Review: Magura's MT7 Pro Brakes Are Ultra-Customizable

Jan 16, 2019
by Daniel Sapp  


German brand Magura has been in the brake business for quite some time - over a hundred years with motorsports - and while they may not hold the same chunk of OEM sales that the red and blue "S" brands share, they're certainly a force to be reckoned with. Back in the day, if you rode trials or just wanted some powerful, rim crushing (literally) stoppers, the Magura's HS-33 was the best option out there.

Fast forward a few decades and they've had some successes, but also some other brakes that weren't quite up to par, although their newest iterations of stoppers have received some big updates to remedy problems of years past.

The MT7 Pro is Magura's four-piston, heavy-duty brake, engineered for the crowd that needs the most power; enduro, downhill racing, etc. The brake is light at 255-grams, has a tool-free reach adjust, lever sweep adjustment, different levers to pick from, and pad options to help riders dial in a variety of looks and feels.
MT7 Pro Details
• Intended use: enduro / trail / downhill
• 4-piston calipers
• Mineral oil system
• Customizable levers
• Carbon fiber lever assembly
• Weight: 253g (w/o rotors, adapters)
• MSRP: $239 USD
www.magura.com

All of these options are welcome as the MT7 Pro is a premium product, and it comes with a premium price of $239 USD per wheel for the brake assembly. Rotors and adapters are sold separately so add on $80-$100 or so more to complete the package as rotors are $33 each for the HC level and adapters are $13.


The MT7 with the HC-3 lever. Lots of adjustments and a substantial hook.

The entire brake system is produced in Magura's factory in Germany. To keep QC tight, the entire building is sealed and pressurized so that there's no chance of dust or dirt getting in and contaminating the products.

If the price of the MT7 is a little too much to stomach, the MT5 brake is about half the price and a viable option for a lot of riders. Some people may have noticed a number of Magura's athletes running this brake. The big differences are that it doesn't have as many tool-free adjustments and the lever material is a thicker carbon and the blade is also a bit heftier. The brake has a slightly different feel that some athletes prefer, but it's the same system as the MT7 when it comes to the guts.
The MT7 brakes use four pads per caliper instead of two longer pads which is said to help dissipate heat.


Details and Installation

The MT7 Pro is Magura's flagship enduro, downhill, and trail brake, and it sports a composite master cylinder made out of Magura's "Carbotexture SL" material as well as a new "one-finger design" lever. The lever pictured here (and that I tested) was the ultra-adjustable HC-3 option, although I did spend time using the stock alloy HC-1 lever as well.

There's a four-piston caliper down at the bottom, and while other four-pot stoppers use a single pad on each side, the MT7 Pro's get four separate pads. The reasoning behind this, according to Magura, is that the smaller pads better dissipate heat than larger pads, and also that it saves a minute amount of weight.


A myriad of lever options as well as little color discs allow for some functional tuning and fashion. There are even colored faces for handlebar clamps if you're into that.


All of the brakes come with the same length hose no matter whether you need a front or rear, which means you're going to have to cut down the brake lines. With internal routing on most new bikes these days, that's a pretty common job, though. Fortunately, if you're careful, you likely don't need to do a full bleed or even anything at all, but if you do, the process is simple and painless.

I think that a lot of people, including myself, have historically pinned Magura's brakes as "difficult to work with" or "hard to bleed" and discounted them at that, especially at their premium price-point. The old bladders trapped air in funny places and getting a good bleed was nearly impossible. However, there have been some major updates and Magura now has a pretty damn competitive product that you can easily and successfully bleed.

As far as bleeding goes, Magura uses their own mineral oil. They say they like it because it doesn't attract moisture (DOT fluid can absorb it) which can cause degradation in performance over time. They also don't have to submit it for testing, therefore they can create and use a fluid that works best with the specific seals in their system.

The levers can be flipped to run on either side, so if your buddy from down under is visiting, needs to borrow a bike, and you don't live in the UK, you can quickly swap things around to goofy style and get on with your day without wasting time at the bike shop or defaulting to drinking.


Bleeding has become far more simple. There's an improved bladder that helps to keep air bubbles from hiding out where they don't need to be.


If you're attaching the lever body to your handlebar, you'll notice that the bolts have a much more open pitched thread than many others that you see on a bike. The force that you use on this clamp is lower than many other brakes that require equal torque on the top and bottom of the faceplate and an equal gap. You tighten the top of the faceplate completely to the lever body before snugging up the bottom. It's engineered to hold the brake in place while you're riding and then allow it to rotate in the event of the crash, preventing the brake from, er, breaking.

I tested this out with a nasty crash a few weeks back. Aside from some inevitable scratches on the bike, brakes, and myself, all was surprisingly just fine. I moved the lever back into place and rolled on down the hill.


Swapping levers is a simple process.

Changing the Feel

One of the things that make the MT7 stand out a bit from some other brakes is the ability to fine-tune their feel with different levers and pad compounds. When you're spending upwards of a couple car payments on a set of bicycle brakes, it makes sense for them to be able to be dialed in by the rider.

Riders have multiple different levers to choose from, including short or long, aluminum or carbon options, as well as the Danny McAskill's HC-3 lever that I've been running. You can also pick up Loic Bruni's signature lever. Longer levers obviously offer more leverage and a bit softer feel, more similar to a SRAM brake while the shorter options will be more sensitive, similar to the blue S.

