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Review: Specialized Gambit - A New Lightweight Full Face Helmet

Oct 26, 2021
by Matt Beer  

The Gambit, Specialized's new lightweight full-face helmet, was designed to satisfy the safety needs of the modern mountain biker. Available in four unobtrusive colors, the futuristic looking helmet caters to more than just one rider category with full downhill certification, MIPS SL, eyewear stowage, and a quick release buckle, all in a ventilated 640 gram package.

Enduro trails and the speeds we ride them at are infringing on what used to be reserved for downhill bikes, and with the increasing number of eMTBs riders can find themselves in that zone more frequently. Carrying these features for such little burden poses the question, "Why not wear a full-face all the time?"

Specialized Gambit Details

• 18 vents
• Breakaway visor
• MIPS SL
• Weight (size M): 640g
• Sizes: S, M, L
• Colors: Black, Oak Green, White/Sage, Dove Grey/Maroon
• Price: $300 USD
• Certifications: ASTM F1952-15 DH certified
specialized.com

Playing off of the looks of the newly released Tactic 4 , the Gambit features similar styling with large intake vents, more volume out back, and a fixed visor carrying a horizontal line into the top of the shell. At the rear of the helmet, you'll notice a built-in dial dubbed the Integrated Fit System (IFS) to keep things snug and a mount for Specialized's angular G-force indicator (ANGi) sensor.

Overall, the shape and volume of the Gambit is well balanced, with a visor nearly the same length as the chin bar, making for a proportioned outline from all angles. Breaking down the construction, the shell is made up of carbon fiber and polycarbonate guarding five unique pieces of patented EPS foam technology to optimally absorb energy. Although it saves on weight and cost, the helmet foregoes any soft trim around the face opening or along the bottom edge of the helmet. Adding a touch of rubber at the front and rear on the underside of the shell would increase the paint's lifespan. There is also the absence of any mesh or foam around the mouth vent, the largest in comparison to other helmets in the category.

Compared to a full-on downhill race helmet, it doesn't provide that locked in or sometimes claustrophobic feeling - think of the Gambit as taking away the false sense of security when you install goggles on a skid lid, but closer to a half-shell helmet that has a fixed chin-bar. For many riders, including myself, there is more justification to wear the Gambit for just about any ride.


PERFORMANCE

FIT

On my size medium test helmet I found the cheek pads fit best in the rearward setting and started with the IFS in the "2" position. Although I mentioned the volume of the shell was well balance in terms of looks, I did find that the helmet preferred to sit slightly rotated downward on my head. Altering the IFS to the "1" setting helped to rotate the chin bar and brow a bit higher. The helmet never moved around unnecessarily, though. A worthwhile tradeoff against breathability for me would be to add some padding around the crown and bring the fit up a notch in terms of comfort and assurance.

It's also worth noting that large framed goggles may not fit in the opening, depending on their foam thickness and your head shape. I had to downsize from the Smith Squad XL to the standard version because the goggle frame was too wide, shedding light on how the Gambit provides full-face protection in a minimalist package.


ADJUSTMENTS

The IFS cradled the back of my head and pulls it away from the shell in a secure manner to promote airflow, hence the lack of padding in the crown area. The dial is easy to reach and adjustable on the fly, locking the helmet in place to prepare for descents. As described earlier, this security device can also be adjusted vertically on the occipital area of the skull.

Two-position cheek pads come in dual thickness levels to tune the fit and keep the helmet comfortably in place. The chin strap is connected with a traditional quick release buckle and splits in two around the cheek pads. Just as you'd find on an open-face helmet, the mounting points are molded into the EPS foam.


VENTILATION

In a head-to-head test, my non-scientific sweat analysis rates the Gambit very close to that of any other hard-hitting enduro open-face helmet. Breathing in fresh air isn't hindered through the large port in the chin bar - there was barely any build up of moisture on the inside. Although there is reasoning to skip the mesh in the mouth vent, it could be knocked down a touch in terms of height as it can sit just in your lower peripheral vision.

What those small cheek and crown pads lack in extra cushioning they certainly make up for with increased air flow all the way around the helmet, from under the neck area, across the top of the head, exhausting heat out the back.

The inability to hear in a full-fledged DH helmet can sometimes toy with my low speed balance, but the Gambit allowed me to stay alert through some precise and precarious moves.


