Review: MET's New Parachute MCR Convertible Full-Face Helmet

May 29, 2019
by Mike Kazimer  
MET Parachute MCR

MET was ahead of the lightweight full-face game with the original Parachute, although the look of that helmet was polarizing, to say the least. The next generation Parachute skipped the removable chinbar, and staked a claim as the world's lightest full-face helmet. That brings us up to version 3.0, the Parachute MCR. It's gained a few grams, but the removable chinbar feature is back (MCR stands for Magnetic Chinbar Release), and as a whole, the look of the helmet is much more palatable.

To create the removable chinbar, MET worked with Fidlock, the company whose magnetic buckles are becoming increasingly common on mountain bike helmets. The chinbar has two metals posts that slot into the helmet, and the magnets snap together to connect the rest of the chinbar. A plastic tube with serrated ridges adds an extra layer of security to ensure that everything is securely connected.
MET Parachute Details
• Magnetic chinbar release
• MIPS liner
• BOA retention system
• 21 vents
• FidLock magnetic buckle
• Certifications: ASTM F1952-15, EN 1078:2012, CPSC 1203 AS/NZS 2063:2008
• Weight: 833 grams (size M), 461 grams without chinbar
• MSRP: €330
www.met-helmets.com

When it's time to remove the chinbar, a quarter turn of the flip-up dial on each side of the helmet is all it takes to separate the magnets. MET's video that's found below does a good job of demonstrating the process.

The Parachute MCR meets the ASTM DH standards, as well as EN 1078, CPSC 1203, and AS/NZS 2063. In other words, it's passed all of the standards that are currently in place for full-face and half-shell helmets. It's available in sizes S, M, and L, and comes with two different cheek pad thicknesses to fine-tune the fit. There are also six different color options, everything from basic black to fire engine red. My size medium test helmet weighed in at 866 grams in full-face mode, and 461 grams without the chinbar. MSRP: €330.


MET Parachute MCR
MET Parachute MCR

MET Parachute MCR

Features

The removable magnetic chinbar may be the star of the show, but the Parachute MCR has a laundry list of additional features, including more magnets in the Fidlock buckle, which can easily be operated with one hand.

The fit of the helmet is adjusted via a BOA system – the dial on the back is turned one way to tighten things up, or the other way to reduce the tension on the two cords that run around the entire perimeter of the helmet. The visor can be moved upwards to create more room for goggles, and it's constructed of a flexible plastic that's designed to bend during a crash, rather than transfer any unwanted forces to the neck.


MET Parachute MCR
MET Parachute MCR
Magnets connect the chinbar to the half shell portion of the helmet, and the plastic tube helps lock everything into place.


The number of vents a helmet has doesn't automatically correlate to how well it'll keep you cool on a hot day, but if you were curious, the Parachute has 21 vents, counting the ones on the chin bar. There's also internal channeling that's meant to keep air moving over your head before exiting out the back.

There are multiple designs currently on the market that are intended to reduce the amount of rotational force that reaches a rider's head during a crash, everything from gel-filled pads to viscoelastic discs placed strategically throughout a helmet. MET went with a MIPS low-friction liner, which is attached to the helmet's EPS foam with rubber elastomers, and the padding velcroes directly to the liner. The idea is that the outer portion of the helmet should be able to slide or rotate during a crash while the liner and padding stay relatively stationary on a rider's head.




Performance

Installing the Parachute's chinbar is quite simple, especially if you remember to do one side at a time. Simply slot the metal tab into the side of the half shell, and then move the chinbar around until the magnets find each other and snap into place. It's easy to tell if everything is good to go by running your hand over the side of the helmet – the chinbar should be sitting flush with the rest of the shell. Removing the chinbar is almost as simple, but it can be a little tricky to find the latch that needs to be lifted up on each side, especially with gloves on.

I did run into a slight issue when I tried to take off the helmet in full-face mode without loosening the BOA dial first - the retention system will pop out of the tabs used to adjust the height at the back of the head. I tried to remember to loosen it up, but I still forgot every once in a while and was quickly reminded of my forgetfulness by the 'snap' of the retention system popping out of place.


MET Parachute MCR
The visor is designed to flex during an impact, in order to avoid putting any undue strain on a rider's neck.
MET Parachute MCR
The retention system had a tendency to pop out of place if the BOA dial wasn't loosened when removing the helmet in full-face mode.


