Review: Kona's Fresh Hei Hei Can Make Cross-Country Fun - Pond Beaver 2020

Apr 14, 2020
by Mike Levy  





I've been mispronouncing this bike's name for more than two decades now, and in that time it's been everything from a US-made titanium hardtail back in '98 to a race-focused, full-suspension cross-country rig in more recent years. All-new for 2020, the latest Hei Hei CR (say "hay hay") is a 120mm-travel cross-country-ish 29er that's intended to excel on both a technical course and a technical trail. Kona calls it a "Mid-travel cross-country bike designed for speed and fun,'' which is a funny way to pronounce down-country, but whatever.

There are only two versions of the new Hei Hei CR, and I've been riding the top of the line, gorgeously green CR DL model that goes for $5,999 USD. Spending $4,499 will get you the standard CR, or you can pick up the wildly colored frame for $3,099 USD.
Hei Hei CR Details

• Intended use: Cross-country
• Wheel size: 29"
• Rear-wheel travel: 120mm
• Fork travel: 120mm
• Head angle: 67.5-degrees
• Reach: 465mm (lrg)
• Sizes: Sm, med, lrg (tested), xlrg
• Frame material: Carbon fiber
• Weight: 26.8 lb / 12.2 kg (as pictured)
• MSRP: $5,999 USD
• More info: www.konaworld.com

The new Hei Hei CR is carbon fiber from head tube to dropout, but Kona has kept the 100mm-travel version around in the form of a single aluminum-framed model.



Kona Hei Hei
The Hei Hei name has been in Kona's catalog since 1998 when it was a US-made titanium hardtail. I'd love to have one of those on the wall.





Kona Hei Hei
The Hei Hei frame looks ready for your cross-country ride and then some.


The Details

If you're familiar with Kona's stout-looking Process range, you're probably picking up the same vibes from their new Hei Hei CR frame. It might be a cross-country bike of some kind, but the frame appears to be ready for that and a little more. Relatively large pivots are used everywhere, minus at the axle where there isn't a pivot at all, and even the one-piece carbon rocker link looks like it belongs on something with another 30mm of squish.

The previous Hei Hei employed a compact, single-pivot suspension layout that saw its tiny shock compressed from above via an even tinier link to deliver 100mm of travel. Nothing was wrong with it, but there was also no way to squeeze in a second bottle cage mount on the seat tube... Unless the shock was moved to the underside of the top tube. Boom, now there's just enough room for two bottles inside the front triangle, not to mention a bump up to 120mm of rear-wheel travel.

Massive box-section chainstays should keep everything pointing the same direction, while low and wide seatstays provide engineered flex in the absence of an axle pivot.


Kona Hei Hei
Cables go in up here...
Kona Hei Hei
And come out back here. It looks a bit weird, but it works.

Kona Hei Hei
The carbon fiber rocker link compresses a RockShox shock.
Kona Hei Hei
Big bearings and ISCG tabs.


All the lines run inside the frame, until the shift and rear brake exit from each side of the seat tube before snaking into the bottom of the seatstays. It works just fine, but it looks kinda odd, doesn't it? There are no threads in the bottom bracket shell, but you will find a set of ISCG tabs around it, and rubber guards protect the chainstay and underside of the down tube.


Kona Hei Hei
The single-pivot rear-suspension design delivers 120mm of travel.

Suspension

With the exception of the Magic Link (someone at Kona is upset I just brought that up), Kona's full-suspension bikes have always been relatively straightforward, easy to understand machines. The same could be said about the new Hei Hei CR as well. It delivers 120mm of rear-wheel travel via an in-line air shock and, in lieu of sealed bearings and all the associated hardware at an axle pivot, Kona saved some weight and complexity by using seatstays that are designed to flex.

Did you spot the unused opening just ahead of the forward shock mount? That means that the new Hei Hei CR was designed to accept a remote lockout, although there isn't currently a model with that setup.

Graphs!


Geometry

While some brands are getting pretty roomy up front, Kona is a bit more modest about their size large, with a relatively compact 465mm reach. A medium is at 440mm, while the extra-large Hei Hei jumps to 500mm, which certainly does make choosing the ideal size for yourself easier.

The important angles are 67.5-degrees and 75-degrees, with the first number definitely a bit steeper than some of the new cross-country-ish bikes out there. Lastly, 430mm chainstays are used across the range.







Test Bike Setup

After tinkering around with different shock pressures in order to have the sag between 20 and 35-percent, I ended up preferring a number closer to the former than the latter. The Hei Hei's suspension isn't too active for its intentions, but it does have a deep feel to it that's not common in this cross-country-ish segment. 185 psi gave me my preferred 25-percent sag number. I'm pretty familiar with the 120mm-travel Pike at this point, so it took all of five minuted to get it sorted.

Kona spec'd the Hei Hei with a few cross-country-focused components that we don't often see here on Pinkbike, including a lightweight flat handlebar from Race Face and a set of Maxxis' fast-rolling, 2.25" wide Rekon tires. While I resisted the urge to put on more aggressive (but heavier) rubber, it wouldn't have been out of line given the slippery spring conditions here on Squamish's rooty trails.

n a
Mike Levy
Location: Squamish, BC, Canada
Age: 39
Height: 5'10
Inseam: 33.5"
Weight: 156 lb
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @killed_by_death


Kona Hei Hei review Photo by Dane Perras
While the Hei Hei never felt slow, racers might want to reach for the pedal-assist switch every now and then.

Climbing

I think of bikes like the new Hei Hei, those 120mm, sporty rigs, as cross-country bikes for the real world. A pure race bike can make you feel like Absalon on the right trails, but it can also beat the living shit out of you while punishing mistakes that your trail bike doesn't even notice. And I'm talking about going up, not even coming back down.

With quick-ish handling and suspension that keeps it stuck to the ground, the green Kona loves to scrabble its way up the kind of pitches that some of us wouldn't even bother attempting. Despite the 2.25" Maxxis Recon tires not helping the Hei Hei's efforts, especially when things were slick, the bike consistently topped out on sections that I've dabbed on a time or three in the past. I suspect that part of that is down to the deep feeling suspension; many of my post-ride notes talk about how I found myself seated and pedaling up rough singletrack instead of being out of the saddle as on other bikes. Keeping your ass planted can, of course, deliver more consistent traction, and that's exactly what felt like was happening under me.


Kona Hei Hei review Photo by Dane Perras
On-the-nose handling means that switchbacks are a breeze.


