Review: Leatt 7.0 HydraDri Waterproof Flat Pedal Shoes

Jan 24, 2023
by Mike Kazimer  

I tend to find myself on flat pedals during the sloppiest, muddiest days of the year, times when trying to clip into a mud caked pedal just isn't worth the hassle. For that reason, it's always surprised me how few options there were for waterproof, or even highly water resistant, flat pedal shoes. Thankfully that's started to change, and now Leatt has joined in with their new 7.0 HydraDri shoes.

The shoes have a waterproof outer fabric and a mid-height cuff combined with a sole that uses Leatt's new RideGrip Pro rubber, which is claimed to be 20% softer (and thus grippier) than the rubber Leatt had used on previous flat pedal shoes.
Details
• 10k/10k HydraDri membrane waterproof bootie construction
• Speed lace system
• RideGrip Pro rubber compound
• Waterproof zipper
• TPU reinforced heal, toe
• Sizes: US 6-13, UK 5.5-12.5, EU 38.5-48.5, CM 24-31
• MSRP: $189.99 USD
leatt.com

The shoes are available in US sizes 6-13, or EU 38.5-48.5 and retail for $190 USD.


A waterproof outer zipper hides the inner speed lace system.
The close-fitting, thing upper cuff helps keep water from coming in from above.

Details

The HydraDri shoes may look like a burly mid-top boot, but in reality they're more like a low-top shoe with an integrated waterproof bootie. The bootie doesn't add much additional ankle support - it's there to keep water out more than anything else.

The inner portion of the shoe is secured with a speed lace system, with a tiny elastic pouch at the top of the tongue to tuck the laces into. There's a pull tab in the center of the laces that makes it easier to cinch down the forefoot, and another pull tab at the back of the ankle to help pull the shoes on.

The shoes are encased in a bootie made from Leatt's HydraDri waterproof membrane, which has a 10k/10k waterproof / breathability rating. Those numbers mean they should work well in the conditions found on a typical rainy ride, but may let some water in if you end up directly in front of a fire hose.

Once they're on and the speed-lace system is tightened, the next step is to fully batten down the hatches by zipping up the waterproof outer zipper and securing the large snap at the ankle cuff. That cuff is nice and thin, which helps keep water from running off the bottom of a pair of pants and directly into the shoes.

The RideGrip Pro rubber used on the sole is formed into a series of larger and smaller triangles (okay, technically they're irregular hexagons, but they look like triangles from a distance). There's enough space in between each of the shapes to allow room for pedal pins, a key feature that help provide more grip.

The outer bootie makes it easy to hose down the shoes after a ride without needing to deal with laces that are full of mud.
The heel pocket was a little shallow for my liking, despite the taller outer portion of the shoe.

Fit

The HydraDri shoes are on the roomier side of the spectrum as far as the width goes, especially around the forefoot. Compared to Five Ten's Trail Cross Gore-Tex shoes, the 7.0 HydraDri has a much less pronounced taper towards the front of the foot. For me, the fit of the size 11 (my typical size for most cycling shoes) was comfortable, and left enough room for slightly thicker socks.

Riders with narrower feet may struggle to get the shoes cinched down enough with the speed lace system – those laces only extend so far towards the front of the foot, and on more than one occasion I found myself stopping to add tension part way through a ride.

I also wish the inner heel cup was a little deeper to help reduce the likelihood of heel lift while riding or hiking. I didn't experience any hotspots or any specific issues due to its height, but my foot never felt quite as locked in as I would have liked.

As far as overall stiffness goes, the 7.0 HydraDri's sole is more flexible than the Five Ten TrailCross Gore-Tex. I don't mind a more flexible sole for a flat pedal shoe, since it allows my foot to contour more to the shape of the pedal, but it's worth noting that the TrailCross shoes have a more sturdy, robust feel too them, closer to what you'd expect from a lighweight hiking boot, while Leatt's HydraDri shoes are closer to typical skate shoe stiffness.



Grip

Is Leatt's RideGrip Pro rubber as sticky as Five Ten's Stealth rubber, or Specialized's SlipNot SuperTacky rubber, the two compounds that I'd consider to be the current benchmarks for pin-grabbing tackiness? Well, no. Those softer rubbers deliver a more tenacious hold than the Ride Grip Pro rubber, creating a more locked in feeling on rough trails.

