Review: Schwalbe Hans Dampf II Tire

Aug 24, 2018
by Richard Cunningham  
Hans Dampf II review


Schwalbe brought the Hans Dampf to market with great fanfare back in 2011. The name roughly translates to "handyman," fitting for a tire that can do a good job of finding grip in just about any situation. Its designers intended the tire to perform at the pointier end of cross-country trail riding, so they kept the weight down using a new aerated rubber compound and a slim, flexible casing. Hans Dampf was well received, but times were changing...

Schwalbe's team must not have predicted an oncoming wave of aggressive all-mountain bikes and a wholesale shift towards the gravity side of the sport. High-amplitude riding eclipsed the cornering grip of the original Hans Dampf's edging tread, and if its sidewalls did not rip, new-school shredders could, um, shred the tread into oblivion in a few rides. Schwalbe's Jack-of-all-trades was not up to to the task.
Schwalbe Hans Dampf 2019

• All-purpose, multi-terrain, trail tire
• Aggressive reinforced edging blocks
• Addix rubber compound options: Soft, medium (Speedgrip), and hard (Performance}
• New tread pattern, bi-directional
• Available in Apex, Snakeskin, and Supergravity casings
• Sizes: 29 x 2.35, 29 x 2.6, 27.5 x 2.35, 27.5 x 2.6, 27.5 x 2.8, 26 x 2.35
• Reviewed: Speedgrip EVO, 27.5 x 2.6, Apex Casing (970 grams)
• MSRP: $82 USD
• Contact: Schwalbe Tires

Son of Hans Dampf

German designers don't give up easily. Schwalbe's team responded by developing "Addix," a series of tougher, longer-wearing and grippier rubber compounds, and then revised both the Hans Dampf's casing and its tread pattern. The result was a much more robust design that could thrive in the brutal landscape that sprung forth from today's super-capable long-travel all-mountain bikes. Fittingly, the new tire is called by the same name, but I'll refer to it here as "Hans Dampf II" for clarity. At first glance it may appear to be the same as its predecessor, but it is far from it.

Hans Dampf II tire
Hans Dampf II has taller, rectangular tread blocks, larger edging tread, and a two-two-three crown pattern...
...Compared to the original Hans Dampf, which featured angular, flexible tread blocks, arranged in semi-circular patterns.
...Compared to the original Hans Dampf, which featured angular, flexible tread blocks, arranged in semi-circular patterns.


New Tread: Hans Damp II departs from the original's design with a taller tread made up of sturdy rectangular blocks. Its stiff, reinforced edging tread is arranged in rows, like Schwalbe's Magic Mary, which should make the tire corner with authority. By contrast, the original Hans Dampf featured an array of small, radially-placed tread blocks, many of which were triangular, and its staggered edging blocks were quite flexible. It was designed to be a fast-rolling tire that that would break traction gently in a more controllable manner. Finally, the original's crown tread was arranged in semi-circular patterns, while Hans Dampf II's tread is lined up more conventionally. The circular theme is repeated, but the tread lies predominantly in bands across the carcass.

Hans Dampf II tire
Closeup of the Hans Dampf II tread. Wear was minimal after lots of testing miles, with no tears or punctures.

Hans Dampf II tire
What Schwalbe has to say about their redesigned tread profile.

Addix Speedgrip rubber: I have no idea what magic is going on inside of Schwalbe's Addix rubber, but the Speedgrip compound has to be one of the longest wearing substances ever used in a performance tire. I seldom lock up a wheel, so I get a lot more wear from a tire than your typical bike park skidder, but the Hans Dampf II set a new benchmark - on par with the indomitable Maxxis Minion DHF. Addix Speedgrip is a medium-durometer compound and is designated with a blue line on the tread. An orange stripe designates the soft compound, which was developed for DH and enduro, according to the official literature. Schwalbe's more affordable Performance range of tires feature a harder compound that is designated with a gray stripe.

