Review: Marzocchi's New Bomber Z2 Fork is Impressive & Affordable

Sep 17, 2019
by Richard Cunningham  
Marzocchi Bomber Z2 fork 2020


Marzocchi's new Bomber Z2 fork is a welcome development for a number of reasons. Fox's acquisition of Marzocchi and the storied brand's return to the marketplace generated much anticipation. Depending upon where your allegiance fell, there were questions to be answered. Would future products from the Italian brand simply become rebranded Fox production, downgraded to hit key price points, or would the Marzocchi team produce stand-alone performance suspension that spoke to riders who may not resonate with the Fox brand? The Z2's answer is,"Yes."

Admittedly, the Bomber Z1 which announced Marzocchi's comeback last year was essentially a doppelganger of the Float 36 with Fox's GRIP damper, thicker 6000-series aluminum stanchions, the trademark Marzocchi fork crown, and with fewer adjustments.

Marzocchi's Sean Estes defends the decision to essentially rebrand the 36, saying that Marzocchi needed a strong product to help re-launch the brand, and it bought the design team the time they needed to develop unique damping and technologies that spoke to the brand's loyal fans. "The Z2," said Estes, "was the team's first beginning-to-end fork design," and he hinted that its new semi-open-bath Rail damper would be proof enough that it was an authentic Marzocchi fork.
Bomber Z2 Details

• Intended use: aggressive trail
• Air sprung, Rail semi-open-bath damper
• 34mm 6000-series aluminum stanchions
• Travel: 100, 120, 130, 140, 150mm
• Offset: 44 or 51mm
• External adjustments: rebound, low-speed compression
• Internal adjustments: air volume spacers, travel
• Weight (150mm, 29"): 2000 grams
• Colors: gloss red, matte black
• MSRP: $499 USD
Marzocchi

Marzocchi Bomber Z2 2020


Meet the Bomber Z2

The new Bomber Z2 is positioned as an aggressive trail rider's fork. Marzocchi's design team took full advantage of Fox's industry standard for reliability, using the seals, bushings and chassis technology of the Float 34. From there, however, they took a turn from their parent company, weeding out over-complicated damping and adjustment features that could be replaced with simpler, more robust and user-friendly options. The idea was to both modernize and maximize the Z2's performance, and deliver it at a more realistic MSRP than today's super-forks are asking.

Your fancy fork may have five dials, each with 20 clicks, but 19 of them are going to be wrong. The Z2's "less is more" design strategy distills the body of knowledge suspension experts have learned from the recent enduro/all-mountain epoch, then hard-wires those improvements into the fork's internals. Fewer parts, spot-on damping, and simplified adjustments that provide clear feedback are Marzocchi's formula for success. That, and the Bomber Z2's refreshing, $499 USD sticker price are poised to shake up the performance suspension marketplace.

Thicker fork legs: In part, to reduce the expense of the Z2, Marzocchi uses thicker walled 6000 series alloy stanchion tubes. The damper side needed to be a bit thicker walled because the Rail damper actually operates on its inside diameter. Reportedly, the Z2 fork, while slightly heavier than the Fox 34, is also stiffer. No Kashima either. Bombers use a black anodized surface treatment that traps lubricant.

Marzocchi Bomber Z2 2020
The Bomber Z2 forks share Fox's air volume spacers and the Rhythm 34's air piston assembly. Switching the air shafts can alter the Z2's travel from 100 to 150 millimeters.

Adjustable travel: Here's where sharing components makes sense - the Z2 shares the same air piston assembly as the Fox 34 Rhythm fork. Customers can change their fork travel from 100m, 120, 130 140 or 150 millimeters by changing to a different length air-spring shaft that is readily available through Fox and its retail outlets. Inside the Z2, the standard damper and stanchion tubes will extend to the maximum 150-millimeter-travel option without modification.

Marzocchi Bomber Z2 2020
Rebound adjust dial is large and authoritative. Use a 4mm Allen hex to adjust the engagement of the Z2's 15mm QR axle.
Marzocchi Bomber Z2 2020
The Rail damper's compression dial offers a useful range of tuning options. There are no indexing clicks - similar to the original.

Rail damper: Instead of sliding a separate damping cartridge into the right fork leg, Marzocchi configured the Rail damper to operate inside the stanchion tube. That reduces the parts and weight, while increasing the volume of fluid inside the damper. The Z2's damper has no bladder or pressurized compensating piston to separate the oil from mixing with air inside the fork. Admittedly, there will be some emulsion (air bubbles mixing with the oil), but Marzocchi suspension engineers say that the length of the stanchion tube and the location of the rebound damper at the bottom of the oil column allows the most important function of the damping system to operate in fluid that has released most or all of its bubbles.