In addition to those options, there are three different pad compounds riders can choose from. All of the pads are organic (resin). Magura believes these work well and also keep the temperatures lower and minimize heat transfer from the rotor to the caliper and that should help performance stay more consistent. There is a "performance" level pad that comes stock on the bike, a "race" level pad that produces more friction and bite - think more like a Shimano brake feels, and then a "comfort" level pad with the least amount of bite. The comfort pads are also the quietest since as you increase friction, there's inherently more noise associated. The performance and race level pads all utilize one pad for each piston (four per caliper) and the comfort pads are one long piece, similar to what you see in a Guide or Code brake. If you want a metallic pad, Magura doesn't make one and you're going to have to go to an aftermarket option if that's the route you choose.

Besides pads and levers, there are also colored discs that can be swapped out to keep your fashion game tight, as well as three different rotor styles to choose from. HC rotors like the ones tested and reviewed here, Centerlock rotors, and a lighter weight SL rotor. Magura has their own Matchmaker style clamps to keep the bars clutter free and you have the option of running things inboard or outboard, depending on your preference.


Magura's Shiftmix clamps keep things tidy.
The HC-3 lever has some moto inspiration and allows for even more adjustability with a strong bite point.


Performance

I worked with Magura's man on the ground and pro athlete Eric Porter to get my set of MT7's installed and dialed-in initially. The process was simple and painless, and if it wasn't for us tearing everything apart to see exactly how things worked it would have taken me, having never installed this brake before, maybe a half hour to put the set on and be pedaling to the trails.

I first rode the brakes with the stock lever, which is a bit longer than the Danny McAskill HC-3 I swapped over to. With the stock lever, there's a firm engagement and an excellent amount of modulation - I'd say if falls right between a SRAM Guide and a Shimano XT when it comes to modulation. The thing that stood out to me, however, was the consistency in the feel, firmness of the engagement, and noticeable quality of the system overall.

In switching to the HC-3 lever with a bit more of a hook on the end, and more adjustability, there's a quicker and stronger engagement, but still ample amounts of modulation.

After three months of riding the brakes on the trail, I haven't had to touch a thing. The MT7's are far and away one of the most consistent brake systems I've been on. Whether it's touch and go slow-speed technical riding or high-speed sustained descending, the consistency is right there and the same as it was the first day.


180mm Storm HC rotors front and back. I've found them coupled with the performance level pads consistent for how and where I'm riding.


I've been using the stock, performance-level pads and 180mm rotors for the entire time I've been testing and haven't felt the need for more power in any way. If I were riding the bike park all day, I would consider throwing on bigger rotors, but for all-around and riding just about anywhere, for a rider that's my weight, the 180's are more than enough.

I can't find anything to truly complain about with the MT7's. They are one of the best options for a high-end brake system on the market and a stark contrast to their predecessors. Very few things in our world of bikes are set-and-forget, but save having to swap out pads after a couple months of riding in garbage conditions, I haven't touched these brakes.


Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesMagura's MT7 brakes are a top-tier product and they consistently provided top-level performance. Having the option to fine tune the feel of the brakes in multiple facets allows for a range of set-ups to accommodate different riders and conditions. If I was in need of new brakes the MT7's would be at the top of my list. Daniel Sapp








172 Comments

  • + 70
 I had a set of Magura Louise brakes for almost 8 years and only had to bleed them twice. In both of those instances I followed their instructions and found the process to be simple and 100% effective.

I've always felt that Magura doesn't get the love it deserves.
  • + 14
 I had 3 sets of various versions of Louise on a number of bikes, they were by a mile the best brakes on the market at the time; in terms of minimal maintenance, ease of bleeds when they were necessary (which wasn't often), and power. I think they still hold their own against most 2-piston brakes now. I had been a Magura guy since the early 90s on HS (before the 33 or any other numbers, when they were just HydroStop, because they were the only hydraulic brakes available), and never seriously considered any other brand.

So when the MT-series came out, and I was building a bike, I got a set (I don't remember what number). They sucked. Hard. Minimal power, always seemed like they needed a bleed but either I wasn't doing it right or it wasn't helping, bite point was in the wrong place and no way to adjust it... There was a recall, I sent them back. They came back better (as in they didn't feel like they needed a bleed) but still sucky in power and bite point.

While they were resolving that suckieness, Shimano came along and made really good brakes that were a lot cheaper. I haven't really looked back since then. These and the MT5s seem pretty good, except cost. They might be the best brakes in the world, even if that's true (I doubt it), it's not by a huge margin; there are other really good brakes for a lot less money.
  • + 1
 On my current bike (pictures in my profile) I'm using Magura Louise 2006 masters (in green) with Magura Louise 2007 brake calipers. I had to put on the 2007 calipers because my new frame and fork won't work with the IS calipers, but the original calipers were still perfectly fine. I admit I didn't quite like the 2007 master (and Magura admits they didn't like it too, which is why the moved on so quick) but I've got the 2008 Louise on my fully and they're great too.
  • + 4
 I’ve always loved Magura brakes. My first set was the Magura Gustav brakes back in the day. I also ran the Loiise Bats. Never had an issue. TheMT7s are next on my list .
  • + 3
 @Weens: Props for spending the time to write all that out.
  • - 15
flag DH-Angel (Jan 16, 2019 at 10:29) (Below Threshold)
 complete rep alert. MT7 worst brakes on the market by far
  • + 4
 @DH-Angel: says 3% of people that have them .
  • + 0
 @Weens: Similar story... After years of being a Shimano guy, I decided to switch to the MT7's. They have been a nightmare to keep operating properly. I can get them to feel good after multiple bleed attempts, but that lasts only a few rides. If I go to high elevation (from 6000' to 10 000'+), I loose all power.

