Review: 6 Months With RockShox's Wireless Reverb AXS Dropper Post

Oct 8, 2019
by Mike Levy  
Eagle AXS XX1 review


It's hard to believe, but the hydraulically-controlled Reverb will have been around for a decade in 2020, and due to an immense amount of OE spec, it's also been easily the most-used dropper post since, well, dropper posts became a thing. There have been a bunch of different versions and updates over that time, but the latest is by far the most notable: The ten-year milestone sees RockShox ditch the oil-filled hose for an encrypted wireless network.

That's right, there's no cable or hose connecting the remote to the post, but it comes at a price: The Reverb AXS goes for $800 USD, or exactly twice the price of a standard Reverb Stealth with their 1X remote. It's also a smidge heavier than a standard Reverb, at 657-grams for my 170mm-travel model, but you're paying extra for the missing hose, not missing grams.

Reverb AXS Details

• Travel: 100, 125, 150, 170mm (tested)
• Electronic, wireless design
• Re-designed head, clamp
• Faster, fixed return speed
• SRAM battery, CR2032 in remote
• Lengths: 340, 390, 440, 480mm
• Sizes: 30.9, 31.6, 34.9mm
• Weight: 657-grams (post), 64-grams (remote)
• MSRP: $800 USD
• More info: www.sram.com/rockshox


Eagle AXS XX1 review
Here's what you get for $800 USD: The post itself, the battery and its required charger, the shifter and its clamp, and some instructions.


The Details

The Reverb's remote doesn't have to pull any cable or push any oil, but it is the home for the electronic stuff, a common CR2032 battery, and the paddle. So instead of it being a barely-there remote, it kinda looks like a shifter at two-thirds scale, but with a single plastic thumb paddle that pivots from the top.

A small spring between the paddle and the remote provides the tension, just like on the AXS shifter, but the paddle itself is flatter in shape.


RockShox Reverb AXS review
The Reverb's remote looks a lot like the one that controls AXS shifting, but the paddle is a bit flatter and can only be reached from the front.


The paddle is essentially a power button, and it only needs to travel a few millimeters before orders are barked to the receiver and tiny electric motor hidden inside the post's head. Then, without any delay, the power of science compels the motor to spin, which then turns the only seatpost-mounted gearbox that I can think of. That opens and closes the oil port that lets the Reverb move up and down, as well as lock in place anywhere in its travel, just like on those old fashioned hosed versions your dad used to use.

One last thing on the remote: As others have noted, I bet there's enough room on it for SRAM to offer an updated two-paddle version. So you could, you know, maybe control your bike's suspension wirelessly? That'd be neat.


n a
From left to right: The battery mount, the head that threads onto the stanchion with the plunger installed (red and silver circle), the circuit board, and the motor and gearbox assembly.

n a
n a
The head with its guts installed but the battery mount removed (left). The plunger (right) still needs to open and close and oil port, just like on the normal Reverb.


The post's head is home to that previously mentioned tiny motor, gearbox, and electronics, all of which forced RockShox to come up with a new clamp layout. While it looks like the dreaded single-bolt setup at first glance, a screw at the front is used to both adjust the tilt and lock it in place. Separating the clamping and tilt duties does make setup easier, too.

At the opposite end, there's a new feature called Vent Valve that lets you bleed air from the system to fix the annoying squishiness that can sometimes infect the Reverb. If that sounds similar to what BikeYoke has going on inside their Revive post, that's because it is. The difference is that RockShox uses an IFP to keep the air and oil separated while BikeYoke lets the two mix freely. That should make the Reverb less likely to get soft in the first place, and that matches my experience over that last six months.


RockShox Reverb AXS review
RockShox Reverb AXS review
The new head seperates rail clamping duties (left) and angle adjustment (right).



Installation

Not much to say here other than it's dead easy. The battery clips onto the back of the post's head, and pairing it with the remote is as simple as holding down the little buttons on each. Can you manage a Bluetooth speaker? Then I have faith that you can do this as well.

You have a bunch of mounting options when it comes to the remote. There's the standalone clamp that's useful if you end up wanting it to sit between your brake lever and grip, or the Matchmaker clamp that lets you attach it to the same perch as said brake lever. There are also two mounting locations on the shifter itself that let you move it inboard or outboard a touch. While I like the AXS shifter on its own standalone clamp so it sits really close to the grip, the differently shaped paddle on the Reverb remote means that it works fine with a more common Matchmaker setup. If you're going to pay $800 USD for a seatpost, you better take the time to set it up perfectly.


RockShox Reverb AXS review
With the battery installed, the head is much larger than a normal Reverb.



Performance

Much like the AXS drivetrain I reviewed a few weeks back, the wireless Reverb was used on multiple bikes and by multiple riders over the last six months. At this point, it's going on over seventy rides and 50,000 meters of climbing and descending during everything from two-day bikepacking trips on a steel hardtail to countless climbs and descents on a Tallboy, Megatower, and now a Pole Stamina 140.


Santa Cruz Tallboy review Photo by Dane Perras
Moments when you need your seat to lower by just a bit are when the Reverb AXS comes into its own.


How many times have I been stranded miles from civilization with a dead battery during those rides? Zero times, although I think it was getting pretty close on a couple of occasions as I often kept using it regardless of the yellow warning light coming on. RockShox is saying to expect somewhere around forty-hours of ride-time, twice what the same battery offers when it powers the drivetrain. It's also going to depend on the type of terrain you spend your time on; it'll last longer if most of your rides go straight up before coming straight back down than if you ride rolling trails that call for plenty of seat height adjustment.

For me, the yellow light would show up after a bit more than two-ish weeks, or between seventeen and twenty-three rides. Because I tend to micro-adjust its height for tricky climbs, I suspect that I'm using my dropper post more than most riders. Either way, the performance doesn't change as the juice goes down, and battery life seems to be more than sufficient.


RockShox Reverb AXS review
RockShox Reverb AXS review
The AXS remote is much, much more ergonomic than either RockShox's two previous attempts at a dropper post lever, but it could be better if they had tucked it even closer to the handlebar.


On the ergonomic front, I've had a few riders tell me that they don't get along with the shape the AXS shifter's paddle, but it makes more sense when you get it closer to the grip on a standalone clamp. The Reverb's flatter paddle felt near enough to the grip on the Matchmaker clamp, but I think it could be even better; a different mount that tucks the remote up even closer to the handlebar - and the thumb - would be ideal. It's not bad, but it could be really good.

The feel is basically the same as the AXS shifter, with a tactile click that lets you know you've done something and only a few millimeters of travel.


