Review: Specialized's New Ground Control Grid T7 Tire

Jul 27, 2021
by Mike Kazimer  
Specialized Ground Control tire review


Specialized's tire lineup has been undergoing an overhaul over the last couple of seasons, with new tread patterns, rubber compounds, and a naming scheme that's actually not overly complicated, something of a rarity in the mountain bike tire world.

This year, it was the XC-oriented tires that received updates, including the Ground Control model reviewed here. The Ground Control is the most aggressive XC-oriented option in Specialized's lineup – it's designed to be fast rolling while still delivering a decent amount of traction in loose conditions. It wouldn't be a stretch to call it a downcountry tire, assuming that term doesn't make you cringe, of course.
Ground Control Details
• Sizes: 27.5 x 2.35 or 2.6" and 29 x 2.2 or 2.35" widths
• T5, T5 / T7, or T7 rubber compound
S-Works, Control, and Grid casings
• Weight: 880 grams (actual, 29 x 2.35", Grid T7)
• Tan wall Soil Searching model available
specialized.com

The Ground Control's new tread pattern uses what Specialized calls a 'block-in-block' design, where a slightly taller inner block is supported on two or three sides by a larger block. The idea is that those larger blocks help keep the tire from feeling too squirmy, while the smaller inner blocks can conform to the ground for extra traction, especially during braking. For a cross-country tire the tread pattern is fairly aggressive, despite the shorter tread height.

Specialized Ground Control tire review

CASING & COMPOUND OPTIONS

There are three different casing / compound options for the Ground Control. The lightest option is the S-Works version, which uses a T5 / T7 rubber compound (the higher the number the grippier the rubber), a 120 TPI casing, and a narrow, 2.1” width to keep the weight down to a claimed 595 grams.

Next up is the Ground Control Control T5. Remember when I said Specialized's naming scheming wasn't overly complicated? I might need to take part of that back – having a tire casing that shares a name with the tread pattern seems a little silly. In any case, the Control T5 has a 60 TPI casing and a little more sidewall protection than the S-Works version.

The third option is the Ground Control Grid T7 that I've been testing for the last couple months. The Grid casing provides even more sidewall protection, and the T7 compound is the grippiest available for Specialized's XC tires – their scale goes up to T9, which is used on the more aggressive enduro and DH tire models. The typical sidewall color is black, but there's also the tan-walled Soil Searching version shown here, with the proceeds from the sales of this tire going to benefit Specialized's program that supports trail builders around the world.

The Ground Control Grid T7 retails for $60, and is available in 27.5 x 2.35, 2.6" and 29 x 2.2, 2.35” versions. The 29 x 2.35” Soil Searching version weighed in at 880 grams.



Specialized Ground Control tire review

SETUP

A Transition Spur served as the test bike, and the Ground Control tires were installed on a pair of Roval Control wheels, which have a 29mm inner rim width. Getting them set up tubeless didn't pose any issues, and once inflated they measured true to their stated 2.35” width. I've been running 21-22 psi in the front and 22-24 psi in the rear, pressures that have worked well, even in the harder packed and dusty conditions that have prevailed over the last couple of months.

PERFORMANCE

The first ride on a set of tires with an unfamiliar tread pattern is always an interesting experience. It's a true trial by fire, since the only way to determine how a tire will handle steep, loose terrain, or dusty, blown out corners is to dive right in and see how it goes. Thankfully, the Ground Control tires met and exceeded my expectations in nearly every aspect of their performance.

The overall level of grip was impressive, especially considering the lower tread height. Sure, they're not going to dig in like a meaty enduro tire, but they still managed to find traction in moon-dust filled chutes, and when pushing into flat turns where the ground was covered with a layer of dried evergreen needles. Those intermediate knobs help create a very predictable tire, one that's free of any vagueness or dead spots.

I only got in a couple of wet rides before summer arrived with a vengeance, so I can't definitively comment on the tires' performance in the slop, although they held their own during those few soggy sessions. The fact that the knobs aren't super tall helps keep them from getting hung up on roots, which means there are fewer surprises on wet roots or rocks.

