Review: Rapha's Trail Pants & Knee Pads Are Impossibly Comfy

Jan 25, 2022
by Mike Levy  



Who remembers mountain biking before riding pants were a thing? Our shorts were too long, our socks were too short, and I'm pretty sure I was too cold and wet all the time. Smart riders had been wearing heavy moto-style pants for years, of course, but these days we've got plenty of bike-specific options to choose from, including the new $180 USD Trail pants from Rapha that are reviewed below.

Rapha is known for its high-end stretchy road kit and classy colors, and 2021 saw them debut an entire range of clothing for mountain bikers. I took a closer look at their Trail shorts, Cargo bibs, and Tech t-shirt back in the heat of summer, but I've been wearing the new Trail pants and just-released $110 USD knee pads since our fall Field Test series (full disclosure: they sponsored it) in October. Conveniently, we've had nothing but wet and miserable weather during that time, and absolutely no chance to wear shorts.

Trail Pants Details

• Nylon 89%, Elastane 11%
• Reinforced, articulated knees
• Adj. waistband w/ cam locks, belt loops
• Deep hand pockets
• Zippered vertical pockets, phone sleeves
• Keyhole metal snap enclosure
• MSRP: $180 USD
www.rapha.cc
Knee Pad Details

• Lightweight, pedal-friendly
• RHEON Labs density changing padding
• SuperFabric outer layer
• Non-adj. cuffs
• MSRP: $110 USD




Rapha Trail pants and knee pads
Rapha's $180 USD Trail pants are intended for riding in cool weather and are water repellent - not proof - thanks to a DWR treatment.


Trail Pants Details

Up at the waistband is where you'll find two adjustable straps, each with a locking cam to hold them in place once adjusted to fit properly. While some brands use a big plastic ratcheting strap or straps to get the job done, I prefer these barely-there plastic cams and they never once loosened their grip. There are also belt loops for some strange reason - does anyone out there wear a belt while riding? - and the metal waist snap locks closed no matter how much eggnog and Christmas cookies you've managed to consume over the holidays.


Rapha Trail pants and knee pads
Thin locking cams on each side let you adjust the waistband.
Rapha Trail pants and knee pads
The metal keyhole snap enclosure won't open unless you want it to.


If you need pockets but don't want to dig out your cargo pants (we don't want you to either), you'll like what Rapha has done with these Trail trousers. There are two normal, unzippered pockets at each side so you have somewhere to put your hands while standing around at the trailhead like a goober, but it's also worth mentioning that they're deep enough to actually be useful, unlike some other options out there. There are also two zippered cargo pockets on the side of each thigh, both with an internal sleeve to keep your phone from flopping around, and that's where you'll want to keep anything important during a ride.

Down at the bottom of the legs is where you'll find non-adjustable cuffs - some other brands use Velcro enclosures or zippers down here to rein in any loose fabric - but they are both reinforced and elastic for durability. And speaking of that, Rapha has also added some reinforcement at the knees and the cut is articulated to keep the cuffs from being pulled up while you pedal or bend over on the trail.


Rapha Trail pants and knee pads
There's a bit of extra material at the knees and plenty of room for knee pads.
Rapha Trail pants and knee pads
Stretchy cuffs instead of adjustable cuffs.


And because it's almost always better to fix something rather than replace it, Rapha also offers an interesting repair program where they'll fix your pants (or other Rapha gear) that you've damaged: "Rapha offers free repair service for the lifetime of the product with valid proof of purchase. This service also applies to garments outside the 90-day return policy."


Rapha Trail pants and knee pads
Like the pants, Rapha's $110 knee pads are meant for trail riders who like to pedal but want a bit of protection.


Knee Pad Details

On a scale from 'These would be ideal for a vert ramp' to 'Am I even wearing them?' Rapha's new knee pads are definitely aimed more towards that latter. To that end, you'll find that they sport a very slim shape that doesn't protrude out from the knee as much as pads that use some sort of hard-shell protection. They're slim enough to fit under even the tightest of white slopestyle jeans, although they don't offer the kind of protection that anyone who knows they'll be hitting the ground multiple times a ride would want; rather, these are for trail riders who want protection but also want to pedal for hours while wearing them.


Rapha Trail pants and knee pads
Long cuffs pull most of the way up your thighs.
Rapha Trail pants and knee pads
This stuff is called SuperFabric and is supposed to be slippery and durable.


Rapha has used a density-changing material that stays somewhat soft-ish until it's struck, at which point it nearly instantly hardens up to offer more protection. There isn't a ton of coverage - it doesn't wrap around the sides of your knees and only extends a few inches below them - but these weren't intended to be a full-coverage option. The outer material is made of the impressive-sounding SuperFabric, and Rapha says that it's an "Incredibly durable ceramic polymer that reduces friction and adds tear resistance so riders won’t get hung up on any obstacles."

These are also pull-over pads with a closed back, and stretchy cuffs with silicone gripper strips are used instead of adjustable hook-and-loop straps.


Fall Field Test Photo by Tom Richards
Warm legs, dumb face. The Trail pants have worked well in rain and cooler conditions, but you'll want to add another layer if it's close to freezing.


Fit and Performance

My 5' 10" frame is mostly legs and that means that pants can sometimes feel a bit short on me, but that's not the case with these. They're long enough to not get pulled up above my ankles while pedaling, and while I thought I needed an adjustable cuff to deal with baggy fabric, it's not an issue because there's not much extra material to begin with. As a relatively slim guy, the POC and Race Face pants I also have in my drawer can feel a bit baggy in comparison to the Rapha trousers, and for that reason, I almost always reach for the Rapha pants first. Another factor in me preferring them is how quiet they are; who remembers the Seinfeld episode with the swooshing pants? That's a real thing with some riding pants out there, but not these.


Rapha Trail pants and knee pads
The zippered side pockets are big enough for the largest of multi-tools, and the phone sleeves in each one keep things from swinging around too much.
Rapha Trail pants and knee pads
Deep hand pockets; I used these to keep my spare gloves warm for when I needed them.


Much like on their Trail shorts, the pockets on their pants are at just the right size and angle to slip a phone or multi-tool into and have it basically disappear. The internal sleeve does a good job of holding either from flopping around while you spin circles, and there's enough room to add in some snacks or other stuff that you might need. Another often-missed detail is how easy (or hard) it can be to open and close the zippers while you're on the move, but it's easy to do with the large pull tabs on the Trail pants which means you won't need to stop to pull out more gummy bears.