PRICE

A few of the reasons the Gambit looks so sculpted is the lack of bolts. The fixed visor clips on and the chin strap doesn't require any rivets, which makes for a smooth finish on the outside of the shell. You'll also notice that there aren't any camera mounts amongst the eighteen vents.

As much as I advocate MIPS for its added safety, it can cause some creaking noises as the shell rotates on the plastic liner during regular use, but that wasn't the case with the Gambit.

For this price, I do worry about the longevity of the cheek pad attachment method - the plastic pins held the pads tight during the entirety of the test, but didn't take much to pull them out of their perch. The durability of the paint has been excellent, despite a matte black finish seeing some encounters with branches, but I would like to see some protection along the rim of the helmet to make sure it doesn't collect chips over time.

WEIGHT

To add to talk of what you're getting for $300, the svelte weight of 640 grams fora medium might feel on the dainty side, but you have to keep in mind the target market for this style of helmet. The Gambit meets the critical DH safety rating, the whole reason why you'd be choosing full-face coverage.




Pros

+ Low weight and exceptional air flow for a DH certified helmet promotes more frequent use
+ On-the-fly eyewear storage and IFS dial allows for quick transitions

Cons

- Minimal padding makes it feel more like a traditional open-face helmet
- No rubber trim on lower edges of helmet, and no option for mesh in mouth vent




Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesThe Gambit establishes a happy medium for riders that want full-face coverage, but the convenience of a lightweight and well ventilated helmet. For those that might be charging on eMTBs at consistently higher speeds or on a winch and plummet style lap, there is no doubt Specialized's newest lid will boost your courage. You won't be left behind on transitions either, because the space below the visor makes it easy to move goggles in and out of place with one hand.

Compared to other helmets in the same category, such as the Smith Mainline, the Gambit does feel a little less substantial, but makes more sense than a 3/4 coverage enduro helmet. Since starting this test, I often see an imaginary question mark floating in front of the Gambit when choosing a helmet for my flavour of North Shore steeps, and haven't found a reason to regret choosing it.

Matt Beer



151 Comments

  • 152 2
 What is this? HALO 5???
  • 34 0
 this ain't it chief
  • 7 7
 Con: UGLY AS HELL!
  • 140 6
 I too design helmets after huffing paint
  • 8 2
 What color paint ? My favorite color is ham !
  • 1 0
 @Middnight: I think you mean metal flake ham, so it glistens like the real thing out of the oven.
  • 94 46
 I look forward to seeing this helmet going up hill on blue flow trails
  • 143 7
 I get the humor of your statement, but I am increasingly thinking I'll be riding full face all the time (even on uphill blue flow trails) if I can find the right ventilation and weight plus safety. The disdain for a full face on all but the hardest trails makes no sense to me after talking to a few very skilled people who have had an oops moment on much easier trails and then paid for another dentist's bike. Meet riders where they're at and don't ever disdain a desire to be safe.
  • 27 0
 @soaklord: Totally agree, head injuries are no joke. Look at what has happened in contact sports and auto racing over the last 20 years in terms of safety. I'm pretty excited to see all the newer (and cheaper) helmets pushing the safety envelope.

At this point I ride with a Speedframe and Proframe. I definitely reach for the full face if I'm willing to deal with the heat which means it gets quite a bit of use in the fall and winter when it's cooler.
  • 32 0
 I easy blue flow trails the fastest and it's at speed I'm most concerned with my beautiful face. Slowly chunking down tech i care more about my arm & leg bones. I too have only ever had big bails on easier sections of trail when I let my guard down or when things get loose and traction disappears. I'm totally down down for a pedable full face for unexpected bails at speed.
  • 12 1
 you know, i agree it may be overkill in general, and i dont kike the whole "everything is dangerous" type thinking, heck i used to ride with no helmet in the 90s and my friends and i are all still alive.

buuuut. i wouldnt shame people for doing so. in fact, im thinking about this kind of full face myself sometimes. might never need it to save me but ive seen enough crashes, including on blue trails (which are very fast when youre a seasoned mtber!) that id feel like its warranted. as long as its peoples choice, this seems great to me
  • 12 0
 after putting my face into a tree and going to the ER for stitches and CT scan last week, I will be wearing my Proframe more often on pedal powered rides. Granted this was a winch and plummet trail
  • 51 0
 @soaklord: Yep, I've been wearing a Kali Invader full time for two years. It's my only helmet and is so light and ventilated it truly almost feels like a half shell. On the hottest days in the summer I'll take out the cheek pads and then there really is no difference between a half shell except for the added protection.