For the same reason, it's easy to see how the Hei Hei would suit those all-day monster rides that test not just your fitness, but also your taint and mental strength. Like some of you sickos out there, I love nothing more than a soul-draining, life-reaffirming, eight-hour, 10,000-foot day, and the Kona is well-suited to that type of misadventure. Long live the death march.

Sure, Kona could have been more aggressive with the Hei Hei's geometry, especially given the popularity of short-travel bikes with longer, slacker numbers. But, when you've just pedaled up something that looked unrideable, it sure feels like they made the right call. Handling-wise, the Hei Hei is more like a turn-on-a-dime, traditional cross-country rig than some of the latest short-travel bikes that sacrifice a bit on the ups to gain more capabilities on the downs.

If you're considering a Hei Hei for some racing, it'll best suit rough, physical courses where its sturdy frame and active suspension make those flimsy 100mm bikes feel overworked and under-sprung. On the other hand, if you're coming off one of those flimsy 100mm bikes, the Kona might have you reaching down for the Deluxe Ultimate's pedal-assist switch. It's not that it feels inefficient - it doesn't - but it's certainly a more active, open suspension system than one intended for full-on race efforts.

The Hei Hei doesn't quite have that fire-under-your-ass personality that a traditional race bike has, but it's also more capable and a hell of a lot more fun in the real world.
Kona Hei Hei review Photo by Dane Perras
Relatively forgiving suspension lets you smash into things that might make some other 120mm bikes flinch.


Kona Hei Hei review Photo by Dane Perras
The Hei Hei's slippery suspension gives it an advantage over short-travel race bikes when the ground is rough.


Descending

If you've ever ridden a cross-country bike down a rowdy and rocky descent at your limit, you might know that it's sometimes equal parts skill and luck. That's not the story with the Hei Hei, however; it feels more like a quick-handling trail bike than a sketchy Spandex speedster.

I've ridden more bikes in this travel bracket than I can count, but I don't think any of them offered the smoothness that comes from the Hei Hei's rear suspension and that RockShox Deluxe Ultimate shock. For having just 120mm, and running 25-percent sag rather than more, the Hei Hei is remarkably forgiving over rough ground. The middle portion of the travel, which is where you spend most of your time, smooths out roots and high-frequency feedback in a way that a bike like this shouldn't be able to - the bike just takes less out of you, especially if your trails are long and rough.


Kona Hei Hei review Photo by Dane Perras
Cross-country doesn't have to be intervals and watts all the time. When you're on the Hei Hei, the name of the game is fun.


With rear-suspension that turns chunky to smooth, there's no doubt in my mind that the Hei Hei would be quite the stage racing weapon. That said, it does feel a touch linear when the hits come fast and hard, but adding a volume-reducing spacer to the shock is all that's needed to sort that out. At the other end of the stroke, the supple action surely helps keep the Hei Hei from sliding around too much when traction is questionable.

While the Hei Hei's rear-suspension is quite forgiving, the handling feels quick and asks for only small inputs. Don't take that as it being nervous, though, because it's not that on-edge, pointy steering that traditional cross-country rigs suffer from. Instead, let's call it responsive. What it isn't is that new-school, short-travel shredder that you ride even though all your buddies are on 150mm bikes; I'm talking about the Tallboy and other options with a similar amount of travel. While the Tallboy is really just a trail bike, the Hei Hei still has enough cross-country in its DNA that I'd prefer it if my rides were equal parts fitness and fun.


Kona Hei Hei review Photo by Dane Perras
The handling is more cross-country-chill than short-travel ripper, but it works.


We have a lot of saucy trails here in Squamish, trails that a 120mm-travel bike isn't best suited to, and those are the places where the Hei Hei can feel a bit overwhelmed. Add in some steepness and the new Kona requires a focused, steady pair of hands to guide it through, but not nearly as much as a full-fledged race rig. Cross-country bikes can be exactly what you need in a lot of situations, but they can also spank you so damn hard if you're on a demanding trail and not paying attention.

The new Hei Hei isn't trying to be a rough and tumble short-travel shredder but, when it comes to cross-country bikes, it offers more room for error than most. Or, if you're like me, more room to ride your cross-country bike irresponsibly.


Technical Report

Maxxis Rekon tires: While I'll concede that the 2.25" Rekons aren't entirely out of place on a 120mm-travel fun-country bike, I feel like Kona missed a beat by not speccing something a bit meatier. At the very least, a set of 2.4" wide Rekons would add to the Hei Hei's abilities on the descents without slowing it down much on the ascents.

Race Face Next 35 handlebar: There's certainly nothing wrong with a flat handlebar, but it does give the Hei Hei that cross-country AF appearance. Don't let that fool you, though, and don't add bar-ends.

Four-piston brakes: SRAM's G2 RSC stoppers slow the bike exceptionally well, and Kona was wise to go with a 180mm front rotor that helps during sustained downhills. A two-piston brake wouldn't have been out of line on the new Kona, either, but the G2s are ready for anything.



Sea Otter 2019
Santa Cruz Tallboy review Photo by Dane Perras
I'm currently testing Spot's 115mm-travel Ryve (left), and have spent months on Santa Cruz's latest, 120mm-travel Tallboy.

How does it compare?

Travel has never defined a bike's intentions, but things are even foggier in 2020. With 120mm, the same as the Hei Hei, some might want to put Santa Cruz's Tallboy up against the Kona, which wouldn't be entirely wrong. The two feel quite different on the trail, though, with the Kona being a much quicker handling, agile machine. I'd be more likely to wiggle around some rocks and sprint up the following incline on the Hei Hei, whereas I'd probably smash blindly through the same rocks and then spin up the incline when aboard the Tallboy. Neither approach is wrong.

There's less distinction between the Kona and Spot's 115mm-travel Ryve, however, with both being quick-handling, relatively sporty bikes. The Ryve does feel like it has the legs on the Hei Hei when talking about efficiency, though, as I've yet to feel like it needs any help from its pedal-assist switch. Stay tuned for a full review of the Ryve in the near future, too.



Pros

+ Active, forgiving suspension
+ Sturdy frame and spec
+ Responsive, quick handling

Cons

- Racers may want to use the lockout
- Responsive, quick handling



Pinkbike's Take


bigquotesIf you're the type of cross-country rider who waits until you have a large bowel movement to weigh yourself, or if you have no use for a dropper post because grams, then the green Kona probably isn't for you. The Hei Hei is a cross-country bike that you can use for racing, but it's not your knife-edge race weapon. It's not your hard-charging, relaxed handling trail bike, either.