Up at the waistband, the two adjustable straps and plastic cams never once loosened and were much more inconspicuous than the large plastic ratchets that some pants use. I had both snugged down during our fall Field Test when there was a bit less of me, and I've let them out a bit more recently as the winter donuts have added up.


Fall Field Test Photo by Tom Richards
The pads are some of the most comfortable that I've ever used, but they still need to be pulled back up every once in a while.


I honestly hate knee pads because I like to pedal and, well, every type of pad that I've ever worn has felt okay for up to an hour or so, at which point they start leaving raw spots behind my knees, slide down every few minutes, or feel so uncomfortable that I'd almost prefer yet more stitches over my knee cap rather than keep wearing them.

This is why I was surprised to not be annoyed by Rapha's knee protection. They do a great job of articulating freely while your legs are going around in circles, and there was next to no bunching of material or weirdness from the padding, even taking into account the closed-back design. In fact, I'd say that these are easily the most comfortable knee pads I've ever worn, so much so that I actually end up using them on a somewhat regular basis. That's half the battle when it comes to knee pads; you need to want to wear them or what's the point?


Rapha Trail pants and knee pads
There are gripper strips on the upper and lower cuffs.
Rapha Trail pants and knee pads
The backs of the pads aren't open, but they never felt too warm or uncomfortable. It might be a different story in the middle of the summer, though.


As far as protection goes, they're intended to be a somewhat slim, pedal-friendly option, so while there's more than enough padding for anything I get up to, I can see more aggressive riders wanting more coverage, especially at the sides of the knee.

Do they manage to say put? Well, no, but if we're being honest about it, I've never worn a set of pads that manage to stay where they belong for over an hour of pedaling. And while these weren't terrible and seemed to move less than other options I've tried, I still found myself having to pull them up every ten or fifteen minutes. Not ideal, but at least they're very comfortable. The cuffs on the large-sized pair of pads I've been wearing were tight enough, too, so I don't think going down to mediums would have been the answer. Why hasn't someone made knee pads that attach to your shorts or pants to keep them from moving?



Pros

+ Pants are great to pedal in, high quality
+ Pants have useful pockets and adjustments
+ Pads are very comfortable
Cons

- There are less expensive options
- Pads are better then some but still slide down




Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesIf you're looking for some mid-weight trousers to do a lot of pedaling in, but don't need them to be waterproof or ready for an Arctic front, Rapha's Trail pants will make a comfortable and practical choice. The knee pads are also very comfortable, even if they didn't stay where I wanted them the entire time.Mike Levy



241 Comments

  • 92 7
 their mountain bike stuff looks nice, it doesn't have that snobby, entitled vibe of their road kits
  • 20 7
 Lol, why are the road kits any more flashy?

Also, you can get Rapha road bibs for pretty cheap (relatively) if you wait for a sale. I just got the Pro Team bibs (retail $270) for $130.
  • 36 0
 While Rapha road kit used to be quite mockable, there are plenty of more obvious/more expensive road brands these days. I got given a pair of their road bibs for Xmas, and they are really really comfy and nicely made. Throw in some subtle colours, crash repair and they could shake up the overpriced (for no good reason) MTB clothing market
  • 13 0
 It’s really nice kit; the jersey’s come with a repair kit that actually works! Took a heavy slam in there short sleeve top and tore the shoulder open - 2mins with an iron and almost as good as new
  • 10 1
 I bought one of their long sleeve cold weather jerseys a couple months back and it's definitely the nicest piece of bike kit I own. I like that all their stuff is not just high quality but doesn't scream I'm ready to line up for the A1 main.
  • 12 4
 @HB208: I'm glad that the understated look is in. Nothing says "kick me out of your trail system" more than a kooks dressed in obnoxious branded kits
  • 2 0
 Or better: get their basic bibs in sale. I like those as much as I do the more expensive ones.
I even find the basics at full price very much ok for the comfort you get
  • 7 38
flag harryhood (Jan 25, 2022 at 9:31) (Below Threshold)
 Maybe, but we all know it's from that entitled snobby company. So it really doesn't matter, I'd feel like a douche wearing it. Maybe if I was on a Yeti.....
  • 13 1
 @harryhood: Why is it entitled and snobby? I mean, I guess you can just say shit but they produce high quality gear.
  • 10 2
 @HB208: I was repeating the words @tgr9 used to describe them, but if you've paid attention to the brand and their presence in the "gravel" and road markets for the last 10 years I think it's kinda obvious. I was on a team that was invited to their "Gentlemen's Rides" back in 2010 and 2011 (I think that's right) the whole experience just oozed pretentiousness.

They make nice stuff, and i'm not saying they don't. It's just the image of eliteness they tried to represent for years can't be brushed off.
  • 14 0
 @harryhood: I guess, but EF is one of the more approachable road teams out there. You're right, they have a kinda exclusive club ride vibe on the road side, but I don't see how that is any more approachable than a bunch of dudes on downhill bikes kitted out in Troy Lee or something.
  • 16 0
 That snobby entitled vibe seems to come from within their road kits, not from the kits themselves
  • 14 1
 I can practically smell the embedded sandalwood & espresso notes in the cuff just looking at the pics.
  • 7 4
 Canadians: anything not flannel-based = snobby and entitled vibe

Note to Rapha: hurry up and release that flannel road kit you've been working on.
  • 4 0
 @mikelevy / wondering when you’ll get a tattoo of a tattoo. Keep us posted
  • 1 0
 @HB208: It' a real worth of their clothes.
  • 2 2
 They just need to lose the "Rapha C**ts" rep and I'm sold.

Looks like nice practical gear but my inverse snobbery is still a major hurdle.
  • 3 2
 It’s not the kit. It’s the mountain biker that don’t have the snobby, entitled vibe of the roadie Wink .
  • 4 0
 @oskare: They don't? I have met plenty that do.
  • 5 2
 For 95% of the world population the average pinkbiker lives a life in luxury. I think it's a bit pathetic and childish to always see people here complaining about expensive gear, meaning a pair of trousers for 180 instead of 90 dollars, when most people could only dream of owning a mtb and the appropriate kit. You are the 5-percenter bashing the 1-percenter but neglecting the 90%.