When was the recall?
  • + 10
 a set of MT5s are 120 euro... stunningly affordable, on the off chance anyone on pinkbike cares about the price of stuff...
  • + 6
 @powderturns: and they work great!
  • - 3
 @THE-GUNT: I have them now for 1 and 1/2 year, at the beginning they were really good, but after some time they really suck and have too many problems. And I don‘t think that only 3% say that. I have so many Friends where the Magura suddently stop working and loosing the preassure. The pistons don‘t come back too good and they rub really easy. The only good thing is that the Magura service is really good and they have send me a new brake After mine loosed suddently all the preassure. (I hit a tree because of those damn brakes)
  • + 3
 @Weens: Interesying that you found the MTs to have a lack of power. Although the MT5s seem to be nothing to write home about, Enduro mag did a fantastic test on brakes and the MT7s came out head and tails above the rest in terms of power and stopping time.

enduro-mtb.com/en/best-mtb-disc-brake-can-buy
  • + 3
 @powderturns: totally.
Anders of you get the MT7 Brakel pass the inkt different with the MT7's are the levers.
I'v got the MT5's now for 2,5years and in the beginning I was sceptical.
But now I have them dialed in and they are perfect.
What I found is that they need a thicker disc to operate properly. Just Google it.
If the disc wears ore the pads then you get a wandering brakepoint and los of power.
So keep your pads new and your golden!
  • + 1
 @TheDoctoRR: I wasn't talking about the current MT7s, I was talking about the first brakes Magura did with the MT name, when they moved away from the "named after Gustav's daughters" naming scheme. They were XC brakes, I wasn't expecting too much, but they were weaker than HS33s.

Point of the story was that even if they have their shit straight now, they had a real low period. And the timing of that was horrible for them, as others were figuring out how to make good brakes right when Magura forgot.
  • + 2
 @Weens: Strange the newer MT6's I had like 4 years ago were stronger than any sram or shimano brake I've ever tried.
  • + 1
 I was never able to fully bleed the MT5 on my girlfriends bike. The plastic bleed screw on a buddies MT7 was stripped in no time. Most shit brake i've ever had to work on. The standard levers are the worst i've ever put a finger onto. The cheap and said to be durable one piece pads (blue ones) can hardly be installed due to the weird hook thats holding them in position. The wood screws that in the clamp are the worst i've ever seen on a bike. In my opinion Magura can never get enough hate for their MT series. You want some nicely engineered brakes that hold up the test of time and are easy to work on? Get some Hope V4's.
  • + 3
 @Muckal: I have none of the problems you mentioned on two of my own and the ladie's bike (however I admit that the bleed port screw is a weak spot if you do not handle it with insane care).
But replacing them with a break from Hope... I'd rather use no breaks at all - with the same breaking power!
  • + 1
 @DH-Angel: Have you ever made a positive PB comment?
  • + 2
 @mrti: the MT5s/7s are stronger than any Hope brake for sure, but i never missed power in the V2s or V4s. In the end i guess it's a matter of personal preference.
  • + 1
 @THE-GUNT: maybe the US customers, here where I am most people who have them just switched to the Shigura. MT5/7 caliper and some Shimano lever's. Worked better then ever ..
  • + 1
 @Muckal: I’d rather have no brakes than hope. Here in the us it would be impossible to warranty, get proper service and parts from bike shops and extremely difficult to acquire them in the first place, as we have no hope distributors. I’d also not run anything from sram because of how poor quality all of there stuff (wheels, brakes, drivetrain, suspension) is.
  • + 1
 @TheSlayer99: that's a shame.
  • + 30
 For those saying the EBT lever bleed plug strips out...I'd suggest ensuring you're not exceeding the maximum recommended 0.5 N-m of torque clearly written in the instruction manual to prevent problems on that part. It's not like the plug or bleed screw on some other systems and takes much less torque.
  • + 3
 In the past, I ripped one up using a torque wrench. F-plastic crap on brake bleed ports.
  • + 6
 0.5 nm (5in lbs) is an absurdly low torque. Even the most expensive dial torque wrenches have a +\-of ~1-3 in lbs for calibration tolerance. click wrenches are worse. At least for aviation (which I’m familiar) it’s old school dial wrenches for anything less than 20ln lbs. *or just by feel Smile @lenmerderdenfer:
  • + 6
 Before Magura came with their MT series you still had a removable reservoir cap. Yes the last generations Julie, Louise and Marta had EBT but you could still remove the reservoir cap (which was/is always my preferred approach). And these were fixed with really tiny torx screws. So maybe back then it was more clear to people how gentle you needed to be. Apparently the T25 head is an invitation to some to ignore the max tightening torque. For 0.5Nm you really don't need a torque tool. Tighten the screw with the torx tool spinning between thumb and index finger, as if you're working on a watch. The 3mm or so of leverage you have is more than enough.
  • + 13
 keep your fingers away from the magura mt7 if you don't get a special discount.
i have been riding it for several years now because i get great discounts on it. if maintained on a really regular basis, it works really well and powerful, thats why i stick to them.

but if i would have to pay the original price for the brakes and spare parts, i would be a poor man.
the lever body is nothing but plastic, and the bladders start leaking really easy. the link between lever body and lever gets loose after a few months of riding. the lever screws to adjust the width are also lose. you have to put glue on them, otherwise you have to adjust the width after every run.
i have to replace the pads really often, and with the 4-pad system, the pads wear out really unsymmetric.
when bleeding the brake (especially with the "quick and dirty" method) according to the official tutorial videos of magura, you destroy the bladder of the lever body immediately.



if you handle the brake with care and do not mind maintenance really often, it is one of the most powerful brakes i have ever ridden. thats why i stick to it.
but for this huge price, i would definitely recommend the saint to everyone.
it is just too much plastic on this brake
  • + 7
 Never been tempted by shigura?
  • + 1
 Totally agree with you.
  • + 1
 While I haven't had the leaking bladder issue you have had, everything else echoes my experience:

+Excellent power
+Excellent modulation
-Finicky bleeding
-Quick pad wear (i'm trying some 3rd party pads now)
-Loose levers after a bit

I got mine at over half off so worth it still, but would get something else at full price.
  • + 1
 @pcmxa: try the EBC cfa660/4r lasts longer, cheaper and more bite
  • + 8
 For anyone interested. I've had a lot of fun building parts list on bike24.de and bike-discount.de, both legit websites.