The Ground Control's rolling speed is very reasonable, and it'll feel extra-fast to anyone coming from something with more tread. There's also a good level of climbing traction, which helps make it possible to make it up techy climbs without the rear wheel spinning out. XC racers will likely want something even quicker rolling, though; running Specialized's Fast Trak in the rear would likely do the trick. On the flip side, for riders that want more traction, running a Specialized Butcher up front is a very fun combo.

DURABILITY

Regarding durability, I haven't had any flats despite running fairly low pressures, and there have certainly been plenty of opportunities. The knob wear is even, and there's no cracking or tearing to be seen. I wouldn't mind seeing a Grid Trail casing option added to the mix, although Specialized's Eliminator tire is a worthy substitute for riders looking for a tough, faster rolling rear tire.


Specialized Ground Control tire review
Specialized Ground Control
Schwalbe Wicked Will


HOW DO THEY COMPARE? SPECIALIZED GROUND CONTROL VS WICKED WILL

Weight: The weight of the Ground Control Grid tire is quite close to that of Schwalbe's new Wicked Will tire in the Super Ground casing, at 880 grams vs. 892 grams respectively – 12 grams isn't enough to choose one over the other.

Price & Availability: The Ground Control tires are priced at $60 and are available now. The Wicked Will is $94.99, and won’t be available aftermarket until next year, although they are currently being spec’d on some new bikes, like the Scott Spark. Point: Specialized.

Performance: The Wicked Will feels like it rolls a little faster than the Ground Control, but it's not quite as surefooted, especially in loose over hardpack conditions. After a few sketchy moments, including one un-planned dismount, I've decided I'm not the biggest fan of running the Wicked Will as a front tire. It works fine in the rear, but those sudden front tire washouts rattled my nerves. Granted, it's been extra loose and dusty lately - when conditions were a little softer and tackier the Wicked Will's performance level increased.

With the Ground Control, unexpected slideouts were few and far between – I was constantly impressed by how well the tires could maintain traction. There was also more sidewall support on the Specialized tires, despite the fact that they weigh almost the same as the Schwalbes. I had to run a couple more pounds of pressure in the Wicked Will to avoid rim strikes, something I didn't need to do with the Ground Control tires.




Pros

+ Great traction for this style of tire
+ Less expensive than comparable options
+ Very predictable handling

Cons
- Rolling speed is quick, but not XC-racer quick
- No extra-tough casing options





Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesIt can be tricky choosing the ideal tire for a downcountry or lighter duty trail bike. After all, part of the appeal of a short-travel machine is that they typically don't weigh as much as their beefier enduro siblings, a trait that makes them more enjoyable to take out on long pedal fests. Sure, you could slap on some heavy duty rubber and get loads of grip and flat protection, but then you'll have a not-that-light bike that also doesn't have much travel; not exactly a best-of-both-worlds scenario.

With Specialized's new Ground Control tires that decision making process is a whole lot easier, thanks to a price vs. performance ratio that's hard to beat. They offer a great balance of traction vs. rolling speed, with a level of handling predictability that's not always present in this type of tire. Overall, a very highly recommended option.
Mike Kazimer









129 Comments

  • 73 2
 ...To Major Tom...
  • 44 1
 “your website’s dead, there’s something wrong”
  • 37 2
 Check your pressure gage and put your helmet on (?)