As mentioned, the Bomber Z2 has the basic damping and air spring adjustments: low-speed rebound below the right slider, a "Sweep" low-speed compression dial up top/ remove the air cap on the left side of the crown and the Z2 accepts standard Fox air volume adjustment spacers.

bigquotesThat's where the efficiency of partnering with Fox pays off. We use the same A-grade components everywhere on the Z2. The efficiency is that we designed the fork so we can use less of them.Sean Estes

A-grade seals and bushings: Most, if not all of the Z2's remarkable performance value can be attributed to reducing the parts count or using new knowledge to simplify older, more complicated designs. "Marzocchi riders will want to bolt this fork onto their bikes and shred without a thought about periodic maintenance," says Estes. "To achieve that kind of reliability, we knew we had to use the best quality seals and sliding parts. That's where the efficiency of partnering with Fox pays off. We use the same A-grade components everywhere on the Z2. The efficiency is that we designed the fork so we can use less of them."

New axle adjustment: Marzocchi redesigned the adjustable quick release through axle from Fox's splined clocking mechanism, to a simpler and lighter weight threaded adjustment. The axle threads into a fixed steel insert. The angle and tension of the through-axle's quick release lever is tuned with a 4-millimeter Allen key from the right side of the axle.

Two offsets: While the crown, stanchions and steerer are the same between 29 and 27.5 inch wheel forks in all travel lengths, the magnesium lowers are not. 29-inch sliders offer either 44 or 51-
Marzocchi Bomber Z2 2020
millimeter offsets, while 27.5-inch wheel sliders only have the 44-millimeter option. Interesting note: our 29-inch fork's sliders were labeled 29/27.5 Plus, which suggests that there's generous tire clearance built in to the Z2 fork.


Riding the Bomber Z2

From the first roll-out, I knew the Z2 was going to deliver a special ride. Pressurized at 77 psi, which was on the high side for my weight, the Marzocchi damper was a measure smoother off the beginning of its stroke than any fork at its pay grade, and better than most forks costing hundreds more. I say this because it was my first thought - and I had only made ballpark adjustments to the air spring and low-speed damping dials.

I rode the 29" Bomber Z2 originally in the 140mm travel setting without any air-volume spacers, which produced a ride quality that was supple up to the mid stroke, with a gradual ramp up in the air spring. With the compression dial backed off completely, I could bottom the fork landing to flat and impacting moderate rock drops. Bottom-outs were never harsh and both control and front wheel traction were enhanced compared to the same tire and bike set up with a RockShox Revelation fork at similar travel.

Adding a quarter turn of low-speed compression brought the ride height of the Z2 up and reduced the number of full-travel events without diminishing the fork's velvety feel over smaller roots and trail chatter, but when I started smashing rock gardens, I found the need for more support up front. I added one Fox air volume spacer, which handily solved the issue. With the low-speed rebound somewhere in the first third of its range, the O-ring indicating 20-percent sag and the Rail damper's compression dial rotated slightly less than a quarter turn, I found the fork's sweet spot: sensitive off the beginning of the stroke, ample support for pedaling and corners, and with enough oomph left in the end-stroke to cover my mistakes at higher speeds.

Later, I switched to the 150mm air shaft that Marzocchi provided me - which added a spoonful of sugar to an already awesome performing fork with no further adjustments.

One concern I had after learning that the Rail damper had no volume compensation device to isolate air from the damping fluid was that the fork would fade dramatically after a long pull down a rocky descent. I gave the Z2 the chance to fail on a 9-mile local descent which features prolonged boulder fields. I emerged at the bottom end with a fully functional fork. If it did fade, I didn't notice - the Marzocchi had enough performance left in the bank to keep the rubber side down and my confidence in the green.

While on the subject of bashing rocks, I found the Z2's chassis was much stiffer than expected. Admittedly, Fox's 34 chassis is also underrated by '36 devotees for its rigidity and steering precision. Marzocchi's 34-millimeter Z2, raises that bar, probably by another ten percent, with pinpoint steering accuracy in situations where I was using most or all of the fork's travel to find a line down the rocks.


Technical Notes

Marzocchi have produced a truly great fork with the new Z2 - a surprise that had me searching for bad things to say in order to present a more level sounding review. One nick is that the brake caliper post mounts are dedicated to 160-millimeter brake rotors. I think the last time I saw one of those was on the back of a 26-inch wheel Trek Fuel. Nowadays, 180 rotors are the smallest I'd suggest for a 29-inch wheel trail bike and considering their target audience, Marzocchi should make this a running change.
Marzocchi Bomber Z2 2020

Good call on the new axle design. Dialing in the splined Fox axle system is not a huge deal, but it can become a guessing game. Marzocchi's Allen key adjustment should (and probably will) begin to appear on Fox products in the not too distant future.


Pros

+ Remarkable damping performance, top to bottom
+ Stiff chassis for a 34mm fork
+ Excellent performance value


Cons

- Dedicated to the disappearing 160mm front brake rotor
- Knob twisters may not accept its minimalist adjustment options



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesTwo opposing camps will probably weigh in on Marzocchi's call to abandon external end-stroke and high-speed damping adjustments in the interest of economy and simplicity. Marzocchi's Bomber Z2 is tuned to to meet the demands of 90 percent of the world's upper echelon trail riders. Most of the remaining ten percent get their suspension and tuning for free. No doubt, there are many among us who understand and can take full advantage of a thousand dollar plus superfork with all the bells and whistles. I'm one of them, but Marzocchi just proved that I don't have to. The $499 Bomber Z2 is going to make a lot of trail riders happy.RC