For comparison:
MT7 front and rear + 203mm HC front and 180mm HC rear rotors = 727.75 CAD shipped from Jenson USA
MT7 front and rear + 203mm HC front and 180mm HC rear rotors = 319 EURO (483.00 CAD) shipped from bike-discount.de.

Almost 250 saved for the EXACT same thing. Same thing for the MT5, $282 shipped for pair of MT5 and HC rotors vs Jenson asking $446.00.
  • + 1
 i had exactly the same situation on my magura mt7, after some time i changed for saint and had no regrets, less power but less problems.
  • + 1
 I’m having all those issues as well
  • + 1
 @Ryan2949: No experience with bikediscount.de, but bike24.de is nice indeed. For those interested in a MT Trail Sport, it may also be interesting to check their bundle of MT5 and MT4. It is a bit cheaper but you have to decide whether you personally like the longer or the shorter leverblade.

www.bike24.de/1.php?content=8;product=233467;menu=1000,2,15,117;page=4

vs.

www.bike24.de/1.php?content=8;product=283668;menu=1000,2,15,117;page=4
  • + 1
 @vinay: Bike-discount is a very serious and thorough company. Nothing but good things to say about them.
  • + 1
 @lenmerderdenfer: Thanks. Yeah just to be clear it is just that I don't have experience with them but I expect them to be just fine. Being from The Netherlands most of my bicycle parts bought online came from CRC. This past year I moved more towards Bike24 because of their more varied offerings (especially as I'm on "old" standard of bike components). Not saying the Brexit will drive me away from UK shops, that's pretty unrelated. In fact I love the increase UK-made stuff like what Superstarcomponents is making. But yeah next time I need something I'll consider bike-discount too. Thanks for the tip Smile !
  • + 1
 @vinay: Alltricks.fr is really good as well. They are surprisingly serious! Super delivery times too.
  • + 1
 @vinay: Actually Wiggle bought both CRC and Bike24, so even if the Brexit hits they still have access to the EU through Bike24.
  • + 1
 @Ryan2949: Take a look at bike-components,might be even cheaper.
  • + 11
 I own these as well as the MT-Trail Sports. Great feel, ultra consistent, and very well made.

If you ride mostly trail, and are looking for a more affordable option, the MT-Trail Sport is worth a hard look.
I would compare overall stopping power to guide RSCs... I prefer the feel, modulation, and design of magura; but that’s personal taste. I’ve tested them on long descents such as Bennet Gap / Black mtn and for my 150lb self they’ve been plenty powerful with zero fade.

I can also attest to the lever clamps rotating in a crash. I’ve twristed these many times and still no damage to report.



Does the MT5 come with the HC1 blade for 2019? The new levers are great.
  • + 3
 I agree. MT Trail Sports for over a year on a bike that was ridded 2-3 times a year never had fading issues or re-bleed. MT5s on several bikes after countless issues with Shimano brakes. Magura is the best brake and at 230lbs thats saying something.
  • + 4
 I have the MT Trail Sports on my 111, and could not be happier. I can't see giving S+S any more money for brakes any time soon.
  • + 3
 Magura's US customer service is great. I broke both mt trail sport levers in a crash and they sent me a replacement almost immediately. I've never broken shimano levers so I don't completely trust them but I still love the brakes and think their cs is great.
  • + 2
 vaedwards, Thanks for your interest but no they don't come stock with HC lever blades. As you know the Trail Sports do which has basically the MT5 up front and MT4 rear but the HC blades retail around $35 ea fyi.
  • + 2
 Not overtightening the lever clamp is an advice they've been giving since forever. Allow the lever assembly to rotate around the handlebar in case of a crash, old MX trick. I don't get why anyone would need to clamp their masters so tight that even in a blow that destroys the assembly, the clamp still stays put.
  • + 1
 If they feel like guides why would anyone want to get them?
  • + 11
 I've never really understood the need for tool-free adjustments on brakes. Don't most people set their levers (presumably at home, where one has tools) where they like them and leave them? Maybe I'm an outlier and everyone else is adjusting their levers whilst midair, bombing down the trail.
  • + 1
 One reason is that many of the Shimano brakes seem to have a migrating bite point, so I often found my myself adjusting the feel. Often as is in multiple times per ride ! I've been running these MT7's for a quarter season so far and hardly ever need to adjust the bite point, but depending on the gloves I'm wearing, the trail, and other little things I sometimes tweak them. Also, if you have a big problem like bent rotor or damage that leaks, it can let you eke out some performance and get you home. Either way, for me, I'm used to it now and would never buy a brake without tool free adjust even if they are solid.
  • + 3
 I can spend weeks dialing in my brakes. I'll ride 'em for a few days, then decide to tweak bits, keep riding, keep tweaking.
Also you've got the change in bite/reach to compensate for pad wear.
  • + 11
 i love my mt5 , they could stop me down a mountain only with the rear brake . best brakes out there !!
  • + 4
 I thought about this brake for my next set, seem to be high quality and I like adjustments to fine tune as I'm a bit OCD with my brakes.

One thing I'd like to see more companies do is eliminate the bleed screw that you have to remove and re-install and switch to a "twist-to-close" type option (I believe SRAM does this now on their calipers), but for both the caliper and lever. This way if you pressurize the system to get a bit more fluid in, it will stay in there.

