Review: Newmen Evolution A.30 Wheels

Mar 7, 2019
by Paul Aston  
Newman Wheels


German company Newmen are only a couple of years old, but Michael Grätz, the man behind the company, knows a thing or two about designing bike components. Michi previously started Liteville and Syntace, who have built an enviable reputation for precisely engineered bikes and reliable componentry. We took a 'First Look' at the Newmen wheels last year, and I have been battering a couple of pairs ever since.

These Newmen Evolution A.30 wheels have a reasonable 1760g weight. That's not uber light for a 29" 'trail' wheelset, but testing proved they were much more capable than the 'trail' category would suggest, they turned out to be more than strong enough for enduro and even downhill.
Evolution A.30 Wheel Details
• 27.5" or 29" (tested)
• Aluminum rims, 30mm internal width
• Flared, hookless rim profile
• Concave spoke washers
• Equal spoke length throughout
• 28 Sapim D-Light straight pull spokes
• Newmen hubs, 36t star ratchet
• Weight: 1760g (29", SRAM XD freehub, rim tape and valves, actual)
• MSRP: €698
newmen-components.de

The A.30 wheelset retails for €698 for the pair, are available in 27.5" or 29" sizes, with Boost or non-Boost hub spacing. Individual wheels and component parts can be bought separately.


Newman Wheels


Details

To avoid any confusion with the images, I had four sets of wheels in total on test. The original wheels started their testing life in May 2018. I used the A.30 and the E.G.30 wheelsets that are essentially the same. The former uses double butted spokes and a smaller ratchet freehub system. The latter is the eMTB version that uses thicker straight gauge spokes, a bigger ratchet system, and the rims are slightly heavier with around 50g more material. These original wheels used Newmen's 'Tolerance Adjustment' caps which was a hub preload system that was designed to prevent to much pressure being forced into the bearings by various axle systems – Newmen say the forces from different frames, axles, and humans can vary from 3000N to over 10000N of force on the hubs. I had no issue with this system, aside from a little additional setup time. But, Newmen found that the majority of their consumers didn't fully understand the system, and set the TA incorrectly which lead to premature wearing of the bearing, loose-feeling wheels, and subsequent warranty cases.

Newman Wheels
Newman Wheels
The Tolerance Adjustment caps were a great idea that I had no problems with. But that system has now been scrapped for something more traditional.

So, the TA was scrapped at the end of last year and Newmen have returned to a standard system. So another pair of each wheelset later and I continued the testing with the new version of the hubs. The rims are laced to a set of Newmen's own straight pull hubs with 28 Sapim D-Light spokes, all of which are the same length, so you don't need a vast array of different length spokes as spares. The hubs use a 36t star ratchet system, similar to DT Swiss, for 10° between engagement points. The difference between DT's patented system and the Newmen version is that the DT ratchets are sprung from both sides, while the Newmen hub has one fixed and one sprung side.


Newman Wheels
Newmen Components First Look Evolution Wheelset freehub system
Newmen's own hubs roll fast and use their 36t star ratchet system. The larger ratchet system is specific to the eMTB for a stronger connection under torque.


Newmen use aluminum rims with a 30mm internal width, hookless profile. They also use patented concave nipple washers inside the rim to better distribute spoke tension and prevent the rim from cracking near the spoke holes, meaning some weight can be trimmed from this zone. The piéce de la resistance with the Newmen wheels is the flared rim sidewalls, which are barely noticeable to the untrained eye. Instead of vertical sidewalls they are slightly flared outwards, which is said to provide a substantial increase in impact resistance. Newmen found that dropping weights on to a rim vertically in the lab didn't correspond to wheels that were damaged testing on the trail. They deemed that most impacts that damage a rim come in at an angle, so flaring the rim out towards that angle improved the impact resistance where classic rims may just fold over.



Newman Wheels
The hookless sidewalls are flared out slightly, which is barely noticeable to the untrained eye.