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Think of the paddle as your switch; the post is free to go up and down through its travel when you press and hold the switch, and it locks in place when you let it go. That brings us to the e-Verb's most useful feature: You can bump the bottom edge of the paddle and sort of let your thumb push off of it as soon as it activates the post, quickly dropping or raising it by just about five-millimeters each time.

This 'feathering' of sorts is incredibly useful on awkward, technical climbs or rolling trails where some extra clearance can make you feel a lot more comfortable. And, aside from the missing hose, it's probably the only place where the AXS e-Verb beats the standard version if you want to talk strictly performance and forget how neat it is to have a wireless party post.


Santa Cruz Tallboy review Photo by Dane Perras
Santa Cruz Tallboy review Photo by Dane Perras
A normal dropper post doesn't feel slow or difficult to master... Until you try the Reverb AXS.


The novelty of it being wireless will eventually wear off, though, and then it needs to work like any other dropper post. Actually, it should probably out-perform them given its price. Thankfully, the changes that RockShox made to the latest hosed Reverb are also used on the AXS version. That means it gets the new internal floating piston, slipperier grease, and new hydraulic fluid from Maxima that's supposed to decrease the force required to push it down by 50-percent. I'm not sure about that number, but it does seem to need much less bum-pushing than the previous generation Reverb.

The return speed is faster for the same reasons, but not quick enough to be alarming to anyone's anythings, and there's a notable and intentional top-out clunk that lets you know it's back at full-mast. All of that, and especially the ability to easily feather the travel, means that I found myself lowering (or raising) my seat even more often than I would when using a traditional dropper post. It's easier to use, so I used it more.


RockShox Reverb AXS review
The post's battery pops off with one hand, just like with the AXS derailleurs, and it refused to rattle loose or lose connection.


Reliability has been... Perfect. But first, it's no secret that the Reverb has a bit of a bad rep on that front, but I'd argue that's at least partially due to it being by far the most widely used dropper over the last decade; RockShox has had a vastly dominant share of the market's OE spec, so there's simply far more of them out there to fail. That said, I know plenty of people who've gone through countless squishy Reverbs over the years, sometimes with only a handful of rides between it sinking under their weight, so any concern about a new version that costs twice as much is entirely valid.

My test post is six months and over seventy rides deep at this point, all without a single hiccup. It's gone up or down every time I've asked it to and without any hesitation, and I haven't needed to test the air-evacuating Vent Valve feature because it's been rock solid since it arrived. As with any dropper, there's a slight amount of free-play between the stanchion and bushings that's required for the post to move smoothly, but it hasn't gotten any sloppier since it came out of the box.

At this point, my Reverb AXS gets a 10/10 on the reliability front, but I'll update this review if that changes down the road.

The Reverb AXS has been trouble-free from day one, and I can't fault it for any part of its performance. To be honest, I also think it's pretty neat that I can control my dropper post wirelessly; there's no hose to accidentally damage in a crash or give you a stroke while trying to push it through your bike's convoluted internal cable routing, and it makes for a clean looking bike. But for twice as much money? Eeesh, I'm not sure about that given that the latest Reverb Stealth has all the internal updates that the AXS versions gets, so it should work just as well (minus the feathering function) but has a hose and costs $400 instead of $800. It's your money, but I'm just sayin'.



Pros

+ No hose means simplicity, possibly better reliability
+ Feathering function is very useful
+ 170mm of infinite seat height

Cons

- Batteries mean remembering to charge them
- Twice(!) as much as a standard Reverb
- Ergonomics are good but could be better



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesPrice tag aside, the Reverb AXS is damn impressive. The short-throw of the paddle and instantaneous response make it easier and faster to use on the trail, which is especially valuable when things are happening quickly or it's quite technical, and I lowered my seat more often than when using a traditional post on the same rides because of that. That's a result of the wireless control which, along with the internal updates to the post itself, make the Reverb AXS hard to beat if we're talking pure performance. 
Mike Levy







227 Comments

  • 144 25
 $800 for a porky 720 grams weight. One can get a bullet proof hyper-smooth Bike Yoke Revive for less than half the price and close to half a pound (200 grams) less weight. Your choice.
  • 17 20
 Two week battery life too eek
  • 17 19
 Wow, April got here quick this year.
  • 47 6
 Or a OneUp for roughly half as much again!
  • 107 14
 Literally the whole point of this post is that it's an expensive halo product that's super easy to set up, use, and above all it's just plain cool. If I had $1,000+ to throw around, you can bet I'd have a wireless seatpost.
  • 95 11
 Pretty sure there's not a gun pointed at anyone's head here .. why trash it? You don't have to buy anything if you dont want to.
  • 12 11
 @ratedgg13: Those OneUp posts sure are cheap! Unfortunately my experience is that they don't work in the wet/mud. Same experience for many others. I am back on my old Reverb for now.
  • 7 27
flag will-burr (Oct 8, 2019 at 6:48) (Below Threshold)
 Missing the 721g porky weight and super long length are too big misses in the CONS column. SRAM obviously had pressure on them to sell it even though it had 2 major misses as a product. To me, you would look like a dope buying this...
  • 15 7
 @xBLASTOFFx: You're literally the first person I've heard of with a bad experience with a OneUp. Interesting.
  • 57 1
 I’m torn here.

On the one hand, I’m with you —there’s no way I’m spending $800 on a dropper. On the other hand, it’s such an irrelevant comment. One can get any number of droppers for less than half this price. (Each with its own set of problems, it seems). So what? Everyone knows that. That’s not news. Why even mention it?

Take away the price, and look at this product for what it is — a new, cutting-edge piece of technological advancement that works. That’s pretty cool.
  • 7 2
 I have revive and it's great. But you can get an axs reverb right now for $600. Not saying where.

Really only thing stopping me is the 200 grams. I've spent too much making my trail bike light to just throw 200 grams on all Willy nilly
  • 4 0
 @TheR: Besides the price there is the weight. You have a 200 grams penalty for very no gains other than having a battery under your seat.
  • 6 1
 @duzzi: Yeah, and that’s something they’ll probably work on. For a first iteration, this is pretty slick.
  • 20 13
 If you're really worried about that half a pound, go take a sh*t before your ride and you'll make up for it.
  • 7 0
 or brand-x or X-fusion for around $100...
  • 8 3
 @xBLASTOFFx: Check out the PNW posts if the OneUp is giving you problems. I hadn't heard of OneUp issues, they make great stuff (the EDC tool is the best thing ever!), but PNW is local so we see more of those around here. Bachelor post is super good deal, Loam Lever is best darn lever in the business, regardless of price. Mine's been good so far in the slop.

So glad there's smaller companies giving SRAM a run for their money these days.
  • 7 11
flag edisfo (Oct 8, 2019 at 9:39) (Below Threshold)
 @ratedgg13: The OneUp is the worst dropper I have ever used. It is so sensitive to clamping pressure that it's rendered useless or it moves.
  • 19 9
 @tcamp86: I take a shit before ride anyway. Who waits?

