Review: Magura's Updated Vyron Wireless Electronic Dropper Post

Jan 22, 2019
by Mike Kazimer  
Magura Vyron dropper post review

It was a little over three years ago that Magura debuted the Vyron, the world's first wireless electronic dropper post. There were some who predicted it was the start of a new wave of wireless droppers, but that still hasn't panned out, although it looks like at least one major player will be joining the game in the near future.

Last season the Vyron received several revisions based on rider feedback, including a faster return speed, and a 25% reduction in response time between the wireless remote and the dropper itself. The remote also received a new plastic cover, one that hides all the unnecessary buttons and creates a larger target to aim for.
Vyron eLECT Details
• Micro-USB rechargeable
• Charging time: 3 hours
• 30.9 or 31.6mm diamteter
• Travel options: 100, 125, 150mm (tested)
• Collar to base: 237mm
• Overall length: 445mm
• Weight: 595 grams w/ remote
• MSRP: $499 USD
www.magura.com

The Vyron is available with either 100, 125, or 150mm of travel, and retails for $499 USD.


Magura Vyron dropper post review
The charging port and on / off switch are hidden behind a rubber cover.


Design Features

Richard Cunningham put together a detailed First Look when the Vyron eLECT was first announced, but it's worth going over a few of the key points before diving into the installation and performance. Like the vast majority of dropper posts currently on the market, the Vyron is air sprung (the air pressure can be adjusted via a valve at the base of the post), with hydraulic internals. The difference between the Vyron and conventional posts is that there isn't a cable or hydraulic line connecting the post to a handlebar mounted remote. Instead, the post communicates with the remote wirelessly via ANT+, with the battery, receiver, and valve motor located at the top of the post, below and just behind the seat rails.

When a signal is received the motor opens up the hydraulic circuit, and the rider has .5 seconds to position the seat where they'd like before the circuit is closed. Battery life is said to be at least 400 cycles, or somewhere around one month of riding.

If the handlebar remote battery dies it's still possible to raise or lower the post by pushing the same button that's used to check the rechargeable battery level, and even if the battery in the post dies there should still be enough juice saved to raise or lower the seat once or twice in order to finish a ride.



Magura Vyron dropper post review
Magura Vyron dropper post review
The remote is held on by a rubber o-ring, and now has a cover that hides any unnecessary buttons.


Installation

The Vyron is without a doubt the easiest to install dropper post on the market. There's no need to fuss with running housing through a frame, tiny pinch bolts, or anything more complicated than plugging a charger into a wall. Instead, once a CR2032 battery is installed in the remote, and the post has been charged and inflated, all that's left is to insert the post into the frame, securing the remote to the handlebar with a rubber o-ring, and that's it. It's a simple as can be – even someone who struggles with fixing a flat tire shouldn't have any trouble getting the Vyron up and running.

It's worth noting that the Vyron's seat clamp mechanism is offset forward by a few millimeters – you may need to slide your seat back a little bit from its typical position to accommodate.

Once it's installed, there's a tiny on / off switch hidden behind a rubber cover on the post, which is also where the micro USB charging port is located. Pushing on the remote will wake it up, and a green light flashes to indicate that it's communicating with the post.


Magura Vyron dropper post review


Performance

The Vyron doesn't behave exactly like a 'normal' dropper post. On most droppers you push a remote lever of some sort, lower the seat to where you want it with your body weight, and then release the lever to lock it in place. That's not the case with Vyron.

Instead, you push and release the remote button, and then there's a .5 second window to lower the seat. What if you push the button, weight the seat, and then unweight it in less than .5 seconds? That's right, it starts to raise back up, which is my biggest gripe with the Vyron. It's simply not as easy or as intuitive to use as a 'standard' dropper post, especially if you're riding somewhere with terrain that requires raising and lowering your seat more than a couple times.

Ideally, the post's mechanism would open when you pushed a button, and close when you released it, but that's not what happens with the current configuration. Imagine being in a race scenario where you've raised your seat to quickly grind up a hill, and then need to drop it out of the way as soon as possible on the other side. With the Vyron, you need to spend extra time weighting the seat at the bottom of the post's travel in order to ensure that it's going to stay put when you stand up. Now, half a second may not seem like that much, but it feels like a lot longer out on the trail.