Seems like the obvious choice for the second line.....
  • 1 2
 and put your helmet on
  • 22 5
 This is Ground Control to Outsideeee, you've really screwed the pooooch
  • 3 0
 @RadBartTaylor: looking at the pictures i would say "check your pressure gage and put your valvecap on". Wink
  • 1 0
 @K1maxX: oh snap mr eagle eye....good catch
  • 40 2
 Honestly, would have been better to compare to a tire we might have already ridden (Rekon, Nobby Nic).
  • 13 4
 Fair point, but hopefully this review ends up being helpful for riders trying to decide between two newly released tires.
  • 5 1
 @mikekazimer: Any comparison to the stock Dissector / Rekon combo that comes stock on the Spur?
  • 3 1
 @mikekazimer: Sounds like a Will on the back wheel and a Ground Control on the front might be an excellent combination. As long as ones OCD can tolerate the mix of brands.
  • 6 2
 @Ttimer: no, no it can’t
  • 3 2
 @ReformedRoadie: and you just buy the same tire over and over, putting the new one on the front and moving the old front to the rear until it wears out.
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: What?! Are you some kind of sadist?!
  • 1 0
 @SimbaandHiggins: he probably doesn't have the same disk rotors and doesn't have the valve stem centered in the hot patch...savage...
  • 4 0
 @SimbaandHiggins: Best in life is to crush expectations, see mismatched tyres driven under me and hear the lamentations of the fashion victims.
  • 2 0
 @Ttimer: You Barbarian! Smile
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: some people just want to watch the world burn.
  • 2 0
 @SimbaandHiggins: Mixing Schwalbe with Specialized, both with unobtrusive labels in white/grey, is the easy part.
Mixing Vittorias and their grey sidewalls with the new Michelins is for the truly depraved.
  • 17 4
 Beyond the tire’s performance is the appearance of it. Hot patch style = nice and simple.

Lots better than the Maxxis/NASCAR style I’ve been blacking out with a paint marker.
  • 10 43
flag tigen (Jul 27, 2021 at 10:28) (Below Threshold)
 Racist
  • 8 1
 @tigen: @tigen: dang...the internet tried to ban you. Jokes aren't allowed any more. hah! One day we'll all laugh again.
  • 13 1
 I just ran the 2.2 up front in a very XC race - one with a lot of pavement and gravel, but with some actual black diamond descending (ORAMM). Also used the 2.2 Fastrack in the rear, both with "Control" casing - this setup worked very well for me and I would recommend these tires.

This said, I would NOT run the S-Works casing on anything but the smoothest track. One ride on the S-Works casing and I got a phantom sidewall cut along a gravel road - no idea how but it was a long, deep slice and I didn't feel anything that might have caused it, leading me to believe the casing is paper thin. Thank goodness I learned this before a race!