By the way the old "take a shit" is old and tired like your mom.
  • 7 5
 @ratedgg13: I have a OneUp V2, and can attest the dust seal is not great. The 2.1 actuator also creaked- lithium grease seems to have helped.

No fatal issues, but overall a pretty mediocre post if I’m being honest. About that same as my BrandX and certainly not as refined as Fox or Crankbrothers.
  • 4 2
 @xBLASTOFFx: My One Up V2 has been perfect, no problems at all (so far). My reverb was nothing but trouble.
  • 6 5
 @ninjatarian: As much as I would love to sing the praises of the OneUp droppers the V2 I recently grabbed is starting to stick already after a few wet rides. From my experience with the V1 I am assuming it needs a cleaning and regreasing. I usually use slick honey, did you use lithium grease on the internals and how well does it work?
  • 1 4
 First time you stuff the bike and the battery is a 100 yrds in the woods and the dropper cost 300$ to repair, you'll get the lower priced option anyways.
  • 12 0
 I need to charge my bike, seatpost, fleshlight, shifter, garmin, cellphone and lights, then its on maybe.
  • 5 2
 @jorgeposada: Fleshlight!? Thanks for sharing.
  • 4 1
 @edisfo: Your sense of humor is riveting.
  • 5 1
 @ninjatarian @edisfo Interesting. I have had one for the last season and rode it relentlessly in terrible conditions. My LBS sells a ton of them and they haven't had issues either.
I've used a BikeYoke, Reverb, RaceFace Affect and KS Lev Integra in the past, and I'd put the OneUp close to par with my BikeYoke in quality and reliability thus far so I'm really surprised to hear such harsh experiences to the contrary. I suppose theres always a few that don't work well...
  • 1 4
 @jorgeposada: it's the internet....
  • 8 5
 @ratedgg13: I bought a OneUp for my new bike build based on all the rave reviews. I have had multiple Reverbs over the years and never had an issue but I was always weary of them.

My OneUp lasted 3 rides before it started getting stuck down and had to be pulled free. I pulled it apart and rebuilt it and regreased the seal assembly. 4 more rides and the same issue occurred. My brother has an e13 dropper and it was broken damn near right out of the box (not surprising given the reviews) and his replacement Bike Yolk has only been so/so with some sticky action on the return occasionally. I'm honestly just gonna buy a new Reverb since I've had good experiences with them.
  • 3 1
 @stumphumper92: Yup. From what I've heard from a few bike shop mechanics is that the PNW, OneUp, RF Aeffect, and Brand-X are all the exact same internals (all those brands buy their posts from Brand-X or Tranz-X)...So guess just buy a Brand-X if you want to save some coin! One Up did figure out how to make their overall length shorter so that's something!
  • 1 0
 @cueTIP: Damn. That sounds like some bad luck. My riding crew has all of those posts in it and they all work great. The only buddy complaining is with a wiggly Reverb!
  • 3 0
 @tcamp86: except you can lose half a pound AND take a shit
  • 1 3
 @xBLASTOFFx: Probably infinitely better than the turd that is the KS Lev Integra!
  • 4 1
 @ratedgg13: one up has been a game changer!
  • 3 0
 @ratedgg13: never heard of it myself.. Mine has been flawless.
  • 1 0
 definitely not bulletproof! Just forked out 150 for a service on one which was very disappointing considering 400quid price
  • 2 3
 @baptistamtb200: cmon. This is not technological advancement.. Its not cutting edge either. It is wireless. Things are wireless allover the place.
  • 2 1
 @tcamp86: That argument is stupid... You can take a sh*t before your ride AND buy a dropper post that is half a pound lighter and you'll be a whole pound lighter.
  • 24 1
 @stumphumper92: So you can get the axs reverb for $800.
Then for half the price the bikeyoke for $400.
Then for half the price the oneup for $200.
Then for half the price the brand x for $100.
Then for half the price the tmars for $50.
Then for half the price a hope quick release for $25.
Then for half the price a bontrager clamp for $12.
  • 1 1
 @edisfo: You mean the intraweb?
  • 1 5
flag tcamp86 (Oct 8, 2019 at 14:36) (Below Threshold)
 @reverend27: I usually wait so YOUR mom can give me a blumpkin.
  • 3 9
flag tcamp86 (Oct 8, 2019 at 14:40) (Below Threshold)
 @billreilly: The argument is sound. The point is that half a pound really isn't that much weight.


























...You're stupid
  • 1 0
 @saturnine: good point
  • 3 0
 @ratedgg13: There were a few guys that didn't adjust the PSI out of the box and had issues (not OneUp issue and 2 min fix), the original V1 bushing wasn't ideal and could deform after 10-12mo. But they put out new v1 IGUS bushing (hard slick plastic) and they work great. v2 of OneUp is even better and the 2.1 cable actuator (free option) makes it damn near perfect. BikeYoke is nice but OneUps 210mm of post in such a compact package for nearly half the cost is just too good. OneUp customer service is pretty awesome too. Maybe a couple of minor bumps with their first go-around on the v1 dropper but the v2 has been nothing but bullet proof for me and it can be shimmed easily too (free inserts) so you can reduce the travel. Serious peace of mind when buying and worried about install length and getting it just perfect but maximizing the post length. Its awesome.
  • 1 0
 @cueTIP: If you got a rare bad post, they (OneUp) will take care of you man. Easy fix (it happens to every manuf) and Cory/John will dial you in. Check your PSI and cable tension first and shoot them a quick email. Heck you are even in Canada Smile . Good dudes over there that live, ride and work right on the trails. These other posts are a fortune.
  • 4 1
 @reverend27: so old man. if you take the "just take a shit approach" on every component you're gonna end up with a 40 lb bike. I bought an entry level spec in 2017 and have shaved off 4 lbs over the past two years. it hasn't been cheap, but not crazy expensive either as I've searched and waited for deals. even if you did take a 4 lb shit every day, it's irrelevant. we're talking bikes here not the GI tract.
  • 1 1
 I'll buy it once they release 200mm of travel. Need that thing slammed !
  • 1 0
 @duzzi: I wonder if the weight matters. All the new Enduro type bikes are 30 plus pounds, what’s another almost half pound? The difference between the 30 lb bike with XO1 and carbon wheels and the NX version bike is three pounds and $3500 dollars. But I do agree, 200 grams is a lot. There’s not too many places where weight can be lost, so 200 grams is a lot.
  • 1 1
 that's $1,065.26 Canadian on this Canadian site.