I think the gear looks great! Thanks for a nice articleSmile
  • 1 0
 @HB208: the loss of time looking is worth more money
  • 1 0
 @FastRiding: What loss of time?
  • 38 2
 www.singletracks.com/mtb-gear/affordable-mtb-pants-from-target

Stretchy, fits knee pads, 95% nylon 5% spandex, adjustable belt, $27, and so far (from personal experience) they're awesome. Look good enough to wear to work.
  • 9 2
 No zippered pocket is a no go for me. But I did actually buy these, nice hiking and casual daily wear pants. They are just not going to be my choice for biking.
  • 14 0
 @pisgahgnar: I don't put anything in my pockets even when zippered, I don't like falling with stuff in my pockets. Too many friends' phones have been ruined this way.
  • 8 0
 @rickybobby18: shhhhhhhhhhhhhh... that's like telling people your local hush-hush spot. LOL!
  • 8 0
 @microfiz: no way. The more demand for those pants there is the more likely they keep producing them and improving on them. It's in my best interest to tell people. Smile Besides, a post on singletracks.com probably has a lot more reach than my PB comment haha
  • 2 0
 @rickybobby18: I really enjoy just hopping on the bike with nothing but tools and water on my bike and car key in my pocket. Even if I don't have my phone I want a secure place for my car key fob and those pants only have a zip on the butt, I don't want to sit on my key when climbing.
  • 8 2
 @pisgahgnar: Split the difference: $75 (sale price) got me the Eddie Bauer Guide Pro Work pants. Zippered thigh and back pockets, DWR fabric, high quality construction, stretchy/functional fit. Win all around. Can’t recommend enough. Maybe not crash rated - don’t know yet - but honestly I’ve dialed back my riding a skosh as I don’t wanna wind up in an overfilled emergency dept with all the Covid patients. (I work at the local hospital.)
  • 6 1
 If you're looking for some cheap pants these aren't bad...

www.costco.com/orvis-men's-tech-pant.product.100769151.html
  • 2 0
 Just got a pair myself, they seem perfect
  • 2 0
 I picked up 2 on sale for $18.50 each. They look solid, amazing for the price. Haven't ridden in them yet due to full winter here but I'm optimistic. Even if they are only good for casual use they are great.

I picked up a pair of the Backcountry Slickrock pants this fall on sale for around $55 and they legit are great for riding. Zippered pockets are a bit small and in a weird area for a phone is only complaint.
  • 1 0
 @heatproofgenie: those blackrock pants are awesome until your dog eats them
  • 1 0
 Can confirm, I bought them from amazon for 23$ and I love them.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: Never mind your phone. I was left a full size imprint of my phone on my hip. It hurt like hell and the phone was 3 weeks old and wasn't insured
  • 2 0
 Found some decent stretchy pants at Costco for $15. I put tape around the ankles and they work like really well. My Gform Elines fit nicely under them
  • 1 0
 @pisgahgnar: I have 3 pairs of those pants, and 2 pairs of the shorts. They do have a zipper pocket on them and the front pockets are deep enough that I dont worry about anything falling out of them. The only thing they lack is a belt of some sort, otherwise perfect pants for riding.

I got mine on sale for $18, and as a super bonus one of the colors they come in is identical to my local mud.
  • 1 0
 @heatproofgenie: I have been waiting for slickrock pants to come back in stock forever. How well vented are they? I ride in socal.

I also bought the wranglers mentioned on Singletrack. Great pants for the price.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: this is the correct take. I usually wear a 36” inseam and would buy a pair if this size was offered.
  • 1 0
 @heatproofgenie: It looks like the Slickrock pants are only available with a 29” inseam. Odd. Is this true? Strange that backcountry (as well as Evo.com) has such limited size details on its site.
  • 2 0
 @haen: They are vented pretty well actually. There is a 4" zipper or so on each side that opens completely plus the material breathes pretty well.
  • 1 0
 @sngltrkmnd: I'm 6'1" and my mediums are a little short for wearing around but perfect for riding if I wear normal long cuff cycling socks.
  • 2 0
 Swung by Target tonight and picked up 2 pair. Thanks!
  • 1 0
 I bought two pair of those wranglers when they were on sale for $18 last week. Been on two rides with them and they're perfect. Can't believe they're so cheap!! Rode with my phone in the pocket and had no issues.
  • 1 0
 This my go to for a couple seasons now. Tapered legs, three zippered pockets with one on the leg perfect for park passes.
$34 and they stretch as well as have a drawstring waist wish works better for perfect fits.

www.target.com/p/men-s-utility-jogger-pants-all-in-motion/-/A-80938229
  • 1 0
 The review says knee pads are a no-go under those pants.
  • 1 0
 @pisgahgnar: But the fact you can carry a Lrg trail tool and your cell phone the same pocket is quite the feature!
  • 3 0
 @spankthewan: my TLD stage pads fit under them well.
  • 2 0
 @spankthewan: alpine stars paragons fit under them fine.
  • 1 0
 First off, I was about to say these rapha pants do not look to much different from my $20 wal mart pants…then seen the wrangler post. I have a pair of stretchy nylon wranglers and they are even fleece lined for cols weather! I love them. Still less that $30 too
  • 1 0
 Got three pair this week. Two rides thus far and they feel amazing.
  • 2 0
 @spankthewan: I got a couple pair when they were on sale at Target for $18 last week. I tried them on with my knee pads (IXS Carve evo+), which are somewhat bulky, and they seemed to fit ok walking around doing squats etc., but they are a little snug around the pads, and you certainly can tell there are pads under them.

I haven't yet had them out on the trail (It's been pretty warm this week. No need for them yet.), but I've been wearing them as general outdoor casual pants (went sledding with my kids in them this weekend, been on a short hike, etc.), and have pedaled a bit, but w/o kneepads (BMX practice w/ my 6yo.).

No zippers, but the pockets are deep enough that I had no qualms riding the bmx track with my phone, wallet and key-fob in the front pockets.
  • 2 0
 While not quite as inexpensive as the target pants, the A.T. plus pants from HandUp Gloves are amazing. I've been wearing them to work. Love the drawstring for when on the bike (belts are no bueno on bikes) and the casual dress pant look everywhere else. Pockets zip up and they are about as comfortable a pair of pants as I own at a fraction of the cost of some "technical" dress pants like the ABC pants from Lululemon. Can't recommend them enough and the company is great overall. Their gloves are amazing the ethos is pretty darn cool and they're responsive as.
  • 3 0
 @soaklord: Another advocate for the AT plus. Got two pairs, and the shorts. All I wear. Bike, yard work, climbing, napping, salsa, work, and coffee drinking. EVERYTHING!
  • 2 0
 @abueno: I’ve been using target joggers for awhile, love them at $34 lol.
  • 18 0
 Any chance you could add some 'reviewers stats' web pages that show each reviewers' height, inseam, weight, head diameter, head shape, shoe size, relative foot width etc.. Essentially all the numbers you find on the sizing sheets for tops, bottoms, knee pads, elbow pads, helmets and shoes.

And then also put the size of the item you reviewed in the overview panel?