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I adjusted my technique a little bit to accommodate the way the Vyron works, but it was still never as simple as using a conventional dropper, and I had a number of instances where I thought I'd waited long enough, and then realized I hadn't as I dropped into a steep line with my seatpost partially extended.

The remote works, and it's easy to locate without the need to look down, but I would have liked to see something more refined, something a little less plasticy and not held on by a rubber o-ring. The fact that the Vyron is electronic and wireless should open up all sorts of design potential – imagine a small push button integrated into the edge of a lock-on grip, or even a shifter style lever that just doesn't have any cable and housing attached to it. Instead, the remote seems like it was an afterthought, and it doesn't hold a candle to the numerous well-designed options that are available for non-wireless dropper posts.

Performance gripes aside, the post has survived all of the muddy rides I've subjected it to without any electrical issues, and the battery life has been impressively long. The return speed was quick enough for my liking, and there's a nice 'thunk' that lets you know when it's back to full extension. However, there were a few times when the post was hesitant to raise after the remote had been pushed. Those instances happened when it was cold and muddy out – the combination of those two environmental factors meant that I had to give my seat a slight tug to encourage it to raise up.



Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesIt's not that Magura have made a faulty product, it's that I don't think they took the concept far enough. The post itself is well made, holds a charge for an impressively long time, and it does work as intended, albeit with a few performance quirks. I could even see it being a useful component for a shop to have on hand in order to loan out to a dropper-curious customer.

However, there are currently several simple, reliable, and much more affordable cable-actuated posts on the market that perform better than the Vyron. 
Mike Kazimer







150 Comments

  • + 68
 "It's worth noting that the Vyron's seat clamp mechanism is offset forward by a few millimeters..."

By far the most appealing thing about this product.

Given the trend towards steeper seat angles, it's surprising there aren't more forward-offset posts on the market.
  • + 5
 Indeed. I'm between M and L frames and went with the L this time..great, but now my seat is waaay too far back at full extension. So seat slid all the way forward...not ideal. A rotating head would be neat..to offset either forward or back.
  • + 1
 Yup, totally agree. Harder to climb being so far back, would be great to be able to change offsets on the fly
  • + 1
 @loopie: I had to the same (was between S and M, went with M). Not ideal having to compromise.. rotating head sounds cool
  • + 2
 Fart activated dropper post would make for a bumpy ride in my case
  • + 2
 @loopie: Rotating head, you mean like Specialized does?
  • + 1
 @vinay: No idea..not up to speed on post tech. Spec has a dropper with adjustable fore/aft?
  • + 2
 @loopie: No expert either, but I thought when fully extended it rotates forwards. I personally ride with a rigid post in quite low and tilted rearwards. I prefer it like that when the saddle is low though I can imagine with the saddle raised you'd want it more level or even forwards. Most saddle positions nowadays (to me) appear like a compromise. People set their saddle level because that's how it works best when extended, but to me that'd feel uncomfortable when set low and you have your hips low and behind the saddle. The Specialized seatpost would probably sort that. That said, I'm still pretty much at the sidelines (that is, PB comment section). I might buy one once they've developed one that I like.
  • + 2
 @vinay: Seat position at proper pedaling height is very, very important...and trumps all other adjustments. DH/DJ not as much...some room there for 'preferences'.
  • + 2
 @loopie: Yeah, I get that. But it would be even nicer if the seat position would be perfect both with the post up as well as down, wouldn't it? I was just wondering whether people appreciate the Specialized seatpost for that. Personally I rarely (as in, never in the past couple of years) ride with a high saddle so naturally I tilted it for how I like it low.
  • + 1
 @loopie: Just looked it up. It is their Command Wu seatpost. It isn't cheap and the seattube is 34.9mm which doesn't fit all frames. Not sure if it was spec'd in the Specialized bike used in the recent PB group test.
  • + 1
 @vinay: I demo'd a 2018 Spec Enduro and was pretty excited about the Wu post but... didn't like the fact that as the rear of the saddle tilted downwards when the post was dropped, the front end nose would remain high! This, IMO effectively negated the advantage Specialized was going for which didn't make sense to me. Otherwise I LOVED the concept, just felt the execution was off. My 2 cents.

I agree with @loopie that seat position at proper pedal heights is everything. Would be cool to see something that adjusts fore/aft and rotates. As it is now I set my saddle with a slight nose-tilt up to accomdate descents and live with the compromised effect on climbing - would prefer the opposite for ascents.
  • + 1
 @yale986: I don't understand your comment; if you tilt back the saddle so the rear is down, the nose will be up, that's a fact on any saddle/any post.