I could buy a new drivetrain and an inexpensive cable actuated dropper.
Awesome for racers with a large budget.
  • 2 0
 You do realize cable and housing is about 100 grams and remotes for other droppers are probably at least 50 grams? Bike Yoke 160mm is 550. That's a total of 700g compared to 720g. I don' think the total weight difference is nearly what you're making it out to be. I agree the price is exorbitant, but the cool thing is you could easily switch this post between bikes. Maybe I'll sell the droppers from all three of my bikes and just get this one.
  • 1 0
 17-23 rides in 14ish days? Bruh
  • 2 0
 @ninjatarian: same experience here. One Up v2 decidedly rough and sticks if you don’t cycle it a good number of times before you ride. Even then it’s not smooth. My Fox transfer is orders of magnitude better; silky smooth after 2 years and no service. The One Up have is brand new and I have only ridden it twice; nowhere close to as good as people say.
  • 1 0
 @stuie321: Did u send then an email to get it sorted...?? Becsuse im prettyvsure if thats the case they wont leave you hanging... And yes, mine has been as good as people say.
  • 1 1
 @reverend27: just take a dump before you ride. 200 grams is nothing ahaha
  • 1 0
 @jorddaniel: actually the post weight for 170mm reverb axs is 701 including battery. The remote adds another 63 grams. So 764 grams.

The Revive 185mm dropper with remote and cable/housing weighs 686 grams.
  • 1 0
 @jorddaniel: and this one has the 185 revive at 657 grams cable/housing and remote.
  • 1 0
 @jorddaniel: according to research the 170mm reverb axs weighs for reverb axs 150mm 730 grams including remote. Just go to r2bike they weigh all parts themselves and take pics.
r2-bike.com/ROCK-SHOX-Seatpost-Reverb-AXS-A1-150-mm-316-mm
  • 1 0
 @reverend27: Seems like all of this is supporting my theory that it is not a 200 gram difference. Seems like all of your research actually works out to less than 100 gram difference, so less than half of what the OP was trying to say. I'm not trying to justify the cost or even say I will get one, but wanted to get the facts straight. Thanks for helping me out with that.
  • 1 0
 @jorddaniel: no thru all this research I had myself convinced to buy one.

But the stack height is too much and I can't for a 150 on my bike.

I really like the idea of no thumb force needed and that I can just quickly tap it to get small adjustment. Because I'm constantly adjusting my height while riding.

I have available a axs 150mm for $600 but the revive has one of the lowest stack heights and weights.

So it would be hard to Justify. I'll just wait for the Bikeyoke version.
  • 1 0
 @jorddaniel: also was comparing a 185 revive to a 150 reverb..so no still wrong.

Sorry had to be petty.
  • 51 2
 800$ for a Reverb, or 990$ for some Titanium Eeewings, or some trickstuff direttissima for 1000$?
I can't decide...
  • 51 4
 200 one up 80 xt cranks 150 xt brakes You welcome What you save we can spend at whistler
  • 34 2
 Become dentist and simply stopy worrying about such silly questions!
  • 47 0
 you can always get stuck on a chairlift...
  • 9 10
 @T4THH: The reason why i bought a brand new e-bike ????
  • 12 2
 I've bought totally serviceable new/used hardtails for less! I figure, if you want a wireless taint tickler, I'm sure there's some on Amazon for MUCH cheaper.
  • 24 25
 @donpinpon29: I happen to like my teeth right where they are. I'll pass on the XT brakes, I'd rather not risk removing them from my mouth because their "variable bite point" feature kicks in before a drop (again) and causes me to crash (again). Blows my mind that people are still okay with Shimano brakes after they haven't updated or fixed a dangerously flawed design in 10 years.

Anyway, as somebody who is an adult with a real job and who also doesn't have kids, this post looks pretty cool. But I'm a sucker for putting shit on my bike that works and doesn't need a lot of maintenance or constant adjustment even when it costs more. This post sounds pretty trouble free. $800 bucks is a bit ridiculous for a glorified electric office chair post though, I'll admit.
  • 3 0
 @donpinpon29: Heck, the SLX cranks are probably even a better deal, with some models just about as light, and look better too.
  • 1 0
 Hey nice brakes are something worth spending money on, but maybe not $1000...
  • 6 1
 @William42: I'm looking to get a checkup done and maybe a clean and polish as well, do you have anything available next week?
  • 2 0
 The brakes. Will make you faster.
  • 3 0
 @donpinpon29: dang I didn’t know there were less expensive components out there. Wow, I think I’ll check those out. Who makes this “XT” that you talk about?
  • 2 0
 @William42: actually I have the same opinion. Never had a brake that kept in place From top to bottom (juicy, codes, xt, saints, x0, formula, blabla) even properly bled. closest to good were xt m785 good enough for dh.
Im an “adult” with a “real job” two kids, mortgage and send it higher and further every time, no f*cks given
  • 47 4
 I'll wait for their AXS Code Brakes.
  • 16 0
 Ba dum tiss
  • 24 16
 They could introduce them with the technology they've got now, and they'd live up to current expectations...true to the legacy of SRAM brakes, they wouldn't work.
  • 4 0
 @teagues: This made me lol at the coffee shop. People now staring at me.
  • 4 3
 @teagues: that is a funny comment, but not true. Shimano drivetrain/ hope or sram brakes, every time.
  • 2 0
 @MelvieD: While I can agree with the hope/shimano combo being top notch if you live any where that sees 30+ degree weather (86 degrees in freedom units) you will be plagued with the sram seizing piston problem. If you do live in a hot climate shimano wondering bit point is nothing compared to flying into a corner and realising your brakes have seized and don't work at all. Fortunately companies like hope, trp, hayes, magura and others are making killer products.
  • 5 0
 @macsmith33: This isn't accurate. Everyone assumes that all SRAM brakes are Guide R's, which were pretty poor/cheap/unreliable and on every cheap OEM build out there.

Codes/Dominions/Trickstuff etc are the best brakes you can buy. Pretty sure they were on the winning EWS bike this year (and previously) as well...and that isn't some quick DH race that's over in 4mins. Codes are insanely nice for a do-everything brake. Reliability is on par with Shimano...tho Shimano bite point stuff and poor modulation is frustrating (not ideal performance for $$$ brake).

