Review: 6 Months on SDG's New Tellis Dropper Post

Dec 14, 2018
by Mike Levy  
SDG Tellis dropper post review Photo by James Lissimore


It wasn't that long ago that you could count on your dropper post to stop going up and down sometime between when it was brand new and an hour into your first lap on it. Thing is, they added so much flow to a ride that the piss-poor dependability was sorta accepted back then. Riders would fix or replace them, but who went back to a tall posting? No one, I'd guess. These days, a dropper has to not just go up and down, but also do it for a long time without needing any attention.

SDG's new Tellis post needs to do exactly that in order to be considered a contender, which is exactly why I've had the $269.99 USD dropper on a high-mileage bike for the last six months. The cable-actuated, hydraulically-controlled Tellis can be had with 125mm or 150mm of drop, and there will also be a 170mm version available early in 2019.

SDG Tellis

• Travel: 125mm, 150mm (tested), 170mm (Jan, 2019)
• Hydrualic w/ non-indexed
• Routing: internal only
• Lengths: 390mm, 440mm
• Diameter: 30.9mm, 31.6mm
• Warranty: two years
• Weight: 552g (30.9 x 150mm), 36g (lever)
• Replacement cartridge: $44.99 USD
• MSRP: $269.99 USD
• More info: www.sdgcomponents.com


SDG Tellis dropper post review Photo by James Lissimore
Can a dropper post be reasonably priced and still be reliable? SDG's Tellis is exactly that.


Inside the Tellis

There are loads of different dropper posts to pick from these days, but what isn't widely known is that many of them use the same, or at least very similar, hydraulic cartridge from Wintek to control their stroke. The cartridges are relatively inexpensive - SDG asks $44.99 USD for a new one - but they've also proven themselves to be pretty damn reliable. Sure, they're not serviceable for the most part, but is that a bad thing when they seem to run smoothly for ages? I don't think so, and the rest of the post is easy to service when the time comes.

Alignment is done via a key-way system, and the actuator at the bottom of the post, along with the remote itself, is designed to deliver a very light feel at the rider's thumb. Up top, a 3D forged head is home to a twin, opposing bolt system to clamp the seat rails, which is much more reliable than a single bolt running from left to right that'll eventually let the seat rotate backward.

It's also worth noting that SDG says there are more than thirty international distributors and service centers who offer support backup, all of them stocked with parts that are also readily available and accessible online. On top of that, SDG has created a bunch of how-to videos that cover everything from a basic installation to a 400-hour service or a full cartridge replacement. That's how it should be done.
SDG TELLIS DROPPER SEAT POST
SDG says that they wanted a dropper that's both reliable and simple to work on. The replacement cartridge goes for $44.99 USD.

SDG Tellis dropper post review Photo by James Lissimore
The Tellis' lever can mount in just a single orientation: On the left and under the 'bar like a remote should be mounted.


The Tellis' remote isn't one of those that can be mounted every which way to the point of it working on your drop bar-equipped recumbent. Instead, it's a simple thumb paddle that's designed to sit where your front shifter used to be back when dropping your seat meant getting off the bike. The clamp is split, of course, and the paddle sports a braille-like textured section for added traction.

The cable is clamped at the lever (the head slots into the actuator at the bottom of the post) via a rather small set screw, and while it isn't the most elegant way to get the job done, it works.


SDG Tellis dropper post review Photo by James Lissimore
With flawless reliability, simple construction, and a remote that requires next to no thumb pressure, the Tellis is a worthy dropper to consider.


Performance

Besides slipping the cable's head into the actuator, then pulling it taut and clamping it, there isn't much to do. That first install took fifteen minutes, at most, and the tension hasn't needed any tinkering since.

There was essentially no side-to-side play at the post's head when it was first put on the bike, and there still isn't any six months down the road. That bodes well for long-term performance, as does the smooth action and no hiccups at any point in the stroke. SDG says that the Tellis works well in temps as low as -20c, and while it never got that nippy, it does seem to be indifferent to what the weather is up to. The touch of top-out at the top of the stroke is nice, too, as it lets you know that it's back up to full mast.