Performance

The pickup of the hubs is solid every time, and although 10º between engagement points isn't radically quick, they were fine on the trail. Personally, on the trail the amount of degrees of engagement in the freehub is something that never crosses my mind – maybe if I was a trials riders or rode very slow technical trails all the time I would think differently. On the trail, the wheelset seemed to be compliant (maybe helped by the 28-spoke count) and never made any scary twanging noises that can come from carbon or bigger alloy rims.

I am also a fan of the straight pull spokes; even though I didn't have any issues it is nice to know that you could replace a spoke on the trail if needs be without removing the wheel, cassette, or disc rotor. This combined with the fact that all the spokes are the same length means that carrying a couple of spares in a bag could get you out of trouble without any 'hacks and bodges of the week' tactics. The downside of straight pull spokes is that they can rotate when trying to true the wheel, but if your wheels stay tensioned as well as these did, it is a non-issue.

I had zero issues with either of the hub designs, and no issues with spokes coming loose and barely even a buckle to mention. Despite months of abuse, an EWS race, and being lent to the 'World's Fastest Albanian,' Genc Marku, who acts as a useful test rider/demolition pilot with 100kg of mass and no interest in slowing down anywhere. The results were surprising as neither of us could ding the rims enough to cause any damage or lose the tubeless seal. I'm sure we have all seen rims with the sidewalls dinged, but the flared rim wall theory seemed to work perfectly – the best damage we could do caused a long flat spot in the rim, or slightly more outward flare that was not really noticeable, showing the design really dissipates energy across the rim rather than folding over in a concentrated area.

Considering the amount of time spent on theses wheels, and the time spent on many others that have failed over the last few years on the same trails, the Newmen rims seem to be some of the strongest and most reliable on the market.


Newman Wheels


Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesThe Newmen Evolution A.30 is a sensibly priced wheelset, with great attention to detail, no hype, and solid performance. The rims are incredible strong and reliable, and fared better than all of the other options that I've tested.Paul Aston








157 Comments

  • + 218
 Too soon Paul. Too soon. Enve is still pretty sore.
  • + 43
 I suppose Enve is happy enough with every bit of exposure they can get and they're glad they've set a benchmark. From now on the price of a wheel will be mentioned in percentage of Enve, lifetime will be in number of destroyed Enve wheels.
  • + 7
 @vinay: I'm not sure about that benchmark and the whole "bad PR is good PR" thing but what do I know, I'm not their target audience anyway.

How many Enves are in one Scaramucci?
  • + 33
 @vinay hahahah, the new astronomical unit... The lastest DT EX538 rim measures 32mm internal, comes in 27.5 and 29" options, the flangeless design promises less dents, and at strength of 4.12 Enves it is 0.5 Enves stronger than the recently tested Newman evolution A30.
  • + 17
 @vinay: the scale goes something like this
1 Newman = 0.25 Couric's
5 Couric's = 1 Bono
5 Bono's = 1 Enve
  • + 4
 @takeiteasyridehard: that would be 1 O´Reilly or 0.65 Magnitude Covfefe!
  • + 1
 @wowbagger: At least a Brazilian
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: 4.12 Enves? That's like 5 rides...
  • + 2
 @Nagrom77: let's keep this above the waistline ;D
  • + 1
 Paul "Savage" Aston

"better than all of the other options that I've tested"

