Review: Nukeproof's $563 Horizon V2 Wheels

May 25, 2021
by Seb Stott  
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The Horizon V2 wheels are built around Nukeproof's own rims and are rated for enduro and downhill use. Compared to the Horizon V1, the new wheels offer an improved freehub ratchet mechanism offering 102 points of engagement for a faster pickup, Enduro bearings and front/rear specific rims in place of off-the-shelf WTB hoops. The hubs are available to suit all major axle standards and freehub options.

The Nukeproof EWS team switched from Mavic to Nukeproof wheels last season, so they have racing pedigree to keep the Sam Hill fans happy. The main selling point is the price - at $563 / £400 a pair they're among the most affordable enduro-ready wheels.
Nukeproof Horizon V2 specs

• 30mm internal rim width, 35mm external
• 29 or 27.5"
• All major axle and freehub standards catered for
• Weight (actual): 2071 grams (918g front, 1153g rear, 29" Microspline)
• 102 points of engagement (3.5° engagement angle)
• Spokes: J-bend, 32 front & rear
• Price: $351.99/£250 (rear) + $210.99/£150 (front) = $562.98/£400
nukeproof.com


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Specs and details

Like a growing number of wheel manufacturers, Nukeproof has opted for front and rear specific rims. They both have the same dimensions (30mm internal, 35mm external width, 21.6mm height), but the rear rim has a thicker sidewall for extra dent resistance. Nukeproof says the 29" rim weighs 510g for the front and 540g for the rear. For context, a DT Swiss EX 511 enduro rim has a claimed weight of 570g, while the XM 481 has a claimed weight of 525g but is sold as an all-mountain rim. If you were to damage a front rim, you could replace it with the stronger rear rim with the same spokes and aesthetics.

Speaking of which, the matte black finish looks to me like a high-end wheelset, while some manufacturers want to visually differentiate between their top-end and lower-price options.

The hubs use Enduro ABEC 5 bearings throughout, which have double-lip seals and a generous amount of grease to help them run for longer in wet conditions. The freehub ratchet is a conventional six-pawl design with three teeth per pawl to help prevent skipping. Between them they engage the ratchet ring a total of 102 times per revolution, resulting in a pretty snappy 3.5° engagement angle.

The spokes are J-bend for easy replacement and the same length front and rear, although the drive-side spokes are shorter so you'll want a spare of each size (not included). The wheels come pre-taped and include Nukeoroof's nifty valves, which have wrench flats on the nut to help secure the seal tightly and valve caps which double as valve core removers.

Performance

Installing tires from Maxxis and Schwalbe without a tubeless inflator caused zero issues (as you'd hope these days) and I had no leaking of air past the tape or valve throughout six months of testing.

I've spent a lot of time back-to-back testing different enduro wheels in the past, and in my experience the differences between them in terms of ride feel and harshness is extremely subtle at most. But the Horizon wheels never did anything odd like flex unpredictably during heavy cornering loads, nor did they ever make any disconcerting noises when battering through rocks (this can be a problem particularly with wheels laced such that the spokes don't touch as they cross over). They were usually last thing on my mind when riding, and that's about as much praise as you can realistically give to a wheelset.

Similarly, the effect on wheel weight on acceleration is often overstated. Yes, a gram on the rim has up to twice the impact on acceleration as a gram of non-rotating weight, but since the difference between a heavy and a lightweight trail/enduro wheelset is perhaps 300g, the effect on acceleration of a bike and rider weighing close to 100Kg is small. In fact, saving 300g of wheel weight will improve acceleration by somewhere between 0.3% and 0.6%, depending on whether the weight is saved from the hub, spokes or rim. But the Horizons's 2,071g total weight (including valves) is competitive for the price. To use DT Swiss as a benchmark once again, a set of their E 1900 Spline wheels weigh 2,106g on my scales.

The freehub ratchet is on the louder side, but not so much that it becomes obnoxious. It's plenty quick enough that you'll never notice any significant freehub lag when stamping on the pedals. The bearings felt tight to begin with, but they soon loosened up so the wheels spin freely and take a long time to come to a halt when spinning in the work stand.

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I pulled off the end caps on both hubs a few times to check for water ingress or bearing roughness and found no issues.


Durability

I had issues with the first version of the Horizon V1 wheels skipping and damaging the pawls, but had no such problem here despite some deliberate pedal-punching to make sure. After a full winter of use in the UK, the bearings all feel smooth with no roughness when spinning them individually by hand. There's no visible wear on the internals and very little dirt ingress despite plenty of filthy weather. It's also nice to see that Nukeproof offer a range of spares including bearing kits, adapters and freehub pawls on their website for reasonable prices, along with clear instructions on hub servicing. Along with those J-bend spokes, this means they should be pretty easy to live with long-term.

Denting rims is a bit of a lottery but despite a few audible rim-on-rock moments over the last few months both rims are dent free. The rear wheel has a very slight wobble which I measured to be about +/-0.5mm. More importantly, all the spokes remain well-tensioned (at least, to the specifications of the "ping" test). That's not necessarily surprising for an enduro/DH-rated wheelset after six months use, but it certainly bodes well.




Pros

+ Well-priced
+ So far reliable and easy to live with
+ Quiet and fuss-free in the rough
+ Fast freehub engagement
Cons

- Cheap and strong, but not exactly light. (Bontrager's maximum holds true.)





Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesA product that just works and does so for a reasonable price may not be the most attention-grabbing strap line, but that's exactly what the Horivon V2 offers. Sure, they aren't particularly light or flashy, but after six months of wet-weather use they haven't put a foot wrong, so for the money I feel confident enough to recommend them. 
Seb Stott


Author Info:
seb-stott avatar

Member since Dec 29, 2014
298 articles

195 Comments
  • 115 60
 You've all been indoctrinated to think this is cheap. Most basic wheelset with fast engagement (finer machined pawl drive ring - wow what advanced technology) for 560$/500€ is cheap? Of course it's strong, it should be at that weight. Looks like frog has been cooked to perfection! Serve it up.
  • 126 18
 You seem upset for some reason.
  • 26 8
 £250 rear, tubeless set up out of the box
Hope £280 no tubeless (an no stock!)
Spank £290 tubeless set up
Good value I'd say
  • 51 4
 Cheap is relative to comparable products. Feel free to post some products with similar hub/rim quality that cost significantly less. And if there aren't any, maybe it can't be done?
  • 10 3
 Same thing with weight. You can make all the math you want,but a light wheelset makes you feel like a superhero.
  • 5 6
 i checked the price for me here. about €450,-. If i wanted anything else id pay up to €650 to €700 for something hopetech with notubes duke or dt rims. so in the price department its not bad at all.

thing for me is that 450 bucks is a relatively big spend anyways. so id rather save up a bit more for the hope hubs and the nicer rims. but if youve just f*cked up a set at the bikepark or whatever and you need cheap replacement this is the set to go for i quess. theyre heavy, but you can trust them.

having that said id never put enduro wheels on my bike. i ride XC
  • 4 1
 Price point for something equivalent a few years back would've been ~300USD I guess. Then we went to 27.5/29", multiple freehub options and general goodness of price increases. Progress.
  • 10 0
 Got them on sale for 385€ with ARD included, hard to beat at that price.
  • 26 6
 @maddcow: at this price it is a good deal for a wheelset. Otherwise considering that those hubs are probably rebranded Koozer or ARC costing 70€ delivered to your door, spokes are basic so consider 50€ to your door, alloy rims 30mm retail for less than 100€ to your door so you can built the same wheel for less than 250€, cost for a company is probably 100-150€ without the cheap Chinese labour assembling it. So 3-4x times the production cost isn't exactly a bargain. Hope wheel are very well priced comparatively, barely more expensive yet manufactured and built in a country paying decent wages.
  • 4 3
 Exactly my first thought! I was also thinking if this could be a carbon wheelset (which would then be actually cheap).
  • 12 3
 I just built a Pro 4, Sapim Race, Spank 359 rear for £275. The front will be £100 less when I do it. That’s £450 for the pair. I know which I would rather have.
  • 16 0
 Where's the guy claiming dt swiss 350 ex471s can be had new for $400?
  • 24 1
 @Mazador: when I was your age a pack of bubblegum cost 25¢
  • 21 2
 "a light wheelset makes you feel like a superhero"

@nozes: Like the incredible hulk when you smash them to bits?
  • 2 0
 @nojzilla: hope supplies stans tape and valve, i know from experience
  • 4 0
 I bought a pair of these recently as my spare wheelset with heavy dh tyres for bigger days away. Only 2 rides so far but £400 for a brand new dh capable pre taped and valved wheelset looked good value when shopping around. The hub noise is a bit annoying but it's my only complaint.
  • 1 1
 @Noeserd: Fitted?
  • 1 0
 @nojzilla: when you said "no tubeless" i thought no tubeless related item at all, sorry. Yes it comes not fitted
  • 25 2
 I can't brag on this wheelset enough. Nukeproof did what nobody else would. They kept my 2017 Kona Process 153 relevant by being the only reasonably priced 142mm x 12mm spaced rear hub with FAST engagement in 27.5.

I have a Boost fork, but not a Boost rear hub and needed bomber wheels but the only FAST engaging hub in 142mm x 12mm x 27.5" had to be a custom build.

I could not find a wheelset online with a rear wheel for less than $500 in the rear spacing I needed that was a matching set, let alone set up tubeless.

Anything I found in 142mm is now gravel spec.

THANK YOU NUKEPROOF ofr upgrading the wheel spec & giving older bikes access.

Had them since September and haven't had to true them yet. I've already exploded my Roval rear on my DH bike twice in a month.
  • 10 5
 @nojzilla: What? Now it's a problem to tape the godamn wheels and screw on a pair of valves all of a sudden?
  • 4 0
 Find a quality alloy wheelset for the same price. Keyword: FIND. Other than that, when these go on sale they are second to none. I got a Horizon V1 wheelset for $275 shipped, taped, and valved for tubeless. They have been bombproof, and from what I know about the V2's these are even better.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: I just saw a pair of those Sam Hill wheels for £380 brand new in non-boost. An adapter for the front would be an easy buy.
  • 3 1
 @pakleni: not for me no
but, when a wheel comes cheaper set up out of the box an one doesn't....or like the Spank simmilar price an set up out the box I guess some people might pick that. Especially when that wheel is in stock ready for despatch but, the Hope has a 4 week lead time.....
An I'm a Hope fan boy
  • 2 0
 @Mazador: These wheels would have been $450 in 2009 just from accounting for inflation
  • 13 1
 Surprised/bummed that this is the top comment. How is this a “basic” wheel set? Show me an alternative that checks all the same boxes as this set, at a comparable price. Every Nukeproof wheel set I’ve had has been super reliable, hubs and rims, and I’m a guy that has destroyed hubs from multiple companies.

I have these and they’re amazing. The rear detensioned a bit after a few months of hard riding (measured with a tension meter, not a “ping test”), but a few minutes on the spoke wrench and they’re back to true and normal. In my experience retensioning is a normal part of the new wheel process usually.

This is a fantastic wheelset at an amazing price.
  • 4 0
 @jaame: I was able to buy the V2's as a mismatched set. Boost front & 142 rear. At the time, no other wheelset was available in the enduro parameter with that engagement with a boost front and non-boost rear.

Every wheelset was either 100mm front/142mm rear or Boost front/rear.
  • 4 3
 @friendlyfoe: Here you go: Superstar Components. Same quality Asian rims but on UK-made hubs and UK-assembled (i.e. paying someone a decent wage) and still cheaper for similar weights (below £300/$420). They do also have sets for a similar price but those are generally lighter and on "fancier" rims (either lighter SS ones or other brands like Mavic, Stans etc).

I have no experience with Bontrager wheels but PB just had an article about their new $350 set. They are more trail-oriented but also lighter, so I can't imagine using thicker-walled rims to make them "enduro" would add $200?