SDG touts a very light feel at the lever and they're not lying - the thumb paddle might depress if you blew on it. The shape of the cam is key here, and it'll be boon on any bike that has terrible cable routing that adds friction into the system from the bends being too tight. It should also help keep the lever moving decently when contamination has gotten into the line, although the real solution there is to do some maintenance.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesIf the Tellis had been released four or five years ago, it would have been one of the only reliable options on the market and probably one of the least expensive. Things have moved on, however, and there are a handful of decent options to choose from these days, including SDG's now proven performer. The Tellis is relatively affordable compared to many other dropper posts, it's easy to install and, most importantly for many of us, it's demonstrated perfect reliability. Mike Levy









109 Comments

  • + 17
 As good as oneup?
  • + 6
 I wanna know!
  • + 6
 At least as good. Oneup travel adjustment is really cool feature. SDG lever is better imho.
  • + 11
 My One Up is been nothing but trouble. Sticky movement that fails to return to full length without pulling up the saddle by hand. The lever has play that keeps changing with time. Priced well, long drop, but doesn’t work nearly as well as a Transfer or Bike Yoke which I also own. I’ve surviced and re-installed, lubed and played with the One Up many times with little improvement. Not the goldilocks post PB commenters are praising.
  • + 0
 @ko-d: Get what you pay for, have personally found 1up componnets to be a bit arse, overrated imo
  • + 6
 If you've got the wrong type of frame the OneUp doesn't work at all. The cable outer just slides in and out of the frame. I mean seriously who the F decided to make it different to every other cable operated dropper out there? OneUp didn't care and saidi was the only person they heard of to have the problem and didn't actually suggest anything constructive to fix it, the shop i bought it from didn't care, eventually i bodged it with a flexible v brake noodle so it works but the actuation is shit.

Wish I'd never bought the damn thing.
  • + 7
 @ko-d: Yeah the action in BikeYoke is the best in market. I have Brand-x, Tellis and Oneup. So far Tellis has been trouble-free. Strange that OneUp that i have has been flawless too.
  • + 9
 @ko-d: theres a sweetspot for tightening the seatclamp... too much and the post gets stuck halfway coming up... but besides that, it has been flawless for me, only 3 months of use though
  • + 6
 Im happy with my Oneup BUT the Problem is the mechanism. To activate the seatpost the cable needs to move to the contact point.... Try fixing your cable tight and the dropper wont work as you need atleast some spare room for the cable to move. With some frames the Oneup wont work because of this
  • + 2
 @donpinpon29 most height adjustable seatposts on the market today are better than the one up.
  • + 1
 Dropper shootout...crank brothers is pretty nice-maybe the best lever too and I've matched it with a ks post. I like the feathery touch of sdg!
  • + 4
 Another rider here who hasn't been happy with the oneup dropper. For the same reasons others have mentioned.
  • + 3
 I've really liked my OneUp. I did get the sticky head at the top once but relubed it and put the bike upside down overnight and boom. Trouble free for 6mo. Dirt cheap and got a WT Light Action. The good news for those with a sticking head is that it's just the bushing or clamp pressure and not the cartridge. You can service that bushing by hand with zero tools in about 5 minutes with some slick honey. That being said, I'd be pissed if it was still sticking for me. OneUp does give a 2yr warranty so if it's broke they are sending you a new post after some trial and error.
  • + 7
 @ko-d: your seatpost clamp might be a little too tight or low quality. I had the same issue, replaced the clamp with thomson and now its great! I have a transfer as well - I like the oneups ability to pump more air to make it faster and it has less side to side play
  • + 3
 I have the same issue with the OneUp sticking. Like others have said, tool-free disassembly (while still installed on bike) and about 2 minutes of your time with a tube of Slick Honey fixes it, but it also may re-occur. Seems like it's an issue with bushing tolerances and not enough lube. Its remote is fantastic.

Other than that I'm happy with it. But I also have two Brand-X's that have been absolutely flawless for 8-12 months. The lever is on the flimsier side but practically speaking that's a non-issue.