@Jgallegos335 's stupid comment about full faces on blue flow trails is part of what's wrong with the bro culture in mountain biking. More people should be made to feel good about their decision to protect themselves more. It's esspecially harmful to the young kids who feel like they need to be as cool as possible.

But I'm seeing more and more enduro / lightweight full faces being worn all the time and it's great. So many of the new young rippers are also wearing them. Probably a generational change coming. Similar to skiing and snowboarding where almost no one used a helmet 20 years ago to now where it's very rare to see someone without one now.
  • 57 4
 Imagine being such a douche that you make fun of people wearing full face helmets.
  • 11 0
 @islandforlife: Love to hear this!!!
  • 2 2
 @soaklord: Have you considered riding with a mouth guard, like martial artists and some football players do?
Won't protect your jaw if you really bin it, but may safe you from unnecessary trips to the dentist.
  • 10 0
 @p1nkbike:keep in mind friend, you and your buddies may have not worn helmets in the 90's but you're alive or escaped life altering injuries because of luck in conjunction with the fact that equipment probably didn't permit the speeds they do now. Skulls weren't engineered stronger in the 90's
  • 3 0
 Have you seen Friday Fails lately?
  • 5 0
 Some people (like the stated dentists, lawyers or engineers) cant afford to loose brain capacity or lot of days off because of concussions.

Discrediting people for wearing safety gear- thats just low :-(
  • 3 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards:
100%, my biggest spill was on a blue, and i was wearing my FF at the time, i don't think it bene fitted me in that crash, but it put a big enough dent in the helmet i opted to crash replace. The more trickier trails i ride tend to be more technical and slower, and probably don't even benefit from a FF, apart from perhaps riding into a tree...
  • 4 0
 @Alan1977: similar here, except mine was on a red trail coz I’m proper gnarly…. we’ll gloss over that it was a flat pedalling section. Think I slipped a pedal but will never know. Head and face seemed to connect with the ground quite a long time before the rest of my body
  • 40 4
 I'm surprised by all the "ugly" comments. I'm not a fashionista, but doesn't look bad at all to me. But then again, it seems all full face helmets get some ugly comments.
  • 14 2
 @bsavery Yea, me too. Looks like most of the other offerings out there. I guess people just gotta type stuff.
  • 9 1
 I don't think it looks that bad, but that $300 stopped me in my tracks.
  • 4 1
 Same. It just looks like all the other full face helmets to me.
  • 6 0
 @hamncheez: Same price as the Smith Mainline and the TLD Stage, same ballpark as the Fox Proframe and the 100% Trajecta.

The price surprises you why?
  • 2 0
 @BrambleLee: I bought my Fox Proframe on half off; forgot how expensive it is MSRP
  • 40 12
 Specialized cut the top 1/3 off a pumpkin, balanced a homemade loaf of bread on top and said …. That is the shape we’re looking for
  • 22 3
 looks like any other helmet to me.
  • 4 0
 @jaydawg69: from the front the recessed channel for the goggle straps give it a weird cut in and bulge.
Personally I think the proframe is better looking.
All personal choice isn’t it
  • 4 1
 @LukeDaws: Proframe is an objectively good looking helmet
  • 26 5
 That front profile (without goggles) is just wrong.
  • 4 3
 It's not great with them either to be honest
  • 17 1
 A breathable, lightweight full face helmet with DH rating is a very tempting proposition.
  • 3 0
 check out 7idp project 23
  • 4 0
 IXS trigge FF is pretty amazing. only flaw is the wind noise at high speed, but that's a function of it's breathability. on cold days, it's too much and I wear a head sock.
  • 8 1
 @GAQ: If they would only cut out their company name. There's a angle on every one of there helmets that says "iDP". Well, I do NOT DP.
  • 4 0
 The rating takes it up a notch for sure. I've gotten spoiled on my Invader and now resent wearing my hot, heavy other helmet for park days. Full face, full time for me, except when my kid on the shotgun seat.
  • 12 1
 As a true Pinkbiker: form is everything, function is, well, if it works that's fine, but it has to look stupendous. Pass me my TLD apparel, which is catalog gear with colors that would make a blind man run.