@msusic You're talking facts here. I absolutely get paying up for something fancy/light/superior material/boutique/better in whatever way. But the fact people here let themselves be told the region of $600 like these or the WTB Proterra is "cheap" for the most basic set of strong but heavy alu rims on rebranded catalogue hubs made and assembled using cheap labour is astonishing.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: As an owner of two older bikes with unfashionable axle spacings / axle diameters, I've found Bitex's hubs to solve my need for relatively inexpensive, bombproof replacement hubs. That said, I may checkout these nukeproofs in the future.
  • 2 0
 @bananowy: Just a quick look on the superstar website and it looks like only the 3 pawl hub comes in at that price with the 6 pawls starting at 400 pounds and going up to 500. The Nukeproof also have twice as many POE meaning you're actually getting quicker engagement for the same price. That makes them equal in price to the next cheapest option on the market. This is all assuming that they don't blow up of course. I have no horse in this race lol. I spent the extra on DT 350 hubs so will worry about replacing them the next time hub standards change.
  • 5 0
 Inflation is upon us big time. You'll look back in 5 years and realize that what was expensive in 2019 will be a bargain for the same price in late 2021.
  • 7 1
 @woofer2609: wait, injecting several trillion dollars into the economy causes inflation??? Who could have guessed?
  • 1 0
 @rodeostu: I looked at the Bitex. Couldn't justify them. The guy who is a wheel builder on here out of the Northeast recommended them but I just didn't want to b/c no recognition or dealer knowledge.

Was able to buy them direct from a US Nukeproof dealer down the road @ridesmoothbro . Just walked in and picked them up and he can handle service if ever an issue so another plus.

From what I could tell, I would assume that Factor, Bitex & Nukeproof (probably Hunt Bros too) are virtually the same product. They all have that steel cleat embedded in the HG cassette body to prevent grooving the body & maybe??? maybe the same engagement?
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: factor is Novatec, indeed it was originally marketed as Novatec Factor. Nukeproof Neutron hubs were Novatec. Hunt also were Novatec (maybe still are, I don’t know). I know they say the Superstar Tesla is a made in UK hub, but it seems to have very Novatechy internals too. I mean, there are only two factories making 90% of all bicycle hubs or something like that aren’t there?
  • 8 2
 @blowmyfuse: Factor, Bitex, and Nukeproof V2 are all very different hubs. They do not share any of the same parts. I could be wrong, but I don't believe Bitex or the V2 Horizon hubs are made by Novatec - just looking at the physical characteristics of the hubs.

Novatec manufacture hubs for Factor (who have boots on the ground in Georgia - very good people). Novatec also produced the V1 Horizon hubs, but NukeProof used cheaper internals while using the same hubshell as Factor. The nice thing here is you can upgrade your V1's to the same internals as Factor and they will be pretty much issue free after. Novatec also manufacture hubs for Hunt.

Bitex have been around for quite some time, and they look to be reasonably good performers for the price. You do have a distributor for Bitex in NC I believe.

NukeProof V2 hubs are an off the shelf hub, using the same internals that you can see Spank, SuperStar, Atom Lab, Boyd, Dartmoor and a number of others have or are currently using. The tell tale sign is that signature 102 points of engagement. NukeProof and CRC has a good history of leaving customers high and dry when things go sideways, and especially after they discontinue a product, so it's good you got them from a local dealer. They refuse to support customers with V1 hubs as far as I can tell from people who have contacted me for help with those hubs.

Factor, those guys provide amazing support. Second to none, in my experience.
  • 3 1
 @jaame: FYI, while Factor may be a spin-off of Novatec, they have an Amercian HQ and currently do their own thing. Just saying they are Novatec is selling them short, IMHO.
  • 2 0
 I build my own wheels. Right now I'm having trouble fining rims and hubs. Finding pretty good deals at retail, I could hardly find the parts (DT 350 hubs + EX 1500 hoops, or Stans hoops, etc. + spokes and nipples) to build a wheel set at this price, and that includes no labor. I'd say that if these are pretty sturdy (hoops, spokes, and driver pawls, etc.), this is a good value.

Regarding weight, while light hoops do allow slightly faster acceleration (as noted), heavier hoops maintain rolling speed better over chunk, etc. So the weight penalty is negated a bit. What matters for most people is whether the wheels hold up to abuse.
  • 4 0
 @privateer-wheels: I’m not trying to sell them short. I think they are really nice hubs as you know. As with any factory, there is a range of products from Novatec... I’m just saying that most companies don’t actually make their own hubs... or any parts for that matter.
I’m surprised about Spank though. I was under the impression the first gen Spike and Oozy hubs were made by Novatec but then Spank went their own way. I though the Hex drive hubs were made in house actually. You learn something new every day.

If I could have got a set of Factor hubs from a local spot I would have done. I like them better than Hope, but Hope are made and available locally plus they have the spares backup for as long as you want. It’s pretty unbeatable for someone based in the UK. So, not pissing on Factor or Novatec at all. The Novatec Neutron hubs I had on my Mega were shite though, but so would anything else have been at the price I’ll wager.
  • 4 3
 @jaame: I got ya. I just would like people to recognize Factor isn't just a label managed from the far east is all =)

As for Spank, if you google their freehub, you will see it's identical to the NP one above. I think Spank did some work on their hubshell/axle/axle ends in house perhaps, but not the engagement. Atom Lab has run this freehub for years before Spank used it, and I believe were involved in its original design.

Hope are great. I wish they were more available in North America since COVID. Impossible to get them in any quantity. But as you mention, spares and replacements are usually easy to get, and usually at a fair price.
  • 4 2
 Issue that I'm having with these is that they're not really something people would upgrade to.

If you destroy your wheels and want robust wheels that can take a beating and don't cost much you have huge selection of affordable take offs for 1/3rd of the price (any bike brands out there has similar wheels on cheaper bikes) and people are selling them for 150-200 euros.
Being creative and shopping around you can get take off Newmen SL A30 rims + Laser or DLight spokes and ZTTO ratchet hubs (DT copy) with robust 36T ratchet rings for 250 euro! Very robust wheelset that weighs 1750gr with tape and valves (I built one myself).