So yeah...thumbs up for OneUp (aside from having some minor maintenance) and thumbs up for Brand-X too.
  • + 1
 @ko-d: yep. Like another post in here mentioned, only "fix" seems to be to run the absolutely lowest torque on your seat clamp possible, it seems clamping the post deforms the outer housing and it binds. Really annoying.
I love the price and the super low stack height, but my other bike has a transfer and the action feels a Swiss watch and makes the one-up feel flimsy and sticky overall. I wish there was a 170mm+ fox transfer.
  • + 2
 Better IMO. The Tellis is super buttery and the remote is ridiculously smooth...so much so that any kid would be able to use. I've been using this for about 7 months now with zero issues.
  • + 3
 I've had multiple droppers and now run the Tellis on both my and my fiancee's bike. Both have performed flawlessly and the installation process was super smooth. The online videos make it pretty much idiot-proof such that you can get it installed and working 100% in 15 minutes depending on if you re-using the housing.
  • + 3
 I have both, I prefer the smooth actuation of the Tellis where I get some stiction with the OneUp. The Tellis is a piece of cake to install too. The cable attachment mechanism on teh OneUp is over engineered in my opinion. I'm not sure which lever I prefer as both are simple, out of the way and easy to set up. So, overall performance andvantage to the Tellis, leaving the only advantage of the OneUp being the the stroke adjustability and lower stack height.
  • + 2
 @veero: YUP. My buddy and I both ride a Giant Trance, and he bought the OneUp dropper and it would always stick. OneUp customer service informed him the frame was an issue and it may never work right. He returned it and I never bought one.
  • + 3
 @ko-d you should not be seeing these issues. As with all of our products we stand behind them, no questions asked. Email us at info@oneupcomponents and we'll get you sorted out.
  • + 1
 @OneUpComponents: I tried that but got little sympathy or any decent suggestions.
  • + 1
 @KennyWatson: Same issue here. I will say that OneUp has gone above and beyond on the support side of things though, which helps a ton.

For me I find I'm having good luck with:
- Running minimal torque on the clamp
- a good cleaning out under the top cap and filling with a very light grease (slickoleum) occasionally. The seal seems undersized, and develops stiction if not lubed well.
- taking all the slack out of the cable housing in the frame - their mechanism seems really sensitive to too much slack.

Having done that it seems to work ok. Not the saviour I'd hoped, but definitely less trouble than the 9Point8 it replaced.
  • + 10
 Basically same concept as CRC Brandx for twice the price. BS that u can't get reliable post is always mentioned but CRC proved that u can, actually u can have reliable post for about 150euros with 2 years warranty. End of comment* Crypto advertisingSmile
  • + 11
 Ive had 3 brand xs die on me - all the same issue of the bushing destroying the anno - CRC always replace but they deffo arnt reliable
  • + 7
 My first brandx 150mm failed immediately as it would not retain air. It was warrantied no issues by CRC. It has now done over a year faultlessly inc multiple trips to BPW, a big two week lakes/wales trip etc plus normal weekly riding. It was about £100 in their sales. Nuff said.
  • + 6
 @Karve: might have been early QA issues.. I have had a rock Shox Stealth which felt like rubbish most of the time.. bought 1 brand X for me and one for my son and cant believe why people would spend so much on thier posts when these things work so well and are pretty reliable.
  • + 8
 Brand X you get what you pay for, the lever has a poor feel and you don't really get as positive actuation as something such as the fox or One up... I've fitted a fair few one ups now and I'd say that thats probably the best post on the market, internally adjustable as well, I saw these at the orange demo day and they feel pretty good for the money but yeah you do wonder why fox and rockshox still charge so much for theirs!
  • + 6
 @Scotj009:
Why is positive actuation so important? Press the lever on the brandx and the seat goes up/down. Ive never had any problems with the actuation. Also the post has been faultless for almost a year now.
  • - 2
 @WilleKn: THIS! I run a BrandX and it work just how its designed. You press the lever and it goes up or down. Simple as that. I cant beleive people upgrade levers for better feel or actuation. What a joke! Push a lever and it works. Simple as that
  • + 1
 @Primo123: sounds like you’ve personally tried many different lever options.
  • + 39
 @Presley82 same concept in that it's a dropper post, yes. We've tried that Brand-X post and you certainly get what you pay for. If you're in the market and your main prerogative is a cheap post, then for sure Brand-X is certainly your best bet. We could have cheaped out on several aspects of this post to bring it down to that level, but SDG's never been in the business of making products just for the sake of being cheap. We prefer to make products that serve a purpose and deliverer customers an extremely good value for where they're priced. The Tellis is no different as we priced the Tellis competitively, but the main focus was on durability and simplicity.
  • + 1
 @SDG-COMPONENTS: nice to see so many options. Thanks for making great products!
  • + 4
 My hope is that someday all dropper posts will be as reliable as my office chair that has loyally gone up and down every time I've pulled the lever for the past ten years.
  • + 1
 @rossluzz: Ha, yes office chairs should be the golden standard. If you look at our cartridge it's not far off that of an office chair one as this cartridge was by far the most durable out there. The difficulty really comes to sealing it from the elements and minimizing head play. Trying to keep things simple with the cartridge, but build a robust post around it that you don't need to touch.
  • + 3
 @SDG-COMPONENTS: My Tellis has been through all kinds of hell. Still super smooth and quick. Would buy again. Thanks
  • + 5
 @rossluzz: Roll your office chair up and down hundreds of miles of rocks and roots, expose it to dust and mud, and slam it into the ground every now and then at a good speed, then get back to us about the reliability of your office chair.
  • + 4
 @clapforcanadaa: But the cylinder in an office chair doesn't have to go over rocks, roots, drops, and jumps! Even at that, I have had several office chair failures with the lift systems. Smile And for sure, if you have a chair for a while, you will notice increased wobble when it is in the raised position.