But if you want a bike to do the odd race on, or maybe even some stage racing, and plenty of all-day adventures that cover some seriously rough ground, the Hei Hei will be a good partner.

The Hei Hei is an interesting blend of cross-country and capable suspension, and it's a package that makes a lot of sense for riders who value fitness but also know that a pure race bike is a bit silly.
Mike Levy








253 Comments

  • 209 2
 Levy is probably the single reason every brand is making more bottle mounts. What a mark to leave on the universe.
  • 91 2
 Mike Levy is the Doug Demuro of bike industry.
  • 38 2
 That and the term 'downcountry' appears to now be in common use...
  • 39 0
 @slimboyjim: In the video he is moving on to calling these bikes "fun country'. Oh boy
  • 58 0
 He is roadies' secret agent. First downcountry, then two bottles, in five years half of us will be wearing lycra! Beware!
  • 11 20
flag DanTae (Apr 14, 2020 at 4:22) (Below Threshold)
 @denis80: can't stand that guy
  • 41 0
 @denis80: "This is a 2021 Kona Hei Hei. I'm going to show you all it's quirks and features and then I'm going to give it a Mike score."
  • 5 9
flag SJA59 (Apr 14, 2020 at 6:23) (Below Threshold)
 No one is going to comment on the A/M frame version looking IDENTICAL to old Transition Bottle Rocket colorway??

www.konaworld.com/hei_hei_cr_race_frame.cfm

www.singletracks.com/photo.php?p=52445
  • 42 1
 @SJA59: I think we have differing definitions of “IDENTICAL”
  • 5 0
 @denis80: Soon to be sporting the two-shirt look for reviews.
  • 1 0
 @SJA59: Looks like a Transition Bottle Rocket colorway
#"lookslikea"fail
  • 1 0
 @PNdubRider:

Lmao, are there any good bike trails out in Nantucket?
  • 4 0
 @mikelevy Hope you don't take this the wrong way. I love having a bottle on the bike. Your enthusiasm is just impressively intense sometimes.
  • 2 1
 @denis80: Hey now don't insult Levy like that.
  • 3 0
 @matadorCE: I wasn’t insulting Mike at all. I was just comparing cupholders and bottlecages. And I do like them both.
  • 1 0
 @SJA59: I wasn't going to comment on the color, but it reminds me of the Trance Adv 29 (which I love).
  • 1 0
 @SJA59: is this the new 'looks like a session"?
  • 1 0
 @denis80: And now, let’s look at all the Hei Hei’s quirks and features.
  • 1 0
 Well, that and all the people who use bottles.
  • 74 2
 Seeks like the ideal bike in a 2 bike garage, if the other one is an enduro rig. Too many trail bikes are now trying to be enduro bikes, making them heavier and slower. And pointless if you already have an enduro bike. Props to Kona for resisting the urge to go all in downcountry.
  • 60 1
 If you reorganize a 2 bike garage, you can hang around 6 bikes on the walls. Which means you'll be fine until you buy your 6th bike and N+1 hits in.
  • 12 0
 I was thinking this would make a perfect trail bike for everyone out there complaining about today's 30+ lb trail bikes. It has the same amount of suspension and I'd guess a similar frame weight as my wife's old Fuel EX, but with much better geometry.
  • 12 0
 I have a 170mm Enduro rig and have been considering a fast short travel trail bike for a long time. I opened this review, now consider me sold.
  • 10 0
 I like this thinking. Sure you can slap DH geo on a 130mm bike so that it feels stable at speed but once you're up to speed and hit a rough section of trail you're going to run out of travel, traction, and capability really quickly.

XC bikes that are slightly more relaxed than a dirtroadie race bike are fun AF. Blur TR, Spark, and it sounds like the Hei Hei fit this category. I would happily ride these on my local XC loops. For days with fast long descents give me ≥150mm please.
  • 12 1
 Yeah that's what I'm thinking. For those of us who don't live in Squamish or Gunnison, a 32 pound short travel rig with 65 degree HA makes no sense. Something like this or a Trek Top Fuel would be great for making flatter/undulating terrain more fun, and huffing around 5 fewer pounds on the climbs would be great. Add an enduro/park bike and you've got yourself a solid stable.
  • 3 0
 @roma258: yeah, the forks trip trail bike test didn't really cater to the sort of terrain this sort of bike excels in, which is actually the sort of terrain most of us have access to. With the "stay local" rules at the moment, in very overbooked. Bet I'd be having a riot on one of these!
  • 2 0
 Overbiked even
  • 7 0
 @mtbgeartech: I came here to say I just bought a 34 sc for the blur. Will be sub 25lbs in an xl and will sit nicely next to my enduro rig. I put a 50mm stem on it with some real bars (760 20mm rise). Quiet the crusher when I'm not needing knee pads. I couldn't be happier with the two bikes and decision to go full xc bike and go up, rather than tall boy go down on weight
  • 2 0
 @pistol2ne: Man that sounds like a fun bike!
  • 1 0
 @roma258: I got my Top Fuel in January as a 2nd MTB to my 170mm enduro bike. So much fun and so bloody quick! Would be hard to sell me the hei hei over the top fuel.
Have been really impressed by the quality of the suspension tune. It uses 115/120mm very well.
  • 1 0
 I think a hardtail compliments the enduro bike a little better. It’s fast, simple, requires skill to ride, and is always ready to go!
  • 2 0
 @skelldify: I got a hardtail to compliment my Smuggler and I'm thinking I need to re-configure my set-up. Hardtail is good for like an hour, but anything longer just beats me up. Maybe I've gone soft at 38. Thinking a lightweight full-sus with decent geo will be more fun in like 90% of situations, and still pedal awesome. Then have the 140mm plus travel enduroish rig for racing, bigger terrain and bike park. I am talking myself into it. Just scared to pull the trigger on anything at the moment because- well look around.
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: to be fair you can get away with a gravel bike in Sussex. Would even bother
  • 1 0
 @pistol2ne: Exactly! I also have a Blur and love it for my local XC trails where a Tallboy would be just too heavy on climbs to be enjoyable. It pairs also perfectly with my Nomad for bike park laps.
  • 1 0
 Why an enduro rig? Depending on where you live, this may be more than enough. I had the previous generation Hei Hei and it was an extremely capable bike on all sorts of challenging terrain.