Hans Dampf II tire
How Addix rubber compounds stack up. The gray compound is for the lower-priced "Performance" range.


Apex casing: EVO versions of the Hans Dampf II offer three casing options: Supergravity is a heavy duty DH casing with four-layer (dual-ply) sidewalls and a more flexible two-layer crown area. Snakeskin is a conventional two-layer casing with an additional layer of nylon cloth to prevent tears and punctures. Their Apex option (reviewed here) uses the Snakeskin casing, reinforced with a double thickness of tough rubber laminated to the sidewalls.

Lots of options: Customers can order the Hans Dampf II in either a 2.35 or 2.6" size for 29" wheels. If you ride 27.5" wheels, you can choose between 2.35, 2.6, or 2.8" widths, and Schwalbe offers 26" riders a single, 2.35" option. Based upon a 30mm inside-width rim, Schwalbe's casings measure within a half millimeter of their claimed sizes. My 27.5 x 2.6" samples measured 2.55" at 22 psi.


Riding Impressions

Earlier this year, I reviewed the 27.5"-wheeled Diamondback Release 2, which was fitted with the original Hans Dampf design in the slightly harder Addix Performance rubber compound. I used the same bike to review the new Hans Dampf, which provided me an opportunity to make direct comparisons on the trail. Well, nearly direct; the originals were 2.35" wide, while the tires in this review are wider, 2.6" models. Without spoiling it, the new tread design retains most of the original's smooth, fast-rolling characteristics, and puts an end to the "waiting for disaster" cornering anxiety that those first Hans Dampfs instilled upon their owners at speed.

Hans Dampf II review

bigquotesRounded tread profiles, like the Hans Dampf II has, transition more smoothly into turns, but the price paid for that gentle entry is that it takes a little longer for the edging blocks to bite in.

Aired up to 22 psi (R) and 20 psi (F), the casings measured 2.55", while the tread widths were right at 2.6". On the bike, the 2.6" casings look less over-sized than I expected, but meaty nonetheless. Mounting them tubeless required a reservoir pump to encourage the beads to seal, but one try was all each tire needed. Initial impressions were that the Apex casings are noticeably stiffer than the original's Snakeskin versions, but a magnitude more flexible than Schwalbe's Supergravity tires. Tire pressure becomes more critical as air volume increases, but less so as casings become stiffer. As such, Hans Dampf II tires can tolerate one or two pounds of pressure in either direction without suffering a critical change in grip.

Rounded tread profiles, like the Hans Dampf II has, transition more smoothly into turns, but the price paid for that gentle entry is that it takes a little longer for the edging blocks to bite in. The good news is that when the new tire's edging blocks meet the dirt, they actually grip the surface. Cornering on hardpack, I learned to anticipate a substantial drift while the original Hans Dampfs were searching for something to hold on to, and then I'd take a wait-and-see approach as the turn progressed. Pushed hard, the new versions enter a corner with an ever-so-slight drift as the transition blocks handoff to the edging tread, after which, the tires lock in and hold their line quite well. I'd never choose them for a dry, hard-pack tire, but they are predictable to the point where they are enjoyable to ride in those conditions.

Almost any tire feels like it can do no wrong in moist, loamy soil. If that's where you ride, you'll enjoy these tires for their predictable braking and all-situation traction. The tread also grips well on rocky slabs, root gnarls, and clears quickly and grips well in the mud too. That said, don't expect the tenacious grip of a single-purpose AM/trail tire like the Magic Mary - the Hans Dampf II falls short by about ten percent in the traction department. Its saving grace is that its rounded tread pattern and harder rubber compound roll much faster. This is the tire you'd want for a long ride on smooth, fast-running trails, interspersed with technical sections.

