Review: Oura Ring, The One to Rule Them All?

Apr 5, 2021
by Matt Wragg  
Sospel France Photo by Matt Wragg

Collecting health data to help your training is not a new phenomenon. Since Polar launched the first consumer heart rate monitor in the early 1980s it has become endemic among almost all professional athletes. In the beginning, athletes simply recorded their heart rates while training to understand how hard they were working, but in recent years the focus has widened collecting data away from the bike to understand how the body responds to training and how it recovers. As the technology advanced, further measures like HRV, the minute differences between each heartbeat, became possible to measure with consumer tech and sports scientists began to research what this long-used medical marker can tell us about our performance and condition. Today there are a few options on the market that record a range of metrics with the goal of optimising your performance and/or health, and the Oura ring is at the forefront of the current generation of advanced health-focused wearables.

Packed into the Oura ring's tiny titanium frame is an accelerometer, gyroscope, thermometer and an infrared, optical heart rate sensor. Not bad for something that weighs just 4-6g (claimed) and slips onto your finger. Using that array of sensors it measures sleep quality, sleep phases, pulse rate, HRV, skin temperature, movement/activity and respiratory rate through the Oura app. It extrapolates that information to give you daily updates on your condition, the main indicator being a daily readiness score based on a synthesis across all of the data fields. Battery life on the ring is extremely impressive - you can get 5-7 days continuous operation from a single charge (that goes down if you keep the Bluetooth connection active) and a full charge takes just 80 minutes.

Oura Ring Details
• 5-7 days battery life w/ 6 weeks memory
• Waterproof
• Titanium frame
• Accelerometer, gyroscope, body temperature sensor, PPG pulse sensors, Bluetooth LE
• Designs: Profile, Balance
• Colors: Silver, black, stealth, gold diamond
• Weight: 4-6 grams (depending on size)
• MSRP: $299 USD / €314
www.ouraring.com

The ring itself starts at $299 USD for the the standard version and charger. The standard ring is available in two profiles - Balance or Heritage - and comes in silver or black. If you are feeling fancy, you can upgrade the Heritage version to a stealth or gold version finish for a little over $100 more and the Balance has a diamond-studded option at $999. It is worth noting that the tech remains the same throughout the range - the price increases are for fancier finishes and precious metals. Unlike its main competitor, the Whoop strap, there is no monthly subscription or further cost and the app is free to use. This means that over a year the standard Oura ring comes out a little cheaper than the Whoop strap, which is $30 per month.


Sospel France Photo by Matt Wragg
Sospel France Photo by Matt Wragg


Getting Started

Before you purchase an Oura ring they send you a free-of-charge fitting kit with plastic rings to check your finger size. I have fairly average-sized hands (I'm usually a 9 for gloves) and the size 9 ring was the closest for me. With hindsight I wonder if I could have done with a slightly smaller ring as fit on the finger is important to get good readings. I appear to have relatively big knuckles and thin fingers - so although the 9 was a little loose on my finger I could not get the 8 over the knuckle, and if I could I almost certainly would have not been able to get it off again, which would make charging impossible.

Out of the box you need to pair the ring to the app. For the first use this needs to be done with the charging stand and app, once you have made the connection and charged the ring, simply slip it on your finger and let it get on with working. Reading online reviews there seems to be some hint that it is better to wear the ring on your non-dominant hand, although I was not aware of this at the time. My wife does not mind what wedding ring I wear, providing I wear one on my left ring finger, so I chose that as it is the only finger I am used to have a ring on and I cannot wear a ring on my right ring finger after crushing it under a concrete block as a teenager.

You will immediately have activity data and will begin receiving scores after your first night sleeping with the ring on. When it is active you can quickly check in on your progress through the day via the app. Oura say that the ring needs a little time at first to get to know you, they say a couple of weeks to set up baselines, then it will continuously learn and improve the longer you wear the ring. While it establishes your baselines, your scores are based on a proxy with similar metrics to you.

Sospel France Photo by Matt Wragg
Sospel France Photo by Matt Wragg
The Oura on its charging base. You can also log onto Oura's website to get a more detailed breakdown of your stats than is available in the app.

The main choice to make with the app is do you allow notifications? If you do allow them it will send you updates about your progress on the days activity goal, inactivity, bedtime and battery levels for the ring. If you do not want to receive these updates you can either choose to disallow notifications or place the ring in airplane mode which disables the ring's connectivity and you need to place the ring in the charger to re-establish a connection with the app (this is also worth keeping in mind if you are visiting anywhere you are concerned for your digital security).