That would be so useful to the reader when trying to work out comparative sizing and also whether something will fit tight or baggy.
  • 3 0
 dob, mother's maiden name, pin. . .
nvm, they work in the bike industry. We've learned from a past article they don't earn a lot (they do have passion however). Wink
  • 4 0
 "Do you hang to the left or the right?"
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: tuck behind for the “fruit bowl” effect.
  • 14 0
 "Does anyone out there wear a belt while riding?" I prefer not to, but I'm so skinny and lanky (and I'm sure there are others) that I've learned to only buy pants and shorts that do have belt loops. Sometimes the adjustment strap just doesn't tighten down enough, or tightening it bunches the waistband up too much. I'm stoked when I don't have to wear a belt but lack of beltloops is a dealbreaker for me. Also why I wish makers of bottoms would put an actual waistband measurement rather than S/M/L; that tells me nothing.
  • 8 0
 This is my #2 behind fit. All of these waist adjustment features are bad IMO. I have ridden so much with a belt that I don't notice it and will not purchase anything without loops.
  • 5 0
 Great points, didn't think about them not having enough adjustment range.
  • 10 0
 @abayers @Sniff303: I have some POC pants that just will not stay on my hips, so I wear them with SUSPENDERS. Get in before everyone else follows suit!
  • 3 0
 I do, since I have the same issue of pants sliding down if I don't wear a belt. Not sure why since I'm not as skinny as I used to be. I pretty much dismiss any riding pants or shorts that don't have belt loops. Which basically means I don't wear any moto-style pants. Club Ride sells a riding pant with belt loops - the Fat Jack. As well as a couple of shorts styles.
  • 2 0
 @IanJF: yeah good point--the aforementioned POCs have no belt loops...would've solved everything LOL
  • 2 0
 All my Endura shorts/trousers came with a belt...
  • 4 0
 I often ride with a narrow stretch Arcade belt. I can’t feel it at all but it does its job. The buckle is also very thin and doesn’t mess with the hip pack buckle basically right on top of it. Highly recommend.
  • 2 0
 @VtVolk: Was reading the comments about belts and scrolled down to recommend Arcade. Superb product, I wear one on riding shorts, ski pants and jeans. Light, comfy, slimline. Highly recommended.
  • 3 0
 I’m not sure if you’re interested in an alternative, but suspenders are a great option instead of a belt. Snow bibs are a good example. I also spent many years in the military and never wanted to wear belts for several reasons. I always wore suspenders instead and many others did as well
  • 1 0
 @VtVolk: @diggery I use a NRS river strap! It is heavy and the buckle is large, but it doesn't stretch, offers unlimited adjustment, and then you always have a three and a half foot river strap with you for rescue/repair/strapping stuff down. Plus it gives you the real kayaking dirtbag look.
  • 2 0
 @Mntneer: I did try suspenders but found they did not play well with upper body armor when I was doing park riding, which other than winter riding is usually when I wear riding pants. Plus, the pants didn't have suspender buttons, so I used clip-on suspenders and they didn't hold very well.
  • 1 0
 @IanJF: logger buttons cheap and easy to install
  • 2 0
 Unless I'm 100% sure a pair of pants will fit my waist, I will make sure it has belt loops. I'm very thin, and have only found one pair of riding pants with a thin enough waist that were also long enough.
  • 1 0
 @lewiscraik: I use my endura belts for everything. Even though the shorts they came with are long gone...
  • 1 0
 Suspenders work for me on pants without belt loops and if you get the right elasticity, are more comfy
  • 1 1
 @Darwin66: yes always an issue when one does not have a enough junk in the trunk to hold your pants up. I have the opposite problem of you. Lol
  • 14 3
 Mustard jacket. So hot rn.
  • 11 1
 So hot it burns at the back of your nose and makes your eyes water.
  • 3 0
 Dwight approved.
  • 7 0
 The trousers (pants) do look good, but I just can't see them being worth double what I paid for the Endura Hummvee Trouser (pants).

If people haven't ridden in a good set of riding trousers, my god does it make a difference! Given the usual weather here in the UK, mine get more use than my shorts it seems.
  • 2 0
 Those are the exact things that came to mind when I saw the pants, my Endura Humvee I bought back in 2012.
  • 1 0
 @DoisforDonuts: Wow thats good if they're still going! I've had mine a couple years now.
  • 2 0
 @bearded-ed: they don't look great anymore mainly just faded and the velcro bits are dead but otherwise fabric is solid
  • 9 0
 Their repair program makes the garments enticing, even if the price tag doesn't.
  • 6 0
 I hate that there isn’t a word about inseam length here or on their website. I’m 6’2” and a lot of legs. Every pair is like capris and I’m assuming these will be too. Only pair Ive found to fit length wise is Forbike pantalones 2.0. A euro fit so pretty snug but finally some long enough
  • 3 0
 I’m 6’ 4”. I’ve given up on finding any riding pant that fit.
  • 1 0
 @sunringlerider: this is why I wear outdoor pants i got from Target.
  • 2 0
 I think 7mesh do a long trouser that you trim down to fit. Not sure how long they are, but if you have the coin they might be your best bet?
That or one of the custom companies...
  • 1 0
 @slimboyjim: I’ll have to check them out. Thanks for that. I do vaguely remember them being a trim to fit and then hem type pants so worth looking into.

Who are some custom companies?
  • 1 0
 @sunringlerider: I'm 6'5" and not a lanky build. Had good luck with Endura MT500 stuff and Nukeproof blackline is great on length if a bit loose around the waist
  • 1 0
 They're not too short, they're knickerbockers!
  • 2 0
 @slimboyjim: @stormracing: Had the same inseam length issue until I got a pair of 7Mesh Glidepath pant. Super comfy and the best pair of riding pants I own. (I bought a size M and usually need a 33 or 34 inseam). 7Mesh support is awesome, they'll help you find the perfect fit. Highly recommend this product and the company.
  • 1 0
 I'm 6'2 with a 32 waist and a 34-35ish inseam, Endura singletrack trousers are the best I have found. Their medium sits right at my ankle and fits great around the waist with just a slight tension on the waist adjustment
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: Something like this -