If you really want to upgrade, you're more likely to go for a more premium wheels such as DT 1501 or 1700 series which again can be found as take offs or on sale in the case of 1700 for close to these OR you can get tried and tested combo with 350 hubs, butted spokes and XM/EX rims for as much.
  • 7 4
 NEVER NOVATEC, NOT EVEN ONCE

www.pinkbike.com/photo/20328394
www.pinkbike.com/photo/20061696

I've had good luck with Bitex hubs tho. They are solid.
  • 1 0
 @TheBlueBear: or you could get 2 pieces of stale bazooka joe gum for a penny!
  • 1 2
 @privateer-wheels: I completely agree about Factor Components.

Ben tried to get me something at the time, but he didn't have stock of my specific wheel when I pulled trigger. He had it for a minute...but then it got bought.

And yes, I believe the Nukeproof dealer has expressed that if you buy a Nukeproof direct from Chain Reaction, you can't just go to the Nukeproof dealer for resolution. You have to turn to the big blue website which gets tough for the "click/buy/break" club. Nukeproof seems to support his customer base very well.

Heck, I'm in Asheville and could drive 15 minutes and put physical hands on I9 1/1 wheels, but they're not 142mm.
  • 6 2
 @blowmyfuse: I have had a number of people come my way as a last resort for broken V1 hubs, where Nukeproof has basically says "go talk to Novatec". I really don't think that's right to do if the product has your name and logo on it. They just seem to wash their hands of V1 owners, instead of deal with the issue.

Fortunately Factor will step up, and supply me with internals to help these people. There is a cost of course, but you get a reliable 120 poe in return, so it's a fix and an upgrade. Microspline is also an alternative for these V1 hubs that NP has not cared to introduce for retrofit, and I don't know why as they should easily sell them to make a buck while keeping people supported. They could also offer these 120 poe upgrades kits too, I'm sure.

Good to hear your friend and his customer base gets support. Hopefully people buy from him and not CRC!

And that Ben, he is a good fella.
  • 3 0
 @blowmyfuse: I've built my own wheels from Bitex hubs.

As an entry point into wheel building, I thought they were really good - much better than my old SRAM hubs where the driver would fall out while trying to lace up spokes. They're not expensive, and for riders who aren't: a.) going huge; b.) riding through rivers of mud; or c.) putting out Nino Schurter quantities of torque - offer reliable performance and good engagement.
  • 2 0
 @nozes: There's all kinds of situations like this in the bicycle world. Take the now virtually extinct 23c road tires for instance. Because the smaller tire at higher pressure transmits so much high-frequency vibration to the rider they subjectively 'feel' faster than bigger tires. Low rotational inertia may give you a disproportionate feeling of performance, but bear in mind a wheel with higher rotational inertia will 'hold' more speed over roots and rocks (it has more 'stored' energy when you are freewheeling). Besides for those people that ignore science in search of 'feeling like a superhero' I suggest jumping off the roof of your house:, feel like you're flying for 0.5 seconds and the insurance deductible will still be less than what ultra light wheels cost.
  • 2 0
 @nozes: right up until your first bad landing or trip through a rock garden
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: If it's that hard to find, I highly suggest bailing on that bike while it has value.
  • 1 0
 @nzandyb: that’s an interesting one. I keep reading this about 32mm tyres offering lower rolling resistance on the road bike. I find it hard to believe simply because I once ride my wife’s bike to the servo with flat tyres to pump them up - 35mm slicks on a 26” MTB no less. I had to pedal all the way there, then pumped the tyres up to 80psi on the air line. As soon as I got back on wow, the bike flew. I recall being blown away by how it rolled. Now people are telling me I should take the 25s off my road bike and put 32s on at 40 psi and I’m more than a little skeptical. Your explanation is very plausible though.
  • 2 1
 Same goes to carbon bikes. Overhyped overpriced and planned obsolete.
  • 3 0
 @nzandyb: Science also tells me that 80 to 90% of my riding is climbing.
I'm well below the average weight here and my jumping days are mostly over,so I can get away with a lighter wheelset.
What I don't want is the industry pushing heavy everything leaving some people like me without options,just to avoid warrantys.
  • 1 0
 I remember a good deal on replacement wheels was the Azonic Outlaws at $200USD from JensonUSA or PricePoint...sometimes on sale they would go for $175. They were solid wheels, the older ones had 36 spokes too. Imagine upgrading these Nukeproofs to 36 spokes!
  • 4 0
 @jaame: Modern tire construction is way different from 35mm 26” slicks. The new super fast rolling wide tires are paper thin and flexible / “supple” as heck. That way, regardless of how wide your tire is (okay, they’re not perfect, but going from 25 to 28 or 28 to 32 or so isn’t a big deal), you are effectively riding on an air cushion only. Older tires, because of how thick and inflexible they were, added significant flexing losses the wider you went.