Did you compare to location of the drilled spoke holes in the rim? Hehehe
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: flangeless design? How's the tire stay on? Rim strips with flanges built-in? You mean hookless flange?
  • + 67
 All this at one third of the cost of the Enves while still being lighter!
  • + 28
 And a lot more durable.
  • + 33
 Come on man, that's totally Chris Kings fault!
  • + 1
 And even more environmentally friendly Smile
  • + 2
 And less splinters! Saving endangered thumbs all around the world.
  • + 65
 "Hello Neeewwwman... "
  • + 29
 Hello.....jeeeerrryy????
  • + 5
 No soup for you!
  • + 2
 Seinfeld for millenials- imgur.com/gallery/Wbggj
  • + 28
 Blimey a review of well priced wheelset that is not made of bloody carbon! Whatever next?
  • + 35
 The review of the next Pole rim. It won't be well priced. Machined out of a solid billet of aluminium. Because.
  • + 1
 @vinay: You should mention this to Leo.
  • + 10
 @FabianJ: only if he can glue and screw it. Just like in woodshop lol
  • + 26
 @vinay: Yes, and it will be called the Pole Ring.
  • + 9
 @vinay: that makes no sense. They should machine out a complete wheel including spokes.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: That would be amazing. An entire wheel including rim, spokes and hub machined out of one piece of aluminium!
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: sounds like a nice rimjob.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: The spokes will be done separately on a lathe and later bolted to rim and hub (with separate bolts indeed).
  • + 1
 @vinay: need to be first on the lathe, from a bar of al 7075, not bolted, they need to be threaded one end right thread, and other end left thread, and then have a hex section milled in the middle to adjust the spoke tension.
  • + 1
 @vinay: super custom butting!
  • + 1
 @FabianJ: Oh yeah, that would require both threaded rims as well as threaded hubs. Just like nipples though, you'll need to allow for some rotation around the perpendicular axes or you'll subject them to bending. Maybe just not thread them but just pass them through both rim and hub and keep it in place with a grub screw? If you want to increase tension, you can always jam a stick or whatever you can find between your spokes and spin it around until it is just right. No one will care about tire clearance anymore. You just want those sticks to clear your forks and frame.
  • + 1
 @vinay: So many engineers in this sports. Too many, one might say.
  • + 1
 @vinay: what we need is a new adaptive micro CNC technology that is capable of 3d machining threads in holes down to 1mm directly. Then we need to manufacture everything from one block (not gluing/ screwing stuff together) and for that we can use micro bots with own power supply that drill themselves into the block. Why? Because welding is old fashioned.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: You mean a small version of what they use for drilling tunnels? Wow, that sure must be something no one has ever done before. The more reason to do it in the bicycle industry where we need to innovate for the sake of innovation. That said, I was actually thinking of just foaming the stuff in a mold. You can foam aluminium these days, maybe even steel, haven't checked. So yeah, get all inserts (headset and a dummy pipe in between to cover it up, bb shell, seatpost, suspension pivots) in there, put the decals in the mold and just dump it full with foam. This will give you kind of a bone structure with higher density near the surface. Of course it doesn't adapt to stresses like bone does, but you could create more surface using ridges and dimples in high stressed areas and that will sort it out. Not sure how much the stuff shrinks. My guess is that it isn't as much an issue as it is with casting as it isn't solid metal so there is more than enough room to contract. My other suggestion is to grow bamboo in there and guide it to the other side using a light source.

Welding old fashioned? I was lacing a wheel for my daughter the other day and I was thinking. Why not have aluminium spokes, heat them, then tack weld them to rim and hub. As the spokes cool down, they try to contract hence introduce the preload.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Lacking micro bots, the single block could be DMLS titanium printed to include the micro threads, and then milled with a 5 axis machine to finish it off. Then we could make a negative mold in a lost titanium process and cast the final part from 7075. Simple.
  • + 1
 Vinay, I have a better idea. 3D print a very light plastic mandrell, then cover it in glue, then cover it with lots of graphite powder grab 3mln miles worth of scotch tape...
  • + 15
 These look solid and reliable.

I have to know, what is about carbon wheels/parts that people are willing to pay 2/3x more for? I can understand it for a factory racing team who are looking for every fraction of speed and efficiency. It just seems the 'gains' are so minimal it seems a little pointless for most.