The most complicated area with setup is if you wish to pull in data from other sources. For instance, if you are out riding the ring may register occasional heart rate readings and the movement, but it is nowhere near as in depth as you would record with a cycling computer, which then means a large part of your daily health information is not recorded and cannot be taken into account when the app is putting together your scores. To access this data becomes complicated because Oura will not pull data directly from third-party apps such as Strava or Garmin Connect. To import data from these sources on an iPhone you need to first connect your activity app to Apple Health, then connect the Oura app to Apple Health and get all the read/write permissions in order to share the sports data from your tracking app to Oura via Apple Health. With this many steps in the process it stood out in the setup process as being particularly tricky to get working correctly, especially because the rest of the setup ran so smoothly. The ring was only tested with an iPhone, but the Oura website states that you can set up similar links with Android to bring in outside data.

Using the Ring

The idea with the Oura ring is that you check in each morning to see how you are doing. On the main screen you are presented with your readiness score in the home page with brief summaries of three areas: readiness, sleep and activity. You can then follow each of these areas into a separate tab in the app to get a more detailed breakdown of the contributing factors. Readiness is calculated based on resting heart rate, HRV, respiratory rate and body temperature. It is worth mentioning here that the temperature reading is based on a skin measurement and should not be considered useful for medical diagnosis - I had COVID while wearing the ring and ran a fever for several days, but this was not picked up by the ring.

Oura claim that their tiny device has 99.9% correlation to a medical ECG device for heart rate and 98.4% for HRV, although there is little information about sampling rates and the resting heart rate consistently came in higher than on the Garmin HRM strap I use to take a manual HRV reading each morning. I have been taking manual HRV readings with the iThlete app using a Garmin/Polar strap since 2016, so I have a good background and have established a reasonable correlation between the scores I get on that app and how my body is recovering or responding. My readiness score and HRV readings from the Oura app did not correlate well with my manual readings and often how I felt. With the discrepancies like this between the two platforms it was a case of choosing which one to follow for a given day as they frequently told me quite different things. That said, maybe this is was an unfair situation for the Oura ring as I only used it for three months, compared to five years with iThlete. If I had stopped iThlete and focused on Oura the situation maybe it would have improved but as the ring was only with me to test I did not want to abandon my long-term health tracking.

Logging onto the app you are given your morning readiness score that pulls information from everything the Oura ring record. You can then go into one of the three sub-categories, sleep, readiness and activity, for a closer look at the area.

The sleep section looks at your total sleep time, time in bed, sleep efficiency (ie. quality) and resting heart rate. The Oura calculates your sleeping based on movement and heart rate, a technique called actigraphy, that has in-built limitations in differentiating between sleep phases. As part of the sleep information the app calculates what it thinks would be your ideal bedtime based on your recent sleep, although it continually recommended I head to bed at 8pm, which is early even for me. It is with the sleep score where I had my biggest issue with the Oura ring - it consistently under-recorded my sleep. On many nights it would register me going to bed at the correct time, but then decide that I was awake for up to an hour and a half after I was out cold. Talking to Oura technical support staff they tracked this down to my heartrate being consistently elevated in the evening and dropping slowly over the course of the night. That (relatively) high heart rate meant the sensor gave me low sleep efficiency and latency scores, reducing my sleep score and dragging my overall readiness score below my perceived levels and the levels extrapolated from my manual HRV reading. Reading online I have seen people suggest that the some other devices use an electrodermal sensor to improve accuracy on sleep tracking, but at present that is not something Oura offer.

Finally there is activity which is pretty self-explanatory as it is not so different from a $25 Fitbit-alike or the motion sensor built into your smartphone, counting steps and periods of inactivity. This was surprisingly valuable to me as the fact the Oura is a ring meant I had it on 24/7 while I would habitually leave my phone elsewhere and take my Garmin watch off when I was not training. That said, I did not turn on notifications for the movement updates as I have moral issues with about being told when to move by a gadget.

Limitations

From what I can work out, I did not have a typical experience with the Oura ring. Talking to a friend who used one for several years, he reported a far higher quality of data, which lead me to scrutinise the cause of my problems. I am open to the possibility that I have weird physiology - I have a bony lump in the base of my wedding ring finger, my resting pulse rate is very low (I have clocked it around 35bpm some mornings) and maybe my knuckle to finger width ratio means I cannot get a ring tight enough to the skin to get good readings. Unfortunately with my mangled right ring finger I could not simply swap the ring to the other hand for a comparison. In some online reviews testers have talked about differences between units but when I raised my concerns with Oura I was not offered an alternate test unit to rule out that possibility. After my time with the ring I discovered that it is recommended you take the ring off for hard physical work where the ring could be damaged such as trail building or hitting the gym. There was no change in the data to suggest this was the case, but as I could not rule it out I do not want to omit that possibility here.