Another reason to recommend Specialized tires is that if you buy them at a shop, decide you hate them, you can exchange them. I have always had a great experience anytime I wanted to return something to Specialized for any reason - gloves, shoes, even tires.
  • 1 1
 Eyyy congrats on oramm, did it last year and took it easy with Jerdon this year. Ran the control in the rear with the tan wall and have zero complaints. Loved the tires.
  • 9 1
 I have been running a 2.6 Ground Control and it has way more grip that you would expect from looking at it. The short knobs roll crazy fast and still provide decent grip. I bought one because it was what my LBS had and fell in love with the way it rolls on trail.
  • 8 1
 We need more fast rolling tread patterns with tough casings for general trail use. I don't need to be lugging around a slow DH tread pattern in the rear, but I also don't want to have to check my speed to avoid flatting or bottom my rim in rocky descents.
  • 1 0
 I've always had a thing for semi slicks and the WTB Riddler is a pretty good one, it comes in their tough casing, which works pretty well as a rear without being way over weight.
  • 1 0
 I was using the Vittoria Morsa for a while because it rolled sooooo fast, but it got discontinued so that's over.
  • 3 0
 @JohanG: loved the Morsa as a rear.
  • 5 1
 @mikekazimer Nice review, thanks. It's good to see some lighter-but-still-grippy tyres coming through since everything gained half a pound in the last couple of years. Downcountry bikes appeared to fill the gap, but were short on good tyre options. Do you have a sense of how this compares to Bontrager's XR4? Very similar spec on paper; and a comparable house brand. It's been my go-to rear tyre for the last year.
  • 2 1
 I've been running the XR4 as a rear on my Sentinel for a little bit now, and so far I'm surprised at how well it's doing. Impressive grip for such a speedy tire! Tannus is definitely helping keep it on the rim.
  • 2 1
 @ddspaz: I've been pleasantly surprised by mine, too, on a 140/150 trail bike in a rocky place. Granted, I weigh 145lb. Pretty fast, seemingly-durable despite some gruesome bottom-outs, and yes, excellent grip for what it is. My only criticism would be that it feels a bit undamped, and as it ages, seems to be losing air a bit quicker, but that's the compromise with the thinner sidewalls and lighter weight. I'm tempted to try the SE5 up front (I have a DHR II at the mo).
  • 3 1
 @dominic54: The Tannus seems to help with the damping, but there's weight sacrifice of course. I'm around 175, so it feels a bit more necessary in my case.
  • 1 1
 @ddspaz: Good recommendation, thanks - yes, I bet it does. I've wondered about a lightweight insert at the back, having smashed one rim, but since getting a shock with better high-speed compression management that's also made a massive difference. Lots of pieces to the puzzle!
  • 2 1
 @dominic54: that's the beauty of the toy!
  • 3 1
 I've been running an XR4 2.6 team issue up front and it's awesome - but I've just started using an XR3 legacy 2.35 team issue on the rear and it's a great match. If you compare the treads - I would say the XR3 tread pattern actually looks a lot closer to this Ground Control than the XR4.
  • 3 1
 @trillot: I'd 2nd this. I've used the xr4 2.6 as a front and the last two generations of gc 2.3 both front and rear, and while I like them all for what they are, I'd agree that the xr4 is one level up the gnar heirarchy.
  • 1 0
 @dominic54: I've had good luck with using a Tyre Defender in the rear as a lightweight insert. It actually does provide a little bit of sidewall support and fends off almost any bottom out, enough to save the rim, I'm sure especially for a 145 lb rider.
  • 5 1
 Nigel Tufnel: The numbers all go to T-eleven. Look, right across the board, T5, T7, T9 ,T-eleven, and...
Marty DiBergi: Oh, I see. And most tyres just use Durometer?
Nigel Tufnel: Exactly.
Marty DiBergi: Does that mean it's better? Is it any better?
Nigel Tufnel: Well, it's a pointlesss scale, isn't it? It's not 50 Durmoeter rubber. You see, most blokes, you know, will be riding at 50. You're on 50 here, all the way soft, all the way soft, all the way soft, you're on 50 on your tyres. Where can you go from there? Where?
Marty DiBergi: I don't know.
Nigel Tufnel: Nowhere. Exactly. What we do is, if we need that extra push over the cliff, you know what we do?
Marty DiBergi: Use a stupid f*cking T5-T9 scale?
Nigel Tufnel: Eleven. Exactly. One more stupid.
Marty DiBergi: Why don't you just use a worldwide standard - make 70top number and make that a little softer?
Nigel Tufnel: [pause] These go to T-eleven.
  • 6 1
 Sorry Kaz but the second pic isn’t in the same realm as @dan roberts

