 and they actually seamed like a legit and comfortable pant for riding! i think i might try some
  • 2 0
 @andraperrella27: I have some of their work/suit pants with a 37 inseam and they're fantastic. Never thought of their workout pants for riding though. Do I have to talk about yoga nonstop if I'm wearing them though? Seems to be a key criteria.
  • 2 0
 @gbeaks33: sorry, 37" is what I meant. Yeah, I was actually thinking just like their ABC pant or something. unfortulately joggers/ athletic things from them only go up to 34" that I am seeing. But when I tried on the ABC (or whichever is their most athletic/ comfortable material, it seemed like a great option for that nice/yet colder weather riding. its just sweet that they are so comfy/ stretchy and come in 37s. Ive never in my life had the ability to roll pant legs and make them fit how I would like. So that is rad... the more I think about it, the more im sold on trying em
  • 3 0
 @andraperrella27: fwiw one of our sales reps is a big fan of ABC pants for cold/dry winter riding in Alberta. Hey general question for any guys with these pant problems - how do you find most long sleeve shirts? Our sleeves are on the long side and I'm curious if they're enough for you.
  • 1 0
 @tj7mesh: rad to hear it! I just realized I was commenting back and forth on my wife’s account that was logged in on the computer. Oops. That’s great to hear there’s someone out there already riding in the ABCs and loving it! They seem like the best option out there right now. I’m definitely going to try a pair now. I’m in the same boat as the gentleman above in that unfortunately zero riding pants fit and I unfortunately don’t have a need for the waterproof trimmable pair. Just need some breathableish regular pair for the colder days.

I can say as someone who HAS to wear XL upper anything and has never dried anything ever before since it’ll shrink to be too short in waist or sleeves, I’ve never really had too tough an issue with long sleeve shirts. If the sleeves are what you’d consider on the longer side, I think that’s pretty dialed then! I wouldn’t consider myself an outlier with an extremely lanky upper though but if slightly longer than normal, sounds pretty solid to me.
I only get a tad bit of sleeve creep when In riding position from a normal long sleeve
  • 9 0
 Cons: Not nice enough to make Henry smile.
  • 5 0
 I've said this before, but it bears repeating. JCrew had some 5 pocket tech pants that were $19.95 on their jcrewfactory website. I bought 5 or 6 pair. they were light, dried really quickly and were cheap. The point is if you look around you'll find pants, shirts and plenty of other gear that is not in the MTB or outdoor space but works comparably well for your purposes. If big logos are your thing, stick with the industry brands. If you don't care for logos, want to to wear somewhat normal looking clothes, and don't want to spend ridiculous amounts of money of clothing that will get ripped and dirty, have a look at the materials your current flash MTB wear is made of and look at the tags on garments on sales racks and thrift stores. I wore a stagecoach brand polyester button up shirt from the 80s and a fellow rider asked me if it was the new line from a well-known outdoor brand. You can pay a premium for branded tablets that defunk your hydration reservoir or you can buy 6 times as many of the identical product when it's marketed to cleaning dentures or dog bowls. The same practice applies to clothing. Don't hunt for bargain used helmets, but if you come across pants that stretch, breathe, dry quickly and don't make your ass look fat, buy 6 at $20 a pair.
  • 6 0
 Why in the world would I buy these when I could spend $600 on a pair of overalls from POC? Please, I'd so much rather flex my poor money management at the trail head.
  • 4 0
 I'd like some shredders that are the dudes wearing tight black skinny jeans to serve as field testers for some proper riding pants and then let pros that wear proper riding pants wear tight black skinny jeans and then we can have a round table discussion to finally settle the debate.
  • 1 0
 I’ve used both and depending where you’re riding them skinny jeans are sick, probably not that great for all day xc stuff but I used to smash all day rides as a kid on a bmx in jeans so the new stretchy ones are a huge step up, super resilient too. I guess what I’m saying is jeans are good if you expect to bail a lot or ride somewhere rough
  • 1 0
 @Peskycoots: And what do you do with the pads? Wear them over jeans?
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: I think if you need pads you should go for shorts, probably don’t want to be in the alps in jeans
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: it’s all about the stretch
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: it appears that the slope style riders wear them under their skinny jeans.
  • 3 0
 reminder that they could have made this look exactly like a regular shirt and black jeans, so you don't look like such a fucking dweeb on the trail, but then people wouldn't know you're a Mountain BikerTM if you ever walk away from your bike, for some reason.
  • 3 0
 But then you could just wear a regular shirt and black jeans so you can show your cred with your BMX Backgound....
  • 3 0
 Can Henry please always be the front/profile model guy with his “I feel like a twat modelling these clothes” look. It makes me feel better about reading reviews on exorbitantly priced clothing when I see Henry visibly demonstrating how I feel about the situation.
  • 3 0
 Can you share how to care for/wash it? Most stuff with that "Waterproof coating" loses it's waterproofing after a couple washes...is it a pain to get clean if you can't throw it in the washer and dryer?
  • 3 1
 Agreed. DWR coating only is useless within a handful of washings.
  • 2 0
 I've been waiting for a jersey like this for ages! Modern pants that are water resistant but not full boil in the bag waterproof are awesome, and I keep wondering why no one was making a top half out of the same stuff
  • 3 0
 Wet weather clothing,just in time for British summertime.Hope the thermal apparel is on its way too.
  • 3 0
 A google cleaner is a unique feature. How does it work?
  • 5 0
 Gonna have to look that up.
  • 11 0
 it purges your search history of all bike related stuff, pretty handy for married people
  • 1 1
 I've had some jerseys and coats with a goggle cleaner. Basically what I've seen is its a microfibre cloth stitched to the inner seam near the waist, so you turn the jersey slightly inside out, and you have a little goggle cloth.
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney For being such an anti-socialite, you sure do look super comfortable in the pic. HA HA Jk thanks for the review.
  • 4 3
 It's worth mentioning that there is a all-black version of those pants, no?
  • 6 0
 It does say that in the review...
  • 1 0
 loving those pants and I like the collar cut on the jersey despite some of the comments
  • 1 0
 so i guess it will be like this from now on....pinkbike have turned into an online product catalogue....
  • 2 1
 The new Derelict campaign, sorry you didn't book it
  • 1 0
 What is this rain you speak of? Even the snow is dry here.
  • 2 2
 Those pants are 5 out of 5 on the cool factor, also the innovative neck collar ain't bad
  • 3 2
 Quite possibly the ugliest pants I've ever seen. Razz
  • 1 0
 Nice wood planters and backyard.
  • 1 0
 So what size are you wearing here?
  • 1 0
 it says large in the review
  • 1 0
 Oh sweet! I've been waiting for pant review #423.
  • 2 0
 why is it so ugly
  • 1 0
 They used all the leftover fabric from the cutting room floor .
  • 1 0
 Little to skinny for my liking
  • 1 3
 I didn't know being homeless was this expensive, I'll have to ask crackhead larry where he gets the money to afford this... get real Pb do better, #staywokepal







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