As Fernando Lamas said, "It is better to look good then to feel good!"
  • 9 0
 And you can eat a burger through that vent !
  • 5 0
 I have a Kali Invader and it has been fantastic on the rocky tech trails around here. Even in the summer 30C+ (86F) and 90% humidity, its still comfortable enough to wear.

These types of helmets are a welcome addition to folks like me that want to push the limits, and stay as safe as possible. I used to track cars and the culture around safety is much more mature in that sport. No one feels “self conscious” for having a proper helmet, neck brace, fire suppression or cage.

Thankfully I haven’t had to test it to the limits.
  • 6 2
 I like it, the my Super DH is abysmally hot as a half shell, super heavier with the chin bar and costs more. Also you cannot find replacements pads for the half shell. This looks like it checks a lot of boxes for enduro racing.
  • 3 0
 I can attest to how hot the Super DH is, but it's been the best helmet at wicking sweat away from my forehead onto that little square pad up front. My Fox Speedframe Pro is much lighter and better breathing, but it does not offer as adequate sweat wicking at the brow.
  • 1 0
 @ZSchnei: The sweat wicking does work great as long as the liner is not shredded apart from use. Mine has been shredded since April and Bell doesn't have replacements and won't do a warranty replacement for it either.
  • 1 0
 @nicktapias: That's odd. I've gotten 3 liners/pad sets from Bell for free of charge, once mine have gone bad. They've been great to work with. It's unfortunate that hasn't been the case for you. Going forward, I'm trying some mixture of stuff that apparently pulls out all of the nasty stuff from sports clothing. I hope it works with my pads.
  • 4 0
 Brings back memories of when I bought a Deviant back in 07 and busted the chin guard with a minor face plant on a wood skinny. They didn't even want me to send it in to inspect the damage but I did anyway. Fast forward several years and a designer from specialized reached out to me after finding the thread I posted about it wanting more details. Told him I sent it in but he never saw it. www.mtbr.com/threads/broke-the-deviant.319830
Back then they called it DH worthy, wish they would stop doing that...
  • 2 0
 Great point. An article on pinkbike about what dh rated really means would be amazing.
  • 9 3
 I guess I'm old, in over 30 years of mountain biking I have never bought a helmet, put it on and went to look in the mirror.
  • 3 0
 I've done that before and thought I looked so weird, then felt embarrassed for even looking in the mirror like that to begin with.
  • 4 4
 you may be on the spectrum then, sorry you had to learn this way.
  • 4 0
 The cradle adjustment in the back sucks. It snags my short hair. There's a reason the Stage and Proframe use a pad fit system rather than a cradle.
  • 5 1
 Specialized is a little late to the game... the Troy Lee Stage offers everything the Gambit does and offers a more, um, specialized fit.
  • 2 0
 Stoked to see more carbon added to bike helmets; its great for puncture resistance. And it's a nice-looking helmet indeed. Not stoked to see _NO_PARAGRAPH_ON_ACTUAL_SAFETY.... Def a problem in MTB right now; all shiny and features, less meat n potatoes.
So what actual safety foam is used? And in 5 pieces, Instead of a single piece??? That seems like a big talking point to discuss. What is MIPS SL, that sounds new? Does this carbon fiber actually contribute to less punctures like it does in lots of mainstream helmets, or is it for show/weight savings?
Here are the paragraph headers, for review:
FIT
ADJUSTMENTS
VENTILATION
PRICE
WEIGHT
  • 9 5
 That is one ugly lit! Good thing you can’t see yourself while wearing a helmet….
  • 2 1
 Any sweaty guys out there use a lightweight full face helmet like this in the heat? I've got a troy lee A2 and I'm pouring sweat by mid-ride. Always thought about going full face for the additional insurance (my face isn't much but it's the only one I've got), but I'd be afraid the sweat/heat would be too much.
  • 1 0
 Leatt DBX 4.0.
  • 11 0
 TLD Stage. I sweat something fierce, and I ride with it 100% of the time. SoCal furnace, Northeast rain forest. Everywhere. And saved me from a catastrophic jaw injury last year. Chinbar took the brunt (and broke) rather than my jaw. Got a replacement and am a customer for life.
  • 3 0
 @Chuckolicious: Agree with all of this. I do not wear it 100% of the time, but have done a lot of climbing in the heat and it was great. I am old, fat and slow up the hills and it is very comfortable.