www.pinkbike.com/u/dan-roberts/blog/review-dt-swiss-ex-1700-spline-wheelset.html
  • 1 1
 ....I prefer the fence backdrop....there is no reference point in the other image and it hurts my eyes/brain Razz
  • 5 1
 Love this tire. Been running it on the back of my Stumpy for a while with a butcher up front. It tracks ground very nicely while rolling quite fast, and actually feels damped as well. Also +1 for minimal graphics.
  • 5 1
 I run one in the front with a slaughter in the back, totally ripping combo for smoother stuff.
  • 2 1
 @corporaltedbronson: Slaughter: A very under-appreciated tire in the Specialized lineup. I ran one on the rear of my Enduro, with Butcher up front, and loved it. Did Spesh kill it? I haven't seen an updated version in years, and they're hard to find in stock anywhere (29).
  • 2 0
 My son and I just tried Eliminator blk dmd F/R at Snowshoe for the week. They were $40 a tire, plus discount code...$127 for 4 tires delivered, with a 30 day try and return policy. Super fast tires that are predictable, and neither one of us had any pinch flats or tears. Might have been the only non yellow Maxxis tires there for the week. i was impressed enough that i just ordered some extra Eliminator and Butchers for us while they are that cheap and in stock.
  • 7 1
 Any comparison to the Maxxis Rekon?
  • 7 1
 Yeah it's $20 cheaper!
  • 3 1
 Would love to hear more about this. It would seem, this one has a bit more traction than the rekon?
  • 2 1
 probably. I haven't used the Ground Controls but pattern seems similar to Rekon and Vittoria Agarro. Using the Agarros on my hardtail at the moment (tread pattern (size and spacing) is similar), happy with them but they aren't the fastest. Rekon Races (2.35) on my FS XC bike, by far my favorite. Got 1k miles out of my last pair before I needed a new set (tore open the side wall). You would think the shorter tread would not provide much grip but they do.
  • 2 1
 @babathehutt: Schwalbe/Maxxis prices are insane. I guess Spesh is trying to get back into the top tier, what with their shitty tires the past few years. Hopefully their prices stay steady as they try to get back on the podium. I live near their HQ and their product managers used to run Maxxis on their rigs, at least before the new stuff came out. I spotted one of them in the Santa Cruz area right when the new Enduro came out: Assegai front, DHR II rear.
  • 2 2
 @singletrackslayer: tires are a personal thing and people fear change. I've been running Specialized tires on my bikes for a few years because of price and availability, and at least in my dry/sandy/rocky terrain, they work great. I've had Maxxis DHF in the past, but my all time favorite tire is the WTB Trail Boss, so take anything I say with a grain of salt.
  • 1 0
 @babathehutt: People seem to have forgotten that tires working are super dependant on the type of soil.
It totally makes sense that a trail boss style would be the best tire in sandy soils.
I grew up riding on clay based soils and the best tire for all out grip was a nokian gazzaloddi 2.5. That tire was the worst conceivable tire when put into use on the sandy volcanic soil in central Oregon.
  • 3 1
 @mikekazimer agreed with the point of needing a burlier casing option. This and the Purgatory are killer fast-rolling rear treads but need the tougher casing option to back up their grip.

I have ground control grid 29x2.35 that I'm running on my epic hardtail. Between these and a set of S-Works Renegades, a lightweight hardtail can be transformed between an all-day gravel bike and Backcountry XC shredder
  • 1 1
 I love the Renegades for XC racing. Although they offer less grip than the Fast Traks, they are way more predictable. FTs have let me down, literally, many, many times.
  • 1 1
 I run Ground Control up front and Fast Trak in the rear on my Epic HT, both Control casing. With Tannus inserts I'm fine with Control casing despite riding hard in rocky terrain. It's a nice combo to ride both gravel and XC/trail without having to change tires. Of course, if you're racing you may want something lighter/faster and lighter inserts (if any).
  • 3 1
 @mikekazimer Thanks for the review. Specialized has been killing it with the newest tire updates. Currently running a Butcher/Eliminator combo on the trail bike and loving it.

My wife has been looking at the Roval Control wheels as an upgrade for her Epic Evo. When looking at the Specialized website, they state that the wheels are not tire insert compatible. She's really light so that's not really a concern for her, but I was wondering if you had any insight on why they wouldn't work with inserts? Have you tried an insert on your current setup on the Spur?
  • 3 1
 NSMB is testing some of the new Controls and openly running inserts. Keep an eye out over there for the review, hopefully they touch on that subject within.
  • 3 1
 I think it has to do with the shape of the rim: "Zero Bead Hook 4mm FlatTop Design" which reduce the chance of pinch flats. But I'd be curious to hear what NSMB has to say about it, because I wouldn't buy wheels that can't have inserts. Other than that, it seems Roval Controls are great wheels for the price.
  • 2 0
 Some light carbon rims are very thin in the well, so an insert pressing against it hard on an impact will crack the inside of the rim. Not designed to take load there.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer thanks for the review. There's one issue you allude to but don't fully explain, and it's the reason I personally got this tire: weight.