Pros

+ A lot of tech for something so small and discrete
+ Great battery life
+ One-off cost with no subscription
Cons

- Data quality not as high as expected
- Clunky integration with other apps for activity tracking
- Relatively delicate




Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesThe Oura ring feels like the future we were promised by sci-fi movies and TV, and having that much tech on your finger in such a discrete package is very cool in my book. I maybe should not admit this here, but I came into this test ready to buy the ring at the end of it. An unobtrusive ring is an ideal solution for me as I am particular about having things on my wrist - which is why I have not tried a Whoop strap or used my Garmin Fenix for this role. The fact that it is so passive is another huge plus in my book - once you pop the ring into airplane mode it does not bug you again until you remember you need to charge it. Also, I find the one-off purchase business model greatly preferable to the ongoing subscription needed for a Whoop strap, but I am sure many people will feel differently on that front.

Yet by the end of the test I was ready to put the ring back in its box. The quality of data it recorded did not match the hype, and at the end of the day any health tracker is only as good as the data it provides. As and when Oura release an updated version I will probably give that a go as I really want this to work, but for the time being it just looks to me like a great idea that the technology needs to catch up with.
Matt Wragg



172 Comments

  • 221 1
 Just what I need when I wake up, an app that lets me know i didn't sleep enough.
  • 26 4
 Yeah, I didn't want to get into this too much here as it is supposed to be a review rather than an essay on the utility of health data. I think there is value in it for people who are not thinking about how well they slept, but once you have some understanding of how you respond to different things I am starting to feel like stopping and checking how you feel in the morning is as useful as graphs and charts.
  • 19 1
 It's debatable how useful these types of devices are for sleep tracking anyway since they're pretty weak at detecting sleep phases. They're essentially guessing based on indirect correlates like heart rate, movement and body temperature. To get an accurate measurment you also need some electrodes on your scalp and face at the very least.
  • 7 1
 I can tell from just this comment you didn't get enough sleep ha ha. Long weekends aren't enough!
  • 30 1
 The value is not in knowing that you didn't sleep well or enough. It is in learning how to improve upon it. I'm on the Garmin platform and find the Body Battery and Stress Score to be quite useful. As an example, I have found out that reading books before bedtime is a very effective way to calm myself and activate my parasympathetic nervous system. Watching TV and using my phone feels similarly relaxing, but the data reveals that it usually keeps my nervous system in a more alert and stressed state, instead of preparing me for a good night's sleep.
  • 10 4
 Asked a somnologist friend of mine if they use data from smart devices in their sleep diagnoses.
He enthusiastically said "Hell no, that data is trash. You can't come to any meaningful conclusions from app-based sleep data gadgets". You need a controlled environment, these gadgets should only serve to confirm what you already know.
  • 18 0
 @chrod: You won't see a surgeon patch up a patient after open heart surgery with a first aid kit either. That doesn't mean that a first aid kit is trash - just that it isn't fit for that purpose.

The same goes for consumer grade sleep tracking devices. It's not the right tool for monitoring stages of NREM sleep or the occurrence of sleep spindles (nor does it pretend to be, that kind of data isn't even available in the apps). It is however useful for logging more general data, which can be just as useful, if you aren't trying to diagnose sleep disorders or collect data for research purposes.

Btw, I would recommend anyone interested in understanding/optimizing their sleep to read "Why We Sleep" by Matthew Walker. One of the most interesting and useful books I have read to date.
  • 4 0
 Lmao I've got a fitbit and I'm almost addicted to looking at the sleep data in the morning. Mostly just curious to see how much deep sleep I got and heart rate. Really interesting to see how much exercise helps me sleep better. A few days without exercise after a crash and my sleep is garbage.
  • 11 1
 @mattwragg: smart to stay away from that quagmire.

As soon as I heard about insurance companies offering better pricing for sharing health data I knew these devices a would eventually cost us more than they provide in utility.

Because you won’t get a deal for sharing data, those who don’t share will ultimately pay more “because a reasonable person with nothing to hide would share the data so if you don’t share you must be hiding high risk health factors”. Just wait.
  • 13 0
 @mattwragg: the real story here is your 39bpm resting heart rate, that’s as low as a sniper on beta blockers!
  • 1 0
 @DylanH93: agree, my favourite Fitbit feature is the sleep tracker.
  • 2 0
 @Nygaard: Refreshingly well written and informative comments, genuinely wish more of us approached discourse in this way.
  • 3 0
 @chrod: that’s just big somnology protecting their interests
  • 2 0
 @mattwragg: it would be an interesting article if you conducted this style of tech testing. This oura ring against the likes of the Garmin fitness watches, Apple Watch Fitbit etc. Or is this something you’re starting with this?
  • 1 0
 @2-1RacingUK: It wasn't something I had really thought about, although I was in touch with a company to try a constant glucose monitor as I think that is a really interesting concept and a lot of World Tour racers are using them now. Unfortunately I had to put that on hold as I caught Covid over Christmas and I'm still building my fitness back up again.
  • 1 0
 @mattwragg: well congratulations on fighting off Covid dude! I’m sure a few of the tech companies would be approachable. Cycling is a huge market for them now post Covid is dawning, as well as a massive number of riders are in the market for Tech to help them understand their riding/health.