That said, if those two options are a 10 on the stickiness scale, I'd give Leatt's rubber a solid 8, which makes them a worthy option for riders looking for shoes that don't require fully lifting your foot of the pedal to reposition it.

When paired with pedals with taller pins, like the Chromag Dagga or Race Face Atlas, I didn't have any issues with the amount of grip on tap, even on rough, chattery trails. Despite Leatt's claims to the contrary, I didn't have as much luck on pedals with shorter pins – there just wasn't as much bite, and my foot was more likely to lift and slide off at inopportune moments.

The shape of the tread itself does work well to increase traction, with enough depth for some of the pedal pins to settle in between the raised shapes.


Function

I've worn these shoes in the middle of several atmospheric river events, the perfect time to see just how well they deal with pouring rain and deep puddles. I was impressed with how dry my feet stayed – that waterproof membrane works very well, and when the shoes are worn with an appropriately long pair of pants it's hard for water to find its way in.

My feet stayed warm and dry, even when temperatures hovered around 40° F (4° C). Keep in mind that this isn't an insulated winter shoe, but they are warmer than a standard cycling shoe, since it's essentially like wearing a rain jacket for your feet. In other words, they're great for areas like the Pacific Northwest and the UK for most of the year, but will likely be too warm for other locations during the summer months.




Pros

+ Excellent protection against rain / puddles
+ Very comfortable, plenty of forefoot room
+ Thin upper cuff works well for layering under pants.


Cons

- Not as supportive as they look
- Sole rubber could be even stickier
- Heel pocket feels shallow



Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesLeatt's 7.0 HydraDri shoes are an excellent option for flat pedal riders who are tired of dealing with wet, soggy feet. I wouldn't mind if the sole was even stickier, but when paired with the right pedals these shoes strike a very good middle ground when it comes to grip, overall fit, and protection from the elements. Mike Kazimer






111 Comments

  • 37 0
 When the Freerider ELC came out in a selection of color schemes destined for discontinuation and outlet sales, I bought as many $60 pairs from Sierra as I could, wondering how long it would be until a good waterproof shoe came out again. I had no idea I'd be hoarding them well into 2023. I'm currently injured and unable to ride, but I am down to my last pair of ELCs and I will stare out into the rain wondering "is today good enough to be ELC-worthy?". I keep them on shoe trees and glue them preventatively ever couple of rides on them. Lurking in the background is the flexy abomination that is the Trailcross, a mistake I'll be forced to use again if my ELCs ever give out.
These reviews are always heartbreaking. See waterproof MTB shoe from incredibly wealthy R&D company. Scroll to grip paragraph. Find "no". Write sad comment. Glue ELCs. Wait.
  • 6 2
 Just buy waterproof approach shoes. Same if not stickier rubber then other flat pedal shoes and the same if not better waterproofing. Unless you're one of those people who needs their biking shoes to look like old skate shoes...
  • 4 2
 Trailcross high tops + waterproof socks have been a good combo for me!
  • 8 0
 @NorCalNomad: In mountain biking I am usually averse to any sentence beginning with "just", ex: 'just lean back and get the speed right and you'll be fine'.
That said, do you have a particular shoe you can recommend that will interface with flats and grip like a freerider? Seems like a packed field to experiment with.
  • 9 0
 @Mtmw On my last pair of stashed ELCs too - no idea why they discontinued them, and why no one seems able to replicate them.
  • 2 0
 I did the same thing with the FiveTen Dirtbag shoes....and I am also on my last stashed pair. I had no idea other people did this also.
  • 8 0
 @steelpolish: I live in Vancouver. It’s chilly and wet all the time. If you don’t ride in the rain, you’re missing out on half the season. There are plenty of trails that are rocky and armoured enough to survive a wet ride. Once you have the right gear for it (pants and a rain jacket are enough most of the time) a sloppy ride is actually super fun.
  • 2 0
 Haha, whoops! Replied to the wrong comment. That was suppose to be @ccrida-pnw
  • 1 2
 Looks like a great take. The zipper closure needs a long term review for sure. Heard this is always the long term issue with similar closure-design clipped winter shoes. Take a look at Fizik and Scott MTB heater shoes reviews on zippers. Otherwise a zipper or flap like on the shimano MW5 or MW7 (clipped shoes) is absolutely key for the soggy winter. I'm on my second pair of Shimano MW5s in Vancouver commuting almost every day in soggy winter and training for sloppy wet cyclocross in them. The Flap is key to keep mud and loam out of laces. I do like the zip here though. IMO Boa closures have no place on an aggressive mountain biking shoe as it takes one crash or one snag on a trailside log to blow the Boa off. That is why I go for the MW5s instead of the MW7. My two cents.
  • 3 0
 @Mtmw: Depends on what you want to do
I really liked the Vasque Grand Traverse shoe for everything for a while; but that was a bias and I beat it up pretty bad o.o - They adjusted well to the shape of my foot and the waterproofing/breathability was not bad. Took them on huge hikes and pretty long rides and they survived (mostly) a good while of hard use.