,


185 Comments

  • 103 3
 But will it make the trademark marz sucky noises when you bounce it up and down? This review (for me) does not answer the big questions
  • 63 1
 The upside-down brake adapter is a start?
  • 2 1
 @Apfelsauce: good catch.
  • 12 1
 @Apfelsauce: Haha what's with PB reviewers and putting braking components on backwards? The rotor pictured in the Trickstuff Maxima review was on backwards as well Big Grin
  • 45 16
 Sorry. Can't trust a reviewer who uses guide brakes
  • 3 0
 the rockshox sector 150 that comes with lapierre zesty does all those noises... so glad to hear them!
  • 2 0
 @Apfelsauce: good eye, also missing the correct conical washers under the head of the bolts
  • 2 0
 @Apfelsauce: That fork is unstoppable!
  • 2 0
 @OTBSteve: i thought Sram ditched those a while ago
  • 2 3
 Guide brakes are fricken awesome when they maintained properly. The power and especially the modulation make them personal favs.

Obviously the recall levers and the need to bleed more frequently (god it takes forever to de-gas and get all the bubbles out) make them a little annoying but when working they are awesome! @makripper:
  • 2 1
 @Stampers: lol what? Even after a fresh bleed they fade over sustained steep downs. I've had 4 pairs and all do the same thing. Mediocre at best
  • 1 0
 @tkrug: Those go under the caliper, and are mostly no longer needed (CPS). The ones I am talking about go above the caliper below the bolt heads.
  • 67 0
 Open bath damping makes servicing at home piss easy.
  • 9 4
 And in the UK where the standard trail conditions may aswell be dish water, that's a good thing ????
  • 31 2
 Pinkbike needs to get sorted with the emoji thing XD
  • 10 0
 this! it says semi-open tho, really wanna read about that, and also oil volumes and service intervals. Make Marzocchi great again!
  • 48 1
 @mtb-scotland - Don't use piss, it doesn't have good damping properties.
  • 25 0
 @bigtim: You must drink the oil first
  • 14 1
 @thomaspearson: It almost certainly not be as bad as you believe it is, depends on the design though but I'd say its the same as some other modern forks. I'm 100% sure this open bath design does not look anything like old Marzocchis, which literally had legs filled with oil, simply because I don't believe they would be able to make fork with competitive weight using that design. So in reallity the damper is likely placed inside the stanchion and is connected with lowers using a piston rod, basically design is similar to old RS motion control damper, manitou and possibly others that I'm not familiar with... So if you ride through mud, water/contamination might get past the wipers and contaminate the stancions lubricant (as would with any other fork), but there is at least another seal between the damper fluid so it does not really change anything. I'd just like to add that I'm really happy with the Marzocchi being back with some actual development, not only as budget fox
  • 8 1
 It's not open bath, the stanctions act as the oil reservoir/damper cartridge. I'm not sure that's an improvement over FOX's basic grip damper, but I'd like to hear a competent opinion from a suspension guy.
  • 3 1
 @winko: yeah the new damper sounds exactly like Motion Control. There's basically no way for anything to work its way through the shaft-to-stanchion seal inside the lower legs. I never found any contamination in the few times I bothered to service my MoCo damper.

I'd like to see a review of RockShox's new 35 Gold, looks like it's pretty much the same features/design concept (except 35mm stanchions) at the same price point. My wife has one on her bike and it feels very smooth, can't vouch for its actual on-trail performance though.
  • 1 2
 @winko: I have an old RST Titan 130mm with open bath. It's basically the damping shaft inside the stanchion with lots of oil. There is a lockring at the bottom of the stanchion to retain the things. All the damping things are using the stanchion as a tube.
What I imagine as semi-open is a system just like this, but with inside another tube that is inside the stanchion, while closed system is on another level of engeneering of a tube inside the stanchion, but with less possiblities to open and service it yourself.
  • 1 0
 @ORTOGONAL555: Grip damper got so much price because of the dampening properties, they could no longer afford people buying the marzzochi over a fox 36.
  • 5 0
 @Notmeatall: open bath dampers use the same oil for lubrication and damping purposes. This is a semi bath. Closed systems use a sealed cartridge, like the charger damper or older fox fit damper
  • 5 0
 @ismasan: I'm guessing it works like Manitou's damper. The damper contains air and the oil can slosh around (open bath), but it is contained within the upper stanchion so that the damping oil in the upper stanchion and the lube oil in the lower stanchion remain separate.
  • 3 0
 I ment semi. Has the same damping type as my mattocs @ORTOGONAL555:
  • 2 0
 So does the bleed damper on the grip and grip2dampers, if you change you lower oil remotely regularly you never have to get into the damper
  • 2 0
 Does anyone know the difference between this and the Rhythm's open bath design?
  • 5 0
 @winko: Yes, the older Marzocchi dampers had oil in the entire damper side's lower leg. The new system has all the oil contained inside the fork stanchion.
  • 5 0
 @dthomp325: the Mattoc does use a foam compensator for the air.
  • 2 0
 @dthomp325:
Again that is SEMI-OPEN. A full open bath system has the oil contained within the stanchion and lower leg. As far as I know we haven't seen a fork like that in a long time. They tend to work well for a long old time, problem is they're heavy and if your stanchion seals are compromised you're going to have a bad time
  • 3 0
 @sam264: Some FOX forks as recently as 2013 used a full open-bath damper design. The R and RL o/b damper cartirdges called for 160cc or so in the lowers on the damper side.
  • 58 0
 A $499 well-performing trail fork is reviewed and 99% of the commentators are bagging on it?? I don't get it. This sounds like a perfect fork for young riders with no cash and for our friends who are just getting into the sport.
  • 41 2
 99% of riders wouldn't notice the difference between this fork and a Fox 34 in a blind test. This one might come out on top.
  • 3 0
 preach
  • 7 0
 @chriskneeland: I would go further that many wouldn't notice between this fork and a fork made from bits of old rebar
  • 3 0
 @chriskneeland: I agree. Its a sensible price too! What is not to like.
I have no idea how many of us have a 9 mile descent to test on. I wish we had them in the UK that were bike friendly and not walking routes.
  • 1 0
 @chriskneeland:
Do you count yourself in this 99%? Just curious. Whenever a new budget fork comes out I hear this XX% couldn't tell the difference type line, and I wonder if it's true and where the author sees themselves within that population.
  • 2 0
 @boydasilva: my thought would be. If this person did a 9 mile descent with out stopping. They are fit. Where I ride doesn't have that drop. The money saved would be a positive. I have a 34 factory. So I would like to try it. I wouldn't complain about the lack of adjust ment. I only move a few clicks for weather and conditions anyway.
  • 30 5
 I am wondering by when Fox will hear us and give us Marzocchis with coil springs. A Mazocchi with air spring just seems wrong.
  • 8 0
 The only thing that I wanted to see was a coil option from them...
  • 4 0
 Marzocchi had lots of air chambers. My old MXComp had air springs in both legs. A friend had another fork with three air chambers. Positive, negative and the third one was a bottom out spring, if I recall correctly.