One to approach I guess. It would be interesting to see what the real world Data would count for the “everyday” person on a bike?
  • 1 0
 @Altron5000: I understood that as to be during sleep? My sleeping heart rate drops to similar numbers, but during the day it’s nowhere near.
I don’t think it’s an unusual number for an enthusiastic hobby-athlete.
  • 106 0
 Mr Frodo, they’re tracking you
  • 19 0
 Definitely ride way faster with those horse kings tracking your ass!
  • 13 0
 you need to put it into the lava if you want to destroy all your data...
  • 2 0
 @jamesdippy: Or a pack of stray dogs !
  • 8 0
 Have about second breakfast?
  • 6 0
 @Narro2: what about 11sies?
  • 2 0
 "They're here."
  • 1 0
 Find the Halflings!
  • 8 0
 RIDE,YOU FOOLS!
  • 1 1
 @jamesdippy: They are called Nazgul, Dammit!
  • 52 0
 Will it stand monkey spanking duties or have I got to go Southpaw?
  • 41 0
 Go for it. Just be prepared for the inevitable data breach and for the whole world to know you’re a wanker Wink
  • 24 0
 Just remember that if you're engaging in sexual activity around bedtime the ring will record the movement and HR spike, which is pretty creepy.
  • 32 0
 I can confirm, it does collect that data. You can’t assign the correct ‘activity’ to it either... ;-)
  • 30 0
 Why do you think they recommend using it on your non dominant hand?
  • 39 0
 No worries, it'll just record a huge spike in heart rate, then tell you you went to sleep too quickly.
  • 28 1
 IT will check how long you last and rank you on Po*nHub.
  • 24 0
 It thinks you just ran a 3 minute mile.
  • 4 0
 It will detect many impacts and call 999 for you I guess. Same with knocking one out
  • 7 0
 @mattwragg: You might be wearing it on the wrong finger?
  • 7 2
 @mattwragg:


Well boys, I had to have a heart test done, and lets say that night my wife and I had some fun. the doctor was worried about my heart rate at 12am, It was a long talk...
  • 3 0
 @mattwragg: So it won't record it for a nooner?
  • 45 1
 All these gimmicks and apps for an illusion of control, overflow of information and more time in front of a screen... Cheers!
  • 6 0
 Great point. I owned an Oura ring for a couple of years and glad I did, but at the end of the day was it worth it? The sleep tracking is data is neat, but as other people have pointed out, it isn't supremely accurate (it's slowly getting there) and is the data really going to push meaningful change?
I did not become obsessed with the data, but I can see all of these trackers playing a psychological game with many people - am I really sleeping enough? Why is this metric so low when 'experts' say it shouldn't be?
I think we are outsourcing way too much of our well-being to data, research and experts. Devices can help to drive meaningful change, but they are only a small part of the equation
  • 33 1
 I’ve been wearing one of these for a few months now as part of a clinical trial for the NHS looking at pre-habilitation for cancer treatment (I don’t have the big C, by the way, they just want to track how effective the ring is at measuring the right things for pre-hab.)

I have to say I’ve had none of the data issues that Matt reports, and tbh it seems to be more accurate than my Garmin on all things HR. The sleep tracker has been fun (my wife and I trying to out sleep each other, or whoever gets the best score has to deal with the kids in the morning.) I’ve been getting alerts as apparently I’m consistently falling asleep too fast, usually in 2-3 minutes which apparently is a sign of over tiredness.

Anyway, having used it as a fitness / health tracker I do think it seems to correlate well with my general fitness / wellness. E.g. The resting HR rate has gradually been falling and the HRV increasing as I’ve been ramping up the cardio. I think it’s good and where it really has an advantage over a garmin is that except for the hour a week on charge I genuinely wear it 24/7.

Would I buy one with my own money... probably not. £300 is a lot and I’d rather spend that on a garmin tbh. But if I was super serious about training for a big event then maybe...
  • 4 0
 For comparison, my old coach suggested I try a Whoop strap as I try to get back towards racing fitness. I took the plunge and am feeling very mixed.