For a stiffer one nice for DH, I liked using my Salewa, not sure what the model is off the top of my head, but the WildFire" might do you good. They are stiff, have great grip (though edges are a bit rounded), and have a GTX option (Much better option than the ?scarpa? Bolder X which is too heavy and stiff in my opinion for biking

If its just light trail riding, commuting, hiking, and general living, give the Black Diamond Circuit a shot; I've been using them for archery tag and indoor stuff more, but they were good on the one ride I took them on. Super light, breathable, and great grip
  • 2 0
 I've been riding with my normal flats, just with the $20 Velotoze mtb shoe cover over them. Keeps me dry and warm, laces free of muck and I just hose my feet down in them at the end of a ride to clean up. If they tear its $20 lost.. not $200 for a dedicated wet weather shoe. They are all the rage in road. They don't win the cool points in mtb, but dang they work well.
  • 2 0
 @McKai: I'm interested. Pictures indicate designed for clipless. Works with flats?

www.velotoze.com/products/tall-shoe-cover-gravel-mtb
  • 1 0
 @Mtmw:

I was just thinking about something gaiter like, to keep the water dripping off my pants and onto my ankles and directly into my shoes. The waterproof socks help a lot with that problem, but I'm also on flats, and it looks like these overshoe things would probably not work?

I'd love to be proven wrong though. As this would save me a bunch of cash.
  • 3 0
 What about overshoes? I'm using those from Endura, which are designed to fit over FiveTens (at least they fit over Freeriders, haven't tried them with Impacts). Downside is that it doesn't feel as controlled as riding with just the shoes (not the overshoes). Upside is that you won't have to buy a separate pair of shoes just for wet conditions.
  • 1 0
 I find the 510 trailcross goretex shoes to have a very stiff sole and grippy rubber. Constantly impressed with them during my atmospheric river rides.
  • 3 0
 staying dry has always seemed an impossibility, but wool stays warm when it's wet. the 5.10 Adidas Trailcross is one of the best shoes I've ridden in, plus it looks like a dad-shoe, allowing all the bros to underestimate the wearer. I find it best to keep some ice water in a tub near one's bike. stand in the ice water prior to leaving for your ride. the rest of your ride will be warm and dry in comparison.
  • 1 0
 Love my ELCs - I even don't mind the colour scheme as it matches my bike... Wish I'd realised when they were being discontinued. I certainly save them for bad weather days, normally with waterproof shorts and waterproof socks. Of course, if they get properly wet, they weigh about the same each as a pair of downhill tyres and need a ski boot drier to dry them in less than a week. Tried the Endura overshoes, and ignoring that they look terrible, I just ripped them and found they fouled the pedals
  • 2 0
 @Mtmw: yeah the strap under the shoes gets chewed up a bit but have survived probably 20-30 rides no problem so far. I see them as a wear item, they probably won’t last forever. Also add some baby powder every once and a while or they are treacherous to get on.
  • 7 0
 There is definitely a market for flat sole boots that can withstand a UK winter (or Pacific NW etc). Goretex is fine but soggy muddy laces are just a challenge.
I've even resurrected my old 510 Karvers (the one with the big lace flap) for the super soggy muddy rides.
  • 3 0
 I'm actually surprised that 10k/10k kept Kaz's feet dry. I find anything less than 15k pretty ineffective in pants and jackets.
  • 3 0
 @rrolly: My experience is completely down to the jacket. I've used a 10k that lasted torrential downpours, then had a 20k pair of pants that were soggy in no time.
  • 2 0
 I still have 2 pairs of Karvers haha!
  • 2 0
 Shimano could probably do it in an effective and durable package for a reasonable pricepoint.