What would be nice is to see parallel air and coil spring again, like I have in my Dirtjumper fork. The coil spring is good enough for the lightest riders, you could add air if you need a stiffer spring. And you could always reduce the volume of the air spring (using oil at the time, now they have these huckpucks) to make it more progressive near bottom out.
  • 1 0
 I guess they were doing it wrong for a decade then?
  • 3 0
 @me2menow: No, they always had coil springs too. Air springs are more economical, would be silly to not make these. But the top end forks had titanium springs until the very end (or well, until they became part of Fox). The Pinkbike editors act like we now have some kind of coil sprung forks revival with Cane Creek and MRP offering these, but that's nonsense. Coil sprung has never been away. It just wasn't economical at the lower end market simply because coil springs are expensive. I've got a 2007 Magura Odur fork which was coil sprung and the lowest end fork of that model year. They eventually had to discontinue it because people were willing to pay more for the lighter and air sprung equivalent (the Menja) than for this fork. Plus of course they had to stock six different springs (two fork travels, three spring gauges), a heavier compression damper, different push rods, preload spacers... So we won't be seeing them at the lowest end of the market anymore. But they've never been away at the top end.

As for Marzocchi now, it depends on where Fox wants to position them. If they get to compete at the top end, we'll be seeing titanium coil sprung Marzocchi forks again.
  • 3 0
 I was thinking of the same thing. I used to have Fox Vanillas and loved em! It was sad when they discontinued them..
  • 1 0
 which fork would you want that in?
  • 3 0
 @jewpowered: For sure in a Z1, but I would not mind a coil-sprung Z2 either.
  • 2 0
 It's their budget line and I highly doubt their target market wants to spend extra $$ and time swapping springs.
  • 2 1
 @dthomp325: The target market is the people who've been running Zocchis fifteen, twenty years ago because of their reliability and relative affordability and now want a Marzocchi again because of the emotional value and the perceived improved performance that the coil spring will give you. This piece of the market got fifteen, twenty years older and now has the money and doesn't mind the increased costs of springs.

It will actually be Fox who doesn't want Marzocchi equipped athletes beat Fox equipped racers at WC events. So that may be their incentive to keep Marzocchi at the budget end of it. But I'm pretty sure if Marzocchi comes with a titanium coil sprung fork, semi-open bath damping and all that, they will go like hot cakes even if the prices are on par with top end Fox forks.
  • 1 0
 @dthomp325: spring with air-preload?
  • 20 6
 Marzocchi always had a lot of bang for the buck ... looks like that is not going to change.