HR wise, it has been far more accurate than my chest strap HRM (wahoo brand) which baffled me.
Fitness tracking wise, its good at noting my workouts but gets messy on the export to strava part, where if I record via GPS or on the trainer (zwift) I end up with duplicate workouts.
While the 'recovery score' is sometimes accurate, some of my best days have been when I've been given a low score. There doesn't seem to be any really strong correlation between recovery score and personal energy level, and while Whoop CLAIMS to track things like mental stress and fatigue, I have found that my mental stress and fatigue are not at all reflected in my scores.
  • 4 0
 @ratedgg13: I had a Whoop strap for a few months. I ditched it after I realized it wasn't telling me anything I didn't already know. With the exception of the heart rate metrics but it still wasn't worth it to me.
  • 2 0
 Likewise. I had a Whoop strap for 6 months. It was really interesting to see the data and I'm sure if you are using it as a tool to structure your training then it may be a worthwhile investment. However, I found the recovery score quite mixed too. When it said to rest, I ran a few PBs and on a number of occasions when it said I was good to go, I found some rides super hard work. It didnt correlate. It was a lot to shell out each month though and it was more of an extravagance than an essential. For what I got out of it, my money was better spent on a Garmin watch which does a variety of different things
  • 1 0
 I found the whoop sleep tracking didn’t work for me. The data would say I was asleep when I wasn’t. I found the hr not all that accurate either. I ditched it before the trial period was up. Expensive monthly fee not worth it IMO.
  • 29 0
 what if my hand falls asleep?
  • 4 0
 that's underrated comment right there.
  • 24 0
 Not buying unless it sends my location to the CIA.
  • 2 0
 It probably does...
  • 7 0
 Forget the CIA, Oura are advertising on their site about Oura for Business - sharing your sleep data, etc with your boss, which is far more immediate and worrying in my opinion. And if you're reading this @brianpark, no, for the love of god please, no.
  • 26 2
 Doesn't the 5G chip I just got in my vaccine make this redundant?
  • 19 3
 Probably not the ringing endorsement that they were after in a review.....

How easy is it to cut off in the event of a crash? If you break a finger wearing a Ti ring there is a good chance that if you can't get it off before swelling sets in then you may lose the finger as Ti is so hard to cut. My paramedic mates strongly advise against wearing Ti rings at any time just for this reason.
  • 21 2
 This is a widely held fallacy... Ti rings are more difficult to cut off a finger than typical gold bands but, unless you're way off grid away from any reasonably modern medical facilities, they can be fairly easily removed with available ring cutters common among emergency centers. The biggest challenge is typically that they need to make two cuts because titanium doesn't bend well like gold where you can make a single cut and then just bend the ring open. Your mates are either having a laugh or just aren't very experienced.
  • 11 0
 I milled a few ti rings several years ago, and after reading your statement I just cut one of the early “prototypes” with a small Knipex bolt cutter - no problem whatsoever.

I tend to believe that people actually losing fingers because they wear titanium rings is an urban myth.
  • 3 0
 As badbadleroybrown says - cutting a Ti ring offf wouldn’t be too much of an issue, working with machinery I still wouldn’t go there though - it’s the carbide rings people use that could be really bad - you aren’t cutting those off and instead need to ‘crack’ them.
  • 5 1
 It's actually Tungsten rings that are the issue. They are extremely difficult to remove.
  • 2 0
 I'd not considered the titanium ring thing until a couple of weeks ago. I had a crash on the road bike and came down on the knuckles inevitably. In A&E they could see the tendons on my ring finger knuckle. My titanium ring had the corner taken off it by the tarmac and I'm convinced it protected my tendon. Given how mashed the titanium was, I assume a gold ring would have just been torn off. In that case I managed to pull it off with copious amounts of medical KY. I'm not suggesting titanium knuckle dusters, but I'm glad I was wearing it!
  • 3 0
 @NickShepherd: isn't that another myth? Whilst very hard tungsten is relatively brittle so with the right tool they are actually easier to break eg with mole grips, just a little squash and they split.
  • 3 0
 @badbadleroybrown: based on how easily I've managed to file down and smooth out my mangled titanium ring, I'd say it shouldn't be too hard to cut off, though obviously you're not doing it in the field
  • 1 3
 @badbadleroybrown: ti are softer than steel, so any cheap "gold ring" is worse than ti. Case closed
  • 3 0
 @veero: my old boss got his hand tangled up in a milling machine. broken several bones. hospital wasn't able to remove his tungsten wedding band with with their fancy little cutters. the guy who drove him to the ER had big bolt cutters and vice grips in his truck. they used those to clamp the ring and snip at it. it finally snapped off.

moral is: don't wear rings around machinery...or maybe don't get married.. i dunno. he said it all hurt a lot.
  • 4 0
 Was advised by an ER nurse to not wear hard rings (regardless of material) while mountain biking. If you hurt your ring finger, you may need to get the ring cut off as you mentioned or in the worst cases the ring will break or "deglove" your finger. I went out and bought a silicone ring for peace of mind after that.
  • 2 0
 @Andrewcycleaddictstaton: Oh yes for sure, I agree there's a risk when wearing a ring, for almost any activity you can do, but especially with machining. Powerful cutting equipment has no respect for flesh. Let's face it though the risk of a degloving injury while biking is very very low. The greater likelihood is something like a broken finger or an injury that results in swelling which requires a ring to be cut off.