As someone who likes their brakes to feel the same all the time to my personal liking, I seem that I always lose a bit too much fluid during my transfer of the removal of the syringe to the install of the bleed screw. It's that amount that I lose that I'd like to keep in the system as I can always get my bleeds to feel great while the syringe is still attached.

These M7's or the Hayes Dominion next.
  • + 0
 New formula 4 pots worth a shout?
  • + 8
 Absolutely love my MT7 brakes. Best out there!
  • + 3
 Been running these for a year and not overly impressed. My saints are better in terms of heat management which counts in alpine racing. Make sure you run organics as you boil the shit out of the fluid otherwise. Plus the hc3 levers actually reduce power as they change the leverage ratio of the lever. Obviously not the master to slave ratio. 11mm to 13mm I seem to recall from the pivot point. Running these as shiguras now, just waiting for race season to properly evaluate. Also make sure the 2mm discs are run. Very poor performance from standard 1.8mms especially as they wear down. Massive lever throw.
  • + 4
 Zee levers and mt5s calipers here, fantastic shigura
  • + 3
 I've been running MT7's for a quarter season and still not sure what to think. I haven't had any problems with them, and I'm addicted to the power which is why I've kept them on. There is just something about the lever feel that is not as satisfying as Saints. It feels a little "wooden" ?? But I've kept them on because they are so powerful and solid (none of the migrating bite point of the Saints, and definitely more powerful although maybe overkill ?) I am eager to try them with SHimano levers as mentioned above. But if you are heavy or do a lot of long brake boiling descents, check them out because did I mention they are extremely powerful brakes ?
  • + 6
 Formula Cura 4.....cheaper, better modulation and will stop a freight train. Also save you $110 per wheel.
  • + 3
 So how do they stand up against maker/model x, y and z? How do they score against other brands regarding bite point, modulation, fading, durability etc.? Sorry but I believe they do much better reviews by enduro-mtb.com with the group tests and charts so you easily can compare the different brands and models performance. I know it takes much more time, effort and lab tech to measure on equal terms but it is worth it as you can provide more details to aid us in choosing best performing or best value product.
  • + 3
 Iv'e got the MT5's on my hardtail, 4 pistons up front and 2 at the rear, the stopping power is insane even in the wet but I made the mistake of letting my roadie friend do a run on the local trail on my bike he grabbed a fist full of front break going through a berm and went straight over the bars
  • + 3
 "they like it because it doesn't attract moisture (DOT fluid can absorb it)"

This line is really getting annoying since it seems to be in every single brake review that uses mineral oil. DOT fluid absorbs moisture because it is explicitly required by the DOT standard to do so. This is to avoid corrosion and water pockets that can flash to steam under heavy loading.

The debate between DOT and mineral oil will rage on, but pretending the hygroscopic nature of DOT fluid is a failing, rather than a requirement doesn't add anything.
  • + 2
 I have had the MT Trail brakes ~1.5 years now.
1) Bite point is extremely consistent. I've never experienced that in a brake before.
2) Organic pads had me concerned, but Magura organics aren't the same as other brands. I wouldn't hesitate using these organics at Whistler; they last a long, long time and modulate very well.
3) For North Shore steeps, 180mm front rotor is too small in my experience. Go 203mm for more power. I found the 180mm HC rotor warbles when pulling really hard, so take the extra power of a 203 and have a quiet ride.
4) Follow the bleed procedure. It works well. Way easier than doing a reverb!
5) I like the thicker rotors magura uses. Feels less prone to warping.

Shop around as these brakes are very affordable.
  • + 4
 I have MT5's on both of my bikes. They are best brake for the money especially once you put the 8.p pads set from the MT7 into the 5.
  • + 2
 Bleeding Maguras is a total pain and if not careful you can ruin the bleed port at the lever with the soft carbon body material. I like the braking when they work. If they truly have improved the bleeding then they may have solved the one issue i have with them. Magura has been awesome with me as far as warranties go. I've had multiple issues with the lever bodies breaking and the bleed port stripping and not sealing.
  • + 7
 I think the issues you've had are updated, from my experience with both the former and present models. Also, the bleed port doesn't need to be cranked down to where you ruin it. Once the plug is pressed in, it's a light turn to snug it up...you shouldn't be stripping it out.
  • + 5
 @WoodstockMTB I agree the bleed port design would be better if they molded in a metal insert. Magura has awesome customer service. I had issues with my MT's and they said send them in and within five days I had a new set in hand. I had a problem with my Shimano M8000's and it took 8 weeks.......had to buy a new set of brakes so I could use my FS Bike. In my opinion, Magura is a top shelf supplier that knows how to work with the end users verses dragging us through bike shops or distributors to get issues resolved.
  • + 0
 This has been my experience too, a buddy of mine has them currently and we couldn't get a good bleed. Bike shop couldn't either and now they're just consistently bad.
  • + 7
 @tgent: the trick I've learned that has been consistent is to do a 'push bleed' from the caliper up to the lever, then lightly repressurize with the syringe at the lever, create vacuum at the lever, repressure, create vacuum at the leaver, repressure slightly so it spills a tad when you take it off.

Many happy Magura brakes thereafter.
  • + 0
 Just had to mount a brand new MT5 and bleeding was a pain in the a*** sorry but these plastic bodys, the poor bleeding and a wobbly bite point are no reason for we to swap to magura.