So, I don't really think it's the gold standard.
  • + 6
 brand x too slow, oneup ftw
  • + 3
 @WilleKn: its important because it feels cheap and sub par, its the same as buying the shitty base model shifter, does the same job but feels bad.
  • + 2
 @senorbanana: aha, OK! I buy the base model shifter too, haha
  • + 2
 @WilleKn: Yeah you clearly just want a cheap dropper, thats fair eough, but go try a fox transfer or a one up and tell me that you wouldn't like a more positive feeling lever
  • + 1
 @Scotj009: for me the lever feel is not worth the 100 € (there abouts) or more over the brandx dropper.
  • + 1
 @rossluzz: Unfortunately I've had two office chairs go bad on me in the last two years....I've had better luck with droppers! lol!
  • + 1
 @WilleKn: Fair enough
  • + 9
 Honestly, most bike parts break after 3-5 months of use. Most droppers are a pain to deal with, they're never working perfect and whenever you have that race or ride that matters the most, that's the time it bonks....

I rode this post for 9 months this year, racing it in Chile, Colombia (see the worst mud ever). Racing is one thing, but I had this post through a season of work - that's days on days of heavy packs, more up/downs than most people will have in years.

Here's the GOOD
- Only replaced the cable twice
- Everything Levy said is on point
- NO MAINTENANCE OR ADJUSTING
- The seals! Why can't everyone just replicate this?

Here's the BAD
- The body is a little long.
- I put another brand on recently, you really notice how bad they are, and now I need to go buy another SDG...
- In bad crashes you may bend the lever body.