With regards the tungsten rings I'm sure there's a video somewhere of someone using a nut splitter and with just a little pressure the ring just cracks and falls off in 4 pieces without so much as a mark on the skin.
  • 1 0
 A buddy of mine crashed riding at Mammoth a few years ago while wearing what he said was a tungsten ring. His finger started to swell and he spent the next couple of hours with his hand in and out of ice while we tried to cut the ring off with a dremel; the ring didn’t have as much as a scratch. A few beers later he realized he was actually wearing his ceramic ring...two taps with a ball peen hammer with his ring on the concrete was all it took.
  • 1 1
 I took fire science in high school (which is preparation for being a firefighter). The firefighters teaching the class told us a story about a colleague who got a ti ring smashed and they were unable to remove it with the tools they had on the truck. He had to go to the hospital to cut it off.

15 years later, I wear a gold ring. I know I can cut it off with my Knipex cutters if necessary. Why risk it with something harder?
  • 1 1
 Why do people wear rings in the first place ?
  • 10 0
 I always knew alcohol wasn't the best for sleep, but how much it negatively effects my sleep is shocking. This alone was worth the purchase. Really like the Health Tracking on these devices. Got a Forerunner, for running Frown And started wearing it all the time. Have a few beers and watch your sleep score plummet. As an older rider I need all the help I can get.
  • 2 0
 100% trufe.
  • 2 1
 Any alcohol should be pre-meal and at least 3 hours before sleeping, preferably 4-5 hours. "It's 5 o'clock somewhere" isn't a bad way to remember...
  • 4 1
 you're not drinking enough then
  • 11 0
 "I have moral issues about being told when to move by a gadget"

I must remember this one next time I sleep in and am late for work
  • 11 0
 Is this a marital aid? Asking for a friend....
  • 22 0
 I find that making sure I am always wearing a wedding ring really helps my marriage, if that's what you mean. Wink
  • 1 0
 @mattwragg: My wife doesn`t like rings, does not like flowers either so, the first thing she did after we got married was ask if I would agree on not wearing the wedding rings !
  • 6 1
 @Gruta: Does she take a lot of "business" trips...
  • 1 0
 @GM303: LOL , she`s afraid of flying !
  • 11 0
 Landfill
  • 8 0
 2 words: Finger Degloving
  • 2 0
 Came here to say this. Go to grab a branch or a rock during a crash? Good way to become part skeletor
  • 2 0
 @Rokcore: I had to check my spelling to make sure Degloving was an actual word, but I did not push enter on that search...
  • 3 0
 came here to say this too. I had a finger degloved from a motorcycle chain and sprocket 10/10 do not recommend.
  • 6 0
 I absolutely thought this was something to go alongside my energy crystals at first
  • 6 0
 Sounds like an finger avulsion injury waiting to happen, don't Google before lunch!
  • 2 0
 Exactly my thoughts, do people ride with rings?
  • 1 0
 @TobiasHandcock: I would think most married men ride with their wedding rings. I took mine off for rock climbing though.
  • 2 0
 @TobiasHandcock: I paid a guy to stab my finger a bunch with some ink. Now I wear my ring on every ride.
  • 1 0
 I just did that (Google ring avulsion). Holy...

Didn't Jimmy Fallon experience sth like that?
  • 1 0
 My wife's old physiotherapist lost her finger when her ring got caught on something on a waterslide.
  • 1 0
 @TobiasHandcock: do people ride with gloves that cover their rings? Of all the injuries to get while mountain biking, hurting my finger due to wearing a ring isn't something that has ever crossed my mind. I have dislocated a finger in a crash once, but not one that had a ring on it.
  • 2 0
 Would really like to see this side by side with Whoop.

One of the things I can figure out with Whoop and Oura is why they don't track overall fitness. Their data is way more complete than Strava/Garmin/Training Peaks/etc yet they only provide a recovery score.
  • 2 0
 The super studded deluxe party edition will answer the needs of the most discerning customer:
Does it count for bonus sleep points when passing out after a rowdy club session?... Can it retrace my steps to find my lost keys. Does it have gyro tech when you wear as a tally-ring and do the windmill?
Oh yes sir indeed
  • 2 0
 While none of these rings/watches/straps are close to dead on when it comes to accuracy, IMO I think the overall benefit - for people who utilize them - is greater focus on personal health. I started a few years back with a Fitbit, & have slowly worked my way up the Garmin ladder. Along the way I've learned to eat much better as well as to structure my workouts to be more productive.
  • 5 0
 Something something tossing the ring into the fires of mount doom
  • 9 0
 Shit! That is how I should have wrapped up the review, after all how many chances will I get to make cheap LOTR ring puns in my working life?
  • 6 0
 "My Precious!
  • 4 0
 Oooh, it goes on my finger. I was using this all wrong. Fits either way I guess.
  • 1 0
 @mattwragg : thanks for the article. I've done a comparison between Whoop/Apple Watch/strapped HR for accuracy and would be happy to compare notes. The TL;DR is that the whoop had similar data accuracy issues (especially in regards to comparative HRV and RHR, and also when in the gym due to the accelerometer effecting the readings).