dirtyridesmtbapparel.co.uk/shop/mtb-pants

I've not used them personally but I think I remember some positive feedback.
  • 1 0
 @caribooyj: appreciate that! I’ll have to reach out to them!
  • 1 0
 @slimboyjim: rad! I did not know about them but choosing waist and length is incredible! Thank you for sharing those. Really appreciate it
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: Ha ha - I just hope they aren't crap now! Good luck!
  • 10 2
 If you don’t need them to be waterproof or ready for an arctic front, WTF you wearin’ pants for?
  • 3 1
 Great question. Mud and cold mostly. Pants keep the muck at bay and make cleanup super easy.
  • 4 0
 I used to think the same. But since owning MTB trousers, I wear them most of the winter. Mucky, splashy shins must have bothered me more than I thought.
  • 3 1
 @grumbly: Yeah, but that’s my point. Cold and wet. That’s what you need pants for. If they’re not waterproof or for the cold (arctic front), why bother?
  • 1 0
 Eveyone wears pants for DH, or cooler days, or dusty days. Sure when it's over 70° shorts are it, but I wear pants for DH exclusively. Try for yourself.
  • 2 0
 Because you can take them off and your lower legs aren't covered in mud. Also warmer than shorts. You don't need waterproof ones just to keep the wind and a kit of rain/mud off your legs. Waterproof or "for the arctic" would just make you sweat, whereas the softshell most MTB pants are made of is perfect.
  • 4 1
 @Bushmaster123: Seventy degrees? That’s your shorts/pants cut off line? I’d be sweating my nuts off!

But yeah, everyone’s got their preferences. To be clear, I have nothing against the concept of pants for riding. I get it. I definitely get why pants are practical for downhill. Helps avoid abrasions and whatnot. And I get why they’re good for cold and wet. But again, according to this review, these don’t seem to be the pants for cold and wet, which is more my point. Not that I don’t like pants.
  • 2 4
 @TheR: Cool, not for you. Every DH rider in world wears them but hey, maybe they're doing it all wrong too. Cheers!
  • 3 0
 @TheR: Where I ride there are plenty of days where it’s muddy and moist but not raining. Full on rain pants would be sweat bags. DWR pants tend to be a decent compromise.
  • 6 2
 I don't want waterproof pants, I just want to be warm, mostly dry, and clean when I take them off. If I need waterproof pants, I'll just wait a few days and go riding when it's not pouring so hard.
  • 1 1
 @Bushmaster123: Did you actually read what I wrote? I’m not being contentious toward the concept of pants, or you.
  • 2 0
 @redrook: It's the cleanliness of them that's a big thing for me. It's just nice not having to scrub mud off your legs! I wear trousers all year round and just find them a lot better than shorts. Yet to find shorts that either have a decent fit but don't ride up over knee pads - it seems they're either fairly loose and flappy (and get snagged on things) or ride up as you pedal.

I've also found when I crash in shorts, knee pads always shift. That just doesn't happen with trousers. On that note, as someone who wears pads on every ride, the pads you wear make much more difference to your temperature than whether your calves are exposed.

For context, I wear Commit Reaper trousers if the weather is good, and Decathlon trousers if it's not. Their RockRider trousers are super good. Waterproof panels where you need them, nice feeling materials, good cut, zip pockets - just great trousers for very little money.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: All good, Mike. Nicely written here.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: In Canada, when it is cold enough, you don't need waterproofing or really need tons of insulation, since y'know, riding is a relatively high output activity. That's like, 8 months out of the year. I'm sure it's similar in the ol' US of A, no?
  • 4 0
 Fully waterproof tends to be awfully sweaty - both for pants and jackets. Water repellent and nicely breathable works well for me in Pacific Northwest winter slop - some rain (short of downpours), lots of mud. I find that with fully waterproof gear, I get so soaked from the inside that I get cold on the descent or waiting for riding buddies/taking ride brakes.
  • 1 0
 @jaycubzz: Thank you. I appreciate the explanation.
  • 1 0
 @CleanZine: Yes, agree with both cleanliness (especially if you're driving home) and on the knee pad movement. I do prefer shorts in the heat though, gets air up and into the sweaty parts haha
  • 1 0
 I just started wearing pants recently and went through a few different styles before I settled on just really lightweight, water resistant pants that have holes in them for breathability (Fox Flexair). Anything thicker or more water resistant was way too hot for me. Even if it was pouring rain and cold it was like I was pedaling around my own personal swamp. I agree with what everyone else says, pants are just great at keeping mud off your legs. Also I feel more protected in them, even though in reality I'm probably not.
  • 1 2
 They are faster. Pointing two open tubes downhill is like wearing a parachute.
  • 4 0
 I only have one piece from their MTB line (Trail 3/4 Jersey) and I can't speak highly enough of it. The fabric, the cut and the repair kit it comes with are all top notch. Once I save up some more money, I'll give another piece a try
  • 6 0
 Because it was mentioned, I do actually wear a belt while riding, and am of the opinion that all mtb related bottoms should Feature belt loops.
  • 2 0
 Especially when everything is sized S,M,L,XL.
  • 2 0
 No ifs, ands, or butts about it.
  • 4 0
 Those look alright but I'll stick with what works -> Leatt airflex pads for the win - pedal all day in and have saved my knees (elbows too) countless times. Pro tip - grab a set of the small knee pads and use 'em as elbow pads (if your physiology allows) - the knee pads have more protection than the straight airflex elbow pads..
  • 4 0
 Have you tried rubbing chamois cream on your knees before putting on your pads @mikelevy ?
Solves the chafing issue for me with the majority of pads. Just remember to do knees before gooch.
  • 1 0
 or wetsuit anti chafe cream @mikelevy - also works well.
  • 3 0
 I made my own knee pads. After three seasons still don't slide down. They are also made like that with lycra sleeve. I ask myself WTF are those brands doing than can't figure out how to make good knee pads.
My Scott knee pads that I use for bike parks rub my skin, slide down and the material (prox) 60 days of usage is stretched.
Protection and cycling clothes have a lot of design flaws but prices like always are skyrocketing.
  • 2 0
 Slovenian innovation! Bravo!
  • 2 0
 Well, it stands to reason that they fit better if you custom made them yourself to fit yourself. Props though.
  • 3 0
 These look nice, but it’s hard to stray from the Walmart Wrangler outdoor side zip cargo pants I’ve been using. Stretchy, somewhat fitted, don’t get caught in the chain, pockets keep stuff in, and the material is durable but light. $22 everyday.
  • 2 0
 ATG Gang represent!
  • 1 0
 I love the wrangler outdoor pants. I don’t wear them riding (I usually always wear shorts) but I wear them pretty much everywhere else.
  • 3 1
 Does anyone make a pair of MTB trousers/pants that fit bigger thighs without having wide flappy ankles? All the models and reviewers for these products are all on the rather slim/lanky side.