The overall fit of the helmet was comfortable in both modes, although in the half shell mode the helmet does feel a little top heavy, a sensation I've also experienced with the Bell Super DH helmet, the Parachute's most similar competitor. It never shifted out of place enough to require any adjustments, but it didn't feel as stable and head-hugging in rough terrain as the Specialized Ambush that's currently my go-to half shell. Summer hasn't fully arrived yet in the Pacific Northwest, but I'd put the amount of ventilation in the middle of the pack - it's not as steamy as a Giro Switchblade, but it's also not as airy as the Fox Proframe or TLD Stage.

In full-face mode, the helmet feels more stable, with a nice and wide field of view. The chinbar's position was fairly close to my face, which I wouldn't typically mind, except for one thing – if I didn't pay close attention to the position of the front vent my breath would be deflected directly up into my goggles. This may not be the case for everyone, but it's worth trying one on to see how everything lines up.


MET Parachute MCR
MET photo.

Final Thoughts

Creating a two-in-one helmet is a tricky proposition – it's difficult to make it work perfectly in all scenarios. At this point, I've tried almost all of the convertible helmets on the market, along with a large sampling of the lightweight full-face options out there, and come to the conclusion that I'd rather wear a dedicated full-face if the situation calls for it rather than deal with the extra bulk and complication of a two-in-one design. That's especially true in an enduro race scenario. Even if I have the option, I'm unlikely to disassemble and reassemble a convertible helmet between stages, especially one with a larger chinbar like the MET or a Bell Super DH – if you're not wearing a pack there's no easy way to carry that chinbar around.

I completely understand that for some riders it's a convenient way to avoid the hassle of bringing two helmets on a vacation, but I still haven't found one that doesn't make concessions in some area, whether that's ventilation, weight, or overall fit, a sentiment that includes the Parachute MCR.


MET Parachute MCR
MET photo.


Pros

+ Easy to use removable chinbar
+ Excellent field of view
+ Lots of color choices
Cons

- Retention system can pop out of place when removing helmet in full-face mode
- Chinbar's position may direct breath into goggles
- Expensive



Pinkbike's Take
bigquotes
The chinbar interface is easy to use, the weight and ventilation are all very competitive, and the look is much more appealing than previous versions. MET may not have hit a home run with the new Parachute MCR – there are a few small issues that prevent it from earning that distinction – but, to keep the baseball analogy going, I'd say they've hit at least a solid double. 
Mike Kazimer









99 Comments

  • + 34
 If I'm shuttling or racing I'll wear my dedicated full face, if I'm pedalling/trail riding I'll wear my half shell and both of them together cost less than this. In saying that it does look like one of the better options for removable chin bar helmets. I just can't be arsed putting a chin bar on and off all the time while out riding.
  • + 7
 for me the best protection is the protection you actually wear. I've had a super 2r and two switchblades. The bell was great, but the jaw was big and clunky so i left it at home most of the time. With the Giro its heavier, but the jaw is physically small enough that i can just stuff half of it into my pocket or my pants, then I've got a DH certified lid pretty much every ride i do.
  • - 7
flag thenotoriousmic (May 29, 2019 at 6:34) (Below Threshold)
 Exactly this. You can buy two helmets for this and there’s yet to be a helmet with removable chin bar that doesn’t make you look like the ultimate enduro specific try hard with the chin guard removed.
  • + 9
 @thenotoriousmic: You don't need a chin guard to look like an "ultimate enduro specific try hard", just wearing goggles with a half shell helmet combined with a fanny-pack works perfectly!
  • + 0
 @unrooted: true even if you’ve got a legitimate excuse to be rocking a bum bag and goggles. Still looks like your trying to hard.
  • + 7
 Think it depends on the person and their set-up. I use the Bell Super 3R for riding and racing and just f*cking love the ability to use it as a half shell on the ups and between stages and as a full face for the downs and stage racing. I've gotten both very used to removing and attaching the chinbar as well as very fast at it... it's just become habit for me.

When I get to the top of a climb I always stop to take a breather or even a bite to eat so it's a perfect time to attach the chin bar, same goes when completing a long down section before heading back up... I'll typically take a min or 2 to catch my breath and that's when the chin bar comes off. It's also so well vented that when rides have a a good mix of up and down, but mostly down... I don't mind the chinbar and don't even notice it during those times either.