Yes, there still are some losses because no tire is absolutely perfectly flexible, but the added suspension benefit greatly outweighs this. Every bump you feel is energy being taken away from your ride.
  • 1 1
 @nojzilla: well price should be directly proporsional to the quality of the manufacture of the components you buy, I own a set of horizon v1 and manufacturing
tolerances are shit, from bearing recess not being parallel and causing the through axle to jam, it gets even worse if you assemble complete with free hub as it won't align properly, even with the slightest amount of preload when you tighten the axle with the wheel on the bike it becomes even worse. pauls tend to bite and the ratchet marking the frehub body from flex and/or misalignement, the freehub seal moves out of it's position and gets mangled between the hub and freehub, the drag is on another level. bearing quality is shit, comparing that with a cheap dt swiss m1900 rear hub that fits perfectly together after 4 years of use they are pricey and bad quality. They can't compete with the build quality of a hope pro4 in any way, not even close. As for the v2, have not tested them but I'll take my chances with something different, like cheap dt swiss
  • 5 0
 @rickybobby18: Shows how spoiled some people are if they regard this as "most basic", hope they never have to ride a real low level wheelset.
This is a solid mid-level pair of wheels, just below something like the Pro 4 / Ex511 wheelset I have - and anything above that level is marginal gains IMO.
And as I commented elsewhere here, 2kg to 2.1kg is on par for 29in enduro wheels. Any lighter for this kind of money and they are very unlikely to be strong enough.
  • 1 0
 @adespotoskyli: Man that sucks, did you try warrenty? I can honestly say over the years Ive had 4 nuke proof complete wheels an one hub with no problems
  • 3 0
 @MaplePanda: "every bump you feel is energy taken away ..." yup can vouch to this. I was stuck on the hardtail for a while and always thought hardtail are faster climbers. With my group we mostly climb on fire roads, smoothish to quite choppy. Never really felt that I had it any easier than my friends with their enduro full-sus. When I finally received my new full-sus I thought it would he harder to follow the group but it wasn't at all, if anything it is easier to follow the group the more the trails get choppy. Same wheels/tires/pressure, only difference if I now have 150mm of rear travel. Obviously there is a limit to everything and the smoother your trail/road the more advantage goes to high pressure and rigidity but it was an eye opening experience to me.
  • 1 0
 @nojzilla: no, didn't bothered. Kept riding untill I destroyed the rear rim and laced my old dt swiss with a new rim. Repacking, sending it back to crc for inspection etc not worth it
  • 1 1
 @chakaping: agreed. The industry will banish you now for disrupting the mindset.
  • 1 0
 @MaplePanda: I was given a set of 32mm tyres with my road bike but I never put them on. They’re in the box with it right now, on the Ever Given. When it finally arrives, if that ever happens, I will give them a go.
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: your really going to blow your fuse when you find out I took a pawl out of the hub on my 2017 process to make the rear suspension work better. Lol
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: “The suspension works real good with no chain!”
  • 2 0
 @jaame: exactly, take out a pawl and the chain has less effect on the suspension and you can accelerate faster. Definitely doesn’t sound as cool as a high engagement hub though which is all that matters. Bzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzbzzzzzzzzzzz
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Ya I don't see the hype for high engagement hubs.
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: I should have sold you my Industry Nine wheels I ended up letting go with the bike I just sold (had the OEM Easton's in the garage that I'm selling now - happy I only have the Boost front still)
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: I wish there was as much choice in silent hubs as there is in loud ones.
  • 4 0
 @jaame: Beating a dead horse here, but after the last hub I nuked after only 40 miles, I gave in and got a DT swiss 350, low engagement. Its not silent, but its very, very quiet. And by all accounts the most reliable hub out there.
  • 1 1
 @hamncheez: with all the rudy stuff in Pisgah I like a high engagement hub for getting up technical stuff and then if you're coming out of a curve trying to give a pedal kick it sucks to have that dead gap where you miss a pedal stroke trying to give it a crank because there's no resistance
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: there’s absolutely nothing to go wrong with it. All hubs should be made like that.
  • 2 0
 @nozes: That's not science, that's an anecdote and EXACTLY the point I'm making.
  • 2 0
 @jaame: modern tires don't have outrageous internal hysteresis losses like those of the past. When tires of the past flexed they absorbed a ridiculous amount of energy... so to stop them flexing you could just inflate until rock solid. High-end modern tires are considerably more efficient in this way, dropping the pressure doesn't result in disproportionate energy losses, coupled with tubeless technology (the tube is another substantial energy sink when 'flexed') and you have a system which is both inherently efficient AND creates further efficiency by effectively damping and rebounding road vibration/bumpiness. This stuff is also super easy to test in both the lab and real world, being skeptical is one thing but empirical data doesn't lie unless someone is purposefully ignoring important variables (ie: testing performance in contrived conditions such as in rolling resistance machines).
  • 3 0
 @nzandyb: I am sold on giving it a go, and I appreciate the education you have provided here. Thanks for taking the time to type it up.
  • 1 0
 @maddcow: quite a late reply i'm aware, but how did you find them? thinking of buying a pair
  • 1 0
 @mackay66: They've been gathering dust as my spare wheelset until I put them on my ebike a year ago. 2k km since then with ~1.5k km on rocky Ligurian trails and no issues so far.
  • 50 10
 Wow, how does anyone have time to ride on their wheels with all the research they are putting into building the perfect wheelset for the perfect price? Pinkbike commenters are a bunch of tight-A$$ed penny pinchers. What is your time worth? God, if I had to spend 4 hours researching every product I buy, what components make it up, where they are manufactured, how much that company is paying their workers, raw material cost, etc. I'd never buy anything. I have alot going on in my life outside of wheelsets. I probably have to buy 2-3 things per day related to house, home and family; this just isn't an option. You do your best, do a quick search for a highly rated product with fast shipping and order it. Geesh.
  • 3 1
 This makes sense if you only ever order said product one time. A couple of us have been at this for a little while. Wink

(edit: no, I didn't downvote b/c I think you have a valid point) Smile
  • 3 2
 could've used a trigger warning for that one
  • 21 2
 They have time because they have a different life/lifestyle than you. Some are young, some are unmarried, some are engineers , some work jobs with alot of free time ? Its also possible that they actually enjoy the search/research part. Maybe they don't drink, or don't watch netflix ? It's a shocking thought that not everyone is in your position, its a crazy world out there.
  • 6 0
 Gawd is in the details. I enjoy the research, installation and maintenance of parts put on my bike. Same goes for researching wheel parts and lacing my own wheels.
Less money spent = more time to play.
You also have a fantastic feel for your bike and know if something is going to go wrong the more you tinker with it.
In addition, no one will ever take the time to get your bike *perfectly* tuned except you.
That being said, yeah, sometimes you just plug and play.Wink
Homebrewing is a good analogy here; the more time you put in, the better the product. Does it save money? IDK, you probably just drink more.
  • 4 0
 Not everyone enjoys things for the same reasons. Some people get long-term enjoyment out of feeling like they analyzed every detail and purchased the perfect wheelset. Others don't. It doesn't really matter either way.
  • 6 0
 @rickybobby18: absolutely. I love bikes but there is no way I would be allowed to spend all that time riding (by my wife). Take now for example. She’s in the kitchen cooking my dinner. I’m “helping the kids with their homework”.