I’m after a pair that won’t be skin tight on the thighs without looking like I’m wearing 90s skater jeans.
  • 2 0
 Look at the Specialized pants, I've got a similar build and have two pairs of their DH pants and they have a nice taper, and plenty of room in the thighs.
  • 3 0
 Endura Singletrack Trousers are working well - pretty snug (but stretchy) around the ankles; plenty of space (and stretch) for my large-ish thighs, accomodate knee pads, good adjustment range on the waist. Been riding the hell out of them, and they're holding up well.
  • 2 0
 Endura mt500 burner… very stretchy, admittedly skinny fit but very comfy. Also they take a crash well.
  • 1 0
 Nothing Endura if you have bigger thighs/quads. I tried the MT500 splash set and eventually got sick of them and sold them on because they're not made for people with cycling thighs. Found the same with all endura I've tried so I've given up with them.
  • 1 0
 @GolfChick: Give those Singletrack ones a try - they fit very differently than the other Endura stuff I've tried. It was the only thing I could get at the time (damn pandemic) and I was convinced they'd be too snug (because all their other stuff had been), but they work for my rather stout thighs.
  • 1 1
 Snap kit from Amazon. Fit snaps on cuffs of cheap tech pants, and able to slide knee armor on at the top of the climb.
  • 2 0
 This may have been mentioned already, but I believe 661 does make a set of knee pads that can snap to their chamois shorts to keep the pads from sliding down. I haven’t tried the shorts to verify this myself, but I have a set of their old Recon knee pads that have the snaps, and they are comfortable for me while pedaling for 1-2 hours.
  • 6 0
 But do they pull down your chamois when you do a superman crash? Because that would be hilarious!
  • 1 0
 Still waiting for some company to integrate knee pads into a bib. No gaps, no falling down
  • 11 7
 I applaud Rapha, working with their riders - developing high end products at a "reasonable" price.
  • 8 4
 "Reasonable" indeed. You can get 95% poly / 5 % spandex (or nylon instead of poly) pants from so many non-MTB specific places nowadays at half the price or less. Pretty much any tapered hiking pant will be great and cost 50% of what these do.

As someone who rides 5-6 days per week, if I bought all MTB-specific clothing it would be ludicrously expensive.
  • 2 1
 @rickybobby18: hiking pants rarely have a longer rise, or side zippers for venting, not to mention articulated knees with enough space for at least lightweight pads to wear underneath
  • 1 0
 I don’t know if you’re being sarcastic — hard to hear tone in text form. Either way, I picked up two Rapha jerseys for $37 each at their end of season sale going on a few weeks back. It’s obvious the quality is exceptional and the fit was well executed. I can hardly find gloves for $37 these days, let alone high quality jerseys with a lifetime repair program.
  • 2 0
 @Hayek: not being sarcastic.
  • 2 1
 I don't get the long cuffs on knee pads. If ixs flow and chromag had a baby it'd be perfect. My chromags would be great without the stupid long cuff I have to jank all the way up till it overlaps the chamois. My thighs taper downwards so I don't get what the long cuff is supposed to accomplish.
  • 4 0
 For me it helps keep them in place much better than shorter cuffs. Different people have different body shapes so some pads may not work for others. It took me a while to find pads that didn't chafe on long rides, I really like the 661 Recon. Feels like nothing is there and the long cuff is super secure, for my leg shape at least.
  • 8 0
 Longer cuffs mean more fabric which gives more stretch, and more stretch in the body gives the thigh grippers a better chance of staying in place. With a short cuff and little stretch, the first time you bend your knee the pad wants to pull the gripper down your thigh. A longer cuff with more stretch takes some of that 'pull' stress off the gripper.
  • 2 0
 I think its also in part a style choice. It is kind weird when your thighs are peeking out between you shorts and pads. Its a bit of a gapper look.
  • 1 0
 I tuck the long cuff (7idip)under my chammy no weird gap. And the never slide down.
  • 1 1
 @RonSauce: I guess longer pads would combat this, but it's really a problem due to shorts too short, not pads, IMO.
  • 2 0
 I ride TLD , and Fox. Happy with their stuff. The key hole snap, and lifetime repair are nice features, and they look nice. Unfortunately, the bay area roadie dbag stigma is burned into my head.
  • 1 0
 It used to be easy to laugh at rapha and their overly serious marketing to roadies. Now their mtb stuff seems well thought out and with lifetime repair why would you not give it a try? As a plus, and incidentally, my local rapha store has a really good selection of rides for all abilities (not mtb)
  • 3 1
 100+ knee pads that still slip despite silicon gripping cuffs. And 180 pants with less than attractive 'stretchy' cuffs that look like they are weight cutting joggers for wrestlers/boxers.
  • 3 0
 Fashion advice from a Canadian? Fashion advice from a mountain biker? Fashion advice from a Canadian mountain biker?

outta yer minds bro
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy does the padding get overly stiff in the cold? I have some Kali Strike pads made with Xelion (another polymer that stiffens upon impact) and they are like hard plastic below 55 degrees. The material really only feels soft enough to be comfortable if it is at least 80 out.
  • 1 0
 Same with my alpine stars pads. If I leave them in the cold and try to put them on in the cold it feels like I'm strapping a 2x4 to my legs.
  • 1 0
 SuperFabric, despite the cheesy name, has proven itself in the motorbike world. I'm therefore very confident of the tear resistance. The impact resistance on the other hand... And there is nothing more annoying than kneepads not staying in place. I'll skip this one and wait for the improved version.
  • 1 0
 I bought a couple of their stuff on sale and was super impressed with the quality and comfort. This experience push me toward the pants in late November for winter riding and yes the price was a stiff one. However they have been top notch, super comfortable, I even used them to run. What i really like is the waist adjustment and how stretchy the pants are. I took a big tumble and impact on the knee and not even a sign of it.
  • 1 0
 I don’t know if this comment will be buried, but I could not be more pleased with Coalatree’s Trailhead pants. Running 2 years now, super stretchy, comfortable, repel rain, and eco-friendly. I’m 6’4” 170lbs, the slims fit perfectly (they’re joggers, so cuff at the ankle bone). They’re a smaller company and I’ve had good experience with their customer support.
coalatree.com/products/trailhead-pants
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy Hey Mike, Looking at these Trail Knee Pads from Rapha. You mention that the padding was thin, light etc and that someone going down a lot might look for something else. I looked it up and these damn things are rated for Level 2 which is well beyond what the Chromag Rifts are rated/tested for protection. Do you like the Rapha's over the less protective Chromags for a rowdy knee pad that needs to be able to pedal? Have you spent any time with the TLD Stages? They are only Level 1 but have a lot of coverage via their big D30 pad which is about 30% wider than the rifts for coverage laterally. I have the rifts, stages (haven't worn them yet) and old Sam Hills but the Hoopers (level 2) and Rapha (level 2) are interesting as they seem to be about the same heat wise but with more protection rating. Curious what you'd go with personally these days.
  • 4 0
 Are these $80 better than other pants available from TLD and specialized?
  • 6 4
 Your mileage may vary, but, as an owner of all the above (and yeah, I am the product and marketing person at TLD) I do love the TLD Skyline pants, wear them 70% of my rides. That Spesh pant was the first pant that had trail vibes for sure, priced well, light, durable and been out for a while. When I had design team make skyline proto's that Spesh pant was one of the key competitors, but I think we did a few things better. Knee articulation is critical for pants like this and a lot on the market have weird knees that bind or you can feel the seam. TLD pant zippered pockets and fly, coolmax® fabric, DWR, bluesign approved fabric, waist adjustment, laser vent holes behind the knee for cooling. I guess the biggest problem we are having is we can't keep them in stock, but more are on the way around the world.
troyleedesigns.com/products/sp21-skyline-solid-pant-black