I'm not having a dig, I'm just wondering why.
  • + 5
 Why? Simple, because they are carbon.
  • + 3
 @dubod22 The last enduro race bike check I saw about a year ago showed a majority of the pros using alloy rims, so that throws out even the factory guys running them. Maybe things have changed since then? idk.
  • + 13
 2/3 more? seriously?

light bicycle are 150 euro per rim, hope pro4 hubs are another 220, sapim race spokes and alu nipples are another 60 euros.

factor in 10 euro per wheel build, it's pretty much the same price as a "brand wheelset" but you get no-bullshit hubs which been there forever and have all the parts available everywhere, standard spokes you can replace in every shithole of a globe.
  • + 1
 I run carbon wheels for the stiffness and more direct feel when driving through the chunder. Also dropping a bit of weight especially rotational weight never hurts. I have never broken a carbon wheels although I can think of a few times I probably should have. I also work in the industry so that helps with cost.
  • + 11
 @trizachblak: I think it´s fair to say that the weight argument went out of window long ago.
  • + 2
 dubod - listen to @thresh, he gets it.

When I moved up to 29er wheels I noticed alot of rear wheel flex when flowing and jumping and railing hard. For me it's just a way to build a stronger & stiffer rear wheel without a weight penalty, keeping in mind that 29 rims and tires are already heavier than their smaller counterparts. I wasn't willing to build up a heavy AF rear wheel to get the strength/stiffness I wanted. My current carbon set is not lightweight, it's average weight. And with factory direct rims from China the cost of a rim is "only" 2x that of a comparable aluminum rim.

If I were on 27.5 I'd probably stick to alu.

Also, these wheels look great!
  • + 5
 Because minimal gains can be the diff between winning and not winning.

Because not everyone is smashing through rock gardens at speed.

Because one can have a decent set for a similar price as these 'sensibly priced' alu wheels.

Because a lot of the other kids are doing it.

Because Waki scorns them.

Because they sound 'trick.'

Because they sell.

Because some people have the opposite problem of wanting to save money.

Because they're one of the latest things.

Because 'versus'--trumped up conflict is popular.

Because they have more room for decals.

Because composites are more cheaply tunable; a layup alteration is cheaper than a new extrusion.
  • + 4
 @WasatchEnduro: Because 29"!
  • - 1
 @ceecee: because everybody is on a pipedream Big Grin
  • + 2
 Wheels I don't know (maybe stiffness for 29" wheels). Frames are actually lighter and dampen trail vibrations to a certain degree. Also, and this is by far the most important and at the same time rediculous reason: because high-end aluminium frames are harder to find in big brands' portfolio than an actual living Yeti...
  • + 2
 I went carbon to save money on wheels. Aluminum was costing me $300 or $400 a year (2 hoops plus the cost of lacing them up). I am going on year 3 of my Nox wheelset, assuming I make it through the season it is cheaper.
  • + 2
 @thresh: 10 euro wheel build? wtf? we used to charge $50 per almost 15 yrs ago?!?
  • + 2
 @lifted-d: i'm not sure what capitalist countries charge for wheel builds and/or import taxes; but it's that low in the communist Motherland these days.
  • + 12
 "Newmen found that dropping weights on to a rim vertically in the lab didn't correspond to wheels that were damaged testing on the trail." Hey Enve, did you read that ? Lab is not life.
  • + 14
 Can we have someone from ENVE comment on this please?
  • + 4
 they're just going to talk about "owning up to it" or something without actually doing so.
  • + 2
 It makes no sense for them to comment. The Enve jokes will stop being funny in no more than 3 months. I doubt whether this article will lower their sales significantly. They have some serious issues to adress and when they will be done with it, they will be back. As you can see from this comment board carbon rims are not going anywhere.
  • + 0
 @Ron-C: So brutal. But so true. The wheels reviewed were garbage. Doesn't matter why. And deflecting or shifting blame vs owning up to it really was a bad move from a brand that is already derided among the readers here and elsewhere, who are, incidentally, their target audience.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I dunno, Waki. Enve has been the butt of much criticism on this forum, not just for their recent gaff. I'm really not sure who their client base is TBH since their product tends to be hugely overpriced compared to the competition. And the name. Really. I have an amazing HP laptop with the same name it its embarrassing.
  • + 3
 @Poulsbojohnny: i think Enve has been ridiculous since the other carbon rims started showing up. At 1/5th of the price. But since then they grew exponentially, from rare exclusive item to just exclusive item. People buy it because they want to believe, their price may have been somehow justified in the beginning, after all one of the first Mtb carbon wheels Eastons, were just a notch cheaper, but right now it is just a marketing strategy. The price attracts rather than repells. They have a clear profile. Exclusssssive. This is what they sell.
  • + 3
 holy haggle batman!
  • + 8
 I run the SL A.30 wheelset since August 2017. My version only weighs 1663 g. After a lot of use and abuse they are still running perfectly straight and without a single dent. I only had to replace some bearings after 2 years, which is an easy and cheap job. Therefore it's the perfect wheelset for me which comes in for a fair price.
  • + 7
 Those rims really are something special, black magic at work. PB is not the only outlet who found that the Newmen rims are ridiculously strong for their weight, much tougher than the equivalent Stans or DT Swiss.