I am currently testing the new 4 piston shimano deore and they just deliver for just above 100€ why do others not get the job done. Shimano is the king of disc brakes imo.
  • + 3
 @Chridel: try my method above. I'd be surprised if you couldn't get them to feel the way you'd like. I've migrated over to Magura because I had 2 sets of Guides go into Warranty, 3 individual Shimanos and the last remaining set of Shimanos I have I do a bleed about every 4 months because the moment I hit rough stuff the lever goes to the bar if there's a bubble. Haven't had that issue with any of my Maguras.
  • + 0
 @danielsapp: This issue wasn't replacing the plug. I could never get a good bleed from the caliper using the pro bleed kit or a simple syringe at the lever. So, I omitted the caliper entirely and just bleed at the lever. its takes a decent amount of force to screw in the metal syringe end to get a secure seal for bleeding. Over torque and voile...the bleed port threads are stripped. it doesn't take much. I didnt ham fist it. I'll be getting a new bleed kit for like $25 for the crazy expensive Magura version that has a plastic syringe end. Best solution would be to mold in a metal insert as mentioned below.
  • + 2
 I had a set of Magura MT7 on a 2012 Bike and have to admit that they never felt "bitey" or "crisp" as in the breaking point felt squishy but not in the desirable way. I found that the top screw that you have to use to bleed the system was poor quality and it did break after the first time bleeding the thing.

A friend of mine got the MT7 just recently and complains about a lack of stopping power as well. Especially in the back despite a 200 mm disc.

I reckon it is, like with everything else, very much down to how you define a good break. I hear 2 different opinions. Either extremely good or extremely bad.

I am happy with my Shimano XT breaks...Solid and reliable
  • + 2
 I've have MT5s on all my bikes for the last 3 or 4 years. I put in the split 4 pot pads in them all. I'm a big guy, ride a lot of DH and parks, so really push by brakes hard. The MT5s have never let me down, even on long DH runs, and also when they have been left for weeks or months. I can't recommend them enough. In the mean time I've had bad Avids, SRAM, and Zees - all needing frequent care. The Maguras for me are fit and forget.
  • + 2
 So, once you've fallen in love with your MT5/7, you can go one higher by putting on any shimano brake lever. Best brake ever, combines best of both worlds. Now it's an even.easier bleed and the brake is stronger than Magura or Saint and super consistent.

Another tip: The original pads wear down fast. Superstar Components make metallic brake pads that are powerful on Magura rotors, and last ages.
  • + 1
 Do you need any special olives or fittings ? I'm a little confused about all that is required to do this, maybe because I haven't taken the time to dig in and look at it, but if you have a link to a thread where people discuss this swap please post it up.
  • + 2
 @preston67: all the source i have on this is in Ger,so you're out of luck there. But google shigura, plenty oughta come up.

Olives and fittings are interchangeable, both Shimano and Magura work. I use Shimano because my superstition telks me to use the same brand as the lever's Wink
  • + 1
 I read up on this and while tempting, I've also read from many users that Shimano's weak point is their master cylinder design. Specifically, that if bike is flipped upside down for repair, any little air bubbles lurking creep into the MC and render them squishy. Any experience on this?
  • + 1
 @WoodenCrow: Perhaps, on occasion I have but a after flipping the bike back over and squeezing the brakes once or twice, they go back to whatever state they were before flipping the bike. I've also heard that Shimano did not hard anodize the M/C piston in the lever and it eventually corrodes resutling in inconsistent actuation. I did experience this with one of my Saint sets, it would work great for a while then get intermittently spongy no matter how much you bled it. I ended up replacing it. Of my 2 sets of Saints over 4-5 years this happened only once to one set, and I never went back and tried the caliper with a different lever to confirm it was the lever (M/C) or not, but when someone described that I was like "oh, that must be what happened with that one brake".
  • + 1
 @WoodenCrow: it's what preston says, after two squishes in the parking lot, the brakes are back. Non issue...

A biggie to keep in mind with shimano levers tho: the o-rings are real divas. never pressure wash or even hose them nor use brake cleaner on them. Following that they'll last
  • + 2
 Really nice brake, I really like the lever design, great feel and leverage. I struggle to see where they fit between say Hope E4/V4 which are prettier, just as customization and cheaper, and Saint/Zee which are more powerful and cheaper. I guess that's the challenge when you have so many big players.
  • + 2
 Personally, I was bleeding my Shimano's monthly, and other than initial setup haven't had to bleed the Maguras in half a year. I can't speak to Hope, but with aftermarket pads I think the Magura's are stronger than the Zees I had.
  • + 3
 I love my MT7’s!! Best brakes I’ve ever tried for sure. Lots of power for big descents in Whistler, Sun Peaks, Garda Lake, Peru etc and great modulation for slippery steep lines!
  • + 1
 I upgraded from 675 slx to Mt5s for my custom build cannondale prophet and I love the difference. That bike isn't light for what it is and the power and feel are so much better. I had no real complaints with the shimanos I just wanted a 4 pot system and the mt5s had good reviews. I found a good deal on ebay for a set plus rotors at around $260 shipped from Deutscheland. Happy rider here.
  • + 1
 Very loosely related question here. I've got a Cannondale Prophet too but other than straighlining rough descends I never felt more confident riding technical stuff on that bike than on my hardtail. It may be my hardtail style/expectations but somehow I can set the rear suspension stable and predictable but then it feels too dull for my liking. I can dial down rebound damping a little to make it more fun but then I'm also more busy absorbing the rebound stroke with my legs (to prevent me from getting bucked off after a harder landing) than actually absorbing the landing itself. I was thinking a shock with separate high and low speed rebound damping like the Cane Creek shock might be the way to go for me. What shock are you using and how do you like it? I've seen people ride it with a coil sprung shock but I never got my head around how that would work nicely with the falling rate suspension design. Cheers!
  • + 1
 Been on Magura’s discs for 10 years and have a set of 35 year old road lever/rim brakes. Zero issues. Ever.

Sram and Shimano have come a long way, by no means are they bad brakes. Just Magura is still the best.