These are BC/XC bikes, after all.
  • 1 0
 @gdharries: Because when you spend the day riding steep and rough trails at >30mph, less than 150mm of travel isn't enough. Yes, the trails can be ridden on bikes like the Hei Hei albeit much differently than on a longer travel bike.
  • 1 0
 @gdharries: if I only rode the local trails to here, this would be the perfect one bike garage. And the same is probably true for a lot of people that lug burly 160mm bikes around flat forests. But when we're not in lockdown, I ride steeper terrain, do a bit of racing and appreciate the safety net when I'm airborne. Hence the enduro rig with slow heavy tyres, bars that don't really fit between the local trees, etc
  • 24 0
 Comparing the numbers this is almost the same as my 2017 trailbike, which was in the downcountry category last year by PB standards. If I wait a few more years it will eventually turn into a roadbike XD
  • 21 0
 2024 gravel bike right here.
  • 8 0
 2027 Paris-Roubaix & TdF
  • 23 1
 This is everything I've been looking for in a trail bike. 130 pike up front and get rowdy af? Count me in!
  • 4 0
 That would make it a Tallboy though right?
  • 11 0
 @Willis24: Or a Trance 29? Smile
  • 2 0
 @OzarkBike: Or a Ripley?
  • 16 0
 If you've been saying Hei Hei wrong all this time, I can't even begin to pro-cess what else you've been mispronouncing. Lee-vee.
  • 6 0
 Hei Hei, Ha, Ha! At least you did not say Larvae...
  • 16 0
 So the pro and con of handling can be summed up as “twitchier than some but not as twitchy as some?”
  • 2 0
 suspension: absorb bumps vs absorb too. much bumps.
  • 15 1
 Hey, hey, that’s a pretty dope looking bike.
  • 13 0
 And I thought Hei Hei was the crazy chicken in Moana....
  • 5 0
 @fartymarty: You being forced to watch a load of Disney+ too.......
  • 5 0
 @Dav82: yeah but I secretly enjoy it, just don't tell anyone.
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: secrets safe with me....
  • 6 0
 The only issue is when you ride through Dawg crap it can smell a bit Stinky
  • 1 0
 @sewer-rat: It took me a while to Process that, but I'm glad you took a Stab at getting the inevitable puns started!
  • 1 0
 Looks like the Nukeproof Reactor.
  • 7 0
 "The Hei Hei name has been in Kona's catalog since 1998 when it was a US-made titanium hardtail. I'd love to have one of those on the wall."

Earlier than that I think. I worked at a shop 1992-1994 and there were a handful of Hei Hei under the butts of some of the fast racers. Was succeeded in Joe Murray lineage by the Voodoo D-Jab. Both were really nice and I too wish I had one on the wall!
  • 5 0
 Was thinking exactly this. I had the 1993 Kona brochure plastered all over my walls the Hei Hei was definitely the highlight.
  • 3 0
 Definitely available before 1998, started in 1991 if I'm not mistaken. I raced a TST manufactured 1996 HeiHei frame for several seasons around that time that was a pretty nice ride. Wish I still had it but sold it around 2001.
  • 4 0
 Yeah, in 1990 Kona had a titanium model, named the “Titanium” model =P. Kona branded it as the Hei Hei in 1991.
  • 6 0
 @bicycle019: I owned the fire hei hei released to the public I still remember the serial # as it was the 6th bike produced. It was wicked until it was stolen at the mount saint Ann World Cup in 92 or 93 (memories fade) but the bike I’m sure I received it in 91.
  • 3 0
 @Kazook: Cool bikes for sure! I have a 96 or 97 (or maybe 98 but I think not) team frame that I got from the second owner in Bellingham, WA, near Kona HQ a few years ago ($150 for the whole bike!) — green and yellow flames over the titanium. It’s an early King Kahuna Hei Hei with the 6al/4v rear end, 3al/2.5v front end (without gussets...the later 1998ish to 2000ish King Kahunas were full 3/2.5 and had gussets). Mine is a 20” (XL), so it might have been Ryder Hesjedal’s frame, possibly Dave Wiens’.
  • 2 0
 @WRCDH: the crazy thing about small world is about 8 years after my hei hei was stolen in Quebec I was in Hawaii and I’m quite positive I saw it ride past at a sto ok light. I had done a few upgrades that were unusual and had replaced the stock Kona decals with new ones that I put in different orientation than the stock set up. It looked the same except a strange handle bar setup. But I just watched it go past in stunned silence. Big regret that I didn’t hall ass after him but ....
  • 2 0
 @Kazook: Kona was kind of big in Hawaii, Kona especially. Not kidding. They had a few sponsored riders back then - Mike French was one, I think - he was racing a really trick Hei Hei. There was a shop in Kona he worked at, and I bet he was really helping them sell bikes.

My super nice Kona Hot was stolen from my living room and re-purchased the following week by the owner of the pizza shop for $150! (according to my so-called friends who didn't steal it back again.)
  • 1 0
 @Kazook: Ha, wild! Glad I’ve never had a bike stolen — I wouldn’t quite know what to do, myself! But I know it takes a moment to process “is that it?” (based on selling a few cool and rare cars) and then it’s too late and it’s gone =/
  • 1 0
 @twozerosix: Yeah, I noticed that when looking in classified ads on Maui on vacation — saw a super cool mid-90’s Hot there in 2017. Not my size, but it was $450 or so, in good shape, and had nice parts.