Also, I love hand picking bike parts, from frames right down to spoke nipples. There is only one thing better than buying high quality bike parts, and that is buying high quality bike parts and feeling like a got an awesome deal. Paying full whack definitely takes the shine off the purchase for me.

Talking about bike parts is also very enjoyable and satisfying.
  • 5 1
 @DGWW: Yea but they whine about it and judge people. Same with every other product that gets released and has a PB article. I'm not seeing them chime in saying "Oh this is a lovely product at a reasonable price for what you are getting as a plug-and-play, ready-to-go wheelset. I personally would rather spend 46 hours researching and building my own wheelset to save 12 cents, but to each their own". Its more likely "WTF, this isn't a good price, I could build the same thing for 25% less, they are raping the consumer and you're an a$$hole if you buy this.".......paraphrasing of course :-D
  • 1 0
 @yupstate: I think some people just need an outlet for them to bitch and complain. People in their real lives probably don't put up with it so pinkbike is a great option. Almost like a therapy session. You can complain about how terrible every product is all day haha. I'd say just going out on the trails is a better option but many prefer Facebook or PB for taking out aggression.

These seem like an awesome option for a wheelset ready to go. Guess I've never really done a deep dive on wheels though, I just want something that lasts haha.
  • 36 0
 Maxim. "Bontrager's maxim holds true."
  • 1 0
 Maximum effort!
  • 10 0
 These are some of my pet peeves. One is bad grammar, the other is the notion that Keith Bontrager invented the light, strong, cheap maxim that pervades the MTB community. People were saying that when he was in nappies! My grandad was saying it in WW2!
  • 8 0
 @jaame: He was mountainbiking during WW2!??
  • 2 0
 @pakleni: Plenty of rough terrain with all those bomb craters.
  • 4 0
 @jaame: Good point, some caveman likely understood the "light, strong, cheap" principle when his fellow cavemen demanded he make arrowheads that never broke but flew just as far.
  • 1 0
 Except for Deore brakes. Lighter and work better than SLX and XT.

And OneUp droppers. Current version is light, long and (relatively) cheap.

And Deity Deftraps. Lighter than TMacs and rear entry pins make it better for rocky terrain where pins routinely get mangled.
  • 4 0
 @chrod: ooga booga
  • 25 0
 These wheels are fantastic. And they're not overly stiff on a haedtakl, which is a plus.
  • 30 0
 I agree, great on a haedtakl.
  • 40 0
 I only ride haedtakl. You guys can have the furdpenkons.
  • 19 0
 @JohanG: Furdpenkons have way better roaslvitten, but I still can't give up my haedtakl. It's just too fun!
  • 16 0
 Hey guys obviously haedtaklporka knows what he’s talking about
  • 10 0
 Sounds like you guys have never tried a varfmaddun, climbs like a haedtakl but smooth like a furdpenkon.
  • 20 0
 IKEA has entered the chat.
  • 3 1
 First heard about the horizon wheels through your channel. If/when my current wheels die out I'm definitely going for these.
  • 6 0
 @mtbracken: These are the funniest half dozen posts I've read on here in a long time. My sense of humor is obviously not complicated.
  • 19 3
 I find it strange that their wheels don’t really make an appearance on their mega and giga build kits.
  • 1 0
 Kelan Grant has a video up with him rocking these out on his Mega 290. He doesn't say much about the performance but he does state the CR team will be running them this season.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9AGFgoFtyU
  • 1 1
 @vinnylow: yeah but look at all their factory builds. Of the mega and giga, only the pro build alloy mega gets their own wheels. The rest get ringle or dt or mavic. It’s not just this model year either, 2019 and 2020 were similar. Just an observation really, I find it strange.
  • 4 0
 @Afterschoolsports: few reasons we choose not to spec our own wheels on some models, at the “higher end” riders like “branded products” to compare directly with some bike equivalent competitors, so we choose to use DT Swiss or Mavic’s (we also try keep the RS models as close to the prev. Years team CRC bike spec. To support the team). Then we’re kind of priced out where there is space in the range to spec as our own wheels are not cheap, so strangely at OEM some of the mid range DT Swiss is much better value to spec. To achieve the price points we are aiming at. Hope that helps.
  • 2 0
 @Nukeproofinternational: I mean what you’ve said makes perfect sense. It’s just always left me a little less confident in the product when it’s come to wheel shopping time. Don’t worry, you’re always still on the list.
  • 19 4
 Am I the only one who feels like every freehub ratchet feels stupid after DT Swiss star ratchet?
  • 10 0
 Ever heard of the new EXP fail? ....You well could be.
  • 12 0
 @IluvRIDING: The same goes for EXP: stupid after the utterly reliable original star ratchet.
  • 3 3
 Obviously you haven’t tried CK
  • 4 0
 I've got a DT Swiss hub w 54t star ratchet on one of my bikes, and an i9 hub on another (older, pre-1/1 and hydra). I prefer the i9.
  • 8 0
 @Frank191: King hubs suck to work on, aren’t more reliable, and have high coasting drag.