I've had pair of the latest iteration of their MW5 for an year now, used them several times in -10/-12°c and they just work. They're the quintessential Shimano product, kind of low key, even a bit boring, but perform and endure. They could apply that upper construction to a flat pedal shoe I guess
  • 1 0
 @C1audio: I cannot say enough good about my Showers Pass refuge jacket. It's either 30k/30k or 40k/40k. It's soooo good.
  • 4 0
 Laces FTW.

Zips get caked with mud, and jam open or closed (whichever is least convenient). Velcro is awful in freezing conditions: get a bit of snow on your foot, it melts into the strap, then refreezes and the velcro stops being velcro.
I've got a pair of Vaude Moab STX mid for september-march riding. Ok, there's a velcro lace retension strap, but they're great. For really grim deep-snow hike-a-bike sessions, add a pair of low trail-running gaiters to bring the cuff well above your ankles, and waterproof trousers over the top.
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: 20k/20k or bust
  • 1 0
 @ir-bandito: That is exactly the set up i am running to and its a winner! Great minds! Smile
  • 1 0
 @ir-bandito: yep got the same but just saw these new ones: www.vaude.com/en-GB/Women/Shoes/Bike-Shoes/AM-Moab-Mid-winter-STX-cycling-shoe?number=205460100360 except they are for women ffs
  • 1 0
 @ir-bandito: Running the samer set up which works great, just a shame they dont make the cuff tighter so your trousers cover it
  • 4 0
 I would like to see a flat pedal boot (or high ankle shoe with an integrated gaiter) that bridges the gap between an uninsulated waterproof shoe like the Leatt shoe above and the warmer offerings from 45NRTH and the like. If they offered a little more grip on snow and ice than a typical flat shoe even better. I've tried multiple hiking boots but the sole is always a compromise on flat pedals, and my Gore-Tex shoes don't cut it on long rides in the freezing to -15 C range.
  • 3 0
 I'm in exactly the same boat. I picked up the Trailcross GTX recently and they pair very nicely with good merino socks, and I'm lucky that my feet tend to run pretty hot. Still, when temps get into 15F and below, I usually grab my worn out old Merrel hiking boots, or my Vans Mid Snow MTE boots. The Vans are my "walking around town in the snow" shoes, but they have a surprisingly grippy sole for flat pedals, and aren't outrageously bulky. Could be worth a look.

Oh and I also ride a Bucksaw, nice!
  • 5 0
 I wish 45NRTH would make a proper flat pedal boot, not just clipless with plastic plate covering the cleat holes. I have found that snow builds up on plastic plate and end up with ball of snow between your foot and pedal.
  • 4 0
 Five ten has (or had) an EPS insulated version of the shoe that I found comfortable until around 10f. Below that, heated socks or shoe cover helped. Look for 'eps' in the name.
  • 1 0
 @swansong: my feet used to run hot, but I've had a few surgeries to treat nerve issues in my feet and now my circulation sucks. I love being outside in the winter, unfortunately me feet don't.
  • 2 0
 @oldmanbucksaw: that sounds like me and my hands. From Mr. hot hands to losing feeling in my fingers if I hold a cold beer for too long even in the summer. Heat gloves and socks are in my future.
  • 2 0
 @swansong: The Vans MTE boot is what I'm using now, it is very good on flat pedals for a non-bike specific shoe. Not perfect, but decent in the snow. I also have 5.10 EPS lo version but had to screw in studs to even hope to walk around on ice/snow or you'll be on your ass.
  • 3 0
 Its just a shame how wasteful flat pedal shoes are, but especially high quality water-proof ones. Once the sole has been used a couple seasons, the shoes are likely to be binned. I have a pair of GR9 shoes, and they're still in decent condition minus the sole, but are unlikely to ever be used again.
  • 1 0
 That's why you take pics and get a new pair under warranty. Did this with my Adidas five ten goretex. Get a new pair every year for free
  • 2 0
 @endorium: They don't say sole wear falls under normal use/wear?
  • 4 0
 Some cobblers can re-sole shoes (or sections of shoes) for you, and some offer softer compound options too. You'll probably need to aim more at cobblers who work with climbing shoes, but I've seen FiveTen and Vibram rubber re-sole options before so they might be able to do something for MTB shoes too. It might wind up being a bit of a bodge, but possibly better than just retiring a pair of shoes that are otherwise fine but just have some specific wear to the soles.
  • 1 0
 @BigMulaCeazy: replaced mine. Sent them pics and a week later had my new ones
  • 1 0
 @BigMulaCeazy or just use some shoegoo...
  • 2 0
 @endorium : I think he meant it's too bad mtb flats can't be re-soled to reduce waste.
  • 1 0
 Amen @BigMulaCeazy. The uppers can take a battering for years and years, but the sole is toast in months. I have been trying to fix my GR5s with some old stealth rubber and it's an absolute messy nightmare.