I have 3 Kona Hots now (a 21” 1992, a 20” 1994, and a 21” 1994 — the 94’s have the rad externally fluted downtubes). They’re all built era-correct with the best parts of the era (lots of Machine Tech stuff too). I thought I’d lost that magical feeling of adrenaline + that unreal pivot-carve/2-wheel-drift feeling that I remembered from the mid 90’s. Hadn’t felt it in 15-20 years. Hopped on my freshly built 94 Hot in 2015 and felt that magic once again — that I hadn’t felt in ANY bike since the 90’s. I was hooting and hollering, utterly shredding, and dropping my buddy on his 2016 Pivot Mach 6. My Hot carved like a dual slalom / pump track bike, but had perfect lateral flex when leaned over, providing lateral suspension / flex over the bumps, unlike some new ultra-stiff carbon hardtails and even some overly-stiff carbon full suspension bikes (my old colleague / world cup DH’er / bike engineering guru Cesar Rojo engineered the Intense M16, his Unno bikes, and others, with similar optimized lateral flex...and other optimized frame flex in the main frame and rear end). On my Hot, both tires roosted every corner...unreal fun. Those bikes were, and still are, something special. New gravel bikes are essentially the same geo, and people say they’re super fun...yeah, no kidding, Kona and others used that same formula with great success in the 90’s! If you can find a Hot, buy it and go shred!
  • 1 0
 @WRCDH: DUDE that describes that Hot riding experience perfectly...that writeup got me a little misty. I put a photo of my old 17" (was it 16.5"?) Hot on my PB page if you click my name. It was some frame that came right from the factory, with matte black paint and no decals. I got some KONA decals and did both the top and bottom tubes. XTR hubs, brakes, shifting, Sugino triple, RS SL with SRP titanium bits...oh yeah Ritchey pedals and a Ringle stem. There's one riding instant I remember perfectly, some whoop-di-doo feature, where I felt the bike compress, sort of wiggle, and then launched into the next part of the trail. I can still remember the liveliness of the bike...that was with the original Project 2 fork too.
  • 6 0
 I still ride a 2017 Hei Hei Trail. Bit different from this bike, but I absolutely love it. I'm not riding Squamish every day here in the Midwestern US, so something like the Hei Hei makes a lot of sense for me.
  • 5 1
 Thoughts on the Hei Hei vs the 2020 Topfuel. Numbers appear to be in line with each other (minus the 115 rear end of the Topfuel).

Wondering why Kona didn't take advantage of the new 2021 Rockshox Sid Ultimate 120? That way us gram counters could hold on the bowel movement before hitting the scale.

I admire Kona for the things they've done over the years, I think they have missed the mark on the Hei Hei for a couple models now though.

Two bottle holders is very nice for those of us who would rather not ride with a pack or who take on all day adventures, and need a pack and extra bottles.
  • 4 1
 I'd also question the Descendant crank spec for this bike...?
  • 5 0
 back when the bike was designed, the new sid wasn't out yet. Makes sense to put a pike on seeing as most people will use it as a trail bike or all-around bike. You could just swap the fork when you buy the bike... the parts spec on the bike is largely inspired by trailbikes, no gram counting weight weenie stuff here but parts that could last a couple of years and be dependable
  • 2 0
 Came here to ask the same thing. What's the verdict? Fun Country or Down Country?
  • 3 0
 @blum585: Seems like they just had them in stock since every one of their "Top of the line" bikes have the same cranks.
  • 3 0
 i bought a topfuel 9.8 some months ago and absolutely love it. I think its the best 2nd bike to an 160 or 170mm enduro bike.
climbs so good und still fun on (not the rowdiest) downhills.
think the same counts for this kona
  • 3 0
 @tgr9: So, what's the Process 134 designed for then, The Process 134 appears to be a much more capable trail bike, whereas the Hei Hei would be a better marathon distance XC bike. Weight does still matter for marathon XC just not as much as traditional XC - if that is still a thing. I understand the Sid response, but a descendent crank? That's more Enduroish… But different strokes for different folks.
  • 2 6
flag ATXZJ (Apr 14, 2020 at 9:24) (Below Threshold)
 @blum585: As of late, Kona has become really good at coming up with solutions for problems we never knew existed. This one is no exception.
  • 1 0
 @lyfcycles: Down Fun. Or Country Country. Fun Down? who knows....
  • 2 0
 @pAzk: Same and agree completely!
  • 1 0
 And I believe the new 120 Sid only comes in a reduced offset, no? Not the 51 that this calls for? Correct me if wrong...
  • 6 0
 Cross country always has been fun! Once upon a time that's all there was.....and outside of DH, the trails haven't changed much.
  • 6 0
 Needs Kona’s green/yellow flame paint job like the 1997-98 titanium Hei Hei team XC bikes.
  • 2 0
 I do like this green, though.
  • 2 0
 @TheR: Definitely! Love that dark metalflake green, one of my all-time favorite colors — seems to present better in the video than in the still pics though. Always wanted a metal flake forest green or BRG Porsche Cayman or 911 GT3 (“someday” I tell myself =). I had a custom (a favor by Jeff Steber) British Racing Green Intense M1 — I got
5-10+ compliments about the paint (well, powder coat) a day at NORBA Nationals on it — and not one compliment when I had a red one and a blue one the year before and after. And since no one else had a dark green M1, people would know it was me that did this or that (like jumping the whole rock garden with Chris Kovarik at Big Bear in 2000 =). Ventana repaired that M1 for me and didn’t have green options, so now it’s translucent cherry red to match a 7” cherry red 2001 Boxxer. It looks pretty darn amazing too!
  • 2 0
 @WRCDH: I had a '96 Honda Civic this color. Not as cool as all that.

If I ever do get a custom paint job on a bike, British Racing Green is definitely a candidate.
  • 4 0
 i'am disappointed no brands have setup a booth at the their headquarters ( they have the displays) and did a virtual tour so we could get the videos just like the other rodent based bike show..... more beaver 2020
  • 4 0
 "If you've ever ridden a cross-country bike DOWN a rowdy and rocky descent at your limit"

the definition of Down Country... or FUN COUNTRY

New Hei Hei looks like the love child of the 111 & Precept... with skinny legs
  • 3 0
 Lockdown quiz:

Santa leaves a gift entry to BCBR or ST6 in 2021 under your tree and want to get a downcountry rig instead of hauling around your 34lb, slack AF everyday trail anchor. Which bike would you choose and why?

Kona Hei Hei
Orbea Oz
Rocky Element
Scott Spark
Specialized Epic
SC Blur
Trek Top Fuel
other
  • 4 0
 2020 Trek Topfuel - because it's light, capable and climbs well. The only thing the Trek is missing is the 2nd bottle cage. But you can't have everything, but it does fit a large bottle in the one place you can put a gage.
  • 5 0
 Trance Advanced Pro 29er.
  • 3 0
 Optic or Tallboy because they're long and slack enough to go down a size, and because I'm not going to podium anyway
  • 2 0
 Scott Spark 910 with full XT looks like a good deal at $4,800. Can fit 2.6 tires. Simple suspension system should be easy to service over a week long race. Lockout for long forest roads sections.
  • 2 2
 Yeti SB100, because youtu.be/VVAsbuLg_QQ
  • 3 0
 Not in your list, but tallboy (or optic @ceecee )
  • 2 0
 @gnarnaimo: Other!
  • 1 0
 Tallboy 3. Or this Hei Hei.
  • 2 0
 Have a blur, just got a 34 SC on order for it. So amped.
  • 2 0
 topfuel!
  • 3 0
 I'll go with the Rocky Element Carbon 90, because:

a/ It has geometry of 69*HA, 75*SA with the Ride9 chip allowing +/- 0.5* adjustment from there. That works for me on anything but double black trails here in BC.
b/ It's stock parts spec leaves little to no room for improvement and has its weight listed at 25.4lbs.
c/ Rocky's dealer network and race support in BC are excellent, any issues resolved without delay.
d/ Two bottles, because Levy knows his stuff.