As for me, I think Spesh's idea is great too, and I'd really like it to become the norm. When riding a fixed dropper I used to leave the saddle a bit under torqued so I could tilt it by hand when lowering it before the descents.
  • + 1
 @ismasan: I hear you, I didn't get it either when I read other's reviews of the Wu post until I personally tested it. Here's an excerpt from an article that maybe explains it better than I could...

"On that same note, with the raised nose not hitting much drop at all, even with the effective 150mm drop at the rear it doesn’t seem quite enough. On the large Enduro I was riding it just didn’t feel like it was entirely out of the way at times. (singletrackworld.com/2018/01/review-this-specialized-command-wu-seatpost-drops-and-tilts-too-but-is-that-a-good-thing)

From what I experienced, even when you dropped the post down as low as it could go, the aggressive tilt of the saddle combined with the lack of drop meant the nose of the saddle stayed effectively at the same height as when the post was near it's maximum extension.
  • + 2
 @yale986: it sounds like the dropper you were using wasn't long enough travel to utilize the feature. There's no way this one would feel like the front of the seat stayed in the same position.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdV-QYtcoFk
  • + 1
 @bhalpin47: Maybe if they redesign it with the pivot shifted more forwards, that could help.
  • + 1
 @bhalpin47: thanks for sharing the vid. I think there is only one length Wu post (haven't looked it up) but I wasn't able to slam it down low enough due to interrupted seat tube. That, coupled with stack height just didn't work for me.

Just re-read my reply and a bit exaggerated to say it stayed at effectively same height. Guess more my point was it didn't get out of the way enough for my liking - especially with short inseams. Too bad too b/c I was gunning for the Enduro as my next bike and the Wu post was a big selling feature but decided against it in the end (for more reason's than just the post).
  • + 1
 @vinay: that would be better. Being positioned forward and over the bottom bracket for climbing helps a lot
  • + 1
 @yale986: For that they may every have to consider placing the pivot lower. That would shift the sale fore and aft. But it also takes more room so you can't slam the saddle all the way down anymore.
  • + 46
 Although if you got two of them and switched remotes with a mate that would be funny.
  • + 36
 This applies to all companies making electronic stuff for bikes: learn from Shimano Di2 levers. They could have made it so it looks like a switch to a toaster and it would still be functional. But they didn't. They did good looking, ergonomic "levers". Whenever I look at stuff like this, or remotes to E-bikes, I wonder... did you find these remotes in Moulimex or Electrolux catalogue?
  • + 5
 Good point!
(but Electrolux’ design department is one of the strongest in Sweden I believe)
  • + 29
 i have a better looking and more ergonomic HDMI/VGA adapter
  • - 1
 If it's really such an issue to replace a single cable every season.. Yet another case of trying to solve non existant problems and ending up with a dog's dinner of actual and unnecessary problems.
  • + 4
 Exactly, why didn't they just make the lever look like the normal style that we already think looks good??
  • + 8
 I think the remote was originally designed to work with their suspension fork and rear shock. The dropper seatpost came later. So it was more of a "beforethought" than an afterthought.
  • + 4
 @bonkywonky: I'm not sure this dropper is perfect, but I wouldn't say overall this is a non-existant problem. I have 3 bikes with droppers and they can be a PITA in some ways, much more so than say a cable actuated derailleur which I also have on all 3 bikes but rarely need to touch. Not everyone will have issues with droppers, but my experience is they are more maintenance intensive than most of the other parts on my bikes.
  • + 2
 @yupstate: I'd say for people with multiple mountainbikes it would make sense to be able to swap components between bikes. You're never going to ride all bikes at once. Obviously drivetrain components would be a hassle, but being able to swap wheels and a dropper seatpost is nice.
  • + 5
 @vinay: that is in fact the only positive thing I see in that product, although I’d gladly see a few KS i9/ Supernatural type droppers with a lever under the saddle. I realize it is a niche thing but I would personally make use of that on my HT.
  • + 1
 @vinay: That's true, I didn't think of that. If you just loosen the clamp, swap over and tighten the clamp, that's super convenient as long as all your bikes take the same diameter seatpost. Possibly even have the option of each bike having its own lever/button so you don't have to swap that every time would be nice.
  • + 2
 @yupstate: Yeah, I think that's why they went with the O-ring mount for the remote though PB didn't quite seem to like that.
  • + 1
 Moulinex ***** my mom had some kind of that
  • + 1
 @bonkywonky: yeah agreed...and you dont have to remember to charge your dropper cable.
  • + 29
 Post is fine. In my experience you get used to the short delay (and it is short), particularly if you use this dropper day in, day out (and don’t switch between droppers). However, the remote is simply shit. If I could write that in a million point font to sufficiently convey my frustration with the shit excuse for a remote, I would do so. This is even with the extra bit of plastic to make it easier to find. I worked out that part of the delay in activation has nothing to do with the post but instead it’s caused by having to find the button. It’s held on with RUBBER BANDS for f@&ks sake. The only way I could get the stupid thing to stop moving around (and trust me, having to look for your dropper remote every time you need to use it isn’t confidence inspiring) was to attach it to a wolf tooth remount wrapped in bar tape. Before they starting making the plastic cover for the remote, you were faced with three tiny buttons, two of which are obsolete unless you run a Magura fork and shock. Anyone? Thought not. In a market where some people have made a living designing better after market dropper levers (I’m looking at you Wolf Tooth and PNW), it beggars belief that Magura have not spent the last three years designing a remote that attaches to the bar with a bolt (and plays nicely with Shimano and SRAM clamps) with a button thats easy to find with gloves on. Given its wireless, they could even make one that was lever shaped. This is a good post ruined by a truly terrible remote. Given the multitude of good droppers that are now available for less money I would recommend avoiding the Vyron unless you have a funny shaped frame or you must have electronic stuff on your bike.