Enduro did the best brake test ever. Again...the guides aren't great, tho nicer RSC's were fine for me reliabilty wise (better than my XT's 8000), the performance suffered. Not enough power and too much modulation. SRAM needs to just stop making all of their other brakes (aside from maybe nicer Levels) and just make Codes. They nailed it with that break.
enduro-mtb.com/en/best-mtb-disc-brake-can-buy
  • 3 0
 @Svinyard: Fair enough, most of my experience with sram brakes is from the guides and from elixirs. I have heard better things about the codes. I am more than willing to admit I am biased against sram brakes but until the start handling dangerous product failures like the heat issues with the guides by recalling them instead of a "hush hush we will replace them if they fail" BS policy like they have been doing I unfortunately can't bring myself to trust they brakes. I just want a little accountability, and if they start pumping out brakes that preform as well as the codes and make an effort to fix and issues that may arise in the future I will totally keep their brakes on my bikes. The bottom line is I don't ride them if I don't trust them, same goes for shimano I am going to avoid M8100's since it sounds like the wondering bit point has only been made worse.
  • 33 3
 @mikelevy One significant con is missing; the stack height of the reverb is really tall, and a lot of riders won't be able to run a long travel version in their frames because of that. This is significantly better on for instance One-up and BikeYoke. Besides, having just a max of 170 mm of travel is not really that impressive anymore compared to the competition, so idk why that is listed as a pro.
Besides, the ability of One-Up's post to adjust the amount of travel to perfectly fit your need is so nice that it should be listed as a con on all other posts that dont have that option. Wink
  • 19 14
 I know it is just the way I ride, but I'm genuinely curious why people need so much of a drop...are they riding frame that are too small for them and need something with a huge drop? I'm happy to be built lanky but even with my saddle fully up, I can get my backside on my rear tyre (saddle is resting on my chest and it isn't comfy). If I drop the saddle, I can still get my backside on the rear tyre, but without the saddle-to-chest - so how short are people's arms and legs that need to have so much drop to get that far back???

I'm not disagreeing with your comment, I just don't understand it...
  • 11 0
 @ShoodNoBetter: You nailed it with your first sentence: It’s the way you ride. For many riders, Especially ones with newer long geo frames, a dropper is not only about getting behind the bike, but getting low or/and getting the saddle out of the way for technical climbs, jumps, etc.
  • 3 3
 @ShoodNoBetter: I agree with you. I find the 150mm drop almost too much for most of what I ride. 170mm dropper would just be overkill for myself.
  • 3 0
 I run a 170 on my cotic bfe but its so low sling i could fit just over 200mm of dropper in there. The seat isnt in the way for normal riding but i hit big jumps from time to time and i still clatter my balls on the seat sometimes
  • 4 0
 I'm guessing the stack height of the AXS is significantly lower. Should just be the post itself since it doesn't have any hardware for a hose or cable connection on the bottom.
  • 4 4
 @ShoodNoBetter: I completely agree. Full drop on a 170-200mm post is reeeeaaaalllllly low, even past DH bike territory. Seriously, add 200mm of height to this (www.pinkbike.com/photo/16791126) and the saddle is sky high.

Granted, I'm still on a 100mm dropper and I'd definitely like more travel. But when I've demoed bikes with 170mm drop I just can't really see any benefit to the last 30mm or so, and I run my post pretty damn high. I found myself always bottoming it out, then trying to come up a bit to where sitting didn't feel so awkward. If all these mega long travel posts were travel adjustable I would get it - sell one long travel post and let the users customize it with spacers or whatever. As is it seems pretty overkill.
  • 4 1
 @bkm303: The additional drop is nice on newer bikes with steeper seat angles, where your seat needs to be higher to reach the correct knee angle and is more forward even when dropped halfway. You don't need as much drop on older bikes with slacker seat angles, but I do agree 200mm is excessive and Bike Yoke claims anything over 185 has mechanical and durability issues with a 31.6 post.
  • 3 1
 @ShoodNoBetter: I'm 6'2 and run a 100mm dropper. never found myself needing more. Guess it is just personal preference
  • 5 0
 @ShoodNoBetter: Many of us with weird proportions need longer posts. I'm 5'11 and need 170+. Why? Because I also have a 34.5" cycling inseam. The higher you need your post, the more travel you need to get it out of the way.
  • 14 0
 @ShoodNoBetter: I think there are three types of people:

1. People like you and I of average height and proportions who do just fine with a 150 and don’t understand why people are so worked up over dropper height.

2. Tall, lanky people with longer inseams who actually need the longer drop for reasons others described above. If you were to read Pink Bike comments, these people make up 85 percent of the population, apparently.

3. Jerry Bros who read the comment section and know radness doesn’t even begin until 250mm of drop. I suspect many of these people are 85 percent of the 85 percent mentioned above.
  • 1 0
 @ShoodNoBetter: I like to get as much drop as possible for three reasons: hopping over things taller than 2ft., tricks, especially tables and spins, and riding steep roll-ins. More drop makes the dangerous things a bit safer.
  • 1 0
 @generationfourth: I'm 6'1" with a 34-34.5 (about 34.25") inseam - my arms are just as lanky. I'm not sure you do need more travel though - once it has dropped the length of arms and legs doesn't change and you can still move around.

I'm riding a large frame (which is about a 19" maybe) - 150mm drop but I've about 10cm of post showing from seatpost to top of bottom collar - so about 25cm of post sticking out the system. Previous bike was a similar size and similar height and my rigid post bikes (when I had them) also had similar proportions - I'm lanky though so don't need the saddle hitting off the cranks to get it out the way. Just because a company is selling a massive drop post doesn't mean it is good or needed, but the marketing hype will suggest it is better.

I've seen far better riders than me riding rigid posts and they also seem to move around without any issues, so although it sounds like a good thing, I'm genuinely not seeing the benefit of having something that long and thinner than the seatpost wiggling around with a weight perched on it.

Obviously just my view (although someone else above has posted saying Bike Yoke claim something similar to this).
  • 1 0
 @ShoodNoBetter: Beyond what others have said... I was once on 125 and it was great, never thought there would be a reason for more. Then I got a 150 and it was even better, didn't realize how getting that extra space just made things even better. Then I got a 170... and again, it was even better! I now have friends that moved to 200 and they're saying the same thing again. My 170 only has a few mm before it's slammed so I don't think I would get the full benefit of a 200... but to my point... you don't realize the benefits until you have it. Do you "need" it... no. But, is it awesome once you have it, yes.
  • 3 0
 @islandforlife: Fair enough...I'm more than happy to consider myself a mince rider and also aware that there are far better riders out there...if it works for you then all good...I'm not knocking it, just don't understand the need (but likewise, you have just provided details of it working, so all good).
  • 1 0
 @ShoodNoBetter: I'm basing this off of experience not marketing or hype.

I'm not imagining needing a 170mm dropper. Last bike had 125mm and it wasn't enough. If I didn't bring an Allen and further drop the post lower for the DH the saddle was all up in my ass. Especially on steeper terrain. New bike was ok at 170mm. Until I got a different seat. I still get along with it but with the longer geo, 77° STA and saddle being central it sure likes to get in the way. Other bike is an aggressive HT and I get along ok with 150mm but it still gets in the way on steeper terrain and because no rear suspension.