I share your lack of enthusiasm regarding things on the wrist, that said I've found the Apple Watch to be hands down the best option. Accuracy seems to be best, BT HR straps can be paired if needed, and if you are already in the Apple ecosystem, it's a pretty slick interface, acting as a standalone phone. The only downside is a relative lack of battery life.

I never considered the Oura, as I've been a silicone ring convert for about a decade, and there is zero chance I would tolerate a metal ring at this point. For me, way more intrusive than a watch.
  • 1 0
 I use the Whoop strap... and whilst I find the monthly price infuriating, it works great and I don't find it that obtrusive. From a fashion stand point, I'm already forced by society to wear one ring.. I don't need another. Am looking forward to someone getting their sh!t together and pushing Whoop out with something that's as good and a lot cheaper. Just a matter of time.
  • 1 0
 You have to get Whoop on sale. I paid $280 for 18 months.
  • 1 0
 FWIW, my experiences have been quite good, and I have a resting HR around 43-45 at night (50-52 during the day). I have found that the "readiness" score is pretty damn accurate - and if I ignore a low readiness score and go hammer hard, I pay the price. A couple other possibilities for the unusual "wake up period" are IPAs before bed. Dammit.
  • 1 0
 the (39) number is the lowest your heart rate gets in the night, the more interesting number is the average heart rate.

Surprised he didn't mention the 3 'nubs' that house the light emitters/sensors; they're placed on the palm side, where your hand is softer and more fleshy- I have to rotate the ring 180 so I don't get weird callouses and hand pain while riding.

It's also funny that certain activities show up as 'high intensity' in the app but are really pretty tame, and that a full day of mountain biking just shows as a few lazy spikes.

If you're into the concept of full day metrics, and willing to stick it out for the 3-4 months, the data truly becomes actionable.
  • 1 0
 I've binned the lot fitness/health apps wise now. Only nod is to fitness tracking is the weekly jump on the weighing scales to keep the motivation low.

Strava
HRM
Fitness watch

All now resigned to the kitchen drawer where all the old mobile phones and chargers live.
  • 4 1
 I don't know if I'd even want something like that on any of my fingers when riding.
  • 3 0
 Can t ride with a Finger Ring of whatever stories attached to it , that s unconfortable and not natural gripping the bars.
  • 1 0
 I don't need a $300 ring to let me know how sh!tty I feel in the morning from lack of sleep, I never get enough, between sinus problems and my wives snoring it's a miracle I get any sleep.
  • 5 0
 Maybe ask one of the wives to sleep elsewhere for a few nights? And I thought the Utah desert was supposed to be great for sinuses? Go figure.
  • 1 0
 Go see someone about your sinus issues, friend of mine was a terrible snorer and suffered from sleep apnoea, had his sinuses drilled out and is a new man.
  • 1 0
 @VtVolk: Yeah I gotta learn grammar and spelling, lol
  • 1 0
 @dsut4392: I think both me and the wife need that, soon as I put my head down my sinuses start to fell like they're swelling up, my wife starts saws huge Redwoods all night, it's so loud it makes my stomach hurt, gel earplugs help but only a little.
  • 2 0
 @mattwragg: just a heads up, your link in the article is broken... pointing to ourring.com instead of ouraring.com
  • 1 0
 I’ve been looking at signet pinky rings because I think they look cool. Is the functionality of this worth it to chose over a regular metal jewelry ring that I don’t have to charge and is presumably more durable?
  • 1 0
 I stopped wearing rings in 2009 after I broke my hand on a jump. I had , just by chance, removed my titanium ring that day, good thing too or I would have lost a finger. To each their own...
  • 1 2
 I don't believe that a device worn on my finge can tell me what stage of sleep I am in. Sleep stages happen in the brain, not my finger. Also, if I simply lay horizontally without moving, will the device think I'm asleep- but I could well just be awake and motionless.
  • 2 0
 There are different heart rates associated with each sleep stage.
  • 2 3
 Can they make version for my lower appendage. I’d “love” dashboard on my nonexistent sex life. Perhaps the accuracy of sensor might make me feel better about myself for ghost activities and solo sessions that would be captured.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, no display? No thanks! My Garmin x6 can tell me all that, plus it doesn't require cellular for GPS, and battery/ solar powered!
  • 2 0
 Haha oh wow okay I didn't realize these were supposed to go on your finger.
  • 1 0
 I'm old school. I keep track of my health by paying attention to how I feel and react to food/exercise/my environment. Could be why I'm fat and out of.shape
  • 2 0
 Hey @pinkbike your URL is redirecting to www.ourring.com
Which is flagged as spam.
Add the “a” in the URL please.
  • 1 0
 Just wear a mood ring, no app required. Black/Red/Orange when you're at work and Purple when on the bike. What more could you need to know?
  • 3 1
 Do they offer XXL sizes? For, well... Errr you know..
  • 1 1
 You: Ring! Ring! Why don't you give me a call?
Ring: You've turned off your notifications... that's why.