Few tires, however, perform well in shifting sand or gravel, and this is where the new Hans Dampf moves to the front. The tread is aggressive enough to maintain drive while climbing, and its flexible casing keeps the tire floating on the surface, where tires with stiffer DH casings would be bogging down and plowing furrows. The zone where I do much of my testing is infamous for its sandy berms, and the big Schwalbe tires aced them while maintaining excellent exit speed. Good to know if you ride desert locations.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotes'Jack of all trades. Master of none.' The old adage applies to Schwalbe's new Hans Dampf, but this time it's in the best sense. This Hans Dampf lives up to its name, with a fast roll and the ability to find trustworthy grip across the gamut of terrain and trail conditions that most mountain bike riders will encounter. It's not going to win races, but if it's adventure you seek, it will get you there and back. Addix rubber, a tougher casing, and a new tread pattern have made Hans Dampf an honest man.RC



132 Comments

  • 116 11
 Kinda looks like a magic mary but I'll trust PB. These big chunkier tyres arent always the solutions though and I always got on with the originals, but hey its progress man I guess so who the fuck am I to comment. I'll be over 40 soon and pedalling my fucking ebike up a hill on a 12 speed cassette with my plus size tyres while posting on instagram about how good a fucking time I'm having while supping on an energy gel and getting fatter and shitter all the while.
  • 27 3
 And never pessimistic
  • 10 1
 Looks like a love child of Mary and Nic. I don't think it's a bad thing.
  • 5 2
 Like Magic Mary and wtb vigilante had a baby.
  • 13 25
flag zokinjo (Aug 24, 2018 at 6:26) (Below Threshold)
 Why to even try them if we have Maxxis Minion in so many versions...?!? Smile
  • 4 0
 The new Hans Dampf is a much more complex tread pattern than the MM. Like a burly XCO pattern with solid side-knobs. I just got an Addix orange (soft) MM and same HD combo in SuperGravity. The MM up front for supreme grip and the HD for fast-rolling rear. High 20s PSI. So far I really like the setup - it might be the best Enduro/DH racing combo I've ever tried.Then again, I'm an old buzzard.... your mileage may vary,
  • 12 0
 40 is the new 80 apparently
  • 2 0
 Dude, why do you have to rag on me like that????
  • 1 1
 @endlessblockades: if your terrain is ok with a super gravity casing at speed. I know mine isn't...
  • 4 0
 Ever listen to Bill Burr? Right up your alley I think
  • 1 0
 @ibishreddin: adopted child of dirty dan and knobby knic
  • 1 0
 @yzedf:

Speed? I barely think about my tires at speed. I've had them over 50mph, though, and they didn't spit off a retread like an18-wheeler or anything.
  • 1 0
 @endlessblockades: What size did you get 2.35/2.6? What size rim widths? Thinking that combo sounds pretty nice. Just debating sizes.
  • 1 0
 @wda1wustl: I could only find the 2.35 and mounted them on 30mm internal /35mm external DT Swiss EX511 rims.
  • 2 0
 @yzedf: My wife rides all of the ProGRT races on super gravity casing tires and the Mont St Anne World Cup. Pretty sure most folks are riding the new SG casing in lieu of the DH casing.
  • 1 0
 Damn dude that was deep.
  • 1 0
 @Trilliamiano: that's what the Maxxis people told me with the Double Down casing. Tore through the casing at the treads on the DHR2 rear, once at Windham (Citizens) and twice at Thunder (Gronk and Schist). Not an issue with either DH casing from Maxxis or Scwalbe.