I enjoy RC's articles He is always fair & it is nice to have him here at Pinkbike. Many of the other contributors could not find their ass with both hands.
  • 15 2
 Could the 160 rotor mount be intended for jump/street riders who'll drop the travel to 100mm as well
  • 35 1
 Who's riding Street on a 29?
  • 5 0
 @kiddlivid: There's a 650B version as well and that would work for street.
  • 18 1
 @kiddlivid: I'm 6'5"... I'd ride bmx on a 29er and it would still look small!!
  • 15 1
 please Marz bring back the DJ fork. I dont know of any person who rides a jump bike who is "ok" with laying £600+ on the RS Pike DJ
  • 17 0
 @commentsectiontroll: Just get a Manitou Circus. It's the same only better.
  • 10 0
 @commentsectiontroll: Manitou circus expert?
  • 4 1
 @winko: 3) I have a set of Circus forks, I like them but have to take the front wheel off a lot to get it in and out of my (small) car boot. Constantly messin with 4mm and 6mm allen keys is a PITA! Had a set of Marz 4x forks back in day and loved them
  • 5 0
 @commentsectiontroll: Yeah that sucks, they should just use the one bolt axis from mattoc... I know that DJ scene is not as big as some others but I wonder why TF nobody is able to put up simple robust dj fork in 2020 that does not cost a fortune...
  • 2 0
 it annoys me because the circus almost did! Fingers crossed someone from marz / fox is reading this!! I am pretty sure they would go far on stock jump bike builds like with NS etc
  • 1 0
 @commentsectiontroll: I've still got my Marz Dirt Jumper one fork in the garage. Just waiting for when I want to build up another little hardtail to play on.
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: Username checks out, Tim.
  • 1 0
 @commentsectiontroll: My thougt would be a 650b z2 with 26 wheels.
  • 2 0
 @kiddlivid: also who’s riding a DJ with a front brake?
  • 2 0
 Disc brakes got stronger over the years. So even though 180mm or bigger were the way to go a couple of years ago, I can imagine a strong caliper with a 160mm rotor in the front would be just fine for some.
  • 10 0
 @RichardCunningham can you tell us if the compression piston have some shims that could be changed to adjust HSC ? What about home servicing ? Considering the damping design this would be a massive plus and would make it the prefect Enduro sunday warrior fork.
  • 5 0
 My experience with fork tunes is that they are shimmed for someone who weighs like 160 pounds. I love external high speed adjustments because I weigh well north of 160, so this is a great question. Can stiffer shims be used, or maybe a heavier weight oil for heavier riders?
  • 5 0
 There are drawings of the compression assembly on the Fox website. It's like GRIP, the compression adjuster preloads the whole shim stack so it's adding high and low speed damping.
  • 13 3
 How come Marzocchi, an Italian brand,so European brand, be sold 799€ in it's own territory, yet be sold 499$ in the US ? 499$ being a mere 450€ ... Would you ever f**k off ?!?
  • 7 0
 Because Fox is an American brand
  • 1 0
 Us price doesnt include tax either.
  • 3 0
 Marzocchi isnt Italian anymore
  • 10 3
 Easy to adapt upwards from 160mm rotors. If you're building a bike out of spares, or upgrading an entry level bike then the option to run smaller rotors could let you get a few rides in before you upgrade to 180 or 200. The reverse logic applies to the forks, when they reach end of days they can easily be stuck on a commuter or pub bike with whatever parts are handy
  • 8 7
 Those 160->203 adapters are less than ideal. They need two sets of bolts and you can't check the inner set properly without first removing the whole calliper.

It might not be the end of the world for most people but it is adding an extra point of failure for a system that you REALLY don't want to fail.
  • 25 0
 @JCO: has anyone EVER seen or heard of a properly installed adaptor to fail?
  • 7 4
 @IluvRIDING: Maybe not, but I've definitely heard of people failing to install them properly Wink

Generally, the bolts going into the lowers are finicky because you're screwing into soft magnesium. The threads are surprisingly easy to strip which can cause the whole adapter to loosen over time. Alternatively people undertighten them precisely because they don't want to destroy their fork lowers, which can cause the same problem.

And plenty of people fail to correctly clean and re-apply the locktite when needed.