Chuck, I also broke my chin bar on a rock, my wife bought me a new one with the thought that the $300 was way less than the dental bills. I still have it, I guess I should contact Troy Lee.
  • 6 0
 Same. TLD stage 100% of the time in Phoenix Arizona, ride all summer. I’m sure people probably think I look dorky but I think broken faces look dorky and I am known to bite off more than I can chew from time to time, riding wise.
  • 2 0
 I have the Bell Super Air R with the removable chin strap. It breaths extremely well, and I don't mind wearing it in the heat. The chin bar is a bit chintzy, so I wouldn't recommend it for big consequence bike park laps, but it's good for east coast enduros and gnarlier than average riding.
  • 5 0
 TLD Stage all the way!
  • 6 0
 I've owned the A2, A1 and Stage. I really think the Stage breaths just as well as the A2 but a bit warmer due to more coverage. The stage also has a feature that should be standard on all fullfaces...ear holes so you can actually hear all the things
  • 2 0
 iXS Trigger FF works for me, but I need a head sweat band with any helmet. I found the Halo ones to work well. Getting older sucks, you lose your hair, then the sweat rolls down into your face and gets on your prescription glasses you need to ride, so then you need a sweat band and to carry a glasses wipe on all rides.
  • 2 0
 @Chuckolicious: Got one this year, I’ve had my stage for half a szn. Down in the Okanagan BC it gets stupid hot in the summer. So far, the breath ability has been very good. It’s light too
  • 1 0
 @prmtb04: It’ll be something special that exceeds this thing. IMHO of course.
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: Appreciate all the info, I'll add the the Stage to the list of helmets to look at. Out of curiosity are those cheek pads soaked by the time you get done with a hot ride?
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: it's something else. That's for sure
  • 6 5
 ixs.com/en/bike/mtb-equipment/helmets/1595/helmet-trigger-ff-black

just saying.....cheaper and lighter.

but then again, Specialized just doing Specialized things....sure it's heavier, but at least it's more expensive!!!
  • 7 4
 That helmet is 40 grams lighter and doesn't have MIPS. It's up to the rider whether MIPS is worth 40 grams. I hung a rear wheel up on a 4 foot drop and did the full Friday Fails thing in a 700-gram-plus DH-certified full face. It shattered into six pieces and cut up my face. I stopped believing in cutting weight on full face helmets AND stopped believing in DH certification in under a second. I wish we had Virginia-Tech-style independent testing of full face masks. I don't understand this rush to compete on weight given these things fold up like pop cans on dentist drops.
  • 8 0
 @Mtmw: I watched a $1100 Arai road moto helmet fracture after falling off my buddy's Ducati. lol.

I mean, these are one time use pieces of safety equipment. It's hard to say when something is a design flaw or just bad luck in hitting it just wrong...
  • 2 0
 actually heavier if you compare a M to a M.
  • 5 0
 @Mtmw: I have plenty of hair - mk1 MIPS
  • 2 0
 @conoat: Or if it's just working exactly as intended
  • 5 1
 @Mtmw: First concussion with that Specialized Gambit already happened:

www.instagram.com/p/CT2pI9usq1L

www.instagram.com/p/CUR2A1OMLyv
  • 2 0
 @JohSch: that sucks, guess it is hard to know where on the scale of completely fine to really bad any other helmet would have been
  • 2 0
 @Mtmw: the current version of the Trigger FF has MIPS and still 595g. It's also a stellar helmet in general ixs.com/us/bike/mtb-equipment/helmets/2292/helmet-trigger-ff-mips-graphite
  • 3 0
 @Mtmw: You do know that a lighter Helmet will decrease the risk of injury being that your head doesn‘t habe as much mass attached to it?
Also… no helmet safes you from a concussion…
  • 1 0
 @Mtmw: given of course the hit is hard enough.
  • 3 0
 @JohSch: Helmets aren't, and cannot be, built to prevent all concussions. They are damage mitigation. The important part of a helmets job is preventing bare skull on hard object impacts that can fracture the skill and lead to bleeding on the brain(which can be life threatening in a very short amount of time).
  • 2 0
 @conoat: But there are helmets which offer more shock absorption and others with less who maybe barely managed to fulfill the norm.