My personal style is to run enough air pressure to not have to deal with pinch flats in the rear, so the only thing I have to deal with is a strong enough casing to deal with the roots and rocks, especially the sharp rocks and me at 200lbs geared up.
  • 2 0
 @yzedf: I've had the same experience with maxxis dd casing 28ish psi tubeless, definitely not a DH casing. The Magic Mary and hans dampf in super gravity were much better, could just be the more rounded and greater number of center knobs protecting the casing on hans dampf vs dhf, I am about 30 pounds lighter geared up though
  • 1 0
 @wda1wustl: I should've added the the Hans is a pretty small, round tire by DH standards. More of a speedy-enduro. Smaller the the MM 2.35
  • 21 6
 Good that there are still 26'' options. i hope all LBS will stock them up
  • 4 2
 The 26" options being 2.35" or change wheel size? Why does no manufacturer make a 26 x 2.5 or 2.6 trail tyre? They are presumably thinking that people who haven't moved on in diameter don't want to move on in width maybe? Or older 26" wheel bikes wont have clearance? But some of us want smaller, stronger, faster accelerating, more manouverable, more fun, little wheels for other reasons. Make a 2.5 and see. At the moment they would have the market to themselves.
  • 2 0
 @G-Sport: I think you are right about the clearance issue. There was no sign of boost or plus when 26" ruled so aside from dh bikes most cant take a huge tire. Its funny, i have a modern 29" sid fork that is non boost but still can take a 2.6" tire.
  • 6 0
 @G-Sport: 26x2.6 might clear some forks, but almost no 26" rear triangle will take a 2.4+ barring stuff from the freeride gazzalodi era. most 26" bikes topped out at 2.35 clearance

why would they produce a tire that probably won't fit 95% of frames?

good on them for making a legit 26" option that's as fat as will fit in most frames.
  • 15 2
 I wish they made a 26" 2.6 speedgrip apex for my old school HT. That would be a totally awsome rear tire.
  • 12 1
 I don't like the fact that the yellow writing on other tyres clashes with my obnoxiously yellow frame so schwalbe are perfect for me as they are a subtle grey
  • 64 1
 And that, in a nutshell, is what mountain biking is all about...
  • 11 0
 @samjobson: and now that we're broke and our girlfriends have left us, let's go ride our damn bikes
  • 4 0
 @samjobson: no doubt. when are those rainbow anno Ti cranks coming out again?
  • 15 5
 Continental's Black Chili is the best tire compound I've ever ridden. I might try the new Schwalbe eventually but not in a hurry to switch from a proven performer.
  • 2 2
 Yes. Yeah its bit less grippy sometimes but last was longer than all my other tires. Durability over torn off sidd knobs.
  • 25 1
 Black Chilli really is something, shame Continental doesn't have a clue how to make a good carcass, already lost count on how many tyres I have deformed before thread worn out
  • 3 1
 @miguelcurto: True... My we're also wobbly as f*ck.
But as long as they ride good and hold up Im set Smile
  • 7 2
 Try the MagicX compound from Michelin. With the Advance Reinforced sidewalls. Now that is the best compound ever. IMHO, YMMV, WGAF, etc.
  • 3 2
 I had Barons and they were crap to me. They had a spot when leaning the bike where the grip was almost none. Grip in other situations was nothing special. They were also loosing a lot of sealant thru the sidewalls. But worst of all was their stiffness. I tried all possible pressures but they still rode harsh. I switched to MM and all problems went away.
  • 5 3
 Got Trailking upfront and a Crossking in the back. Brilliant tires.
  • 2 0
 @uskas: but when the loam goes to soggy slop fest, I rather use the barons... I agree 100% with the stiffness, makes you think your fork is 20 psi more.. however since I changed to coil fork, it kinda improved... when I switch to MM or Maxxis I think I have a flat ; )
  • 1 1
 @uskas:

I'm running a full set of the Barron's now and they're decent, I wouldn't say I'm blown away by any standard though, grip, wear, are fine, but that's it. They did leak a ton of sealant through the sidewalls, but now they hold air great.
  • 3 2
 Too bad their sidewalls seep sealant for years... if you like coming back to a flat tire each new ride Conti is the way to go. Carcasses are shit.
  • 2 0
 +1 Black chilli but conti carcass ride like sh1t too firm even sub 15psi
  • 6 0
 The guy that invented Black Chili (Wolfgang Arenz), developed all of the Schwalbe Addix compounds.
  • 3 0
 @nzandyb: and now funny enough is starting his own tire brand.
  • 1 0
 @Boardlife69: I agree though they seem to wear a bit faster than others IMO
  • 2 0
 @eswebster: They leak Stan's but don't leak orange or there own sealent something do with a chemical in Stan's . My trail King was flat every day with Stans and maybe slime I think it was? LBS said Continental "like" Orange sealent . Lasted a week or 2 then no problem.
  • 3 0
 @blk91: Stans is washing water vs orange or conti sealant
  • 9 1
 I may be in the minority but I liked the rowdyness of the original HD. I have bought the new tyre, in speedgrip and it is sooo good with the MM up front. I also have a set of minions and prefer the Schwalbe combo.
  • 3 1
 I guess with tires it really comes down to how and where you ride. I had the first gen Hans Dampf on a bike I bought and it was dreadful for my hometrails. Then I went to Mallorca once, tried out another bike with them on and it really shone on those dry, loose, rocky trails there.

So anyone trying to sell you one tire as a be all and end all is, in my eyes, sadly mistaken.

I've been strictly Minion for the past years but the MM/HD combination is tempting.
  • 18 32
flag WAKIdesigns (Aug 24, 2018 at 1:50) (Below Threshold)
 @wowbagger: what you describe is more than a typical situation where rider is contwnt with this sort of tyre, and that is because those dry ass, loose surfaces are dry ass loose surfaces, meaning not much really works there. The only way to ride them is to find those rare spots where any tyre would have grip, banked rock, a patch of harder packed dirt, but most of it just speaks: slide. You may as well run fast rolling low knob designs like Rocket Ron. Which brings us to conclusion that HD1 sucked arse and became 100% reduntant after Schwalbe introduced the latest iteration of Nobby Nic. Which is far from being greatest in its category. Bonragers XR3 and XR4 (which is BTW a short cut version of Magic Mary), Maxxis Forekaster and Aggressor, Spec Ground Control and Butcher reign in this segment. And that is because they all understood how tricky game it is to incorporate intermediate side knobs. The balance between predictable lean in and good edge is very hard to get. One tends to exclude another. Unless you run Minion DHF but that’s a different category. I seriously doubt this HD2 is any good for an advanced rider, an adept of art of cornering.
  • 3 1
 same here, good combo! Grip up front and rolling speed at the back, a nice do it all setup.
  • 16 19
 @qreative-bicycle: what's wrong with pairing MMary with Rock Razor in the rear. Hands down best semi slick I have ever tried and I tried all of them but SE2 which I doubt is better than RR. Especially now in latest ADDIX compounds. Cope this fkr with Procore and your are set for being fast. It rolls and corners better than HD, climbs better and only brakes worse. 3pros, 1 con.
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns: you're forgetting that the RR skids the best...
  • 8 0
 @Will-McCurrach: yeah the rock razor is a great tire, but you need to learn the art, and get the balls for, no traction no traction, hookup right before the tree at the corner and out..... rolls fast as hell and once you learn to trust the hardy side knobs its a beast. I'll be buying these for the back of my bike for a long long time. Great tire.
  • 4 1
 @WAKIdesigns: assguy blends transition nobs beautifuly. Always ran DHF and then decided not to be phobic and try. Assguy in the front from now on, but the urge to test a Mary is real.
  • 5 1
 @WAKIdesigns: why that f*ck the neg props?

Jezuz!! Can one voice opinions based on experience around here??
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns: RR in the rear and an original HD in the front is a rediculous combo. Probably the best I've ever had.
  • 3 2
 @Grosey: Mary folds when pushed hard into hard packed corners making you reluctant to be too active. It’s a tyre for folks who tend to rail corners rather than hit them. I’m the latter kind. It suits softer surfaces, preferably wet. I can imagine why Minnaar would want something like Assegai since he is extremely smooth and precise. Looking at Assegais side knobs I doubt it would suit me. They surely fold some. Again, personal preference.
  • 9 0
 26 by 2.35
Got bless Hans!
Thanks guysSmile
  • 5 1
 >I get a lot more wear from a tire than your typical bike park skidder, but the Hans Dampf II set a new benchmark - on par with the indomitable Maxxis Minion DHF