That said, I'm intrigued by the Trek and the Kona. If demo tours happen this year I'd check out those two bikes.
  • 1 0
 Ripley Or Revolver
  • 3 0
 Intense Sniper with the improved rear end. Why? Because I own it, and it's the best bike I've ever ridden. 23.Xlbs with normal 34 SC/DPS, and still under 24 with a DPX2 and 120mm travel.
  • 1 0
 @LeDuke: this was going to be my other option if this blur didn't come at such a cheap price. Demoed one and it absolutely rips
  • 1 0
 @blum585: The wolftooth b-rad may be that second bottle option. Only issue I have is when standing/sprinting/suffering over a crest. Slight bottle/leg interference.
  • 2 0
 Factor in a rear shock for about $300; $2100 difference is for that second water bottle.
  • 1 0
 @bikewriter:

Recognized Brand name tax, plus there's at least two additional up charge points in the supply chain...

In a normal bicycle purchase its manufacturer facility to brand, then brand to importer/distributor, followed by distributor to dealer, and then dealer to consumer. In this case of the ebay frame its the factory itself to the ebay dealer (who is also the brand and the distributor) and then to you.
  • 1 0
 @deeeight
You had us in the first half, not gonna lie. At first glance of the frame on Ebay I thought it and the Kona were identical but upon closer inspection methinks not. Take a close look at the inner angle of the downtube/headtube/toptube junction. The Kona has an angled detail whereas the Ebay frame has a more smoothly rounded junction. The angular bend near the bottom of the seattube is also different, higher on the Kona and at a sharper angle.
  • 2 1
 @dlford:

They're from the same factory is my point... what...you don't think a factory will adjust the molds slighting for different customers ?
  • 1 0
 @deeeight:
I am not in the know about carbon manufacturing. Is altering the finished procuct as simple as shifting a few angles, installing a bump-out, or milling/grinding relief in a mold? Or is an entirely new mold required?
  • 2 0
 @dlford: Entirely different molds.
  • 1 0
 The shapes of some frame parts does seem to indicate it's from the same factory, but def not the same mold - different travel, different down tube, different rocker, and chainstay. One way to tell would be to look inside the rear triangle through the cable ports. My FM06 was built with their "EPS" technology on the front triangle, so the insides look super clean. But the rear triangle looks god awful inside. Going on one year with no problems; even the pf bottom bracket was properly done. Not bad for $600.
  • 5 0
 FUN COUNTRY BIKE? mark Levy is the origin of all those New category names lol
  • 3 1
 Okay, so if I have this right, it's cross country, then fun country, then downcountry, trail, all-mountain, enduro, downhill?
  • 2 1
 @Ron-C: You forgot super-enduro and freeride between enduro and downhill.
  • 1 1
 @Ron-C: Don't forget gravel bikes....
  • 2 0
 Engineered flex is quite interesting. In the future I hope to see more frames and components with this type of thing as it seems like the next natural refinement to me. Maybe one day all products will have a flex or compliance rating with some sort or flex-ometer as a general guide.
  • 1 0
 I wish they could have shown it going through the travel to get a better view of how it works.
  • 2 0
 Check out the Fisher Sugar, a bike from the early oughts that had flex stays. Kona's old Hei Hei also had this feature. It's not new and it's not revolutionary! It's just marketing wank!
  • 2 0
 @jdh: Indeed! I had (still have actually) an 01 Fisher Sugar. The engineered flex in an aluminum rear triangle was always a bit spooky, but it's still going strong 19 years later.
  • 4 0
 This is the standard design on XC bikes these days, and hardly new. Scott, Cannondale, Specialized, Orbea, and a half dozen others use it. Pretty much everyone who isn't using a multi-link rear end is using flex-stays now.
  • 1 0
 @LeDuke: wow. I knew of a couple but didn't know it was that many. Proven tech then.
  • 2 0
 You could certainly shed some weight off this build with some carbon rims and the new SID 120, sounds like a pretty fun bike! I wonder if putting on a 32 tooth chainring would help up the AS a bit and make the bike feel peppier? Big fan of the two bottle setup, certainly makes the death march a bit more manageable. I'm definitely interested, although I honestly just want it to be black.
  • 3 0
 Nothing thats not to love about this bike imho, except for the price. But then again, if you start comparatively looking at other carbon downcountry bikes, this quickly starts looking quite reasonable.
  • 2 0
 But seriously though. Levy, what is this weird obsession with water bottle cage mounts all about...? As if wearing a backpack wasn't an option. I'd much rather have all the things I want to take on a ride tightly and securely packed into my pack than loosely attached to my frame with flimsy plastic mounts and velcro straps.
  • 18 14
 Why do kona insist on ruining what generally are really cool bikes with silly slack actual seat angles?
  • 6 12
flag Minikeum (Apr 14, 2020 at 0:52) (Below Threshold)
 Exactly my thought. The guy is basically seating on top of the rear axle with the seatpost fully extended
  • 6 3
 Eh, my large Kona Process has an actual STA of 76°, just as advertised.
  • 10 2
 Just ram the saddle forward it’s no big deal. 75 degrees isn’t abhorrent either
  • 2 2
 Yeah reminds me a lot of my 2008 Trance X. Way slack.
  • 5 0
 It’s slacker than my 5 year old son!
  • 5 3
 Not a problem. This bike—like every other bike on the market—has a fully adjustable effective seat tube angle.
  • 4 4
 @bridgermurray:

For/aft position of saddle is there to get the bike to fit you, not correct for poor geometry.
  • 6 0
 Have you ridden one? I'm 6'3" and ride a large process 153. I live in the PNW and pedal up steep stuff lots. It doesn't bother me at all.
  • 5 0
 I had that thought as well, but Mike never mentioned it affected the bike climbing abilities. If anything that bike climbs extremely well according to mike, seems Kona nail it.
  • 2 3
 It's distressing how much resistance your question is getting, when a two-second visual comparison of head and upper seat tube angles shows STA is in the 65-degree range. 'It's like a rocket! Nailed it!'
  • 2 0
 @Richt2000: I mean obviously it would be better if it had a 90 degree ST angle but slamming it forward is a pretty effective way to increase it by about a degree and a half. thats a geometry correction in my books
  • 1 0
 @Richt2000: bike fit isn't cool on pinkbike
  • 3 0
 It's an XC bike that needs to react quickly in tight corners and at speed. A steeper seat tube angle means a longer wheelbase and thus a slower turning bike.
  • 1 0
 @gdharries: unless it means a only a steeper STA. If one happens to ride flats in a midfoot position with the saddle at full extension, STA regardless of any other dimension might be a no go. If one wants a longer stem--say 60mm--for those same tight corners, how's that going to play out with the long working toptube at max saddle height? It's a regressive geometry.
  • 2 0
 Any comparisons to the new Ripley? I have a feeling this will be cheaper as a frame-only option, at least 2nd hand.

edit: Never mind, $3099 for frame/shock make it $200 more!
  • 5 1
 I think the Ripley with a step cast 34 would make a great LT XC bike. Since I don’t race anymore, I’ve been tempted to move my parts from my XC bike to a Ripley frame, but something I could still do an occasional race on.
  • 2 0
 @whambat: Don't forget about the new Sid Ultimate 120 for a Ripley fork option...
  • 4 5
 When you compare it to the new Ripley, you wonder why Kona is even trying. The hei hei (most likely) pedals worse, is far less capable on the descents, weighs more, looks worse, and costs more...

The Ripley wins in every way.
  • 2 0
 @bikekrieg: yeah, I’ve become a bit of an Ibis fanboy in the last couple years, after knocking them in years prior, for their change in price structure, adopting modern geometry, and finally having good water bottle mounts. I even like their cheap stock wheel sets on my Ripmo (I usually break cheap hubs). But really, their prices are really crushing the competition, while still making a better product.
  • 2 1
 @bikekrieg: Kona builds seem like a better deal- the CR/DL build with XX1 groupset and a pike ultimate for $6k vs Ripley XT build with two piston brakes and Fox Float components for $5.8k. The Ripley gucci build with Fox factory and XT is all the way up at $9k...and you still get the two piston brakes.
  • 1 0
 Is the price in the review a typo? On the Kona site it is listed as $2999 Canadian (~$2160 USD)
  • 1 0
 Edit: I meant price for frame only
  • 2 0
 @konakula20: it's $3099 USD on the website, but the color sure is pretty!
  • 3 3
 And the Ripley is miles ahead as a whole, a far better bike.
  • 1 0
 Unless you HAVE to have two bottles on your frame, agreed the Ripley is a superior product (DW Link, threaded BB, cleaner cable routing, one degree steeper STA).

Props to Kona for building a solid bike that fits two bottles, though--no small feat. Still seems like an awesome bike for all day epics.
  • 2 0
 Very similar to my FM06, especially the low-ish antisquat and slack seat angle. Looks to be about 72deg at the pictured saddle height. I still climb pretty steep stuff though.
  • 4 0
 Oh god, that ti project two fork. The steel ones look good but damn that thing is pure sex.
  • 2 0
 Two things.

1. The rider makes the bike capable, not the bike. Remind me how Nino wasn’t capable on his incapable Spark RC when you went riding with him.

2. CN has suspended the Squamish to Williams Lake trains.
  • 5 0
 More XC reviews and more XC content on PB please!
  • 2 0
 I feel like with the amount of rear tire clearance it already has, they could've straightened that seat tube out more and increased the angle.
  • 4 0
 The Frame only option appears have the best color scheme.
  • 3 0
 Have to disagree here as the yellow rocker is just over the top with a 2000s engineering look to it. To each their own though. Someone mentioned black and I think that'd look pretty killer.
  • 2 0
 "If you're the type of cross-country rider who waits until you have a large bowel movement to weigh yourself"... nice one Levy!
  • 4 0
 I heard Matthew McConaughey bought two of these
  • 1 1
 The race format of very technical descents similar to enduro but with tighter liasons or timed all the way round, will be the next discipline.... cross country but with less weight on fitness, more weight on bike handling. I personally think. Apologies in advance if this makes you angry. Most things seem to.
  • 3 0
 Not gonna happen. If you time both up and down, then it will always be fitness/efficiency/weight focused instead of bike handling focused, because there is always more time to win on the uphill than to lose on the descent.
Apologies accepted.
  • 1 0
 @GZMS: been thinking about this. You could potentially solve this problem by having some timed uphill stages, but still having transfers too. As long as the uphill and downhill stages take roughly the same length of time for a fit rider, it should reward an all-round rider and all-round bike.
  • 1 0
 @toooldtodieyoung: You mean like XC?
  • 1 0
 @toooldtodieyoung: that would be some very weird discipline, where you race uphill, but only for 10mins, after that you pedal leisurly.. ????
I'd say some EWS stages could be a bit more pedally, not be all downhill, so that it woud force bike companies to really focus on developing allrounder bikes, instead of mini-dh rigs
  • 1 0
 @GZMS: 10 minutes at a time. You might have three or four uphill stages per day, same as the down stages. Maybe it only works with certain types of terrain, but that's pretty representative of my typical ride. For my climbs I link a series of singletrack trails up with fireroads in between, and then try to ride as much singletrack as possible on the way down. Each trail could easily be a "stage" unto itself, or be broken into a few stages.