For reference on my FS I have about ~40mm of post exposed, on my HT I have 30mm of post exposed (not including collar).

Yes I've seen plenty of way better riders on rigid XC bikes with rigid posts handle it just fine. It's just not the way I want to ride my bike. I don't get what difference it makes to you if I need a longer post?

edit: it's probably because a lot of us are riding longer bikes and our center of gravity is more central (where the saddle is) and we're no longer hanging off the back over the rear tire as you indicated.
  • 1 0
 @toli-ibz: I ride a 170 on my sb130 because you got to get low on that sucker in the steeps. I feel like Logic Bruni cruising around with my lips inches from the handlebar. I probably look like Elmer Fudd but that’s a different story. I have a 150 on my 2016 GT Force and it’s great for that bike. You’re right. The longer the reach, the lower you got to get.
  • 1 0
 @ShoodNoBetter: I for example have stupid long legs.
I need atleast 5cm more seatpost lenght than my friends who are as tall as me.

Sucks as I cant Install a 200mm dropper sadly as it will stick out and will be too high then.
  • 1 0
 @dthomp325: stack height is from the bottom of the dropper collar to the saddle rails if im not mistaken. Has nothing to do with inserted length.
  • 1 0
 @bkm303: I'm 6'1" and ride a 185 Bikeyoke on a large Nomad. I could definitely use that 15mm to 200. At this point you should be able to find a dropper and seat tube insertion to all but slam your post, Seat just above the rear tire. So many factory builds are still showing inches of post. Ride a DJ bike around for a while and you'll notice the benefit
  • 26 1
 How does this and other AXS products function at 40f or below temperatures?

I kind of feel, in all fairness, that any lipo battery operated bike product review ought to at least speak to this scenario.

Sincerely someone that has used battery operated devices in the cold.
  • 4 0
 It's not like it can be worse than the hydraulic one in the cold, evening rides in the Fall were cold enough to lock that thing out.
  • 6 0
 @maxyedor: It can be given that battery chemistry is negatively impacted by temperature.
  • 4 0
 @mikelevy: @inclag makes a great point. Take that reverb out in The cold winter months and let us know if the battery life is affected.
  • 1 0
 Afaik, the motors are geared down, and its not like they need to sustain the constant torque to actuate the post or the derailleur. Shouldn't be a problem. Even if voltage drops due to cold, these things should still work.
  • 1 0
 @phops: it's more of the battery life that is concerning. My buddy was telling me a story about when he was lost Backcountry boarding in a storm and every time he took his phone out of his jacket it would die from the cold.
  • 1 0
 @blkmrktrider156:

Thats an undervolt condition. Batteries don't die from the cold, they just don't produce full voltage.
  • 1 0
 Poland here, it's getting cold now (been riding the full axs thingy from April), the lowest temp I've been riding thus far this year was -1C (~30f) and no issues there - the cable systems are starting to get "cringy" at around ~0 (you have all the mud and the water lock in place there, unless you keep your cables maintained each month you won't be able to do a lot with that system).

That being said - I've rode in -15C (5f) with a cable XX1 and the old RS - and it's garbage, but it got me where I wanted Big Grin so really interested of the winter ahead of me Smile
  • 21 0
 I was going to buy 8 Brand-X droppers, but now i don't know what to do.
  • 1 0
 Spend the money on new theeth. So your dentist will have your problem..
  • 13 0
 Funny thing is, on a Santa Cruz Megatower the tire hits the battery while bottoming out... I can see this getting a problem on more bikes...
I‘ll pass on this one, rather get a Revive Smile
  • 9 0
 I think Isabeau Courdurier pointed out the same problem on her Intense during a bike check interview when asked why she does not run the AXS post.
  • 3 0
 Anyone know if there is enough adjustment room to spin the post backwards and still get proper seat angle to avoid the tire contact issue? Is there anything in the design that would otherwise affect rotating the post 180 degrees? Asking for a friend...
  • 12 0
 Uhm two weeks or 17 rides? Wtf
  • 17 0
 Yeah really. Who takes two weeks to get 17 rides in?!

Kidding.

17 rides = 17 weeks for me.
  • 1 0
 came here to say the same thing! i need a new job smh
  • 1 0
 Prolly mostly on ebikes tho, from the reviews lately.
  • 12 2
 Everyone can hate on AXS Reverb all you want, After trying one out it is really amazing. Don't knock it till you try it. Smile
  • 3 1
 Dont think anyones knocking the performance of it
  • 2 0
 Agreed. One was on my demo bike and it was fantastic. That said, I'm not buying one.
  • 2 3
 The issue is that for the price, you expect more capability with it being electronic, like lowering without having to sit on it, or programmable mid position.

Even the shifting systems are not up to par for what I expect for the price. The controller needs to have programmable buttons for the specific gears, so you can set them up before hand for something like an enduro race where you know what gear you need to be in.

Also, you need to have the option to link both dropper and shifting (with the option to link the electronic shock/fork adjust later on). For example, you have one button for "steep climb" - you press it and the derailleur begins the process to shift to the lowest gear, not going all the way until you put pedal strokes in, and the dropper automatically pops up. At the top of the climb, you press another button for descend and the dropper goes down while the derailleur starts to shift to a higher gear. All of this is already possible to do.

Likewise, you should also be able to pair the power meter, speed/cadence sensors, and gps units and have the option to program shifting and dropper post based on that.

Funny things is Im pretty sure that all of that is coming, industry is doing the standard incremental release so you buy the shit now at a high price, then you upgrade to the latest and greatest stuff with more features, taking you twice or thrise the cost instead of just a one time investment.
  • 9 0
 Totally on an unrelated note, why are the grips the wrong way around? (or at least the wrong way ergon think you should run them)
  • 3 0
 I think someone is just messing with us, as in the first picture they are rotated the other way round?
  • 1 0
 I did the same with mine, and I prefer this way ... Thought I was the only one
  • 1 0
 Its the a scheme
  • 10 0
 Another in the Pro column: if you have multiple bikes, you can swap over the dropper.
  • 10 0
 Two weeks is 17-23 rides??
  • 1 0
 Where do I sign up?
  • 8 1
 From my point of view even the 400 bucks for a perfectly working Revive are hard to justify. And no this thing is 800 bucks. Thanks but I will pass this one
  • 1 0
 Just picked up a 185mm revive. It is so damn good. Really damn good.
  • 5 0
 @mikelevy Why not use the matchmaker portion (the part between the clamp and the lever) that is angled TOWARDS the grip, rather than the one you’re using. They’re interchangeable.
On my AXS derailleur set up for example I’m using the one you show here, so it aims toward the right hand grip, and positions the RD shifter closer to the grip.
  • 4 0
 Right? "the ergonomics are poor when I run the matchmaker mount the opposite way that sram sells them." Go buy a right only matchmaker kit: you get the mount pictured.