Personally i prefer the (aftermarket) 32 spoke version of the same rims for increased stiffness. Laced to hubs of my choice. While the Newmen hubs are good, they are not as extraordinary as the rims. You can get similar performance at comparable prices from a number of other hub makers.
  • + 0
 what hubs would you go for and what's your weight goal?

I wouldn't mind running these but my next bike may or may not have that weird 157 spacing which rules out the Newmen hubs (last I checked at least)
  • + 3
 @wowbagger: I went with DT Swiss 350 hubs. I wanted "fit and forget" hubs that are proven to be super reliable. They are a bit heavier than the Newmen hubs, but the 29" wheelset still came out in the 1800g-1900g range. DT 240s would be functionally identical but lighter and more pricy. Other light options are Acros and Syntace hubs, but they don't have the same reliability record as the dt swiss.
  • + 12
 @wowbagger: the 157mm SP hub is in the works. We do offer the 32h J-Bend hub with 157mm spacing and it is available right now.
  • + 0
 @wowbagger: Check the Acros hub, especially if youre looking for 157 Smile
  • + 0
 too bad it's almost impossible to find good non-boost 27.5 wheels these days, and when you find some, they are full price.
  • + 1
 @wowbagger: hope pro 4 hubs, i found the best prices on r2bike.com. they also sell the newmen rims.
  • + 0
 @zede: lace them up yourself, youtube offers great tutorials, and it's really easy to learn. it makes sense to buy a decent truing stand (www.maba-toolz.de seems to be good value for money). but building your own wheel is very satisfying Big Grin
  • + 2
 @rynee: there are few things as satisfying as getting the components and sitting down with your children to lace up some new wheels. I've done it a few times and my daughter is very useful.
Then the satisfaction you get from getting them true, and having them stay true for a couple of years including multiple races and a 120km/h excursion off the bike rack and down the freeway.
Just a great feeling!
  • + 1
 @jaame: ha, I couldn't have said it better. My wee one was also very interested in my strange activity Smile
I didn't try the last part you described, though Smile
  • + 1
 @rynee: I hope I never repeat it, but I was very surprised that the front wheel was still totally true, and the rear was out of whack by 2-3mm. Spank race 33 rims, pillar TB spokes, hope Pro4 hubs.
The saddle and handlebar stem did not fare so well.
Vibrocore bar was still totally straight too incredibly. I still binned it, but I think it could have been fine!
  • + 7
 Someone give ENVE another box of tissues, Paul's released a new wheel article.
  • + 4
 Newmen just kinda popped up out of no where. I'd never seen a press release or ad for their product anywhere, then they were suddenly standard equipment on some of the new (and much better looking) Cube's.
They strike me as the type of company that isn't out to reinvent the wheel (yeah, I know, but I had to..)
  • + 4
 Hey Paul, could you please comment on the stiffness of the wheels compared to a set of Carbon wheels you have ridden recently, or is the difference as noticeable as the hub engagement?
  • + 3
 I use a SL A.30 since October 2017 and the front is still strong today with a bit of truing. I had to replace one rim on the back and did go for the EG.30 instead. Still smacked it 2 week's later and only could hold air with procore. I hate procore and only use it because the sidewall is to flat to hold that tire for air anymore. However this wheelset is the strongest I ever had. No dent so far and I did kill wheelsets every two months. DT , spank , whatever...
I ride rocky terrain with some chunks of roots. I am the avatar rider with 74kg and a 180mm travel bike.
I was super happy with the weight, my 27,5" wheel's had 1580g and that is with tape.
  • + 0
 *Avarage