Regardless, a 160->203 adapter exacerbates the problem by hiding the critical bolts, making it that much harder to spot on a pre-ride check.
  • 6 0
 I see the reverse logic on the brake adapter as well, which is installed backwards. (:
  • 4 4
 @JCO: if you need a 203 that’s the wrong fork for you.
  • 4 1
 @JCO: I dunno why fork makers don't put delicious in the damn lowers in the first place..
  • 4 1
 *helicoils
  • 11 0
 Is Vernon Felton still around? Miss him
  • 7 0
 Think he went to work for specialized or some other frame mfg
  • 7 1
 Would future products from the Italian brand simply become rebranded Fox production, downgraded to hit key price points, or would the Marzocchi team produce stand-alone performance suspension that spoke to riders who may not resonate with the Fox brand? The Z2's answer is,"Yes." - grammar on point !
  • 11 3
 When you say it's a dedicated 160mm brake mount - presumably a post mount adaptor would still do the job?
  • 3 0
 Yes it would, just like we used to 10 years ago when anything but 160pm forks were rare (fox 40 was main exception, that's been 203 for as long as I remember)
  • 3 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: I remember fox 40 being only fork with IS mount while everybody else used PM Smile
  • 1 0
 @winko: wasn't it a 203 is? I remember they had a unique adapter
  • 2 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: Yeah it was kind of unique setup, i think you had to run smallest 160mm is-pm adapter and it would fit 203 rotor.
  • 2 0
 @winko: correct, I still do!
  • 6 1
 Am I reading the last paragraph incorrectly? I read that as 'this fork does not have externally adjusted end stroke high speed compression and rebound'? I can understand trying to describe high and low speed damping adjusters in more simple terms but that's confusing as heck. Dampers are speed sensitive not position sensitive (bar a few dt swiss fork etc), as described by the high and low SPEED adjusters. a high speed compression adjuster has an effect on damping forces at high shaft speeds, hit a bump hard and the fork will compress more quickly. Doesn't matter where in the stroke you hit that bump, the high SPEED adjuster will have no more effect on a high speed impact at the end of the stroke as it will the same bump at the beginning of it's stroke.
  • 5 1
 Yes you are right. I think RS started using beginning and ending stroke terms, just to make thing easier (but not right). Maybe the writers refers to high speed rebound, which would make more sense, since rebound velocity is related to position in the stroke.
  • 6 0
 Sounds good but here in europe (bike24) its about 124€ cheaper than top of the range pike ultimate. I dont think thats enough difference to buy barebones fork
  • 3 0
 Yeah hard to compete against RS here they are heavily discounted always.
  • 2 1
 @vid1998: or is it ? Retail in the US is 499$/450€, retail in France (so in EU) is 699€/770$. For a product that is supposedly Italian ... I was seriously considering this fork but since I saw this it will be a hard pass !
  • 1 0
 @Balgaroth: Ah, forgot to include vat again. Then the difference goes to just 50€ or less. Which is 60% of what Fox factories go for...
  • 5 0
 20 clicks but 19 are wrong... More like 1 of them is just better. Less tuneability doesnt mean the setting you get stuck with is just as good. Still love this pricepoint though.
  • 3 0
 Yes fun writing, but heavier&lighter riders do need usable adjustments
  • 1 0
 And of course this fork has infinite adjustability (no clicks), so an infinite number of positions are "wrong".
  • 8 3
 That's going on my new HT project this spring. Love me some proper Zocchis in the front Smile
  • 15 24
flag qdex888 (Sep 17, 2019 at 0:29) (Below Threshold)
 That's not a Marzocchi anymore. That's a Fox dressed as a big "M"..
  • 7 4
 @qdex888: facepalm and shakes head.
  • 7 3
 @qdex888: did you even read the article or just come straight to the comments to make yourself look foolish? Yes it uses fox Air spring, seals and bushings, but everything else is new for this fork.
  • 17 2
 @thomaspearson: You can paint the picture however you want it, but it is still a basic version of a Fox fork. It has less adjustments, heavier construction, cheaper stanchion coating, shared internals/bits aimed at a lower price point than Fox. There's nothing wrong with that, but call it what it is. It's not a top end Marzocchi of old- it's a value driven, reliable piece of suspension that lives under Fox's top end models.
  • 9 4
 @inked-up-metalhead: It's not really a different fork whatsoever. It's just a cheaper offering with a catchy name. Not saying it doesn't perform well, but Marzocchi as a separate brand is no more.
  • 7 1
 @ORTOGONAL555: so different lowers, axle, uppers, damper and name is the same fork? Again, air spring, bushings and seals being shared doesn't make it the same fork. If it was like the z1 then fair enough, that was a cheaper 36 with a different lower casting, that I'll agree its the same fork, but when this has a completely different structure and damper (meaning it'll feel completely different) it's really not the same.
  • 2 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: Agreed, it is not the same fork, but Marz is still being kept as a budget suspension line, what I want to see a Marz that is designed from the ground up to compete with the Lyrik and 36
  • 4 1
 @SonofBovril: was marzocchi really anything else though? Yes the last forks they made did compete, the 380 was pretty damn good, and in their heyday the legions of devout freeriders swore by the bomber ethos, but the only reason anyone I know would ever consider it over fox or rs was price, marzo units have always been cheaper for the equivalent item. Not saying its a bad thing at all, there's a lot to be said for solid mid level components that work well for years, I've spent most of my riding life on that exact category of parts, but writing it off as a budget fox is doing it a disservice, the semi open bath damper should be better for riders who don't regularly get stuff serviced, the stouter chassis should be more durable etc. If all that is because its more budget oriented then it's great it's being kept cheaper, why do we need another company competing with fox and rs? There's already cane creek, mrp, dt Swiss, dvo, formula and others that sell forks claiming to be the same level of performance, and others like trust and intend offering uniqueness for a high price, there's only really been manitou with the circus and mattock that have truly made a dent at a more budget focused level.
  • 3 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: It's not the exact same fork, of course. What I meant was that it's still a cheaper fox fork. It's like Marzocchi was a different model series in the Fox catalog. The original poster stated that he wanted a proper Marzocchi fork, which this is not. I hope I explained myself better this time.
  • 11 2
 @inked-up-metalhead: yes, it's a complete joke that people are acting all pissed about "the marzocchi of old", as if anyone would actually go out and buy a heavy, open bath, coil sprung trail fork in 2019. They made what appears to be a great fork here, so what if they used a few Fox parts?