Despite the plethora of tire options out there today, most 29er XC tires seem to be in the 650 - 800 gram range, and most full-on trail tires are 900+ grams. There simply aren't many tires with solid casing in the range of 800 - 900 grams, which is a sweet spot for me and for many other riders too, I suspect. I find that I tend to destroy typical XC race tires, but don't want or need heavy full-on trail tires for my Intense Sniper (perhaps the first bike that started the downcountry craze?).

So in summary... this 850 gram Specialized Ground Control offers a good compromise between weight, durability, and traction for riders doing long alpine-style riding (long climbs, long descents) who aren't racing and hence counting grams. I've been running them for a couple of days and been very happy so far.
  • 6 1
 @mikekazimer vs. Rekon, please?
  • 2 1
 love my Purgatory Trails. Specialized tires are great value and wow you can actually get them at your local bike shop vs other well known brands. Hmmm in stock and 30% less cost? Yes please.

I think i weigh about the same as mike tho and wow thats low PSI 21! i weigh about 155 and have big front tire roll on purgatory tires at that PSI although maybe you are running cushcore.
  • 1 0
 I ran these years ago- after the last big update, and they were unreal for what they were! Took on everything in Sedona, and survived Moab.
But, I was running 21mm ID rims and found that anything but a XC style tire would wash out in any serious corner.
Now I run 30mm ID rims and all kinds of tires work!
This is a fantastic review by Kazimer. I’m ready to pull the trigger on a set of boots for my new Tallboy build, and the definitive nature of this review is exactly what I need!
And still for $60.. Same price, better tires!
  • 2 1
 Looks decent.
Are you gonna review the new Butcher and/or Hillbilly in the T9 compounds and tough carcass?
Spesh have made some promising tyres before but the compounds have been a bit hard IME.
  • 3 0
 Looks a lot a Rekon Race. I’ve run them front and back, as well as with an Ikon up front for ages… great tires.
  • 3 0
 Think I'm going to order one of these right now for my new Spur build. Seems about the right balance. Thanks MK!
  • 1 1
 I had Maxxis Dissector EXO Dual Compound tires this year and their average weight was 910g. I can’t compare them to this tire but the Dissectors were like a DHF light and not bad at all as a front tire and rolled very fast. This tire reminds me of a small block 8 with bigger side knobs.
  • 3 2
 Be wary. The new set of Fast Trak Control tires in 2.35 measured exactly 2.2 on 29mm internal width rims. Either mis-stamped at the factory or Specialized lies about their tires sizes.
  • 1 0
 They have always fibbed on their tire sizes, but at least in the past they offered some tires in .2in increments so if you wanted a 2.6 you could buy the 2.8. But it seems in the last two years, all tire mfg have gone undersized. Bontrager just released their new 2.5" SE5&6, etrto is 56mm which is 2.2in. wtf?
  • 3 1
 The Ground Control is also available now, the Wicked Will, not until Spring 2022.
  • 4 1
 I run this tire with a purgatory up front. It works well.
  • 4 1
 Interesting. Not too far off from Vittoria agarro or Rekon.
  • 2 1
 That's what I was thinking. I've been impressed with the Agarro in 29 x 2.35" front and rear on both trail and XC bikes.
  • 1 1
 agree with @trailsquatch on the Agarro, running 27.5 x 2.35's on my hardtail, traction is great but they could be a bit faster. I would definitely consider giving the Ground Controls a shot at $60.00 a tire. For speed and traction by far my favorite is Rekon Race, a little pricey but worth every penny.
  • 1 1
 I am running 2.6 and 2.35 agarro on my Hardtail. Even rain a 2.35 on my big bike last year in the rear. They definitely are impressive and punch above their weight in most terrain. The 2.6 has noticeably bigger knobs and is a much more rounded tread, but it's more of a 2.5 than a 2.6 on 30mm rims.