Say what ? I finally got around to running DHF's on my trail bike and I really like them, but they wear crazy fast. I am replacing them every 2 months due to general wearing down of the knobs. Maybe I am running a different casing tire than the reviewer though, since there are like 63 different varieties of DHF.
  • 1 0
 Try the dual compound rear. Will last a whole season. And MaxxGrip front always
  • 6 0
 Seems odd to compare the 2011 to the 2019 version and not mention the 2015 and 2018 updates.
  • 4 1
 Really didn't like the old hans dampf, found it un predictable, didn't seal tubeless, draggy and punctured easily. Wore very quickly with knobs disappearing every ride. Magic Mary is a great tyre though. Maxxis carcass seem much tougher for a similar weight.
  • 2 0
 My HD honestly never looses air tubeless, like ever.
  • 3 0
 For where and how I ride (Mostly the same conditions as RC) I had no problems with the old HD except for the premature wear of the edging knobs (but I would still get close to 400 miles out of them, taking into consideration where and how I ride). But I just put the new version 2.35 on my 29er and I do not know what the difference is but every time I ride my 29er there is an extra grin on m face and the only difference is the new school HD. Well done Schwalbe
  • 3 0
 I've just finished 3 weeks of trying the Hans Dampf in 29x2.6. Except for my disappointment that the 2.6" only measured 2.4" on a 30mm internal rim I have been really impressed with the tire. I'm comparing to 2.4/2.5 Dhr/dhf Minions and overall I think the Hans Dampf turned out to be better. It is definitely faster rolling than the Maxxis tires and only gives up a bit in aggressive cornering.
Best suprpise about the new Hans Dampf is durability. I had a pretty solid couple weeks of riding and the treads still have nice square edges and no under-cutting on braking edge and cornering edge of the tires. Good work Schwalbe, now please go buy some calipers and get your sizing more accurate.
  • 5 0
 Magic Mary up front and Hans Dampf II our back has been amazing for me. Love them!
  • 3 0
 RC did you give that bike back yet? Maybe get a pair of the new Conti mountain kings in 2.6. That would make an interesting comparison.
  • 2 1
 Just mounted a pair of 29 2.35 Hans Speedgrip front a rear - I am now testing the Nobby Nic Speedgrip in the front and Hans in the rear. So far my 2.40 Team Issues cornered much better however, these are very fast rolling. It has been an extremely wet summer this year and look forward to dry trails to really see how these perform in the next few days. From the site the Magic Mary 2.35 29 doesn't come in SpeedGrip???
  • 1 0
 That's probably because no one buys a Magic Mary for speed
  • 2 1
 I’ve had many pairs of schwalbe tires but heard complaints about orig hd durability, thought it was hyperbole. Finally got some snakeskin version on deep discount, like $5/tire. Wow! Literally 1 4 hour ride in the damp nw forest and side knobs we’re gone. Just worn away like pencil erasers, center tread knobs were half eaten. Given happyness and durability I get from maxxis and now vittoria I think it’ll be a while before I return to schwalbe.
  • 2 0
 With a discount like that, they were likely over 10 years old! Guessing they were the 26” version.

My buddy just bought a really old truck. He picked it up and tried to take it on a vacation, the tires fell apart and he almost died. Rubber work bests when new, degrades after a few years.
  • 1 0
 Last year I purchased 2 2.40 Fat Alberts and 2 2.35 Hans Dampfs in 26" (hey, it's what I have in a 2015 Mach 5.7 carbon and it's great) for $10 each from Jenson, shipped. They have all been great (at my ability) and $10, shipped, come on. Lots of traction on all of them. I wore out the Fats in Chattanooga and especially Phoenix and am now on the Hans. I wish I had bought 10 of each for my stash. I usually run Trail Kings, all of the tubeless obviously.
  • 3 0
 Schwalbe's casings measure within a half millimeter of their claimed sizes. My 27.5 x 2.6" samples measured 2.55" at 22 psi.