ABBA was prescient. Who knew?
  • 1 0
 I’m sorry but huh?
  • 1 0
 I would actually wear this ring. No more fighting with the wife over me “losing my ring” at work.
  • 3 1
 It won't take long until someone puts it on their cock
  • 2 0
 Don’t know about you, but I think for most the finger/dingus proportions don’t really work that way
  • 2 0
 can it be worn on nipples
  • 1 0
 Heard it keeps cougars away, too. Unfortunately, it doesn't have the same effect on creepy old men...
  • 2 0
 But does it vibrate for her pleasure ?
  • 2 0
 39bpm!!! Forget the ring; I want @mattwragg 's resting heart rate.
  • 2 0
 nope. You dont. Miine was super slow. Pacemaker before the age of 50.

Also, could have a heart block. reads 35 but you could be missing a bunch of beats.

Enlarged heart from endurance training?

@mattwragg should see a doctor.
  • 1 0
 I really thought mine was low until I saw @mattwragg 's.
  • 3 0
 @fabwizard: Heart rate is steady thanks and I get annual checks from my GP, plus my BP cuff would pick up arrythmia and I'm good for bradycardia as the warning sign is that it doesn't react, while mine does.
  • 2 0
 @jeremystclair: My sleeping HR was dropping to 20 at times, so pacemaker.

Now it is set at 50 minimum and it is hard to sleep as it feels like it is racing.
  • 1 0
 @fabwizard: Wow! mine for last week was 57 but I do regularly see ones in the high 40's.
  • 4 0
 @jeremystclair:My low heart rate was being watched for the past 10 years as it crept down with more and more heart blocks.

I was in the middle of the Trailforks 30 day challenge and one day felt so dizzy driving home from work(previous night started ride before midnight and finished after midnight to get two days of riding in) and it would not go away.

Went to ER and they would not let me leave, was serious enough they bumped me to the front of the line surgery next morning.

They said i was very close to falling asleep and never waking up.

Get your hearts checked folks.
  • 1 0
 @fabwizard: Glad you were aware enough not to just go home and sleep it off and are still here to tell us about it!
  • 3 0
 @mtb-thetown: actually thanks goes to my wife. Apparently my life insurance wasn't worth enough so she sent me to the ER.
  • 2 0
 @fabwizard: Jaysus, that sounds terrifying - glad you seem to be doing well now, I get you on 50bpm at night too, that would suck. Did the doctors talk to you about causes or is it idiopathic? I have a healthy concern for heart health as both of my grandfathers died of heart attacks...
  • 2 0
 @mattwragg: It was like father like son. My dad had his pacemaker installed at 57, mine at 49.

There was a predisposition that I would have an issue(they had warned me 10 years earlier it was coming) however, my doctor blamed it on abusing my heart. Too many 24 hour races, marathons, excessive training etc....
  • 1 0
 A wedding ring can tell you all that, wakes you up, let's you know when your low of funds in the bank!
  • 1 0
 ...and the battery life is really good. I only wear mine for sleep monitoring and it'll do about two weeks.
  • 1 0
 I find that it doesnt really bother on long rides, actually dampers taint pain when worn deep on the shaft
  • 1 0
 The all new Enduro C-ring! Will it contact a doctor on my behalf if the "effects" last longer than 4 hours?
  • 1 0
 Just make it a vibrating ring, probably sell more! And the Adult Video Conference is more fun than any bike Expo!
  • 2 0
 Will it slow me down ?
  • 1 0
 That is a realy elaborate aprils fool prank.
  • 1 0
 Ahhhh.... hmmmm... Gloves...
  • 2 1
 I'm sorry, how f'ing much?! Nah I'm out.
  • 1 0
 Aren’t those just unisex masturbation monitors?
  • 1 0
 I thought Apple Watch much more suitable for day to day usage.
  • 1 0
 I find my ring hurts when I ride.
  • 1 0
 Do they have a ribbed version?
  • 1 0
 So, you'd be married to Big Brother until death do you part.
  • 1 0
 I would assume it is not suitable for major 3 lifts at all?
  • 1 0
 39 bpm?? who tf is this athlete
  • 1 0
 google degloving... not sure about this ring!
  • 1 0
 Please read Alain Damasio last book before buying.
  • 1 0
 This feels like a really late April fool.....
  • 1 0
 It’s a game changer. Been wearing mine for a year now.
  • 1 1
 hmm 300? i wud add it to my axs trustfund
  • 1 0
 Robot fingers.
  • 1 0
 Charge your phone man
  • 1 0
 Married to my health!
  • 6 7
 Looks like Session!
  • 2 4
 My treasure!!!
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.019746
Mobile Version of Website