Bleeding has never been a problem for me. Feel if you have issues with brake bleeds you should let your shop take care of it.
  • + 4
 I have these on all three of my rides. Love them! Though I would like to try the new Hayes when these wear out
  • + 1
 I struggled, as did my bike shop with bleeding my Pro carbon MTs at first. But I listened and learned and actually moved them from my old bike to my new bike recently and I had them working absolutely perfectly pretty quickly after routing new lines and all. I have to say when I ride non Magura equipped bikes, I'm not real impressed with the modulation, control, power, or anything really.
  • + 4
 Very happy with my MT5: powerful, affordable, consistent and quite light. What more could I ask for?
  • + 1
 3 years about 7000 kms on my Mt7 Danny M stoppers. For starters if you are striping the bleed screw you are idot. Bleeding brakes is very very simple removing caliper and rotating it around and using few simple tricks I can go months with out bleeding. The lever body will not take much for abuse I will agree with that. Regular top bleed help allot since there isn't much fluid in the master cylinder. I ran into a leaking issue at Trans Bc this year and mounted up some Shimano SLX levers. This is possibly the best mod you can do amazing power if you like a short lever stroke and huge power just save yourself the time and buy some cheap SLX levers. Red Kool stops are great choice for pads and make sure you use a 2mm rotor and not a 1.8 that does make a difference. If you have odd brake pad wear service the pistons. Ramble on pink bike users.
  • + 1
 I have both 4 year old saint m820 & magura mt7. The mag's came 2nd hand on a dh bike and were a massive pita initially to get to work satisfactorily. But after 1 million bleeds ultimately using the marshy gravity bleed with uberbike race matrix pads, they work really well.
I have a spare set of new saints ready to go, but am more likely to just swap the brake lever out to make shiguras if the levers leak or snap. They dont feel very robust. Carbontech = plastic as far as im concerned.
And despite being the most hamfisted person I know Ive never stripped or broken the bleed screw!
  • + 3
 would love to see more magura support at events and races. Shimanos support is the sole reason that most of my bikes are buiilt up with shimano components.
  • + 1
 I had some Hope 4 pot brakes & after after a few months the pistons always moved at different speeds, some slow/some fast leading to inconsistent feel & pad wear. no amount of piston resetting, cleaning or bleeding would fix it, so eventually gave in & bought 2 pot shimano. longer term do the magura 4 pots have the same issues?

anyone in the UK reading this knows they'd need aftermarket sintered pads for the winter...
  • + 1
 I have three x 4 pot calipers in use and I haven't had any issues with the pistons being wonky or needing manipulation like the Hope brakes tend to (and which drives me crazy).

The Magura pistons are self-centering IIRC so you usually just need to press the pistons back flush with the caliper, center the caliper over the rotor, pump up to grab the rotor, and tighten the caliper bolts when changing pads or needing to adjust things in my experience with multiple Magura sets over the years.
  • + 4
 I love the mt7 and mt5's. Selling my Saints to get a set so very timely review.
  • + 1
 Got the MT trail which is 4 pot front and 2 pot rear. After experiencing loads of issues with shimano and terrible fade on saints I tried these and have been fantastic so far. Bit of a knack to bleeding them correctly but once you figured it out the brakes are pretty lethal and fade free.
  • + 3
 I cant find magura's signature loic Bruni levers, where can I find them? I don't even see them on their website
  • + 0
 Personnaly, they have a cheap plastic feel to them and all the bolts are still made from the same flimsy material that they used way back in the 90's. The bleed process may be simplified, but you have to be so carefull around them not to cause any damage. Some of them do have an issue with sticky pistons, but Magura is spot on with their customer service. (YT - are you paying attention??) Once you get them to work, they feel very progressive and oodles of power are at your disposal.