Side note I did smack them with 2,5 bar (36 psi) on the rear an a bit boulder I could not see with high-speed.
  • + 0
 Great reviews and I like the graphics too
  • - 1
 @Serpentras... Carbon rims do not go out of true, especially ones over 400g. if you don't have dents it means you haven't smashed them into rocks much. You just didn't. I have seen enough carbon rims in person with smashed flanges, delamination, small cracks. Mostly cosmetic but still, no dents, well, how can you dent something so stiff? It just doesn't dent. it doesn't. Then using procore with carbon rims is asking yourself for trouble, A - carbon does not like high pressures, even with low volume tyres, it will crack spectacularly, the fibers will separate - just ask roadies buying carbon clinchers (some of them will talk weird since they lost teeth after their front exploded - and if they used clincher with rim brakes - double trouble) and B, procore will make it even harder for you to keep spoke tension right, it is hard enough on carbon rims without procore, or with alu rims with procore. As much as I love procore (have it myself) it's a damn piece of work. Finally make sure you don't use alu nipples in general, but particulaly if you are setting them up tubeless. Sealant speeds up galvanic corrosion and even anodized nipples don't work since anodizing will get stripped during truing process. I am not telling you to ditch them, just... these are typical properties of carbon rims. Happy trails
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: what are you talking about Waki ? Those are AL rims , NEWMEN only have one wheelset out for carbon and they are for XC or anyone who likes narrow rims.

Spoke tension is no issue if you have tools and I ask you what do you do if you just smashed a rim what you replaced and it cant hold your tire anymore when your done? Do you just say f*ckit and replace it again?
I did use the procore just to hold it. If I rip some Spokes out I will replace the rim/spokes and get rid of the procore, its just to heavy.

Denting was the wrong word because it was a dent but not a buckle normal wheelsets do if they get hit hard enough.
  • - 1
 @Serpentras: sht I thought these were carbon... idiot me
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: hey me too! I even looked on bike components to price them up. I couldn't believe the weight and the price! Then on second read of the review I realised they are metal!
Guess what? It made me want them even more!
  • + 1
 @jaame: the reason I can't get it why carbon wheelset are a thing if I compare them to my Evolution SL/EG 30 Set. They total lack of value/price compared to the Newmen wheels.
  • + 1
 @jaame: I think I’ll give them a try when my EX471 dies. It just doesn’t want to...
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I am very tempted too. Just waiting on my 29er that I am borrowing to see if I like it enough to buy one. If I do, these wheels are on the shortlist
  • + 1
 @jaame: they cost as much as DT Swiss, but in all fairness to DT folks, I know two dudes running XM481 on their 29ers (which is identical in size and weight to Newmen) and those rims are holding up for them. They are defo above average riders, young dudes with no family so plenty of riding time and smash their bikes into stuff in Malaga, Finale, Madeira, Åre, Hafjell and many more.
  • + 1
 If buying new wheels, DT EX511 would be at top of list. After seeing the A.30, I think I would get these, prefer the graphics too.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I thought the DT Swiss ex1501 wheelset was about €1500
  • + 1
 @jaame: Whatever good hubs like Hope Pro 4/DT350 (incl.36,54t rachet) are 400€ + 60€ for dt comp spokes + 30€ for prolocks ca 200€ for XM481/EX511 or Newmen. 690€. If you want you can upgrade to DT240 you pay 200€ extra. 890$. With Chris Kings you are at 1000€. Pillar aeros 200$ more.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: just had a look. €654 plus tax.