I guess short answer, IMO is no, what can you do with the extra $80 bucks?
  • 1 0
 I would say no.
  • 9 0
 @stiksandstones: here's one for you if you dont mind me asking. why don't you at TLD ( or almost any MTB brands for that matter) offer riding pants in a longer length?
Most seem to be a 30" or 32" inseam its a complaint I here on almost every winter ride from taller riders! you all make plenty of options for fat riders up to 42" waists surely there more market for a 2-3 inch longer leg! and personally it bugs the hell out of me that i cant get ones that fit right unless I spend an inordinate amount of money on ones from niche brands that make to order! (Noranna and Kitsbow will both do you a longer length if you ask nicely for example)
I ended up taking a pair of £120 Berghaus stretchy softshell mountineering trousers to an alterations place to get the legs tapered down to match the leg fit of riding trousers but with a 34" inseam in the end, which work pretty well, but I'm sure I'm not alone in prefering a dedicated riding option for us lanky riders.
  • 1 0
 5:10 TrailX come in a long length, that's why I got mine. Also way cheaper. Not sure why they call the "tracksuit bottoms" because they are definitely not. www.adidas.co.uk/five-ten-trailx-tracksuit-bottoms/GM4580.html
  • 1 0
 Double comment, oops.
  • 2 0
 @almightybenners: well said!
  • 2 0
 @almightybenners - maybe you know of this but DirtyRidesApparel (a UK brand) offers custom fitted pants. I ordered some & absolutely love them, easily the best pants I've ever bought. Just add 2'' to the inseam for pads and they have a winter / heavy and lighter (cool weather) option plus plenty of other stuff. Can't believe I'm not hearing more about this brand here (or other sites). I finally found DirtyRides after ordering prob 6-7 pairs of Fox, Endura, TLD pants and thinking how awesome they'd be except for the fact that NONE of these companies have 34 or 36'' inseams (not sure about the waist size max tho)

Another great option: Kuhl Rock Renegades and again, just add 2'' to the inseam though light pads only will fit under these (but the 2'' extra is helpful for riding anyway to prevent creep-up). Easily a great pair of light cool weather pants - I wear mostly for where I don't need pads to semi-rough stuff.
  • 1 0
 @almightybenners: Yo - tall rider here and I formally had this problem - maybe you know of this but check out DirtyRidesApparel (a UK brand). They offer custom fitted pants that (in my view) are affordable & stylish to boot. I ordered some & absolutely love them, easily the best fitting & best looking mtb pants I've bought. Just add 2'' to the inseam to make up for pad-pullup. They have both winter & heavy and lighter (cool weather) options plus plenty of other stuff (shirsts, shorts), all customizable in almost any way. Can't believe I'm not hearing more about this brand here (or other sites). I finally found DirtyRides after ordering prob 6-7 pairs of Fox, Endura, TLD pants and thinking how awesome they'd be except for the fact that NONE of them fit and NONE of these companies have 34 or 36'' inseams (not sure about the waist size max tho) that I can find.

Another great option: Kuhl Rock Renegades and again, just add 2'' to the inseam though light pads only will fit under these (but the 2'' extra is helpful for riding anyway to prevent creep-up). Easily a great pair of light cool weather pants - I wear mostly for where I don't need pads to semi-rough stuff... so good I bought 2 pair.
  • 3 0
 @stiksandstones: but...when's your supply chain coming through? I've been on the email list for the skyline pants for a couple months now.
  • 4 0
 @almightybenners: Agreed. There's nothing more frustrating than a brand saying, "Humans don't wear a 30/34, but a 40/30 is definitely normal."
  • 4 0
 @stiksandstones: Cool pants, but literally not one size is long enough for me. FYI many people have inseams longer than 32.5".
  • 1 0
 @stiksandstones: Thanks for the inside line on these, and as an(other) tall rider, here’s my vote for a 36” inseam. Til then I am in the Eddie Bauer pants I’ve commented on elsewhere in these and other posts. Proper length and excellent fit thought they’re not designed expressly for riding. Cheers!
  • 1 0
 @stiksandstones: been waiting for the stock to come back in. Hopefully soon. I bought a pair of the Specialized trail pants in the meantime as my first pair of mtb pants since moto pants for DH a long time ago. They are sweet except for the tiny ankle openings that make getting them on and off a challenge. These wrangler offerings mentioned above, however, also look like a good choice for $30. That is not a lot of cash for a pair of pants these days!
  • 5 0
 $180 DAMN
  • 6 1
 My Wrangler ATG's are so fine at $26.99
  • 1 0
 @dirtyalpine: was curious about those. Interesting that Wrangler jumped into adventure clothing. Mountain Hardware has some sweet stretchy pant I got for $45. Very similar to mtb trail pants.
  • 2 0
 @dirtyalpine: Yup, found some at Ross for $9 & bought 4 pairs - breathable stretchy goodness.
  • 1 0
 @dirtyalpine: Which ATG pant did you get? I see there are many different ones.
  • 3 0
 @THE-GUNT: "Side Zip 5-Pocket" at Target.
  • 2 0
 @THE-GUNT: Get the "jogger" ones, with the drawstring on the cuff. Just ordered some myself....if you look around you can find them on sale for less than 20 bones.
  • 1 0
 @Bushmaster123: can you share the name of the Mountain Hardwear pant? thanks
  • 1 0
 @cruddy: Yes sir! AP Pant Ridgeline. That's what it says on the tag. They are not stretchy, but they have a roll up cuff that snap and expose a reflective strip. Kind of an urban cycling feature. Zipper pockets in the back, deep jean style pockets in the front and one velcro pocket on the thigh. For $45 they are sweet. The material is interesting, its more of a cotton than polyester/stretch that most of these style of pants are. Billabong has some similar style and function for around $55 ( I believe ), part of their Adventure Division line.