We should demand that replacement soles are available for all flat pedal shoes. And that they can be easily replaced at home, or by the most lazy cobbler.
  • 1 0
 @MildMildWest: just message the manufacturer. Adidas always replace mine.
  • 3 1
 I don't really get why longevity is such a big issue. Grippy, comfortable shoes are softer and more akin to faster wear. In fact, a couple of seasons seems decent enough IMO. For comparison, my wife runs half marathons, and she burns through $150-200 Hoka running shoes about every 4 months. Considering most of us are on bikes that are several thousand dollars, what's another hundred bucks for new shoes every other year?
  • 3 0
 @tacofeet: I'm speaking more to the environmental waste. Especially with waterproof clothing, which I understand to often use chemicals harmful to the environment in manufacture and decomposition. The fact that the wear of a sole essentially prematurely expires the shoe entirely seems wasteful to me, especially when the rest of the shoe is built to withstand more than a season or two - this is even more egregious with waterproof products. This video (www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPUUA9AOe5A&ab_channel=FutureProof) does a good job in discussing some harmful byproducts of waterproofing, I'm not sure if they apply to Leatt's new shoe, but it's worth consideration.
  • 1 0
 @endorium: I will give it a go.
  • 2 0
 @BigMulaCeazy: Good point on the chemicals, a lot of our 'technical' gear needs some pretty nasty manufacturing methods. And the only 2 acceptable end of life options seem to be landfill or incineration.

Great at insulating us from the environment - terrible at going back into the environment.
  • 2 0
 @BigMulaCeazy: In that regard- I agree with you 100%. Shoes being a consumable item is worse for the planet then it is for the wallet. The blame for environmental impact always gets placed on the consumer(s)- when the company designed a product that doesn't last like it used to, regardless of complaints. I would pay more for "green" products- that's why I chose 5-10's over a few other brands, the "made from recycled ocean plastic" label sold me, even if it is BS.
  • 2 0
 Having worn these since they were first announced in the new product article on PB in the New England winter slop this season, I agree with all the pros, and 1st of 3 cons. For 2, I wouldn’t really want the sole any stickier with my OneUp composite flats when riding thru snow and ice sections in the winter, plus I’d like the sole to last at least 2-3 seasons for the $179 usd price tag. For 3, I think this will be a person to person feel for the heel pocket, since it fits my foot like a glove. Lastly, a thin ankle brace works well with thin wool socks if you half size up and also works with wearing thicker socks on the really fridges days.
  • 2 0
 I wish someone would make some pants with a properly waterproof arse and shins, and the rest pretty light weight and stretchy. And five ten to make flat pedal shoes with lace covers. Wool or waterproof socks, job done.
  • 2 0
 The Gore Fernflow pants might be what you're looking for: www.gorewear.com/us/en-us/fernflow-pants-mens-100815. They're a good option for those drizzly days when full waterproof pants would be overkill. Ion also has a few options with a waterproof rear panel.
  • 1 0
 I'll add on to Kazimer's Gore Wear recommendation with their Paclite Trail pant for when the rain and puddle smashing is more serious. Super thin and somewhat stretchy, plenty of room for layering and knee pads. Full on waterproof with an ankle cuff that can cinch down. Only downside is they're a little noisy while pedaling, but those pants along with Showers Pass Ultralite waterproof socks is a great combo for the really wet days.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: do they have an "integrated waterproof bootie" too? Smile
  • 4 3
 FFS, it's rain. Can we just call it such?
If you want to keep calling them atmospheric rivers, then fine, but you'd better start naming them.
Are we going to start calling high pressure systems from dry climates Atmospheric Deserts?
Now get off my lawn.
  • 1 0
 Atmospheric rivers bring rats
  • 5 0
 It's not really just rain, though. There's a difference between an atmospheric river and a regular storm. And yes, @zmums, the rats come out when the rivers arrive.