Marzocchi is a budget-oriented brand, get over it. The industry does not need another RS/Fox competitor for the already crowded top-of-the-line/most-adjustments market segment. It needs more options in the Manitou / Suntour / X-Fusion segment - solid options for riders on a budget.
  • 4 1
 @ORTOGONAL555: it's a proper marzocchi in the fact it's simpler, cheaper, more reliable, plush as shit and it's got the m brace. What even is a 'proper' marzocchi in your opinion if its not what I've just stated? Made in Italy? If so you're 10 years late.
  • 3 0
 @bkm303: True, the high end is pretty well covered already, with Fox, RS, Cane Creek, DVO, Öhlins, MRP and Formula all looking for a piece of the cake.
  • 1 2
 @inked-up-metalhead: the OP talked about a "proper marzocchi".
  • 3 1
 @inked-up-metalhead: just to clarify, I'm not stating this is a bad fork. What I don't undestand is how people get sio hyped for new Marzocchi suspensions while theese are just cheaper Fox. But Who cares really, it's always good to have more options on the market. We just need to be careful with how marketing managers label the stuff they sell.
  • 3 1
 @ORTOGONAL555: right I'm pretty sure you're either trolling or stupid? How many times, just because fox own marzocchi, and they use a few parts from their parent company, doesn't mean it's a fox. And yes I know the op said proper marzocchi, I'm stating it is a proper marzo, how is it not? You've still not answered that, your just regurgitating the same 'it's a cheap fox' line over and over. Either come back with something of substance or accept you're wrong.
  • 1 0
 @ORTOGONAL555: maybe are hyped because it’s a good fork for $500. Period.
  • 1 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: it's ok man, I didn't want to piss anyone off, it was just a friendly discussion over what looks like a good fork. I didn't want to convince you I was right, maybe my wording wasn't the best since I'm not a native english speaker.
  • 1 0
 @ORTOGONAL555: dude, it's cool, it's just you keep saying the same 'it's a cheaper fox' line, which I've stayed why I don't think it is, and I've stated why I think it's a true marzocchi. You didn't come with any counter arguments, you just stated the same line over and over. Last time: it's not a cheaper fox. It's a marzocchi, even though fox own marzocchi. They went away, designed a fork, and (smartly) decided to use their parent companies bushings, seals and air spring. That does not make it a fox. You said a few times 'the op said true marzocchi' what is a true marzocchi to you? You've still not clarified.
  • 4 2
 Zokes were famous for smooth buttery coil and oil suspension forks that you could absolutely beat the piss out of. This is not a true Marzocchi. It may indeed be a good fork even a great feeling fork. But it’s still a stripped down modified Fox.
  • 2 0
 A 2002 Monster T was my absolute favorite feeling fork in the history of forks. Smooth was too rough of a word to describe it... Silky is better. Even the 888/66RC was a smooth platform with a slight weight penalty. But I agree, coil springs and lots of oil made the old 'Zokes ride amazingly. Whether or not today's market would buy into that is an interesting question...
  • 1 0
 @pnwpedal:
i got one mofo !!!
  • 2 0
 @pnwpedal: I have an Avy open bath damper and coil spring in my Pike. It's heavy but it feels way better than any of the new forks I've ridden. Have we moved backwards in fork technology?
  • 1 0
 @fpmd: Id say no. I picked up a Mattoc Pro 2 and love it. I had Monsters, Z1fr, 55cr... Mattoc is super plush w/o bottoming out. First fork I can run at 30% and still hit all my bigger lines.
  • 2 0
 More oil, stiffer lowers, simple damper, a simple one piece axle with pinch bolts would be nice.
Give me reliability ditch the fancy crap and you have a fork for a crusty old codger like me.
Half the cost of most forks in this category. Nice.
Would love to see a pic of the damper . Does it use ports with needle valves or shims?
  • 2 0
 What I'm reading is Marzocchi is back... In spirit. With some heavily Neutered fork offerings.
Nothing like the old stuff. I have 2 x 350NCR's which are just amazing forks. Now a few years on we have basically a budget 36 and a budget 34 with a basic emulsion damping. The "all new Rail damper" sounds like a MoCo design, which used to SUCK.! No compensator in the damper.
And DON'T make that suggesion about the brake mounts. There are still people that run 160mm front rotors. This is actually more versatile. It's not that hard to just fit an adapter
  • 2 0
 Every time I read about stiffness bar being raised, quote, probably by another ten percent I just can't help but smell bs spirit. Was it same trail, same day, same rider, same setup kind of shoot-out test? If answer to any of these is no, how any credible judgements are supposed to be made?
  • 5 0
 "Aggressive trail" ...is this the new downcountry?
  • 2 0
 In this earlier article they said there would also be a 37mm offset:

www.pinkbike.com/news/marzocchis-z2-bomber-returns.html

Did they drop that? Would have been the perfect 26" wheel specific fork again.
  • 1 0
 So I just watched Sam Pilgrim's video of putting a Z1 on his DJ. Its a 27.5 fork lowered to 80mm to get the comparable height using the smaller 26" wheel. I don't see that as an option for any of these forks, am I just missing it? There seem to be plenty of people riding 26" DJ bikes with Bombers on them, its seems like Marzocchi would make that an option.
  • 1 0
 I’d love to see that happen
  • 2 0
 I wonder if 29+ would clear. Looks like it might, would be a great option for my hardtail. I'm having trouble figuring out if any local shops might have one I can see in person, Fox Factory is the only listed distributor.
  • 2 0
 Didn't fox use some marzocchi damping tech to design the Grip damper?