During races... not having a chin bar on my face when I'm climbing to the next stage is huge. Then once I get to a stage start, again, I'll either need to take a breather and get myself sorted or it's a 5 to 45 min wait to drop in anyway = lots of time for the 10 seconds it takes me to attach the bar. Similarly, at the bottom of a stage, I am typically f*cking gassed and need a min or 2 before heading back up to the next stage = lots of time to take the bar off.

I wear a small-ish pack with a low horizontal bladder that also has back protection, it happens to have a perfect attachment system on the outside of my pack for the chinbar. The attachment is good enough that even if, for whatever reason I'm not riding with the chin bar attached, it's very secure and doesn't move. I easily see for guys that don't use a pack why they'd not want to use this type of helmet.
  • + 3
 @islandforlife: this sounds like Patrick Bateman’s morning routine. Definitely a psycho Wink
  • + 1
 Best when your mate reminds you to put your chinbar before things go downhill.
  • + 0
 @thenotoriousmic: brace yourself for the next chapter. I'm betting on using a freshly-strangled dog's intestines as a tyre insert (stops pincher flats).
  • + 5
 Maybe I am getting old but rocks and trees don't know you are shuttling. I don't get this. I like to tell myself that I can take it easy but in the end the fun gets the best of me.
  • + 1
 Definitely agree. To me, the big plus of the Mk2 Parachute was exactly that it didn’t have a removable chinbar. I know what I’m like, it would be on the kitchen table when I planted my face.

I repeat bought the last model which I think is the nicest thing anyone can say about a helmet, especially when they’ve smashed one up.
  • + 1
 @tref-h: but it does, it would take a lot for me to hallucinate 4 bolts, trust me. It's like a carmakers putting a nitro button on the dashboard and saying you can't use it...
  • + 5
 I have the Bell Super DH convertible, it's saved me from dental work and possibly a fractured jaw. On the climbs I attach my chinbar on my handlebars with a couple Velcro straps, which takes 20seconds to attach. It works extremely well!
  • + 4
 I took a couple photos of it attached to my handlebar. I put a couple piece of 3M tape to prevent the chin-bar from rubbing paint off the handlebar. The thin Velcro straps wrap around the bar when not in use(smooth side against bar).

www.pinkbike.com/u/razzle/album/Chin-bar-attachment
  • + 4
 I have a question for mtb dads; is there some great, light, well vented (maybe even with removable chinbar) full face helmet in size 51? Something suitable for every day
My 2 y.o. already has a proper IXS full face but it's way to heavy for daily use so he is using it only on big pumptracks
  • - 3
 What about the mtb moms?
  • + 4
 wait...what?! 2 y.o.?!
  • + 6
 @JDFF: Yep. What about?
  • + 2
 Got a nice Bell full face helmet last summer in Vallnord. It was the only one I found with three diferentes shells for heach kids size (instead of thicker linning in the smallest sizes). Close to 90€, I dont remember the model right now. Will update late
  • + 4
 Bell Sanction
  • + 3
 @rglasser: Literally 50% of the small kids at the local BMX club wear these. Light but not the best ventilation. My 3 YO grandson is wearing the XS and 6 YO granddaughter the small.

There are only a few lighter(for kids) options that have better venting and they are double the price.

Cannot recommend these helmets more.
  • + 1
 @fabwizard: I was thinking about Sanction and probably will get one for pump tracks but still not superlight and vented enough for every day summer rides. I'm searching for something like Bell Super in kid's size.

My younger kid is becoming faster and faster trying to follow his older brother but he crashes more and more because of it. Also, quality protection is almost impossible to find for kids so small
  • + 1
 @pakleni: Here is a link for a comparison of kid sized helmets