They’re also awfully expensive. At that price I’d do Onyx hubs.
  • 1 2
 @wyorider: except you don’t have to work on them and they have no drag of adjusted properly. Get onyx if you want them to break but at least they will warranty them.
  • 1 1
 @Frank191: The simple fact you are having that conversation proves my original post.
  • 1 0
 I had an old DT swiss Hugi hub with a star ratchet fail. It was freewheeling both directions. I also had standard freehubs with pawls to fail, but not in such way. I was always able to get back.
  • 12 1
 Doesnt look good for Roval right now, with their $90 more expensive 20 poe hub and 28 spokes :-/
  • 7 1
 Roval is 200g lighter, so thats not negligible. I'd say the $90 is more negligible.
  • 7 2
 Also, star ratchet >>> pawls
  • 2 1
 @okavango: Shades of grey. I've had this rear wheel and hub (w/102t) on an e-bike for a while now and no problems, no 'popping', and inside the freehub the pawls are like-new. Sample size of one.....but I think the difference in reliability is negligible.
  • 2 0
 I’d pay extra for star ratchet guts all day.
  • 8 0
 These are good wheels and great value. @Nukeproofinternational was kind enough to send me a pair after CRC denied a 3rd/4th warranty on the old V1 Novatec cheese hub wheels which was incredibly empathetic and kind of him.

So far the only issue I have had is that I managed to induce one solid ding/flat spot in the rear wheel. This was user error in that I was riding a Michelin Wild Enduro tire that had a slight/tear leak. Since then I've added some Michelin DH34's to the sled and the wheels have held up great. I know I'll need to replace the rim before I start downhilling with them as they'll get all buggered within a run or two due to the flat spot and uneven tension, but so far I'd say that these qualify as mountain bike wheels. The same couldn't be said for the V1's.

I'm aware that the weight of these wheels is not in the 'light' category, but NP claims that these are good for DH use. Based on my experience so far, I see no reason to doubt that these would be capable of DH use.
  • 8 0
 Ive ridden this set of wheels for 8 months now. Brand new out of the box. No loose spokes. True. Fast engagement. Tubeless set up is a breeze. These wheels have more value than the price tag.
  • 4 0
 I bet they help you ride smooth, bro.
  • 5 0
 Usually I'm a Hope fan but, lack of stock.
Had a NP Neutron front for a while now an it's held up,tubeless set up works though needed a tube to seat the tyre no biggie.
Just bought a Horizon rear for my new build. out of the box.. very impressive for the £
  • 7 0
 Con - can't decide where to line the valve up on the tyres. Damn. This wheelset can't be on my short-list.
  • 3 0
 Everyone knows if you lace your own wheels you can build a better set for cheaper. The thing is, 95 percent of riders aren't interested in doing this. And that's good for us, because if everyone chose to do it this way then the price of wheel components would increase.
  • 2 0
 Weight seems very much on par for a sturdy enduro wheelset, this could be just what I need for a mullet experiment.
Just a bit concerned that 102 POE sounds worryingly high, as I've found less POE hubs have proved more reliable in the past. Hopefully it's a proven hub design from Novatec (and not one of their exploding ones from a few years ago)?
  • 3 0
 @RecklessJack: Contrary to your opinion Novatech's 42T drive ring and pawls were historically prone to failure. Their 60T hubs provide higher engagement and better reliability.
  • 2 0
 If it helps, I'm 100KG on a 55lb ebike...and even in 'turbo' mode + lowest gear + low cadence pedal smashing, I've had zero issues. Had the 102t hub for several months now. Pawls look like new. It's a bit loud but some people like that.
  • 3 0
 Back in my day you could get dt 350s laced to 511s for a haypenny and a spit shine to the shop managers shoes! *Shakes fist to economics*
  • 1 0
 On the high end of the list, I recently bough a set of crank brothers carbon synthesis rims laced to factor hubs... I love them so far. Good balance of comfortable and laterally stiff. Factor rear hub is very quiet and ~120 pts of engagement... climbing is great.
  • 1 0
 Got them in Feb this year and after about 280 miles, something (hub???) is creaking and sounds exactly like this:
youtu.be/7i8534rlCMs

I swapped the XT M8100 derailleur with another one from my other bike. Still creaking. Then I took the cassette and chain from the other bike and put them on and it’s still creaking. Still trying to investigate where it’s coming from but so far based on the process of elimination, it’s pointing to the hub or freehun
  • 1 0
 I've had similar, tracked to freehub. Greased the hell out of it, went away. Tried a new freehub, same again.
  • 1 0
 OMG I have the same creaking sound! I thought it was the BB (it was due for a replacement to be fair), the derailleur clutch, even the pedal spindle. Nope, it has to be the freehub and it seems I'm right!
  • 1 0
 Sheesh I forgot about my post. Found out it was my chain. Lubing didn’t get rid of the creaking… got a new chain instead.
  • 4 0
 The price is awesome though
  • 4 1
 They look good but who wouldn’t rather spend an extra 80 quid and get some DT 481/471/511 on Hope Pro 4s?
  • 1 0
 These hubs are pretty great, 102t engagement, cheap freehubs, replaceable bearings and pawls.
  • 2 1
 Been running the rear wheel for 1 1/2 months now, it's been great so far. Strong, good engagement for climbing and acceleration and it's not too loud. It also looks nice and for the price it's hard to beat.
  • 1 0
 Just picked up the Neutron V2 wheelset for £275 delivered. Now that is a cracking value.

Wheels seem really nice and went up tubeless with a track pump and no sealant. Still holding 3 days later (i will add spunk)
  • 2 0
 I'm on the fence between Horizon V2 and the DT Swiss ex 1700. The DT is about 100 g lighter (rear) and has the new 36t 350 hub. Thoughts?
  • 4 0
 Ride a 36t hub then ride a 102t hub and then try 36t again........ you'll want the higher engagement hub as the difference is pretty noticeable.
  • 1 4
 @dhrideruk: Yes, but not when your hub is f*cked because of all those poe.
  • 3 0
 @c-radicallis: Did you read the review? Seb said he had problem with the old Horizon wheels so purposely tried to do the same to these but couldn’t break them.
  • 4 0
 The Nukes have higher engagement and you can upgrade them to have a quiet hub (not mentioned in article - huge selling point). I'd rather have that then save 100g.
  • 1 1
 @dhrideruk: As far as i can tell he only rode them for a "full winter". While the fact that he broke the V1's proves that version was either complete crap, or just had bad luck, the fact that he didn't break these in such a small amount of time doesn't really prove anything. Most people won't be riding these wheels for just a winter.
  • 2 1
 @c-radicallis: hubs just don't implode because they have more engagement. The hubs being used in these wheels are okay hubs I think. They are used by numerous other brands. You don't have to look far to tell who they are. Atom Lab, SuperStar components, Spank, Dartmoor, Boyd they have all used or are currently using the same hub internals in their hubs.