In which case, I would probably go for those. The Don said on GMBN if he was spending his own money on wheels, he would get ex1501s
  • + 1
 @jaame: I have their home built version. Avoid straight pulls man. You will pay exactly same for jbends.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: good point. I had some hope pro3 hubs previously with the straight pull flanges and the direct mount discs. What a pain they were to clean!
  • + 3
 I'm running these in 29" on the new Stereo 150. We were a bit cynical at first, but they are extremely light and don't seem to tike a ding after some fairly hefty hits. I'd have no problem buying these aftermarket. I actually think they perform better than my old XCM1200 carbon wheels.

The pedant in me is annoyed that Scots mud is hard to clean off them as they have a blasted finish.
  • + 6
 Nothing Newmen,...
  • + 5
 Heard in the corridors at Enve: " Serenity Now!"
  • + 1
 isnt it DTs EX-patent....

hence why everyone is making ratchet hubs now it fair game. not that it wasnt spectacularly difficult to sidestep the patent anyway.

you know what patents are there for (uk anyway) to reduce how much tax you pay, look up patent box and you will realise why all the "pointless" patents in the bike industry exist.

Neil
  • + 1
 Can you elaborate?
  • + 3
 I have the Syntace hubs with the bearing tension system. Had no problem setting it up. But it is said only 60% of people are capable of following directions.
  • + 4
 And 80% of statistics are made up - so if I learnt my maths correctly, that means only 12% of people actually know how to follow directions?
  • + 1
 @hangdogr: 51% of people regularly regurgitate tired phrases they think are clever.
  • + 1
 @JohanG: Hmm, that was very clever. Almost no faux statistics at all.
  • + 1
 Just got a set of these on my Radon Swoop and gone belt and braces with supergravity and cushcore as they looked too light on paper but sounds like I needn’t have worried. Still, I can go full hulk smash now without wincing. Mine are new set but still have the older TA adjust caps thankfully, they spin ridiculously fast!
  • + 5
 Is there a US dealer for these wheels and rims?
  • + 3
 I would much prefer J-spokes. For my riding I see zero performance advantages with straight pull spokes just a load of disadvantages.
  • - 1
 What about replacing broken spoke in right flange of rear hub?
  • + 4
 Well then get a pair of J Bend. They offer both.
  • + 2
 @MordFan: Ok, I assume you don't ride with spare spokes on the trail. If you do, your concern is valid. I don't. Otherwise it takes approx. 10 seconds to take off a cassette.
  • + 1
 I agree, but the good news is this: There is an aftermarket version of the Newmen hubs with J-bend, or you could get the awesome rims and get them laced to a hub of your choice.
  • + 0
 @Serpentras: Do they? It's not mentioned in the review and I don't see them on their website.
  • + 0
 @IluvRIDING: Not sure about their website, but shops have them in stock: www.bike-components.de/en/NEWMEN/Evoltion-SL-J-Bend-XD-6-bolt-Disc-Rear-Hub-p52772
  • + 0
 @IluvRIDING: never checked their website for it but they have them. Shops have the hubs and you get different service PDF for the straight pull and j bend version.
  • - 6
flag Mondbiker (Mar 7, 2019 at 2:25) (Below Threshold)
 @IluvRIDING: so you don´t ride with single spare spoke but ou ride with cassette tool and chain whip? You are pretty special aren´t you?
  • + 6
 @MordFan: I have done a multi day tour last year, where exactly this happened. J-bend spoke broke near body of DT 370 hub and blocked cassette & freewheel randomly. Go back? Then I remembered that for spoke hubs you could pull out freewheel-body. I then removed the wheel and pulled out the cassette, which was really easy(fortunately !). Fetched out rest of spoke and reinstalled free hub with installed cassette and could go on for rest of tour, without replacing spoke. But really liked that having 32 spokes, think this would be more a problem with less spokes.
  • + 0
 @mensch-mueller: Thought about that just a few moments after submitting this comment Smile
  • + 2