My brain hurts.
  • 1 0
 I find the new nobby nics don't hold a candle to the old dampf, mainly cause of the side knobs, which seem to run in the wrong direction and lower profile. Now these dampfs seem to have the same side knobs, which has me wanting to stock up on some old ones, which I've been happy with on my clay based trails.
  • 1 0
 Just goes to show you its all a matter of opinion. I always found the original HD to be very predictable and forgiving. And that helps you become a better, more aggressive rider. One of my favorite tires for sure. I prefer the more rounded profile and after years of Maxxis dhf and various combos from them, I still think the HD's were the best all purpose tire for me. However, as much as I wanted to get some of the new ones for my new sled, I just could not let myself spend $90 a tire on them. Got some 29x2.6 Purgs, and I have to say I am very satisfied with them. They remind me of the HD's but half the price.
  • 4 0
 Schwalbe spelling bee in the comments, winners so far include:

Scwalbe
Schalbes
Schwable
  • 2 0
 Shhhh-Wallabees!
  • 1 0
 There doesn't seem to be a 'channel' between center knobs and the side knobs. Probably easy to over power and plow on into an understeery, front end washout face-plant.
Sure it'd make an acceptable rear tyre for panic braking at all angles; not that that's a commendable way of cornering.
  • 2 1
 I'm running a MM Ultra soft/RR soft right now and the MM is probably a bit much for my day to day trails. Thinking HD2 front/RR rear, both super gravity/addix soft would be a good combo--a little faster rolling and not too much loss of traction vs the MM. Anyone running this combo?
  • 1 0
 Great to hear they have improved durability. I liked the grip in certain situations, but I'm a big guy and started ripping the knobs off first ride on the rear. I still like it as a front tire in the eastern US roots.
  • 2 0
 The original tire was a fun tire for drifting. It would brake loose easily and maintain control in the drift. Looking forward to this new version.
  • 2 2
 No more Hans Dampf for me, the previous ones I had died, the side knobs were going away one of the other, like in this review of 2015:

vikapproved.wordpress.com/2015/05/29/schwalbe-hans-damf-tire-review

If Schwalbe is serious, they would offer a refund for a defect.

This is not acceptable.
  • 8 0
 Yea except that isn't a problem anymore. So you're sour about not getting a refund, and rightfully so, but the new tires (2018+) are not like the old.
  • 2 0
 While we're requesting tires, can I get a slightly tougher Rocket Ron 29x2.6 in Addix compound? I think that'd make a sweet rear tire.
  • 1 1
 I liked the original tread design alot, tons of knobs and a profile that gave predictable drift in loose kitty litter riding that I find myself in all the time. I was hoping the 2.6 version would just be bigger with a few more knobs thrown in. Instead they make it bigger, round it off and REMOVE some knobs and call it progress. I'll progress myself to a different tire.
  • 1 0
 Looks better. The old Hans Dampf as a front had a tendency to wash out. The Magic Mary is still the best front by Schwalbe. A little slow rolling but just hooks up in all kinds of terrain.
  • 4 3
 Dirty Dan at the front and Magic Mary at the back, perfect combo for North Wales and it's famous monsoon rains. These tyres would be like death penalty in those conditions...
  • 4 2
 Imo HD is a very good all around tire. The problem with schwalbe in general, though are the knobbies, they easily crack.
  • 3 0
 There is also a 24x2.35 performance line for the kids..
  • 1 0
 Scwalbe, how about some orange stripe tires in sizes larger than 2.35? Some of us with wet roots and rocks need all the help we can get.
  • 3 0
 while it wont win any races?!! bullshit
  • 1 0
 I've been running the new HD front and rear in the 27.5 x 2.6 size. It really is a great all arounder. Rolls faster than all the other 2.6s I've tried.
  • 1 0
 why no Speedgrip Apex 2.35 (27.5) ?