Writing this has actually gotten me more wound up about just how bad the remote is and how frustrating it is that they persist with such a bit of junk.
  • + 24
 I had one. For me it was good in that I could fit it to a bike that didn't accommodate an integrated version. Also you could swop it from bike to bike. All good. But, the .5 second delay was just too much in the real world. Way too many times I went over a drop with the post still up. Some say you can get used to it, well I tired for a year before selling it. By getting used to it they mean knowing the drop is coming and lowering the post in time. That time is too long and too often you will be riding in an area you don't know, so cant anticipate unless you slow way down. Basically its too slow to react in the way other posts react. If they could get it to act like a switch Id have one again.
  • + 7
 That's the sort of thing I want to know. Ta.
  • + 5
 I ran my Gambler with it during the 'Mountain of Hell' event. I was able to pedal at a decent position while few others were walking by their light enduro. I love switching bikes with that dropper this is the core concept to me.
  • + 19
 i see a future where hecklers become hackers - the name of the game is to mess around with competitors all wireless components - every time someone breaks through a firewall there's plenty of cheering in the crowd - it's a strange future
  • + 5
 I only imagine battery gone wrong like those vape mods.
  • + 5
 @Luis-Sc or making it Alexa enabled.

“Alexa, grab Mikes front brake and engage his dropper post”
  • + 11
 Been running two of these on two different bikes for 2+ years now.

Yes they do take a little getting used to a different technique but once you've got it down it's no problem. If you're a full on racer then that 0.5s might make a difference. If you're a normal human it's absolutely fine.

The problems I have had have been reliability. Both posts have completely died twice. However, and it's a big however - Magura service & support is phenomenal. Send the post back to them and you have a new or repaired post with no questions asked couriered to you within 3 days. They've sorted every time so far in that time frame.