Work, race, play - If I'm not breaking it in a year, you're never breaking it. ahahhh
  • + 4
 Meh. Same as Bontrager Line dropper, Pro Koryak, Giant Contact etc etc. and while they all work, none of them are great. The plastic parts (keyways and actuator) inside the post worry me a little, they're going to crap out sooner rather than later IMO.
  • + 2
 I’ve had two giant droppers on my 5 year old bike, and only got a second one when the gas chamber emptied in the first one after 4 years and about 5000km.
Upon inspection the keyways and actuator were fine after that much use, and if I didn’t get a very good deal at the LBS I would have just bought a replacement gas strut.
  • + 2
 @samjobson:
It's only the 2019 ones with plastic keyways, which is why I'm worried. Nobody has actually put a long term test on one yet.
  • + 1
 FYI my 2017 giant one crapped out on the first ride. My 2019 bontrager one has been okay so far, apart from the lever being junk.
  • + 3
 I have the Giant Contact and all the parts look pretty much the same as in this thing. It works fine but bushings scratch the anodizing and it develops play over time. Fortunately Giant replaces them without issue.
  • + 18
 @sam264 As we'd mentioned in the original launch, we utilized off the shelf parts for many of the internal components, because they worked quite well and allowed us to keep the cost down. We're not trying to hide that which is why we included the photo of the internals. Compared to those options you listed we offer both seat tube diameters (Bontrager/Giant are limited there), but more importantly we offer all the small parts for the post. So down the road when your warranty runs out (with any brand) you can fully service your post. Plus with all the service videos we've made live from the get go, you can do servicing yourself or any local shop can without any specialized tools you'll need to source.
  • + 5
 @sam264 I was the one from the original launch video facilitating all the field testing. Personally, I've been on the exact same post for 2 years @3,000+km and haven't changed a thing internally. The post still has the same minimal play as it did on day 1. I've had plenty of massive stacks on it, so it seems to be holding up just fine. This comment is mimicked by the 120+ product managers, athletes and test riders that have been on it as well over 2 years. Everything breaks eventually, but keyways and actuator are definitely not showing signs of craping out.
  • + 4
 Pretty positive. As others point out other brands using Wintek have had good results (FSA, Bontrager etc) but only SDG has had such extensive documentation. Applaud any brand which facilitates users DIY
  • + 2
 I’ve been running one for a while now in some pretty gross conditions and it still is working like new! It’s definitely put some of my other posts to shame. Plus the lever feels so much better thsn any other dropper lever, including my previous favourite Woolf tooth lever.
  • + 2
 I bet you for every person that swears by this dropper, there will be someone who finds it don't work for shit. Same with every dropper out there. We have the know how of nuclear power and time travel, but, alas...no guarantee of your dropper going up and down without failing.
  • + 1
 i suppose if you want a reliable post you have to shell out the hard earned money. my bikeyoke revive is flawless since two years but it was expensive. what i dont like about the tellis and other similar droppers is that you need a replacement cartridge after some time of usage. there is enough waste and garbage in this world already. if they would bring a refined version of the gravity dropper..that thing looked horrible but indestructible.
  • + 1
 I've owned TWO of these things for the passed 3-4 months. The first got returned within a week or so because it developed horrid side-to-side play, and the second had the same thing happen, albeit it took a few more months to materialize.
I like that SDG brought to the market a reasonably priced dropper, and one that only requires a $40(plus or minus) cartridge to replace, but from my experience they still have some work to do on it.
Luckily for me, the place I bought it from(Jenson) returned both(even after a few months of use on the last one), and allowed me to use the credit towards a different brand
  • + 1
 Sorry you had those issues, I understand that's got to be extremely frustrating for you. Some of our production posts didn't have the actuator nut properly torqued to the actuator and cartridge, so unfortunately we had a batch that developed this play. Simple fix, but hard to have confidence in a new product especially after the same issue twice. We've since sorted the assembly so this isn't an issue, so you definitely shouldn't run into it again. Shoot us a message if you ever want to try it again and we'll send you a discount code to help out.
  • + 1
 @SDG-COMPONENTS:
The first one I bought was the day they became available(at Jenson at least), and the second one was shortly there after, so they both very well could've been early production pieces.
Thanks for the discount offer. Still rolling your seats on both my bikes 'cuz they're the most comfortable for me
  • + 1
 @YoKev: Yeah, most definitely the case if you were an early adopter. We tested the hell out of the posts well before production, so it's really unfortunate that an assembly issue tarnished the experience. Stoked you're loving the saddles though!
  • + 2
 This post sounds very similar in most/all aspects to the X Fusion Manic. Budget price, reliable performance, cheap and easy cartridge swap, very light lever action, and a little longer length than average for a given drop.
  • + 1
 FWIW, I'm still using a KS i950 from 2010. Admittedly I had to give up on using the remote, which never worked well no matter what I did. But the post itself it still going strong, through many British winters and plenty of mud & grit.

If you're yet to get on the dropper post band wagon I highly recommend it. There are plenty of good options out there now.
  • + 1
 I have 2 of those from 2012. Both have required an IFP bleed exactly once and it's a 1 hour job at home. Both still going strong. Bikeyoke Revive on my new bike feels nicer and has more drop but the KS still does the job.
  • + 2
 Some of us still have a bike with a Front Der and Shifter.

Is anyone making dropper remotes that don't get in the way of the front shifter??
  • + 4
 Any word on the little bag hanging onto the rails of the saddle?
  • + 1
 Interested in that as well
  • + 1
 It lo
  • + 1
 Well, that was weird. Anyway, I was trying to say... it looks like a piece of old innertube, wrapped around a bunch of stuff, and held on with a length of 2-sided Velcro. I do the same thing. Cost me nothing. Or there's always those 20+-dollar wrap things...
  • + 1
 You can buy this from Specialized. some saddle from them have two little screwholes to mount that "MTB Bandit"

www.specialized.com/de/de/mtb-bandit/p/155910?color=229850-155910
  • + 1
 @garfunkel187: Thanks!