For me the most concerning thing is NukeProof has a history of not supporting their product in the event of failure, as seen on the V1 wheels. I've supported a good number of V1 customer NukeProof left high and dry with repair/upgrade parts for their hubs.
  • 1 1
 Around 2 kg, affordable(ish) and reasonably strong. Seems like a decent deal.

DT star ratchet hubs have a little less coasting drag but these engage faster. Depending on local trail conditions these are an attractive option.
  • 1 1
 These have been on my radar for a while to replace my stock rovals (with 360 hubs) on my Status when they die. Easy to buy in mullet off the shelf and seemingly bombproof. I'd rather get a hope wheelset but don't really rate the fortus rims
  • 1 1
 360 hub converts to star ratchet with 4 parts. I’d do that.
  • 1 2
 I bought V1 wheelset in 2018 for £300 (great value IMO) which lasted about 18 months before wrote of the freehub body on the back wheel. Bought a replacement then obliterated that and the ratchet ring about 3 months later. I was happy with them until that happened, and loved the loud rear hub. Granted, I'd never stripped and serviced the freehub (which I will do for all future wheels now) but I think I'd still be hesitant to buy NP again if I'm honest. Now I have DT Swiss wheels I'll probably never go back. These new wheels might be used by the CRC EWS team, but probably not for the life span that the general paying customer would expect to get.
  • 4 2
 @ajl-mtb The reviewer here specifically mentions any issue with the V1 has been overcome and the wheels have caused zero issues. Seb went out of his way to make them fail and find similar issues, but to no avail. These wheels are seriously reliable and outperforms the 1700 series of DT Swiss by miles. Honestly for your next pair of wheels these should be up there for consideration.
  • 3 0
 @chillescarpe: You probably mean the 1900 series? The 1700s are now 350 hubs and ex511 rims IIRC.
  • 2 0
 Increasing POE means smaller teeth in the ratchet, equals more chance of chafing and slippage. They do sound nice though.
  • 2 0
 @jaame: it does, but given Seb has actually said in his review he tried to break them I don't think there is any issues with these ones!
  • 3 1
 @dhrideruk: yeah but he didn’t ride them and only them for three years. I bet with 3000 miles on they would be more likely to skip than a trusty Pro 4 with its “shitty” 44 Poe!
  • 1 0
 @chillescarpe: Yes I read the review and took it all on board. I hope the V2 is much improved and people love them, I loved the V1's until they went wrong. And I acknowledge that there's potential my negligence in maintenance might have contributed to their demise. I think everyone tends to factor experience in to decision making, I was just just being honest in saying I probably won't buy them. I have other Nukeproof components on my trail bike, and I've got a serious crush on the 29er Giga, so I don't hold it against Nukeproof at all!
  • 1 0
 Not that it matters, NP offer 2 sets of pawls. Loud and silent. They seem like a good value wheel, I have a set and no problems yet.
  • 2 0
 I wouldnt say this is a heavy wheelset , Hopes fortus 30 is almost 400g heavier
  • 1 0
 Hope rims have always been ridiculously heavy, but if you compare to a DT/Hope wheelset you save 200g for about £80
  • 1 0
 They do sell that as a DH wheelset TBF. Not excusing them for not offering a 30mm internal enduro wheelset though.
  • 3 2
 Well, the Hope Fortus rim is just stupid heavy tbh. For context the Nukeproff Horizon wheelset is 300 grams heavier than Newmen SL A.30 and probably not as strong as well, so i think it's fair to say that it's a heavy wheelset.
  • 2 0
 I'll take a few dents to the rim if I can save a major dent in my wallet. Lots to appreciate with these wheels.
  • 1 0
 I've been using the wheels for 4 months in the enduro sector now i have a little movement on the rear wheel
  • 1 0
 It would be great if they had 29 boost front wheels in stock. Been out of stock for a while now.
  • 3 1
 @seb. How do these compare to the equivalent Hunt wheels?
  • 1 0
 $562.98? They either really don't do rounding of non-UK prices or talked to SRAM
  • 5 4
 I've said it many many times. With wheels like this at this price there is just no need for plastic 2K ones!!
  • 1 2
 These wheels look fine too... but still think I’m going to a shop or wheel builder snd just building something on 350,101, or hope hubs and good alum rims for about the same price and weight.
  • 1 0
 You’ll pay more, even if you lace up the parts yourself.

I’ve built a lot of wheels over the years and seldom do because good prebuilts are cheaper most of the time.

That said, DT hubs and EX511s make for a bombproof build and are a pleasure to tension up.
  • 1 0
 Hunt Enduro Wide Wheels, tubeless out of the box, £399. That's no joke either.
  • 2 0
 Ach! Valve doesn't align with tire label....
  • 2 0
 600$ Alloy wheels so hot right now,
  • 1 0
 Over 500€ for a very basic wheelset is not cheap by any stretch of the imagination.
  • 6 9
 These are basically oem level wheels that nobody would buy because they already have the wheels that came on their bike, there are thousands of new take offs of similar quality for sale for less, and if you're upgrading you get something better.
  • 2 0
 The take offs aren't much cheaper since covid and ones like these save you having to research the specs and reputation of every house brand wheelset on Marketplace before it sells in four hours.

"Over 250 people currently viewing this item" if CRC store app is to be believed.
  • 1 0
 I guess, a fair comparison would be to a E1700 not E1900.
  • 1 0
 Bontrager's Maximum huh? I thought that would have been Lance.
  • 1 0
 Have this set on my 2020 Slayer, can confirm - good value and strong.
  • 1 1
 Why not take some photos of the product before the test !?
  • 3 1
 Go check the manufacturers website.
  • 1 0
 Because mountain bikes are supposed to be filthy?
  • 2 1
 Great wheels
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