If you're looking to remove cable clutter from your bike or need to remove your post for travel or to switch between frames then this is the post to go to.
  • + 2
 magura service features sounds nice but to be honest - as an it guy - i want the parts on my bike to be repaired by manual labor and exchanging wearable parts and not firmware updates or sending them back to the manufacturer.
  • + 0
 So are those warranty repairs or paid up services?
If it was a paid up service what was the cost?
Just trying to work out I'd it's worth it there so expensive. Prices have dropped so much for good droppers its getting to the point might as well buy a new 1 every couple of years and just chuck the old out unserviced in its life.
  • + 2
 Why do you have two when they’re so easy to switch from bike to bike?
  • + 6
 @skelldify: Because he's constantly in the process of having one of the two repaired by Magura
  • + 1
 @skelldify: one bike is 30.9 and the other 31.6
  • + 1
 @markg1150: not paid a penny other that the cost of shipping to Magura
  • + 1
 @K1maxX: all the repairs have been because a mechanical part failed or the electrical unit packed up. No firmware / software updates.
  • + 1
 @pwn1: yes i know, you are right. i was just exaggerating. but still i like my bikes/parts to be repairable without being bound to the manufacturer.
  • + 9
 "There are easier and more affordable options than the Vyron"
If you consider having multiple bikes and only one dropper, the price can be far lower than multiple shitty droppers.
  • + 4
 Not to mention that you save money by needing only one saddle. If you want/need high-end saddles, that can add up to hundreds of dollars.
  • + 8
 This post is great if you have to regularly remove the seatpost from your bike, e.g. for traveling or switching to a rigid post for chairlift sessions. Also nice for older frames without dropper cable routing.
  • + 2
 I have an older frame without dropper cable routing and it has a Gravity Dropper. On my new frame with dropper cable routing.... oh wait, Gravity Dropper, too! Stealth routing is a pain in the ass, in my opinion.
  • + 1
 There are cheap options for posts that can be lifted from the down position, like OneUp's.
  • + 1
 @skelldify: if your frame can take Stealth Routing then you should get a Stealth post, as it's extension above the seat collar should be much less. Lowering your seat for descents greatly outweighs the extra 30 min of install time.
  • + 9
 The moment e-droppers become relevant is when they start dropping with a servo, without my body weight. This here brings nothing to the table compared to conventional ones.
  • + 2
 Good point! However, such a dropper would have to be reeeally reliable so you can trust it to actually be in the down position when you're approaching the gnar, since you're not getting any tactile feedback.
  • + 1
 I'm surprised we haven't seen servos inside a post yet. The first time I blew a seal in the parking lot was the last!
  • + 2
 This was my first thought on e-droppers. Make it go down on its own. If they made the return height programmable, you could buy a 170mm and set it up to be a 100-170mm, depending on your needs.
  • + 2
 A dropper like that will be HEAVY!
  • + 1
 @billreilly: Maybe if it can be spring loaded by pedaling action (instead of using servos)?
  • + 4
 I was an early adopter of the Vyron for a bike that I didn't want to run zip-tied external cable housing. The half-second delay seems to be about the difference between the thumb first touching the Wolftooth releases I use on my other posts, and when it's engaged enough to get a response from the post. And I don't have to keep my thumb on the "trigger" the entire time to get the seat where I want it. I paid substantially less that the MSRP, bringing it in line with the KS Lev. The only gripe I have is that I can't buy the cover to retrofit my release so I don't accidently hit the fork/shock lockouts. I know it doesn't mean much to the Pinkbike crowd, but I recommend this dropper post in lieu of the cable/hose restricted alternatives.
  • + 3
 The future of electronic droppers is CX/ gravel bikes, where the brake lever shifters make adding cables and routing tough.

The first company to bring an electronic dropper in gravel/CX seat post diameters (27mm-ish) will have an untapped market.