Posting English language link below for those interested:

www.specialized.com/us/en/mountain-bandit/p/133107
  • + 1
 @garfunkel187: but specialized is the devil
  • + 1
 I’ve owned 1 of these since they dropped it and the only complaint is the side to side play. A little much but besides that it has been super reliable and I haven’t had to do any maintenance to it whatsoever.
  • + 1
 Except the Manic orients the cable opposite to this SDG. The SDG is easier setup wise, but the reverse orientation allows me to run my preferred hacked XT front shifter
  • + 3
 Tested in Canada, so you know it won’t fail you in winter!
  • + 0
 What?! No I-Beam?!

I was really hoping for a dropper post finally to have I-Beam. How can SDG miss such a opportunity? And from the I-Beamiest of all I-Beam companies? I'm dissapointed of you @SDG-COMPONENTS
  • + 1
 Main thing is sdg has some of the best customer service! riders whom ride socal spots a ton.
  • + 1
 What are the benefits of ibeam
  • + 1
 What’s w the saddle position and rocky MTB? I thought they sucked. No dw link?
  • + 2
 No I-beam compatibility? Does SDG let it die?
  • + 7
 Definitely not dead! It's still alive and very well. As we were brand new to the dropper market we wanted to prove ourselves first with a railed version, but you can bet we're more than keen to bring the benefits of I-Beam to the dropper segment.
  • + 2
 @SDG-COMPONENTS: I'll buy one instantly once you release the I-Beam version. Have been waiting for a I-Beam dropper for over 5 years now!

Also, I don't understand your logic? Why try to compete in a market (railed droppers) which there is so many other highly competent competitors, instead of just releasing into a market where you'll be instant kings? (I-Beamed droppers)
  • + 3
 @megatryn: if all customers were as well aware of the benefits of I-Beam it'd be no problem, but unfortunately it's still not widely accepted; especially outside of the DH/DJ market. The railed dropper market is certainly crowded, but still room for us to come in with a product that improves on other offerings with unrivalled durability, simplicity and competitive pricing. As the Tellis continues to gain credibility we'll for sure be able to bring out the I-Beam head and offer something that really stands out from the crowd with the best rail interface out there.
  • + 0
 It's the same as the giant Contact Switch (S) whose price is half lower than this! Only difference is that you can get it even in 31.6 diameter.
  • + 0
 I just clicked the post for a larger view of that saddle. Wanted to see if there was any more room on the rails to possibly move that thing farther forward.
  • + 1
 Must be one of those slack 74.5 degree seat tubes.
  • + 1
 Another case of geometronitis? prominently displayed, with well lubricated saddle
  • + 1
 Please tell us about the saddle clamp. It’s amazing how many posts manage to screw this part up.
  • + 1
 Had the same mechanical dropper for three plus years and serviced it once. Who’s been putting up with unreliability?!
  • + 1
 What's with the nose of the saddle pointed down so low?
  • + 2
 better for climbing, where i ride i'm either in the saddle climbing, or out of the saddle descending, i run my seat similar, its great.
  • + 1
 Come to laguna beach and find out, lol!
  • + 1
 Not like my reverb????????
  • + 0
 My history with droppers rated best to last. Bike yoke revive, SDG, Giant contact, Reverb and One up tied for worst
  • + 1
 @MikeLevy which gorgeous Rocky frame is that!?
  • + 2
 It's a Rocky Mountain Element.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Another one huh? I can't stop riding Rocky's either. Thanks!
  • + 1
 Literally exactly the same as bontrager posts
  • + 1
 Gaint bicycle*
  • + 0
 4 or 5 years ago the DOSS WAS the only reliable seatpost...
  • + 1
 Gravity Dropper had the heavy, expensive unbreakable market locked down years before Fox got into the dropper game.
  • + 0
 Sooo different from the othersSmile Smile Smile
  • + 0
 It is the same seatpost as faint make. Almost the same exact internals
  • + 1
 The same exact internals as the Bontrager line posts.
  • + 1
 Yeah but it looks like they are better supporting it
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: better supporting what?
  • + 0
 Mine failed after 28 days... ????‍♂️
  • + 5
 Did you send us a message regarding this? Obviously shouldn't have issues after 28 days, so please do message support@sdgcomponents.com and we can see if it's a setup or manufacturing issue.
  • - 2
 My PNW Cascade dropper has been flawless so far, only 2 months of riding and no issues. $200 for post with remote.

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