www.scientificamerican.com/article/better-atmospheric-river-forecasts-are-giving-emergency-planners-more-time-to-prepare-for-flooding
  • 3 2
 @mikekazimer: I guess? I mean if you can't drown in it, is it really a river?
And if it is a river, shouldn't we start naming them (a la hurricanes)?
Heavy rain, or pouring rain, worked alright for the past 50 years, the weather radar showed what intensity the rain would be, and people dressed, prepared accordingly.
The name just seems sensationalist and pretentious (it's been around for decades, I know.)
  • 2 0
 @woofer2609: If you haven't yet, check this site out for AR info: cw3e.ucsd.edu, they have a rating scale that makes sense to me (and is more accurate than heavy/pouring/what have you)

The IVT (Integrated Vapor Transport or how much water those things transport) can be nuts, like 2x the Amazon!
  • 1 0
 Great write up @mikekazimer
these were the ones I mentioned in your last shoe review. Interesting to read your thoughts one them. Do you think you would continue to use them when the turns nasty. Or do you have a preferred shoe for those days?
  • 1 0
 I want riding shoes that are also good for digging. I want to push dirt around and then ride in the same shoes. Shoes need to be dirt proof and ridable. Show me that... (slack heel pockets suck)
  • 1 1
 I have some danner hiking military looking boots that are all right. Waterproof, sole is flexible enough for grip on a pedal.
  • 1 0
 Waterproof approach shoes
  • 1 0
 @NorCalNomad: What brand/model do you like?
  • 2 0
 Knee length waterproof merino socks, pads over them, Full length trousers over them. Decent shoe half a size bigger than normal. Happy feet.
  • 1 0
 I know us Brits like to say it's constantly wet and cold here, but that's not actually the case for most of the country and I bet these shoes would run a little too hot for a big part of the year.
  • 3 0
 Am I the only one revelling in the joy of waterproof socks and whatever shoe is grippy?
  • 3 0
 ***WARNING*** Incoming hate for high prices, followed by what users buy for waaaayyyyy cheaper.
  • 1 0
 The list of good quality 'cheap' stuff is getting shorter every month it seems.
  • 2 2
 I'm sure these are dope but I honestly don't get how companies make money with such niche products like this.

Also for what it's worth... 5.10 freerider pros with $20 ankle gaiters are essentially waterproof.
  • 2 0
 how do they compare to a plastic grocery bag between wool socks and your normal shoes?
  • 4 0
 Much less sweaty, and your foot doesn't squirm around like it would with a plastic bag on. They also dry quicker than whatever shoes you're using with plastic bags.
  • 1 0
 So why not publish a review of waterproof socks, pinkbike?
There are people out there who think it is nearly equivalent to waterproof shoes…
  • 5 3
 I’d rather have wet feet with more grip than damp feet with less grip.
  • 4 3
 Id rather put plastic bags on my feet than spend $200 on "wet riding shoes".
  • 1 0
 @porkchopsandwich: yeah the plastic bags and rubber bands really save the day
  • 1 0
 @porkchopsandwich: It all depends on where you live. For people from cold and wet areas it is a necessity to gear up for those rainy days.
  • 4 0
 @porkchopsandwich: waterproof socks are gold.
  • 1 0
 Less grip isn't an issue. Fivetens if anything are too soft and grippy. Most flat shoes nowadays are more than grippy enough. Rideconcepts I have for example, feet have never slipped on tech and UK wet/muddy weather.
  • 1 0
 @rrolly : waterproof socks... heard of that for years but never tried. Are they that good? What pros and cons? and what brand(s) pleaaaase!
  • 1 0
 @endorium: It is when the temperatures get below freezing.
  • 1 0
 @somebody-else: I don't think your pedals freeze. Been sub zero here the last week. Zero issues with foot slipping. If your feet slip a lot, maybe worth looking at how you feet are on the pedals etc
  • 1 0
 @danstonQ: I've got two pairs. They're great because your shoes that aren't waterproof typically dry out more easily than those that are. They also create an extra warmth barrier.