Also, does anyone know what ever happened to the KS LEV electronic dropper that was supposed to come out last year?
  • + 3
 i have had 3 of these...the adjustment time on relearning from other droppers in minuscule....it becomes even more part of your riding experience ...never had one issue at all and the reason i have had 3 is as soon as i get one a customer buys either the complete bike or the dropper post off me after seeing me happy as larry on an awesome product....matches the faultless brakes they offer as well ....plug and play
  • + 3
 Had 2 in two years. The first one went out after 2 months - after a wet ride. Magura shipped a new one, no questions asked. The second went out this fall, again after a wet ride. I have used my wife's hair-dryer to dry it out and bring it back to life many times, but no bringing the last post back to life. Went to a Fox Transfer and haven't looked back.
  • + 4
 Top tip for the button, especially on the old ones when it was very small, is some skateboard gripper tape up to shape and applied. Never miss it now even with winter gloves.
  • + 3
 I have had one these posts for well over a year now. It has been very reliable. There is a slight delay from pressing the button to the post actuating, but you soon get used to it and it just becomes forgotten. The electronics have not caused any issues. The O-ring is not ideal and the button could be a little less chunky. Longer travel might be nice. Compared to the other unreliable posts I've had in the past, this is a good one.
  • + 3
 Does that mean it is good, or the best of all your unreliable ones?
  • + 1
 @woofer2609: It's good!
  • + 2
 I want Tesla acceleration-like rebound in my post, not Leaf. Give it a "normal lever" trigger and faster reaction time and this would be pretty sweet. I'd probably also try to mount the electronics lower on the post so that the weight isn't moving up/down, but "fixed" and closer to the frame. I'd also think that allowing it to run on alkaline batteries would be more durable. It's why avalanche beacons don't use LI, it degrades and loses charge too quickly when exposed to cold, plus then just carry an extra AAA in your pack if it loses juice. ...or take advantage of regenerative braking on the LI design, now we're talking Wink
  • + 2
 Whenever I evaluate any component, frame or really anything I am considering spending money on I ask myself whether or not it is going to improve my experience over where I am now. Invariably, few things do and at best they are simply small notches upward. In addition, simplicity, durability are paramount. I can see that a electronically activated post could have benefits, but number one above all of my aforementioned points is that it must perform better than what already exists. Di2 has plenty of proponents, but having ridden with it on a number of road and mountain bikes it wasn't enough of a plus for me to justify a purchase. An electronic post may come along that does outperform current manual posts, but I do not believe we are there.
  • + 2
 After riding on a di2 setup and it dying on a ride because I forgot to charge, I swore ill never put any electric component on my bike again. I dont want another thing to worry about for long backcountry rides or camping trips where I cant cant charge
  • + 8
 Do you also swear off shoes because of that one time you forgot to tie your shoe laces?
  • + 1
 @nouseforaname: #velcro4life
  • + 1
 @nouseforaname: Except you can tie your shoes up away from the house.
And it's so obvious that doesn't tend to happen anyway, unlike with low batteries. Having to remember to charge all one's various gadgets is a pain, and even worse when travelling. Adding more to that list has little appeal.
  • + 2
 I bought one of these posts back in August and I've really liked it. I still ride a bike with external routing and I really didn't want an external dropper and this post seemed like the best fit for me. It is really easy to set up and pretty light too. In the cold, if you haven't raised it for more than 20 minutes only a slight tug is needed to get it moving again. (But who has their post down for 20 mins anyways?) The .5 second wait is really easy to get used to, I have found that even before I owned this post I would sit on the seat after lowering it for at least .5 seconds anyways. The lever is fine but it could have come with a real clamp or a way to make it look more like a traditional lever. Battery lasts more like 600 cycles though. Great post though, would recommend it.
  • + 2
 The unbelievable disappointment in myself and from my friends when i forget to charge my seat post and have to pull it out and hope it charges in the car on the drive to the trail might just trigger my anxiety way to much
  • + 3
 No thanks. I ride bikes to get away from the electronic strings we all attach ourselves to every day. I don't need another thing to keep charged while I'm out in the woods.
  • + 1
 In the previous version they were using a NiMh batter, I don't know if that has changed, but what's the expectancy for battery life? Especially with high self discharge rates typically associated with NiMh batteries, you'd want to charge before almost every ride to ensure operation. NiMh also will develop a memory over time and a corresponding loss of capacity.
In 2019 they should be using a Li-ion.
  • + 5
 it should be self charging, off bike vibration perhaps (like one of those shaky charge torches)
  • + 1
 As far as i know the battery has similar characteristics as the Sanyo Eneloops. Which means almost no self discharge. Memory should not be an issue in this application because it lasts so long that you never reach a lot of charging cycles over the lifetime of the post. Also you don't need to recharge it when only half-empty because even at low battery it will still allow for plenty of activations.

Not sure why the wouldn't use Li-ion, though. There must be some engineering/convenience reason for it. Cost really isn't a factor anymore.
  • + 1
 @Ttimer: self discharge. Sounds kinda icky...Wink
  • + 1
 Mine is now three years old, and no battery problem. I only plug it in about every three months,
  • + 1
 I just don’t care for the idea of electronic anything on my mtn bikes! Or any bike. Good luck charging your fox active suspension, electronic shifter/derailleur and seatpost on a long biking adventure... ie bikepacking trip. Sure there’s solar but that’s take ages I bet!
Just me.
  • + 1
 Had the opportunity to demo one of the older posts and have to say if the new post still has the .5 second delay, no thank. It's definitely a cool concept,but as many other commentators alluded to if you're moving at a decent clip then the response time of the post is just too long. I found my self getting caught with seat half up on a decent one too many times.
  • + 4
 ah, the Internet-connected fridge of the bicycle world... this is such a bullshit...
  • + 1
 I've got mine almost 4 years now (the electronics block was upgraded at Leogang WC Last year so the update is already installed). It's a nice dropper but it's a shame that there are no service kits are available. If there is any problem with the seals, bushings, whatever you have to send it to Magura.
If they would offer a service kit and some technical drawings of the internals it would be a great post. Unfortunately it won't hold pressure since day one even after two times sending it to Magura HQ. Now its my replacement post for the worst case.
  • + 0
 You know what'd be cool? Having the battery charge from the same or a similar type mechanism found in an automatic watch. Almost as good an idea would have it powered by AAA batteries. These could always be replaced trailside. As for actuation? Make a battery operated dropper with the same activation properties and remote as a cable operated dropper....but with no cable. Fwiw, doesn't cost any more to make something aesthetically pleasing.
  • + 0
 Im all for new innovations but I fail to see how that’s something we needed?