rascalrides.com/full-face-mountain-bike-helmets-kids
  • + 2
 My soon to be 3 year old also wears the IXS Xact for pump track, but a half shell for normal riding. I looked at the lighter options, such as the Cratoni and Kiddimoto ones, but didn’t like the lack of rear coverage.
  • + 2
 My daughters have Bell Super 3Rs in the womens specific version. It is for head sized 52cm - 56 cm. May not fit your 2 year old quite yet, but soon enough. Many people dont realize these fit kids very well. The womens version also comes in a couple of shades of blue and grey so he wouldn't have to sport a pink one. We have one in bright pink and another that is navy-ish blue. Love having full face protection in a lightweight package.
  • + 1
 @DoubleJackOnTap: Yeah, it would be too big for him.
  • + 2
 @lewiscraik: The sanction is just that little bit smaller than the 3R
  • + 3
 I have to say with the switchblade the option to run a 3/4 helmet is kind of nice despite its fugly appearance. If your helmets ends up being a jack of all trades master of none you might as well have something that not trying to replicate the half shell you already have
  • + 4
 I use the v2 and love it. I live in Portugal where the temperature regularly gets above 35c and I rarely have issues with overheating. It has been so good that I never wear a half shell anymore.
  • + 5
 Yeah, the previous version is a fantastic helmet. I hope they didn't mess with the fit, that was just superb (along with the ventilation). Definitely going to look into this as soon as the price goes down a little bit.
  • + 1
 Yep it's great. Once I replaced the gel forehead pan with a traxfactory pad I can use it even on relatively hot days. Only changes I'd like would be to remove the D-lock buckle for a conventional one. I don't want a convertible helmet. No point in that for me.
  • + 3
 I kinda look at convertible helmets like freeride AT ski boots. I’ve always wanted to believe the hype that the next AT boot is actually stiff enough to ski in bounds like I want to ski, and can still tour on it. But, repeatedly I’ve been let down and decided to go back to a two boot quiver because I always ended up disappointed. I feel that way about my Bell Super. I’ll just stick to my half shell Smith, and go back to a non-concerting full face.
  • + 3
 I have been very pleased with my v2 and use it for all my riding (xc, trail, park) but it's starting to look worn and I've been considering a replacement.
But ouch on the price.
The Urge Gringo that is my current candidate is less than half the price at 149 €.
  • + 2
 Does any one know what this mess of letters and numbers means?

"Certifications: ASTM F1952-15, EN 1078:2012, CPSC 1203 AS/NZS 2063:2008"

Beyond passed the relevant tests? Like what is that -15 at the end of the ASTM cert? That mean it's less than full cert, like minus 15 from full? Or is it like a sub cert? I have Fing clue. This is needlessly Byzantine
  • + 3
 The main worldwide markets certifications are listed accordingly; European CE EN1078, Australian AS/NZS2063, US CPSC1203 and the unique existing protocol for DH and BMX racing, that is ASTM which includes chin guard testing.
They are official protocols of certification, the "-15" we refer to the last version of the ASTM protocol issued in 2015.
The Parachute MCR passes and exceeds all of these standards with large margins which we apply into our internal testing; for instance we crash hundreds of helmets in advance to apply the certification at the external authorised labs, with the aim to create a large statistic database of impact results, making us able to predict each impact point structural performance.
  • + 3
 I love my bell 3r. To me its practical to only wear the chin bar when I hit jumps or bike parks especially as mentioned when you're traveling and can't bring 2 helmets because your family have gear to haul as well
  • + 2
 Hmm I use full face no matter what I'm doing. I've fallen going uphill at 2mi per hour into a ditch which would have ended badly without a full face. So I just use a Super 3R for trail riding and a Giro Disciple for bike park. Both helmets cost me less than the this MET though.
  • + 4
 I just cant believe that the orange plastic tubes dont not snap in the case of a Crash...
  • + 2
 There are also two metal tabs that are holding it in place - it's not just the plastic tubes that secure the chinbar.
  • + 1
 I just crashed in one of the earlier versions of the Bell Super removable chin bar. 5 stitches in my face, I guess it would have been worse without it, but it did not work at all like a true dedicated full face. Once impact occurred and the chin bar touched the ground, the bar didn't do much and the whole helmet slid down, leaving no more protection than a regular half lid, allowing anything/everything to come in contact with my face. Lesson learned.
  • + 2
 Had basically the exact opposite of your situation. My Bell Super 3R chinbar and helmet saved my face from some seriously nasty rocks. Destroyed the helmet, face and head were just fine... fyi for those wondering, Bell gives a 30% discount for crash replacements and will send the shop a new helmet so you can grab one from off the shelf.
  • + 1
 @islandforlife: I hear you, don't get me wrong, it saved me from a much worse situation and probably did what it was intended to do, but after that I'll just be wearing my D3.
  • + 1
 The earlier bell convertible helmets were never astm dh certified so they protected you hardly more than a half shell. It is nice to see lightweight or convertible options that are dh certified these days.
  • + 2
 Still waiting for helmet companies to make a lightweight full face helmet for everyday trail riding. Sort of like the POC Artic SL Race slalom helmets with face guard. Full faces are just too much helmet for everyday use.
  • + 2
 Been also wondering why the slimmer face guards such as the one in the Artic SL haven't been adopted at all yet for bike.