I find RR fast for the type of tires I usually run, especially on hardpack or loose over hard (hello Socal). In terms of grip, I much prefer the agarro to the aggressor in the rear. Maybe just giving out a bit on the braking traction. I haven't run true XC tires in a long time, but these are definitely no slouches for gnarlier terrain.
  • 1 1
 @SATN-XC: Yep, definitely more of a fast rolling trail tire than an XC speed demon. Works surprisingly well as a rear tire on my enduro bike (in dry conditions) too!
  • 1 1
 I'd give the point to GC over the Rekon. An Aggressor would be a better duel.
  • 2 1
 @Jcmonty: I’m with you.

The agarro is amazing all around with the exception of braking on hard pack bike park type trails
I am on my second agarro after an agressor on my trail bike
  • 1 0
 @Jdorph: another vote for Agarro here. It would be good to have a comparison of all the faster trail tyres. ie: Ground Control, Rekon, Agarro, Mountain King etc. Agarro might not be the fastest rolling but as a FAST TRAIL tyre has terrific traction and feel in almost any condition.
  • 2 0
 I have mazza / agarro combo and it works for me on trails in any conditions. It looks a bit inappropriate on enduro bike, but faster rolling tire on rear feels great and there is no grip shortage. I gave it a try over martello on rear and don't regret it.
  • 1 0
 I have about 10 hours on an Agarro 2.6 and I'm starting to tear side knobs off. I do NOT skid, mainly just XC and rocky trail riding, barely ever use the rear brake.
  • 1 0
 @Jcmonty: I have a 2.35 agarro on the front of my ht and a barzo on the rear. It runs super fast but could use some more grip on looser steep stuff. I have a 2.6 I ran on the rear of the full suss (with a Mazza) that I may try on the front of the ht now and move the narrower one back since you say it's good.
  • 1 0
 @stpan: I loved this combo for trail rides on my patrol, but for enduro race season had to move up to some bigger rubber. Mota and Mazza combo ran well for steep, dusty races. Although now I tried the wild enduros and am sold
  • 2 0
 Man, a tire that looks like a tire I would have on my moto instead of the weird ass design of most others? I'll take 2.
  • 3 1
 Block in block knobs reminded me of Panaracer Fire XC/FR tyres. Similar idea, different execution.
  • 1 0
 Would it roll noticeable better, than a 2.3" DHR2/DHF pair? The 2.35 version is on discount on bike24... One thing, I would mount it on 22 inner width rims.
  • 3 1
 In stock for 20 minutes hurry.
  • 1 0
 What would be a good combo to run up front with in the back if you wanted just a tad more grip? Purgatory?
  • 2 0
 eliminator, the new style purgatory does not look like it would do well as a front tire. or dual ground control honestly
  • 1 0
 @whiteranger3: Isn't the Eliminator really a rear tire, though? Then again so is the Dissector and I know alot of people like running it up front.
  • 1 0
 Just checked: Eliminator might be slightly more grippy and faster rolling than other options, but at 1000g, its kind of in a different league than the Ground Control.

By comparison, you can get a 29x2.4WT Dissector in EXO/TR at 912g.

An XR4 at 780g.

I'd like to see companies release tires with grippy compounds and substantial cornering knobs, but perhaps not as much puncture protection. Now that we can leverage inserts for additional tire support, I'm not sure we need all of our tires to have those additional layers.
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: I've run the Eliminator in front with Ground Control in the rear and it worked really well. The big difference I think is the more square profile and big shoulder lugs.
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: Eliminator works great as a front tire. Eliminator F/R and DHRII's F/R are my two favorite set up's for everything. The Eliminator's being the faster rolling of the two.
  • 2 0
 Tioga Edge 22
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: nope not just rear specific. i run eliminator 2.3 F/R on my hardtail, have run the 2.6 up front on my enduro bike and loved it, and have a buddy who runs the 2.6 grid gravity on his enduro bike as well. definitely a good front tire!