Cable is cheap to replace , a cable actuated trigger is also cheap to replace in the event of a crash ( and its position in a much safer place under the bar) and the whole cable thing is extremely reliable...

This just isnt = fail
  • + 1
 How about no electronics EVER in mountain biking? Unless it's for lights. What a concept!
  • + 1
 I'm going to build a whole mtn bike with no electronics. It's gonna wow the whole industry. Seriously though ... part of the appeal to mtn biking to me is that there are no electronics. GET OFF MY LAWN!
  • + 0
 So, let me get this straight - they still haven't figured out how to make a reliable manual-operated dropper for you dropper fans; and now you have these tech-happy designers trying to make those same unreliable droppers wireless. Gotcha.

"Step right up folks, step right up here... for today and today only, for the low low price of $500, you can buy one of these droppers and I'll throw in my cobra venom elixir that will cure all your ailments, diseases, erectile disfunction and grow yourself a full head of hair too."
  • + 3
 150mm
yawn
call me when you have 250
- 6'5" guy
  • + 1
 @sideshowb exactly.. Not even a 170mm option for my lanky ass. At the very least!
  • + 3
 If it was $498 I would consider buying it.
  • + 1
 With a bar full of shifters and a bird nest of cables infront of my head tube, I'd welcome some electronics to clean up my cockpit.
  • - 1
 It does provide a good solution for anyone who does not have a frame that can take an internally routed cable / hose.
It does provide a solution to those that may want to swop the dropper from bike to bike.

If you have ever tried to install / remove an internally routed dropper you will know what an advantage this is.

Sadly however, for anyone who races around trails with unknown drops / jumps / corners, that delay may well be too long for you. Sure, its just .5 seconds, but it can and will catch you out at some point. I'm not super quick, but for me it did require more planning, just at the point on the trail when you looking down a drop. That's not the time you want to be factoring in any delay. .5 seconds can actually be quite a few meters out on the trail.
  • + 1
 What cost? its basically the same cost of a reverb and I can move one post between all my bikes in theory quite easily. Sounds like a sweet deal.
  • + 2
 When will a dropper post drop by itself? How bout we focus on that concept first!!!!!!
  • + 3
 Seems like a solution looking for a problem.
  • + 6
 I personaly think this is a solution to some problems:
People who cannot fit a Dropper but do want to try/have one.
  • + 2
 modern solutions require modern problems
  • + 0
 @wittereus: yeah this looks awesome for a minority of people who regularly swap posts among bikes. For most riders its utterly pointless.
And the lack of service information and parts is troubling.
  • + 2
 Having spent time fishing around routing dropper cables, I think this concept makes a ton of sense. Appears the technology is not quite there yet however. As soon as someone makes a full length (170+) electric dropper that works as well as a Bikeyoke, I will buy it.
  • + 1
 @DriverB: totally agree!
  • + 1
 This newer Mk2 version of the post came out over a year ago, when I saw the review thought is was a further development with better remote....
  • + 1
 A rubber cover for protecting the electronics- really? Come on give us a totally waterproof solution- A screw cap with an o'ring is what is needed to be properly sealed.
  • + 2
 Totally agree. I have had this post (actually three - the original, plus two warranty replacements) for around three years and the design of this "dust cap" is not only very fiddly, but completely ineffectual at sealing the unit. The reason for the failure of my two posts was apparently due to water ingress in this area; I actually had an accompanying letter with my second replacement, heavily implying that I was power washing the bike (I think living in Scotland is the problem). Having now strapped on a rear Mudhugger the most recent post is behaving itself, but I don't think I would rush out to buy another.