But for now, I will resist the temptation of buying a new set. I'll stick to Shimano for the time being. They never (or hardly) ever fail me and are a no brainer in set up and maintenance.
  • + 0
 The plastic body that the mounting screw goes into is the same plastic piece that the brake fluid reservoir is on. There's no real way to fix it if you do like I did and crash causing the mount screw to pull out stripping the female end of it. The first time it happened, they sent a replacement out right away. When the shop was swapping it out, I saw the tech tighten the screw with a torque wrench and strip the straight out of the box replacement. They worked great for the three rides I had them on, but if this is the poor quality control and design I have to expect from an upper end price point, I'm going to quickly back off and go right back to my Shimano XT's (m780's which have been working flawlessly for years now).
  • + 1
 Still have first series Gustavs on a giant Brooklyn TMX from way back and have had and worked on many HS sets in red, grey and the infamous neon yellow. Those and some Mavic ceramics and you were king !
  • + 3
 Other than the 1-finger lever... are these updated with any changes from the MT7 they were selling last year?
  • + 0
 Had too much crap with Magura brakes over the last few years. Several MT models which were somewhere between utterly inconsistent or down right defective. When they worked, they stopped great - but when they didn't, i got injured... So, i'll stay away for the time being, thank you very much.
  • + 0
 I had these brakes and I didn't have that great of an experience with them.
One of the lines punctured, the reach adjustment pin fell out and they required constant bleeding. Normally not that big of a deal but No shops around me carried parts. The reach adjustment pin cost me over $60 to replace. My options for parts were ordering on ebay...
I sold the set I had last year. For the price of a single brand new Magura MT7 I ended up getting a Pair of Shimano Zee's. Parts are cheap and plentiful.
  • + 3
 Need to be more yellow, I'd have had the Danny Mac edition ones in a heart beat, if I wasn't so poor/tight.
  • + 4
 Four pads per brake because more is always more.
  • + 3
 So the only point of getting more expensive MT7 is lever adjustment, interesting?
  • + 3
 I currently have a few sets of the MT7. My only wish is for a proper bleed valve at the caliper.
  • + 1
 I mentioned this exact point in my comment in this thread. Would love to see it across all the brands!
  • + 3
 These things are at the top of my want list. I'd go Magura on all my bikes if I was a dentist.
  • + 2
 I got a pair of MT7, and I find the bite point adjustment really hard to turn on both levers.
Am I the only one ?
  • + 8
 I find it easiest to pull the lever slightly as I’m adjusting the BAT.
  • + 1
 @coregrind: I'll give it a try, thanks !
  • + 1
 Yes I've noticed the same thing. I generally only adjust it on install though so I haven't been concerned about it but we're not the only one to experience this, heard it mentioned before.
  • + 3
 MT5 and MT7 on all my bikes.
  • + 2
 Kudos to the reviewer for knowing the differences between braking and breaking. :-)
  • + 1
 If you fail to be braking at the correct time you’re sure to be breaking yourself...
  • + 1
 @danielsapp: True, true.
  • + 3
 I’d like to see a Hope vs. Magura vs. Saint comparison.
  • + 2
 Enduro-mtb.com/en is into group tests if that's what you're looking for. The team is half German so they like being systematic like that Wink . Then again I actually enjoy this one more in depth review. So yeah, maybe check Enduro-mtb for the global picture if you're in the market for a new brake and then when you've got it narrowed down, check reviews like these to go more in depth.
  • + 2
 I wanted the hs33 raceline brakes so bad as a kid but couldn’t afford them!
  • + 0
 Just can't get past the whole plastic brake lever thing...... over tighten the bleed screw by .0087nm and you've got a stripped lever...... I know, I know, they've been using it on BMWs for years......
  • + 2
 @danielsapp how does the SB130 ride with a coil?? been pondering on that one for a while...
  • + 3
 It’s “not recommended” That said, I’m into it.
  • + 1
 @danielsapp: you are riding an SB130 with coil? Please elaborate :-)
150cm in the front or did you beef that up as well.
  • + 1
 @danielsapp: funny...seeing as though Push is working on fitment right now.
  • + 1
 @rondre3000: there are a few companies working on a coil currently. However, Yeti states they designed the bike around an air shock and don't recommend a coil, although it can be done. It's all relative to where and how you ride and what you're looking for, IMO.
  • + 1
 @mtb-journal: Yep, 160 GRIP 2.
  • + 1
 MRP has a progressive spring - great option for running coil for SOME suspension designs. I just got their Hazzard rear shock but currently to snowy to ride.
  • + 1
 @danielsapp: where did you see/hear that stated? Would appreciate an official word or source because their model site FAQ says otherwise.

"The Yeti SB130 is designed to be compatible with both air and coil sprung shocks."
  • + 3
 @rondre3000: Here's the official word, word for word directly from the engineering team at Yeti. "While it can be done, the SB130 is not optimized to run a coil shock. The bike is, of course, optimized for an air shock, as spec’d."
  • + 1
 @danielsapp: Thank you sir! Odd that it seems there are conflicting messages coming from them.
  • + 3
 Looks good. I'm heavy, and I need infinite braking power.
  • + 2
 Shimura here, pair up with XTR levers.
  • + 2
 The Shigura XT7
It’s the best option in the stopping game
  • + 2
 Do you still get the wandering bite point when using shimano levers??
  • + 2
 @mikelee: ever so slightly if it’s been a while since a top/bubble bleed. Really though, the performance is so good that to point this out as a barrier to entry over the pudding that is all things sram brake is splitting hairs. It’s a wonderful time to be on bikes when we get to criticize a system as good as Magura.
Pad wear...now that’s a serious financial burden to commit to on MT7 Calipers.
  • + 3
 Zee's for the win.
  • + 1
 Looks great as usual. My experience has always been great with Magura products and service.
  • + 1
 I love the force of the MT7 - i dont likie the Carbotecture...
  • + 1
 I would love customizable levers on my HOPEs.
  • - 2
 Comments tell the real story. Lots of plastic . Easy to damage when doing a bleed.
Sticky pistons( all four piston calipers have this issue)
Expensive.
Does your local shop carry pads?
  • + 2
 I always take Pinkbike comments with a grain of salt. Although these comments are pretty accurate. Bleed screw NEVER had any issue with it, just torque it down to recommended spec and no problem. Lots of plastic, yes but that`s not a problem at least for me, caliper is a very robust aluminum piece. STICKY PISTONS, yes yes and yes this is my main issue with them. But the power is something else that`s why I keep buying them for my bikes, simply put they are the most powerful brakes I have ever tried, period.
  • + 1
 @pipomax: I take reviews and comments with a grain of salt.
  • + 0
 My maguras lasted one whole season and then the levers blew up and leaked everywhere such B.S time to go back to shimano
  • + 1
 5 year leak proof warranty...?
  • + 1
 He’s bleeding the brakes outside!?!?!?
  • + 1
 Weird flex but okay
  • + 0
 Man, you all got me really interested in "Shimura" or "Shigura" brakes. More info please!
  • + 2
 Shimano M8000 lever with Magura caliper - www.instagram.com/p/Bm7215tnICf/?taken-by=id8sta for example

Lots of info at ridemonkey.bikemag.com/threads/frankenbrakes-and-brake-improvement-discussion.274164 if you are interested in the topic

IIRC the recipe is this:

Shimano lever
Shimano olive at lever
Shimano olive cover/insert at lever
Magura hose
Magura caliper
Shimano or Magura mineral oil, Pentosin mineral oil (used on BMW and Audi vehicle brakes, usually much less expensive than Shimano or Magura oil)

Profit - $$$
  • - 1
 If you have to offer so many different levers then your design has failed in the first place
  • - 2
 Cannot get a consistent bite point on my front one
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