seems like Speedgrip Apex will only be available in 2.6 (27.5)

is this true?
  • 3 0
 Ya, just checked Schwalbe’s site, can only get a 2.35 (x 27.5) in Soft and nothing in Speedgrip. Want Speedgrip then you have to have a bike that accepts 2.6 in the rear. If that’s the case, that’s pretty lame.
  • 5 6
 The first version of this tire that came with the bike was absolutely terrible. The most unpredictable tire I ever used. After 3 completely stupid and necessary crashes I replaced it with a set of DHFs. All problems solved.
  • 11 1
 The performance version of any Schwalbe tyre should never be installed on to a real mountainbike. I've still got scars in my shin from riding my friends bike with performance compound Nobby Nics
  • 2 1
 AGREED. They came stock on my bike. I guess the rear was ok but it's a terrible front. Incredibly unpredictable like you said...I was never really sure where my limit of traction was going to be in any given turn. I replaced it with a Butcher and will get a DHF once it wears out.
  • 3 3
 Accidentally bought a Dampf TLE and threw it in the bin after 3 rides. maybe it was the awful compound. but it was like riding with plastic tyres
  • 12 2
 first rule when buying Schalbes: go super gravity. always.
  • 14 3
 @strasznyzbigniew: it's a trail tyre ,some of us peddle
  • 4 4
 @nick1957: the rule stands. if you want lighter tire, buy something else. i prefer Schwalbes, but had to many problems with snakeskin casing, even when doing light trail riding.
  • 2 1
 @strasznyzbigniew: I even had liteskins previously. lol
Cant recommend them tho.
  • 3 0
 @nick1957: what exactly are you selling?
  • 1 0
 @nick1957: Pedal harder - SuperGravity4Lyfe
  • 1 0
 @endlessblockades: pedaling at max sustainable heart rate , with lighter better rolling tyre i will be faster / travel further . Again trail riding not DH
  • 1 1
 @nick1957: Not when you're trying to pedal around a flat snakeskin tire.
  • 1 0
 @dualsuspensiondave: Ha ha , if you are ripping xc/ trail tyres , yes you need dh casing and probably don't need to be concerned about all of the above.
  • 2 1
 @nick1957: Nah, flatting exo tires riding Ohio XC trails. I'm definitely concerned about rotational weight.
  • 2 0
 @dualsuspensiondave: wow . We all tend to think our own trails are universal , so yours must be rocky ,here in the UK Cotswolds mostly loamy, mud ,some rocks but generally avoidable so MM on front NN on back. So what do you use for your conditions.
  • 1 1
 @nick1957: Nah, they're flow trail man. Just about no rocks in Ohio.
  • 1 1
 @nick1957: Double down casing rear or a super gravity casing from Schwalbe. I'm about 185-190lbs. geared up, so that's worth mentioning. I had a NN rear tire one time, lasted only a few miles. I either pinch flat a casing that light, or burp them down to unrideable psi in the turns (running 28 psi).
  • 4 3
 I'm tired of worn out puns, but if they fixed the tear-away knob issue I can see how these might gain traction. :/
  • 3 2
 The biggest downfall here is schwalbe doesn't spec any of their tires with tan logos anymore
  • 2 0
 .05" is 1.27mm. Just sayin
  • 1 0
 I feel like I’m trying to read between some vey blurry lines here in your review. A few contradicting ideas.
  • 1 0
 wow !!! it took them 7 years !! to realize that HD is too fragile for AM/enduro riding (no match for Magic Mary) !!
  • 1 0
 It just looks so damned round..
  • 1 0
 Meh, MM and HD are a good combo, but DHF and Aggressor are better.
  • 1 0
 Why! Why oh why don't you just measure in metric ffs?!
  • 4 6
 i'm glad to hear its improved as the old version didn't do the job for me. Will i purchase the new version over a Minion DHF though? Not worth the risk.
  • 1 1
 Nice, concise article.
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