Anyway, Marzocchi still lives on in my garage. Just finished doing a full service on a '10 888 RC3 ti Evo. Next on the work stand is a 1998 Z2!
  • 1 0
 I would love to see a comparison of this Z2 to the DVO Beryl. I got my Beryl two months ago on sale and it is amazing. Stiff, responsive, simplified like the Z2, but it rides like butter. It is more aggressive with a range of 150-170mm. Huge upgrade from the RockShox Sektor Gold I had before.
  • 5 5
 Why not get Fox Rhythm GRIP instead? Better, sealed damper, same chasis and take offs go for like 200-250 euros/dollars, half of what Fox asks for this one.

Rhythm chasis is beefier than regular 34, as it's "ebike compatible" if you want more stiffness over regular 34.
  • 7 0
 because the rhythm forks are now OEM-only
  • 5 0
 (said as a proud owner of a takeoff rhythm 34 that works great!)
  • 2 2
 Same chassis on the rhythm to z2, same air spring, new damper
  • 1 0
 Hey Marzocchi or any retailers where can I buy this in 29 140 in the gloss red color??? Everywhere only shows the black not even an option on Marzocchi website. Need a new fork now and want this.
  • 3 0
 I've been ridding my Z2 for a month now and I can tell it is a fantastic and simple fork.
  • 4 3
 So it's not an old marzocchi, which is a good thing. It also uses fox parts, which is a good thing. Finally, you get a renamed GRIP damper on a $500 fork which is... A good thing!
  • 2 0
 I love love LOVE it!!!!! As a guy who rides often and is hard on equipment, this new influx of affordable, durable, functional products is amazing!
  • 2 0
 100mm seems tempting for the dirt jump bike, miss simple old Marzocchi forks.
  • 3 0
 "Whoa... are those BAWHMERS?!?"
  • 1 0
 Marzocchi should bring back their chrome finish on the lowers, like they had on their old Z1. I would buy directly just for the looks.
  • 1 1
 They should also bring back single crown inverted shiver
  • 1 2
 I doubt you can simply change the air spring to vary the travel between 100 and 150mm without the need for a damper switch at some point through that travel range. The Rhythm 34, for example, has two damper assembly part codes for the 29" fork: one for 100-120mm air springs and the other for 130-150mm. I could be wrong, perhaps the RAIL damper is superior in this regard.
  • 3 0
 I believe that is exactly what they were saying, that you don't need to change the damper when changing the travel.
  • 1 0
 Unless the damper has some specific position-dependent features in it (it sounds just like RS motion control, so probably not) there's no reason you'd need different dampers for different travel ranges. As long as they provide a reasonable adjustment range there's no reason you couldn't use the same damper.
  • 2 0
 Love my Bomber 55R— 160mm of coil goodness! If only I still had the Stinky SIx that the fork came with Smile
  • 1 0
 wish they'd make a new DJ1 or even 4x, i loved the old days when they were WAY cheaper than the alternatives but were still dependable.
  • 4 2
 Stopped reading at air spring.
  • 2 0
 I miss my Bomber......."20 clicks and 19 of them wrong."
  • 1 0
 Hopefully this will start appearing on OE bikes, bringing prices down quite a bit.
  • 1 0
 It's already on the Giant Trance 29 3
  • 1 0
 @PhillipJ: And the base Orbea Occam
  • 1 0
 And the Marin Rift Zone 3.
  • 1 0
 no 1.8" tapered steerer = fail.




i'm joking....just in case the industry doesn't get that.
  • 1 0
 I don’t know, 160.021mm disk, not 36mm and no option for 15/20mm and it’s too light not heavy enough.
  • 4 2
 Nice
  • 4 2
 Super nice
  • 1 0
 Has anyone had sound problems or cracks in the z1?
  • 2 0
 $500 nice. Way to go!
  • 1 0
 Sounds like a good, cheap option for shorter travel bikes.
  • 1 0
 What’s with the lack of indexing on the compression adjuster?
  • 1 0
 Yo Fox, tell your bros at Marz we need 20" and 24" forks ferda kids
  • 1 0
 The damper in the stanchion is brilliant
  • 1 0
 These may be the next for that goes on my dj bike in the 100mm option.
  • 1 0
 Hey Bro, A fork for your Ripmo AF!
  • 1 1
 This would be cool for my Sick! Bicycles Sesh....errmm OnOne Ticktick
  • 1 0
 You had me at Bomber
  • 2 3
 Other colors besides that Red?
  • 12 0
 They wouldn't be as fast Wink
  • 2 0
 Detail section....
  • 2 1
 Matt black
  • 1 2
 I need it to be 160 mm + . Anything less I'd kill on my trails.
  • 7 0
 Sooooo the Z1 is for you?
  • 1 0
 @Bflutz625: Opps my bad- didn't realize they were talking the Z2 - I saw Bomber and thought Z1. Had it many moons ago. Super fork. Good call.
  • 5 7
 So, it's basically a fox 34 rythm?
  • 2 3
 different damper and black stancions
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.056069
Mobile Version of Website