Hope that helps! Highly recommended the Mtn Hrdwr.
  • 1 0
 @cruddy: just checked the website, they sold out of most sizes unfortunately. I just got them last week too! Bummer, should have grabbed a bunch of them. Figures...
  • 2 0
 @Bushmaster123: Thank you for your reply! I'll keep an eye out for them. Much appreciated. Cheers
  • 3 0
 Petition for Pinkbike to hire someone with a decent ass to model all these pants.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: Just pull the back of the lower cuff up over the the thickest part of your calf, and the pads will stay in place. At least it works for me and a buddy. (POC VPD Air for both of us though)
  • 1 0
 Yup, tried that - that's how they should stay put but don't.
  • 4 1
 1 step closer to being a roadie lol
  • 2 0
 For some reason, to me that first kneepad photo makes Levy's knees look backwards. Like an alien... Hmmm..
  • 2 0
 RVCA stretch pants work as well and are $60 retail, I got 3 pairs at half off from evo
  • 1 0
 Mountain Hardware has some on sale for $45, I believe they have a lifetime repair policy too, but don't quote me on that.
  • 1 0
 For sure, there are lots of less expensive options out there. We've done a bunch of articles on how to MTB on a budget, including one covering clothing. I wouldn't spend my own $180 USD on pants, either Smile But these are still nice.
  • 3 0
 The super expensive brand that sponsors PB is super comfy? You don't say.
  • 1 0
 Should've went with the orange jacket, Mike! Funny how I have both the orange and that curry-colored jacket from Black Diamond.
  • 1 0
 I ride PNW winters in $80 Truewerk T2 work pants. Super comfy, stretchy, fits over kneepads and has multiple pockets. Also DWR coated.
  • 2 0
 oops

> Pads are better then (should be than) some but still slide down
  • 1 0
 Fox Flexairs and Leatt Airflex much better. If you're going to buy expensive bullshit at least do yourself a favor and get the Assos mtb kit.
  • 1 0
 Interesting, what makes the Foxes and Leatts better? Assos don’t do trousers/pants
  • 1 0
 @mashrv1: Less hot, don't slip down legs. Assos do make pants for mtb. I was mostly referencing the shorts/bibs/jerseys. If I lived in Scotland, I might feel differently
  • 2 0
 Hmmm those Leatt Airflex look nice. I really like my Flexair pants but I'm looking for a breathable pad to wear under em.
  • 1 0
 G-form E-line kneepads are the only kneepads I've used that offer adequate protection, don't slip, and I don't notice on long pedal days/no chaffing
  • 1 0
 Wild: I had the exact opposite experience. Spec'd (and called Gform to make sure) my size, easily fit, but w /that opening in the back, the lowers kept creeping up & the uppers kept creeping down so they'd bunch up at my knee (and this was mostly for downhill and some level-ish pedaling...so odd. Never had any Gform pad do that before. Ditched & went w/ another brand. I'm sure yours work for you, not saying otherwise, but I'm sure diff't shaped legs make for different experiences. The protection was good though, looked good, but that bunching up thing.. .totally bizarre.
  • 1 0
 @Mtn-Goat-13: I couldn't wear their normal "Pro-X" pads without them ending up around my shins early into a ride. But for whatever reason the e-line's stay in place and I don't have to remove my shoes when taking them on and off. Maybe it's just the shape of my kneecaps or something but the fit was pretty dead on.
  • 1 0
 @chummyweim: Wild - I wonder whats up w/ their sizing (?) I by no means have mega quads & calves...really kinda a thin tall guy but I had to do a XXL kneepad but L elbow. Did yr pads not have that rubber / grippy inner lining at the top (not sure its on the bottom edge)?
  • 3 0
 Yes yes, $300 is completely reasonable for a pair of pants and knee pads.
  • 3 1
 For me, nope. For a lot of others, sure.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: for sure. It's all relative after all.
  • 2 0
 Im good with a pair of frayed jean shorts with a slab of liver for chamois ride all day then fry up the liver
  • 1 0
 I buy Rapha because I like to support small family owned business that support local trial projects. Like making paved climbing trails.
  • 2 0
 I wouldn't put a multi-tools in the zipper
  • 1 0
 I use a small, flat multi-tool that is perfect for side pockets. I don't carry keys on the side pockets as that's asking for a dead leg.
  • 1 0
 Cute pants but I’m 6’5” and they don’t make a 36” inseam so these would fit like knickers.
  • 1 0
 661 make knee pads that clip to their shorts (in answer to Levy's question)
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy the kneepads are so comfy that tou now will use them om the gravelbike?
  • 2 0
 Yes, but only with a lycra kit that's two sizes too small for me while smoking a cigarette.
  • 1 0
 What are these weird, pointy back-thigh guards, hanging down from shorty shorts? www.pinkbike.com/photo/21952258
  • 1 0
 I wish the shorts were 2" shorter tbh
  • 2 0
 Pads are better then some but still slide down. THAN, not then.
  • 1 0
 Giro boardwalk shorts have traditional belt loops and yes, I wear a belt while riding & wearing these.
  • 1 0
 Nice review - sounds great! But I'm going to have to stick to my Wrangler Trail pants from Target for $26.99.
  • 1 0
 I'm going to invent kneepad suspenders. They'll attach between your boxers (or briefs) and the kneepads. Problem? Solution!
  • 1 0
 You going to the moon Levy?
  • 1 0
 Mars.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: (thought the rocket on your thumb may be a GME nod)
  • 1 0
 Levy, what size pants do you wear from Rapha? Medium or small?
  • 2 0
 Medium
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: I now feel famous that you responded to me, one love.
  • 2 1
 But how do they handle the Raphast trails?
  • 1 0
 Just get 5.11 pants, hey are half the pricetag
  • 2 0
 No. Just no.
  • 2 1
 How much Walmart store credit did they pay for that head line though?
  • 2 1
 The emperor's new pants. Kooks.
  • 1 0
 A Rapha product that isn't absurdly priced? Never thought I'd see the day
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy. Like knickers but with knee pads!!!
  • 1 0
 Odd camera angle - looks like Levy put his legs on backwards this morning.
  • 2 1
 and impossibly short
  • 1 4
 Ralpha = Italian for rip off.
It's a hard pass for me.





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