EWS and enduro in general definitely seem to have evolved into DH races that you pedal to. That's cool, but it no longer represents how or what I like to ride. Then again, as I keep proving, I’m not fast enough to be a racer, so what I would want to "race" maybe isn't all that important to anyone else. Lol
  • 3 0
 It looks amazing. Space for 2 water bottles is amazing, nearly reason alone to buy one...
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy shot in the dark on a response here... trance 29 or this if you could only have 1 bike and raced sea otter XC and chunky ass downieville Classic every year?
  • 1 0
 With such numbers becoming the norm for xc bikes, I can’t wait to see how gnarly future courses will get. Things are definitely getting interesting here.
  • 3 0
 It's ok @mikelevy you've also been mispronouncing Vitus
  • 2 0
 yes please! Still in love with my 2017 Hei Hei but this one looks like a whole new party train. Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Demoed the last hei hei and it was a rocket! So now they have sacrificed a superior pedaling platform for a 2nd water bottle to appease pinkbike (Levy)?
  • 1 0
 I thought you guys were also testing the Devinci Django. That would be an interesting comparison with the bikes you've mentioned.
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy did you get to ride the new top fuel. Can you give a quick comparison
  • 3 0
 Hei Hei, my, my. Kona rocks and will never die.
  • 3 0
 Responsive, quick handling is both a Pro and a Con ... wtf ?
  • 3 0
 #sensiblecountry geometry
  • 3 0
 Bike is so renowned that Pixar named a chicken after it.
  • 1 0
 A steeper sa would be better and I hope an xc version comes out soon and dang that's an expensive frame :-(
Otherwise it looks really nice and I'm hoping to try one out soon.
  • 2 0
 Reminds me of the process 111.....
Is this a sign of things to come?
A carbon 111 in the works?
  • 3 0
 Life's too short for the 370 three paw hub.
  • 2 0
 looks like the perfect trail bike! wish they had more / better build options but will purchase frame and build my own.
  • 1 1
 So everyone running 50 mm stem nowadays, however:
1. Enduro bikes get 480+ Reach
2. Downcountry 480+ Reach
3. DH Bikes 480+ Reach
4. Cross Country 460 Reach

Are people who riding CC shorter?
  • 2 0
 There is ZERO chance that seat angle is 75 degrees with the seat at the height in the picture.
  • 2 0
 Wouldn't it make more sense to make the shorter travel version with carbon and this one with alloy?
  • 1 0
 The Hei Hei Cr cost about 4000 dollars and the Process Cr price is 5400 dollars for the same level of equipment..
Is that correct?
  • 2 0
 first look I thought it was a new Yeti ASR
  • 1 0
 I thought it was a yet too
  • 2 0
 I guess @danielsapp didn't ride this bike to compare it to Orbea Oiz TR?
  • 7 0
 Nope, we live on opposite sides of the continent.
  • 1 0
 Fitness & Funny, is the way to ride new Hei Hei. Not XC race or Enduro hard trails !
  • 2 1
 ”It can make cross country fun ”. I doubt a bike can make the impossible possible.
  • 1 0
 possimpible
  • 2 0
 My kind of bike. Good job, Kona.
  • 2 0
 Put a DB inline on that and youd have a perfect daily driver
  • 2 0
 It has almost the same numbers as a Scott Spark.
  • 1 0
 This bike reminds me of a bike.

Also, how's the ride compare to the previous gen Hei Hei? Kona's demo events are on hold.
  • 2 1
 Geometry is in the database for comparison purposes:
geometrygeeks.bike/bike/kona-hei-hei-cr-dl-2020
  • 2 0
 This bike is not that far off the Kona sex one of the early nineties.
  • 2 0
 Yeti called and said they are done with the ASR, you can have it.
  • 2 0
 Can you compare to the Satori please?
  • 1 0
 Ok YT let’s see yours now!!! Stop coming out with teasers with COVID 19 scribbled on the bottom of each picture lol
  • 1 0
 Is anyone else skeptical about the security on the second bottle?? It looks like it wasn't sitting all the way in the cage
  • 1 0
 How have you been say it for two decades if not "hay hay?"

And why did your friends let you mispronounce it for so long?
  • 2 1
 Only a fool would weigh themselves before a large bowel movement.!!!!!!!
  • 1 0
 Pinkbike makes a new bike category AGAIN! Big Grin
  • 4 0
 I'm sure he does this to explain to his wife why there's a new bike in the garage again. This guy is a genius!
  • 1 0
 XC was fun even before dropper posts became the norm.
  • 2 0
 "Hej hej" - swedes
  • 1 0
 @pinkbike @mikelevy was that 26.8lbs with pedals?
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy is this a Honzo with rear suspension?
  • 2 1
 Where's the front wheel and fork in the first "Riding the Hei Hei" photo?
  • 1 0
 Funcountry bike! haha! Niiice
  • 2 2
 @Mike Levy did you just slide in a new bike category there?? #funcountry AKA a fun version of a #downcountry bike?
  • 1 0
 Just wait, maybe "all country" will be next, since we obviously do not have enough bike categories...
  • 1 0
 I'll love to have that bike for a long ride. Looks neat.
  • 1 0
 Today I learned that riding cross country isn't fun
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy Is this the true Process 111 replacement we've been waiting for?
  • 1 0
 They've been promising that for years, and this is the first introduction of a new bike from kona that didn't mention the 111.
  • 2 1
 Damn it Levy, how in the hell do you mispronounce Hei Hei?!
  • 2 1
 I think the Top Fuel would have been the closest comparison
  • 2 0
 Fezzari
  • 1 0
 Comfortably fits a 2.4 in the rear??
  • 1 0
 Be careful @mikelevy, its illegal to be on train tracks! Stay Safe!
  • 1 0
 I keep asking them to make the Hei Hei Hei but so far....nothing. ????
  • 1 0
 I spy some non-factory wheels on that bike....
  • 1 0
 Yeah yeah
  • 2 3
 "feel like Abalon"? nice use of a very obscure Old Testament reference there mike...
  • 1 0
 Very smart looking bike.
  • 1 1
 "fun country"!? now where just being lazy...
  • 2 2
 Same old question: will there be an Evil review re: the 2020 Following ?
  • 2 2
 Almost the exact same bike at the Norco Revolver FS 120.
  • 1 1
 And... What's wrong with responsive quick handling?!
  • 1 1
 Looks like a session.. ????
  • 1 0
 Levy in pants? Who dis?
  • 1 0
 Looks like a session.
  • 1 0
 Looks like a session
  • 4 4
 Lost me at 27lbs...
  • 1 2
 At least a pound too heavy.
  • 2 4
 Garbage cable routing. No anti-brake bearing thing in the rear triangle. Looks like a 2013 Norco Revolver.
  • 1 2
 Does it remind you of the Trek Supercaliber?
  • 2 4
 That brake hose routing is awful
  • 1 0
 Haha--I agree--why not port it through the top tube and out the back of the seat tube?!
  • 2 5
 I like that Kona is just flash frozen at 4 years ago. No new ideas and proud of it!
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2020. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.037786
Mobile Version of Website