Slimmer, less restricted guards, seems like a total win for everything but full downhill- It seems like an intelligent compromise for ski.

@methelmets @BellBikeHelmets @troyleedesigns @KaliProtectives
  • + 1
 I wear a Bell Super 3r and I love it, the reason I bought it was because I don’t have strong need for a full face but I race enduro often and wearing a full face is a requirement. I decided to get a convertible to save money on buying 2 separate lids.
  • + 4
 Any upcoming review on the new Sweet Protection Arbitrator helmet?
  • + 1
 You didn't include any pics of the separate chinbar. Is it easy to carry? How do you get it to the top of the hill? Can it comfortably fit over a hip pack or slide into your short's waistband?
  • + 1
 You can see the chinbar here: www.pinkbike.com/photo/17271799. It's about the size of the Bell Super DH's chinbar. It's fairly bulky, and best suited to being carried on a back pack. You could probably rig something up on a hip pack, but the waistband method is unlikely to work well.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: as a super DH owner, is like to point out that this chinbar is very different in shape. The bell chinguard forms a loop that snaps in the back of the helmet. This loop means you can wrap it around a hip pack to ride up the mountain, then pull it off at the top. This "U" design can't do that, and would need to go in a backpack.

At these prices, the helmet vendors need to sell water bottle form factor mounts for the chinbars. Dont know why product testing never revealed the need for a mount.
  • + 3
 All I see is the old Canyon colour scheme, perfectly coupled with the reverse italic title... Canyon Strive, 2015. Yuk!
  • + 4
 Welll.....it looks better.
  • + 3
 The flex visor is a must for every brand, just wonders it goes back in shape if put like sh*t in the car for a while.
  • + 3
 I had this problem with Urge down o matic. My car must be as clean as yours I suppose.
  • + 2
 I prefer to have a separate full face and half shell. Cheaper overall and if I break one, I still have another helmet to use whilst waiting for a replacement.
  • + 1
 "The next generation Parachute skipped the removable chinbar". Strange, I removed the chinbar on mine yesterday. 4 screws. Was it a dream?
  • + 2
 Pretty sure one of us is a generation off—do do you have the first generation? The most recent iteration of the Parachute didn't have a removable chin guard AFAIK.
  • + 7
 @brianpark: Googled a bit, I think it's possible to remove the chinbar, but it's a modification that's very much unsanctioned by MET and one that does not conform to any safety standards afterwards.
  • + 1
 @brianpark: Second gen. I wouldn't have let the first one anyone near my head. Rusetti is right I believe, which begs the question: why is the option there? They put a bit of glue on the bolt heads, but that's worth nothing in real terms. Also you have to find some pretty big washers to do the job the holes in the chinguard do.
  • + 1
 @BenPea: The screw on mine have covered heads exactly so you can't do that without removing the head covers... So I think the option isn't supposed to be there.
  • + 2
 @BenPea: ah, that makes more sense.

No idea why the "option" is there, but I'd guess it was part of how they decided to manufacture it, or possibly they intended it to be removable during the design phase, but then decided against it.
  • + 1
 The chinbar on the Parachute v2 is not to be removed. Any modification of the helmet would mean a reduction of the original product and its safety features.
  • - 1
 Never understood the appeal of convertible helmets. If I'm racing enduro or riding in a bike park, I'm wearing a solid full face, which is safer. If I'm riding mellower trails, I'm using my half shell which is lighter and more comfortable. A convertible helmet has the negative aspects of full face and half shells combined in one, more expensive package.

But comfort and such, you say? I take the full face off in transition stages, which are uphill. Never had organizers and safety staff(even in an EWS qualifier event) yell at me and others to put my full face on while pedaling or walking uphill.
  • + 5
 Lots of crashes happen when you least expect them (duh. otherwise they wouldn't happen). There are some long, relatively easy uphills here, connected by single black downs. I used to just put my full face on my bars for the way up, and ride down with it on. 3 problems: it makes it hard to ride with a full face helmet bouncing around on my bars, wearing the FF riding up is hot as F, if you only wear a half face helmet, you leave the rest of your face exposed on the way down.
I just undo the chin bar on my Bell R3, and wear it around my neck on the climbs. It's not obtrusive, and negates the need for a back pack (which I loathe wearing).
Many of the injuries my friends get aren't on big air or anything, but hitting a curb while getting groceries on their bike, or other such nonsense.
That being said, I pretty much only go full face now, especially commuting.
  • + 2
 It's illegal in some places to not wear a helmet while riding a bike. As stupid as that may, it means that for some events you have to wear a helmet at all times, you risk disqualification otherwise. When its 30+ outside and you've got a 45 minute climb to do you can bet your ass I'm wearing a half shell.
  • + 3
 @woofer2609: this is why I just wear a Parachute V2 all the time. I've had 9 stiches in the face from a stupid crash on mellow trails. I know other people that have had similar happen.