I actually prefer to run it backwards, as I like a bigger gap so my thumb doesn't hit the paddle, but seriously, c'mon @mikelevy
  • 5 0
 ''On the ergonomic front, I've had a few riders tell me that they don't get along with the shape the AXS shifter's paddle, but it makes more sense when you get it closer to the grip on a standalone clamp. The Reverb's flatter paddle felt near enough to the grip on the Matchmaker clamp, but I think it could be even better; a different mount that tucks the remote up even closer to the handlebar - and the thumb - would be ideal. It's not bad, but it could be really good.''

Seriously???

Use your right Matchmaker X on the left and the left one on the right... Tadam!
  • 7 0
 I love my AXS stuff. Dropper and rear der., have been flawless so far. Super expensive, but worth it. You get what you pay for.
  • 13 1
 blink twice if you've been kidnapped by SRAM execs
  • 1 1
 @arrowheadrush: naw, axs yeti
  • 5 2
 I really like the one I have, but one of the biggest things to go in the Cons list is the ease of getting stolen. Cabled system kind of ties the post to the bike (it does make it harder to remove)...this solution (works very well) means it is quite easy to be off with a post.
  • 4 1
 get it out of the bike while you drink your latte, easy fix.
  • 12 1
 @Lagr1980:
Who would leave his or her bike out if sight for even a second...?
  • 6 0
 @rollbretzel: i sleep with mine
  • 1 0
 @rollbretzel: Pretty much everyone...if you have a QR lever for the seat then it only takes a second to remove...allen key bolt will be longer, but everyone leaves their bike out of sight at some point...

Go to an uplift day? Ski lift user? Stopping to give a message to someone inside a shop/building? Plenty of opportunity if the person has an idea of what is being used.

Sad state of affairs but such is life these days.
  • 6 0
 $800!!! WTF? No thanks. I’ll stick to my flawless OneUp 210 that cost 71% less than that!
  • 3 0
 Does SRAM have a battery charging dock for multiple batteries? I imagine that it would be incredibly annoying fumbling through several separate chargers. Especially if you have a full AXS groupset with spare batteries.

That separate tilt and clamping feature is incredibly nice, however. No more over or under torquing saddle clamps!
  • 1 0
 wish for a multi battery charging dock too, but to be honest, I only do quick recharges when I work on the bike and until now, I've never had charge issues. Always carry a spare battery though.
  • 3 0
 When they make a 200mm version with the 2020 hydraulic version shorter stack height, they'll have my money. Tempted by a 170mm model but I know as soon as I do a new one will be released! Bring on the 21st Century I say, gear cables have had their time, and plenty of it...
  • 1 0
 @mnorris122: The C1 reverb has been out for a few months and has all the features mentioned. Shorter stack height, 200mm drop and the vent valve. The reverb isn't as short as the Oneup, but it's only 9mm longer than the shortest post on the market (Oneup v2)
  • 3 0
 "The AXS remote is much, much more ergonomic than either RockShox's two previous attempts at a dropper post lever, but it could be better if they had tucked it even closer to the handlebar."

They did - you've got the MMX clamps on the wrong sides Smile
  • 6 0
 why are the ergon grips rotated in such an awkward way?
  • 11 9
 So instead of picking up any one of hundreds of take-off Reverbs for under $100 on Buy/Sell or Ebay and having to rebuild it every six rides, you can now pay 8x as much for a much heavier one that needs to be recharged every six rides.

SRAM never fails to amaze. I'll give them that.
  • 9 4
 This line really cracks me up:
"...due to an immense amount of OE spec, it's also been easily the most-used dropper post since..."

It's a political reason those posts are OE spec... SRAM works with OE's and says "all or nothing" on their components... it's not because they are high quality, it's because of how the do business.

When the reverb that comes on my new bike inevitably craps out, I will throw it away and get a oneup or a 9point8.
  • 3 0
 @jcav5: It's getting hilarious on Ebay where you can now find essentially brand new takeoff Reverb Stealth 150's for under $100. They are going to be worthless before long.
  • 3 1
 @jcav5: the only reason why Eagle was so quickly adopted...
  • 2 1
 Meh - my six Reverbs have performed just fine. The service is convoluted I'll give you that, but done right (replace that u-cup seal with an o-ring) and they are dead reliable (no pun intended)
  • 3 0
 @yzedf: exactly. If only Shimano would get with the program and play ball with the OE's.... my brand new, shop installed, SRAM GX shifts like warn out shimano... it's seriously frustrating.
  • 5 1
 But you can swap it between bikes well easy more money for n+1 to feed the habit
  • 9 1
 Someone else can swap it easily too...Big Grin
  • 4 0
 1up, 200 notes, works fine, my brain works out the height, and my arse adjusts it just fine.
  • 5 1
 E-bike review with wireless dropper post review = Pinkbike comments warriors = Cardiac arrest
  • 1 0
 I just do not get how they messed up the ergonomics of the lever, and really messed up the ax’s shifting paddles. The company that first brought is intergraded brake and shifter clamp comes out with a top tier shifter that only kind of works with a separate clamp?
  • 1 0
 @mnorris122: It's because @mikelevy doesn't know how to set up his clamps, he has the MMX the wrong way round (they are facing inboard)
  • 3 0
 Am I the only rider who wants their dropper to be able to drop at the push of a button? I thought once we went electronic this would be addressed.
  • 3 0
 @mnorris122: It's possible, it would just have to weigh 2kg if you wanted a motor powerful enough to drop it.
  • 1 0
 just purchased a new dropper as I wanted to go from 150 - 175 just got myself another fox transfer £250 cheapest I could find a axs reverb was £480 could not see how it was worth the extra money , plus its heavier and I have batteries to charge !
  • 1 0
 Where was it £480 new? That’s less than trade price...
  • 1 0
 I rebuild my reverb when it starts acting up every year and a half or so using their great YouTube service videos. I don’t even get new seals just clean it up and use fresh oil. Works like a charm. The new Hydraulic thumb lever is nice too very smooth action. No complaints
  • 1 0
 Ditto.
  • 2 0
 I absolutely love mine, and being a mechanic and working with cable and hydraulic droppers all the time, whether it's upgrading, fixing, or bleeding them it's so nice to not have to deal with it on my own bikes.
  • 1 0
 I’ve got three different brands of dropper posts in my garage. The ubiquitous Reverb, a Thomson elite, and a brand X. The reverb never ever worked correctly till I gave up and put the Wolftooth conversion lever on it making it cable actuated instead of hydraulic. Now it works as it should. The Thomson I’ve had for 4 years and it’s been flawless. I’ve sent it back for routine service twice is all. It’s never failed. The brand X cost me $125 American. It’s been installed in my son’s bike now for two seasons. It works flawlessly as well. The only quibble I’ve had with it is that the stock lever is garbage. It’s $125 post after all. I upgraded to the wolftooth lever on his as well and it’s perfect. No hiccups. All our posts are now running the Wolftooth levers. The Thomson lever was ok I just didn’t care for its ergonomics. So my take on dropper posts is that the actuation levers are the weak link in all of them. Get a really decent lever and you’re good to go. Brand X seems to be best bang for the buck.
  • 3 2
 I hope one day these e-groupsets will require us to install a crashing app on a version of OS that's not supported on most phones. And people will happily go back to mechanical parts.
  • 21 0
 "Watch this 30 second ad before changing your seatpost height"
  • 3 0
 I can't help but think a dropper post would have been like 150$ at most in the 1990's.
  • 7 0
 Which would be around $300 now - sounds about right?
  • 6 0
 You can buy a V1 170mm Oneup Dropper for 150$ right now on JensonUSA. Deals to be had, son!
  • 4 1
 Truth be told if I wanted a divorce I’ll buy it .but what an absolute rip off.
  • 4 0
 "NO HONEY YOU DON'T UNDERSTAND THIS IS A GOOD INVESTMENT"
  • 1 0
 I‘m not sure how I could convince my wife that this is a ‚safety‘ Feature.
  • 1 0
 Makes me wonder why shimano never came up with a hydro dropper post using servo wave- The instant engagement/ disengagement of having a solenoid in the dropper is my only interest in this.
  • 2 2
 No Reverb!... never again! Anything below + 10 degrees centigrade it stops working effectively ... which can be virtually anywhere in Canada at any given point 12 months out of the year.