The 29x2.3 GRID is only 890g claimed weight which isn't terrible IMO, but i'm a heavy 240lb endur-bro Wink
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: My favorite front ever. 1000 miles in, and it's still going strong. Rolls fast, corners amazingly wheel, and brakes surprisingly strong.

They are supposedly releasing a grippier compound one soon as well.
  • 1 0
 @Jcmonty: Yes, I heard this. I'd put a hard compound on the rear and a soft one up front. Unbeatable for all around trail usage. Needs bigger knobs for downhill.
  • 1 0
 The Edge 22 is a strange looking tire, but at 950g its closer to the weight of the Ground Control. Still think the Bontrager XR4 is the closest match to the GC while weighing less and being a tad more grippy.
  • 1 1
 Are we allowed to refer to these tread patterns as Strava Seekers?

I've wound up on my face using tread patterns that short more than once.
  • 1 0
 Waiting for the "Ground Control Control Control Control Control Control Control Control Control " model next year.
  • 1 0
 Racing Ralph approves this message.
  • 2 1
 this will surely be more durable than the Racing Ralph. Ran RR front and back on my hardtail....lasted about a month.
  • 2 1
 @SATN-XC: Don't call me Surely!
  • 1 0
 @ReeferSouthrland: I knew I was set myself up for that when I typed that out, lol
  • 2 1
 @SATN-XC: as a front tire, the 2.35X29 nobby nick comes at the same weight, rolls nicely, and costs about $50 (in Europe). Lasts X3 the racing ralph which I like as a rear tire.
  • 1 1
 @SATN-XC: Man, that long? You must've gotten the 20 TPI, 12-ply version that weighs 1,240g.
  • 1 0
 @ReeferSouthrland: "Over 50yo mountain biker alert!"
  • 1 0
 @singletrackslayer: specifically.... "Schwalbe Racing Ralph, 27.5x2.25, Snakeskin, TL Easy, Pacestar"....I know Schwalbe is popular with PB commentators but I haven't gone back to Schwalbe after those tires.
  • 1 0
 @saara: Schwalbes are untouchable in US for $50 bucks....
  • 1 1
 @Bkinzel99: I order them from Germany, too
  • 4 1
 @SATN-XC: That's too bad. I have a Racing Ralph and Racing Ray on my XC bike and have been nothing but impressed. For such skinny, low-profile tires I've found them to be exceptionally versatile and predictable.
  • 1 0
 Do you know the true width of the 2.2s?
  • 1 1
 Seems heavy for an XC-ish or down country-ish looking tire.
  • 4 1
 This is the heaviest of the 3 options Specialized makes - you can get the S-Works version in a 2.1" width for $10 more and save over 200 grams.
  • 2 2
 That weight and no heavy duty casing? Interesting.
  • 9 1
 Most tires with a heavier casing weigh over 1000 grams - I'd say that weight is pretty typical for a tire like this. The casing is comparable to Maxxis' EXO casing.
  • 1 0
 small block 8
  • 3 3
 Looks Ikonic
  • 3 1
 No, it doesn't
  • 1 4
 Who the h... buy specialized branded stuff,other than specialized owners?
  • 3 1
 I do. Some of their tyres are really good. Same for the saddles.
  • 2 1
 I do. Saddles, helmets, and shoes are fantastic
Won’t ever buy their gloves again.
Won’t buy their tires ( enduro/dh) until their team starts winning on them. ( the photos of their bikes in the pits are not with the wheels/tyr s they actually use in the race runs)
  • 5 1
 The Butcher in T9 compound is outstanding. Bridge saddle is the best saddle I've ever used. Their shoes are excellent. Lots of Specialized-branded things are pretty great including their bikes.
  • 3 0
 @lenniDK I do. Their tires have been awesome for me as have been their Enduro XL lock on grips.... the best I have ever used. $60 for a bicycle tire is still freakin' ridiculous, but I get 2 of them with 15% off and free shipping, so $51 a tire is suddenly a lot more tolerable..... Try getting that value with Maxxis or Wobbly Schwalbely.
  • 1 0
 @DBone95: got any codes to share to get that deal?
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