 Yep great wheels, they won't appeal to whose who like bling but for those who want no fuss it's a great option. I've always wondered if you can use the star ratchet upgrade from DT in the hubs.
  • + 2
 Na you can't, they are different. I also lost the ratchets after 2000km. They replaced but with warranty and since then I have 4000km on it without issues. Just replaced the bearing's in the hubs a week ago. Bearing's are really cheap. 4€ for each bearing.
  • + 1
 I have these wheels and have put in 1300miles or so on them, even raced downhill races. I still haven’t dented them and the rear is still pretty true, I stripped a star ratchet and the customer service from Newman was top notch, new ratchets in the post a few days after it happening. Brilliant product and fantastic customer service from Tim there.
  • + 5
 Where can we get them in the US?
  • + 3
 You can buy them from bike24 just like the rest of the world.
  • + 1
 If people find these an attractive buy, I'd also suggest looking into the Hunt range of wheels which are pretty similar but even better value. I'm have their Trail Wide wheels and really like them.
  • + 0
 I love my A.30 wheels! Light and durable.
Though I am not a wheel destroyer, dinging a few spokes on other wheelsets is all I did over the last years.
Nevertheless I‘d like to see a better engagement/more ratchets on the hubs.
  • + 5
 10/10 No hype
  • + 0
 i don't mind having carbon parts on my bike (bars stem cranks etc.) but for some reason i just don't trust carbon wheels at all every time i ride a pair i have this feeling that they're going to do what ENVE's M735E did under Paul Aston, rather stick with the tried and trusted aluminium when it comes to wheels
  • + 4
 Cant think of anything smart to say, im ENVEious
  • + 0
 Run them already for over 10 Months ... and few nasty pinches without any consequences (on YT capra)
With sapim CX-ray spokes 1680g. Tubeless without any problem with normal floor pump (maxxiss and schwalbe)
  • + 2
 "Michi previously started Liteville and Syntace" Jo Klieber might disagree!
  • + 0
 Oh crap. Now I want to relace the wheels I haven't even received yet. The SL A 30 seems to have ERD of 595 while the DT E1700 is ERD 600. Wonder if could get away with the original spokes?
  • + 2
 Probably. It's 2mm extra length per spoke, which will be well within the rim cavity
  • + 3
 2019 - The year of alu rims !
  • + 1
 "an enviable reputation for precisely engineered bikes and reliable componentry"
  • + 2
 Finally, something that Aston hasn't destroyed. Razz
  • + 2
 I guess it means that light riders can use these wheels on DH bikes
  • + 1
 less than 78 euro per rim (for the stronger Evolution SL), and 40 euro for shipping to US. might be my next rim set.
  • + 1
 Did someone test or compared these wheels to HUNT trail/enduro? That would be interesting...
  • + 1
 also running the A30 rims… top notch wheelset! no issues even at 100kg naked mass… #shralp
  • + 1
 The only thing that makes more noise than this comments section are carbon wheel sets.
  • + 1
 Wrong! Nothing is noisier than us! Not even Chris King, Hope, I9, or Spank hubs! Big Grin
  • + 1
 Can the rims be purchased separately? In a 32 hole configuration? (In Canada?)
  • + 1
 1. Yes, 2. I bought the 32 hole version and had them laced to DT hubs. 3. No idea, sorry.
  • + 0
 @Ttimer: :thumbsup: thanks. where/how did you buy yours?
  • + 1
 @slyfink: I got them through a wheelbuilder who had them in stock. I think bike-components.de and a few other shops also have them, not sure about shipping to canada, though.
  • + 1
 Newman! (Seinfeld reference...)
  • + 1
 27, 29ers are dead, any update on the 36er version?
  • + 1
 Can one get these in the US?
  • + 2
 please delete
  • + 1
 Would love an in depth review of these hubs!
  • + 1
 +1 for star ratchet hubs
  • + 0
 No cost > $1500 US = No care.
  • + 0
 What PSI did PA run while testing these?
  • + 0
 What bike did you test these on, Paul Aston?
  • + 0
 Syntace was founded by Jo Klieber as far as I know, not by Michi Grätz.
  • + 1
 Michi co-founded Liteville together with Jo, Syntace founded by Jo.
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