My trek dropper and fox transfer posts ( cable actuated) have never failed ... even down to -20 degrees centigrade. When, and if, I bought a new ride it would be the first thing to go...
  • 5 2
 Um, why not get a Magura Vyron for $350?
  • 7 1
 Because reasons.... I find the Vyron super slow...
  • 6 0
 I have compared both side to side....the Vyron is like using Telegraphy and the AXS Reverb is like high speed internet.
  • 2 0
 @Serpentras: Apparently the latest firmware update has removed some of the lag...apparently it works quicker now.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, they just did a big email letting people know about that price. I'd be more tempted to try that post.

And that comment from Levy about how Reverb's probably get a bad rap since they are the most speced OE.

Any bike shop I've ever walked into, those posts come up and or one is being warrantied. Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @yeti85: They still both get you to from A to B, but one for 800$ the other for 350$ and 1second.
Sorry I buy 2 Vyrons...
  • 2 0
 @qreative-bicycle: buy 2 vyrons and I'll do 4 runs on my favourite trail while you wait for the magura brains to react.
In all seriousness, if I only had 350$ to spend on a dropper, I'd go with BikeYoke or whatever is the most realiable mechanic post right now. But never the Vyron...that thing is just horribly engineered.
Check out the internets and you'll find online shops that sell the AXS reverb for around CHF600.-. But having had it for several months and being a heavy 100kg+ guy that rides 8h a week on average and that has had many droppers just give up, I'm super happy with my Reverb AXS...no problems at all. And luckily in my case, price wasn't an issue.
  • 5 2
 does it still coming with autosag function??
  • 3 0
 I'm just sitting here content with my $100 KS Eten
  • 3 1
 can't help but think the guys who think this is so cool are the same ones who wear smartwatches
  • 1 0
 No complaints on the stock Bontrager Line dropper I've been using for the past 6 months, we'll see how it fares on colder weather, though
  • 2 1
 What i really need is one plug to charge my e bike, shifter, , derailleur, dropper, cell phone, ear buds and pink vibrator. All these chords are confusing me
  • 1 0
 Its good until you hit a harsch landing on your longtravel 29“ er an knock off the battery!
A dude i know did this, was funny to watch…
  • 3 0
 $800 for thumb tattoos.
  • 1 0
 Is it possible to use one RH shifter pod for gears and seat? I already have the Twinloc system on the left side.
  • 1 0
 Nope...I've tried that...the finger-activated button would be good, but doesn't offer a choice of action for just that.
  • 1 0
 I think so actually. I thought yohan did it on his new commencal meta 29 in one of his videos from earlier this year before he got hurt
  • 2 0
 I use the button on the back of the RHS shifter to operate the reverb, then the front paddle to shift into a easier gear then the left hand shifter to change to a harder gear.
  • 4 2
 Yeah! More E-waste! (rolls eyes)
  • 1 0
 So if I have this post and other stuff like this, I'll have 4-6 separate batteries in one bike lol
  • 1 0
 Any review that starts with "Price tag aside, ..."
Really?
With that caveat, anything is AWESOMER.
  • 2 0
 What's the warranty ? No mention unless I missed it.
  • 1 0
 I was a hater but these things are actually pretty sweet! Would like to see lever options!
  • 1 0
 so make the worse dropper more expensive and complicated??? my LBS won't even touch these because of all the issues. no thx
  • 1 0
 I'm going to hack all your AXS and make your bike do stuff when you least expect it
  • 2 0
 but it's still a Reverb. Sorry, am done with that brand forever.
  • 1 0
 When it goes up AND down at the press of a button.... then ill pay $800 for a dropper.
  • 1 1
 I ride a Satori Sorata Pro, 88eur shipped. Purging my Reverb costed me 120eur :-)
  • 1 0
 Not a fan of placing weight that high on the bike but I'm certified WW.
  • 2 0
 Then why do you ride like you do? Look at that horrendous seat tube! Get a scooter/recumbent frame and lower that CG, man! Razz
  • 2 2
 Congrats RS ! You made an already mediocre product more expensive without actually fixing the problem . :p
  • 3 0
 They did though. With the vent valve.
  • 1 0
 What kind of saddle is that? A Tioga?
  • 1 0
 Price is high, I will wait until they drop it.
  • 1 0
 I don't care about the post, just tell me all about the Pole Stamina 140!
  • 3 4
 If you gonna buy all that shit bike industry sell, your bike come near a motorbike price or more, c'mon.
  • 5 0
 Motorbike price? Where are you buying your bicycles so cheap?
  • 1 1
 wait a sec.. wasn´t this revealed like about 2 months ago?
  • 4 0
 No, more than six months ago.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: oopsie, my fault, time goes by faster than it seems LOL
  • 1 3
 The mechanical Reverb is a piece of poo, rebuilt too many and now there's a wireless one...? Welcome to the millennial mount!
  • 1 0
 Take all my money.
  • 1 0
 This is peak MTB.
  • 1 1
 Lost me at $800.....
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