I know MET was caving to pressure from what others released- but I think this is a step backwards.

The V2 is light and really well ventilated.
  • + 2
 Think it depends on the person and their set-up. I use the Bell Super 3R for riding and racing and just f*cking love the ability to use it as a half shell on the ups and between stages and as a full face for the downs and stage racing. I've gotten both very used to removing and attaching the chinbar as well as very fast at it... it's just become habit for me.

When I get to the top of a climb I always stop to take a breather or even a bite to eat so it's a perfect time to attach the chin bar, same goes when completing a long down section before heading back up... I'll typically take a min or 2 to catch my breath and that's when the chin bar comes off. It's also so well vented that when rides have a a good mix of up and down, but mostly down... I don't mind the chinbar and don't even notice it during those times either.

During races... not having a chin bar on my face when I'm climbing to the next stage is huge... also not a fan of not wearing a helmet even when it seems ok. Then once I get to a stage start, again, I'll either need to take a breather and get myself sorted or it's a 5 to 45 min wait to drop in anyway = lots of time for the 10 seconds it takes me to attach the bar. Similarly, at the bottom of a stage, I am typically f*cking gassed and need a min or 2 before heading back up to the next stage = lots of time to take the bar off.

I wear a small-ish pack with a low horizontal bladder that also has back protection, it happens to have a perfect attachment system on the outside of my pack for the chinbar. The attachment is good enough that even if, for whatever reason, I'm not riding with the chin bar attached, it's very secure and doesn't move. I can easily see for guys that don't use a pack why they'd not want to use this type of helmet though. You need to be able to stash the bar somewhere simple and easy to access otherwise you just might not use it.
  • + 2
 @woofer2609: I would do that on some rides as well. Take off my helmet on climbs and wear it on the downs. However, I would put my helmet on my hydration pack. There are many hydration packs that have helmet straps.
  • + 4
 But... It's not ugly...?
  • + 0
 I have both a trail and full face helmet the combined cost of both was significantly less than this offering, added to the fact that one heavy crash would render this helmet for the bin I'll pass.
  • - 1
 So Met finally updated the Parachute? I tried buying a parachute like 3 years ago, but no one carried it and Met never bothered to extend their US suppliers or even update the helmet at all. I wouldn't change out my Proframe for this one, and the removable chinbar just adds unwanted weight and complexity IMO.
  • + 1
 Watched a guy's chinbar snap off after going face first into a rock at BME this weekend. I prefer my dedicated full face for racing and half shell for everything else.
  • + 2
 Flexible visor is a great idea. Took long enough.
  • + 1
 What about the magnets affecting a GoPro?
  • - 1
 I cannot see +300€ value on this Helmet, considering that I've bought an Arai Rebel for less (299) and included a pinlock & transportation!
  • + 2
 Bell Super DH.-
  • + 2
 330 €. yeah. right.
  • + 0
 Would never race with one of these removable chin helmets, I like my face too much
  • + 1
 Slalom pole defender
  • + 1
 looks a faff
  • + 0
 All I see when the chinbar is detached is a bell super 3r.
  • + 9
 All I see is an Atreides I want to kill
  • + 2
 Well, I see a Met Roam which is almost exactly what it is w/o the chin bar.
  • + 3
 I can see a Session...
  • + 1
 Yeah Bitch! Magnets!
  • - 2
 There is no way to put it nicely but something tells me if you buy this helmet you are highly likely to wear socks to sandals and have two pairs of New Balance shoes...
  • - 1
 No pics with helmet on someone's head. Fail
  • + 1
 nm, is in vid which i couldn't watch earlier.
  • + 3
 There are action photos of it in both modes, along with a video where you can see it on someone's head. But I'll try to include pictures of my stunning good looks next time.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: I really just want more pics of you for my shrine Wink
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