One pair I have are Bontrager's oversock that I wear a thin merino underneath which is great because I can peel off the the oversock after and I'm still good for post-ride coffee/beer. The other pair I have is the Sealskins waterproof sock which is thicker. Warm and good as well.
  • 1 0
 @endorium: I’m not experiencing slipping, I’m just able to feel a big difference in traction between my Freeriders and my Powerlines when it’s actually cold outside. Here that’s for several months, for you it’s obviously not and that’s fine. But what you like, just don’t preach about how it’s good enough for everyone else because it’s good enough for your mild winter weather. Same as I wouldn’t suggest what I wear to someone in Norway…
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: not preaching. Just saying people coped just fine 15 years ago with a lot worse foot wear and rubber. We are spoilt nowadays
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: I agree. Get the Sealskinz extreme weather and you have warm feet all day.
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: been rock rolled. Replied to wrong person
  • 1 0
 @danstonQ: sealskinz brand. I run the warm weather ankle length sock with hydrostop. Hydrostop is a silicone strip on the inside of the cuff that stops most water that running down you leg from getting in the sock. They are a bit steamy and a bit thicker when compared with regular socks but keeps my feet happy when it's below 5C or very wet.
  • 2 0
 Could you not have cleaned the dog poop off in the first pic?
  • 1 0
 Too funny!
  • 2 0
 Water proof flats !?!? You mean wellies ?
  • 1 1
 This shoe looks like a rebranded Salomon S/LAB XA Alpine 2, with a different sole. Looking at the lace garage, and the lace pull, I'd say Leatt had Salomon make them a shoe.
  • 1 1
 Then you ride through a puddle and have wet cold feet for the rest of the day as water runs down your legs….
  • 3 0
 Having pants that extend over the cuff is key. I like the thin profile on the cuff of these for that reason - it really helps seal out the water. But yes, unless you're wearing waders a deep enough puddle will go over the top of any shoe.
  • 3 2
 The Trailcross Gore-tex is just sooo good.
  • 1 4
 Serious question - why do people go out riding in 40F degrees in the pouring rain? I don't know how you could even see without water in your eyes or on your lenses, your trashing the trails and it generally sounds miserable...I mean if you are a racer or something then why not just hit the exercise bike on those days?
  • 5 0
 Serious question - Have you ever left your corner of the world? We would never ride if we waited for perfect conditions!
  • 3 0
 @lancet-muffler: I live in Oregon / pacific northwest, which, if you've never left your corner of the world, you may not realize gets lots of rain...
  • 4 0
 @ccrida-pnw: Well, sucks to be you then Smile
  • 4 0
 @ccrida-pnw: And Washington gets loads of rain too. Except that we have trails on glacial till which hold up great in the rain. It's not as miserable as it sounds. Also, you can frequently sneak in a ride between the heaviest rain events.
  • 3 0
 I get what you're saying, but most of the trails here are fine to ride in the wet (been built up with rocks, good drainage) and the weather is around 40-45 for 3 months of the year. If you don't ski, you can almost ride year round. I'd rather ride in this weather than when it gets dusty dry. I just take off the glasses, don't need them anyway. It's actually incredibly peaceful if a mist moves in and the trails are empty and you're enveloped in silence a 30 minute ride away from a major metropolitan centre.
Stash a beer at the trailhead in a creek and it's still cold upon return from a ride.
  • 5 0
 I'd take any level of cold and rain over an exercise bike. The point of a bike is to move.
  • 1 0
 Don't care, still want some with ankle protection
  • 1 1
 I can't understand why the sole pattern isn't a basic waffle style on MTB shoes....
  • 1 0
 Nothing is Waterproof!
  • 1 2
 2 things in life are waterproof; Rubber and roofs.
  • 1 0
 I prefer wide booties.
  • 1 0
 And you cannot lie
  • 1 2
 No adult sizes, sad.





Copyright © 2000 - 2023. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv42 0.060431
Mobile Version of Website