That said, the mechanical operation of the post has been very smooth and sturdy, and Magura's customer service has been hassle free (apparent incredulity at the potential for their design to admit water aside...). I'm mostly just disappointed that with this new update, they haven't thought to improve on some major design weak points - sealing of electronic parts and the admittedly naff remote.
  • + 1
 My first thought when i saw the charging cover as well.
  • + 0
 @Sreyno: I've never had the water in the electronics problem, but I stay off wet trails to prevent damage, which is a climate-dependent condition you don't have. Have you considered doing an over-wrap with 3M water-sealing electrical mastic tape? It's way cheap. I use it for many purposes including rub-spot protection, bottom bracket/downtube rock guards, and chain slap protection.
  • + 1
 @Geochemistry: That's a good idea, but I think that non hermetically sealed battery placement in the area of a bike that is absolutely prone to dirt and water penetration shows poor design. If this wasn't thought out, what else wasn't.
A $500 dropper better make me coffee in the morning as well.
  • + 1
 @Geochemistry: It's not a bad idea, but I imagine taping it up would get tiresome when you have to access it periodically for charging. It just shouldn't ever have been an issue.

An opportunity to address the problem has been missed. Unfortunately, for me, it's the fatal flaw in an otherwise well made component.
  • + 2
 At least Seth's bike hacks likes it, even tho he most likely he got it for free to "try out".
  • - 1
 maybe once all of my gears and suspension are already connected to a battery this might seem logical but until that integrated system exists (not far off - SRAM+Fox), this is going to fall by the wayside as an expensive gimmick
  • + 1
 5 years ago it could be great to show off with your design and technology but now 500$ for wifi which is not really necessary. Good luck with sales.
  • + 2
 Proof there is a system lamer than hydraulic.
  • + 3
 Love mines. No cables and I can switch from bike to bike. And No cables. Perfect for my bar spins.
  • + 1
 Cool but with my luck, some hacker will activate mine on some steep gnar to launch me over the bars.
  • + 1
 Why would anyone buy this post instead of a BikeYoke Revive?...for an ugly and cumbersome lever?
  • + 1
 It's crazy that they're still so far off the mark the second time around...
  • + 0
 @sam264 exactly... Its like is it even an improvement really!
  • + 1
 400 cycles = 1 month riding?! I probably adjust my seatpost 75-100 times on a 2 hr ride. At that rate I'll get about a week.
  • + 1
 150mm one of these for $650 CAD or 170MM Brand X for $170 CAD.
Not really a tough choice.
  • + 1
 Fantastic post to lend customers while theirs is being serviced. Well done. Makes customers happy
  • + 2
 please stop
  • + 0
 What frame is that on?? The front end looks like cast aluminum bolted together in the video screenshot.
  • + 2
 Pole Machine
  • + 1
 bikemaceutic industry is insaneeeee
  • + 1
 gif comments required:

"But why?"
  • + 1
 Dropper? What's a dropper? GET OFF MY LAWN!
  • + 1
 If your into that sorta thing?
  • + 1
 What no app so I can control it with my phone?
  • + 1
 Maybe good for a road bike or gravel bike if they made a 27.2?
  • + 1
 Had one, Delay was enough to drive me nuts!
  • - 1
 Whats the point putting electric bullshit on device known as steam, coal, electricity, or nuclear power independent? Its like putting washing machine into steam locomotive
  • + 1
 fixing problems we dont have, by making new problems we dont need.
  • - 2
 If I can access the internet and sat nav from my phone in the woods, why can they not invent a dropper that is instantaneous and goes DOWN without having to put my but on it. That would be the shit...
  • + 0
 The charging port and on / off switch are hidden behind a rubber cover. that leaks dirt
  • + 2
 I noticed that. I also wondered why they didn't position the port box in the FRONT of the seat post to keep the crud out. I also wonder if you could just spin it around and remount the seat.
  • + 1
 Not in my experience. Do you have one, or is this just conjecture?
  • + 1
 @Geochemistry: its in one of the photo provided in the article Wink
  • + 1
 BikeYoke Revive wins!
  • + 1
 Plasticy ha ha
  • + 0
 There is no need for this product in the market.
  • + 3
 I disagree. Let's let the invisible hand decide.
  • - 1
 No 170mm option so it's already a no buy from me! Loving the 170 one up components post!
  • + 1
 RIP cables!
  • + 0
 What happened to SWOBO?
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