We don´t know in which category this Speci helmet falls. The test results are almost never getting published.

Typically lighter helmets (500-750g) are worse then heavier ones (~1000g).
Even heavier ones at around 1300-1500g are bad for the neck.

Some testresults:
www.bike-magazin.de/bekleidung/helme/tuev-test-integralhelme-mit-abnehmbarem-kinnbuegel
www.mountainbike-magazin.de/zubehoer/test-27-fahrrad-helme-im-labor-und-praxistest
  • 2 0
 @JohSch: absolutely. physics cannot be cheated. lol. tradeoffs will be made, and it's up to the user to determine which tradeoffs to make. Personally, a heavy DH helmet has my neck and shoulders fatigued at the end of a park day, where a lighter helmet leaves me fresher and probably less apt to make a fatigue mistake at the end of a day. Is this the right call? who knows, but in conjunction with slowly tapering my risk taking as the day goes on, I think it fits me well. YMMV
  • 4 1
 I think its a good looking helmet. The pics here make it look fine, but the pics on the Specialized product page look better.
  • 5 4
 www.foxracing.com/product/proframe-helmet/23310.html?dwvar_23310_color=001&cgid=mens-mtb-gear-helmets-proframe

Better looking, less expensive, same safety rating, Fidlock, MIPS, only 50g heavier. Just get this one.
  • 2 3
 How do you get 50g heavier? Check your math.
  • 3 2
 I have one and so does my friend. The one issue we both have is that without goggles the ProFrame can roll forward on your head and be a bit uncomfortable. Great with goggles, but not as good with glasses.
  • 2 1
 @ultimatist: YOU check your math.
MTB News actually weighed the helmet and they found it to be heavier than Specialized claims.
  • 1 0
 @mtb-thetown: I've stuck car wheel weights to the back of my programme to balance it out - works a treat! Obviously I can't recommend it for safety reasons though...?
  • 1 0
 @mtb-thetown: proframe*
  • 2 2
 @BenTheSwabian: the gambit is either LIGHTER than claimed (www.betamtb.com/gear/protection/first-impressions-specialized-gambit-lightweight-full-face-helmet), or on point for the few outfits that tested. So M vs. M is 640g vs. 750g for the Proframe.

Another "on point" weight measurement: bikerumor.com/2021/10/26/review-602g-specialized-gambit-dh-certified-full-face-helmet

Not sure how MTB News got a 50g discrepancy. Maybe they sweated into all the pads and measured it wet.
  • 5 0
 Why aren't ear holes standard on full face helmets?!
  • 1 0
 What does IFS position "1" vs "2" mean? Theres like 30 clicks and nowhere do i find i can actually move the internal mechanism. As a note, ive always worn large or extra large helmets but this thing is huge. Im 59 3/4 but its still big, cant imagine someone with 58-59 with a size large.
  • 1 0
 @m3the01 The two rails that hold the IFS, not the dial, can be adjusted in or out, by pushing or pulling gently on them. There is a small number to indicate it’s position.
  • 1 0
 @mattbeer: Much appreciate it. I checked, as seen in similar, but mine doesnt seem to have it. It is normally red,
  • 3 1
 Would have been cool if they took the same approach to this as they did with their tires and actually make some as good or better than the competition for less money
  • 4 0
 Dude doesn't seem that stoked to wear it.
  • 1 0
 The question remains, why are the chin guard so low? Looks like it will reduce the impact when you perform a OTB to face plant
  • 4 1
 Looks like an Elefant from the side, look at those ears
  • 1 0
 Generally speaking, indentations into the side of one's head suggest a soft skull. Not really the look most people are going for.
  • 4 1
 'I'll take this over the TLD stage' -nobody, ever
  • 1 0
 I would consider it over the stage. I just did a crash replacement and received it yesterday. Only because I also like the styling of this one. I do think the MIPs SL is weird. I think i like regular MIPs better. Having not tried it on of course…
  • 2 0
 Urkel called, he wants his face embracer back. Yikes, I need 'special eyes' to see the beauty in that hell mutt.
  • 2 0
 Smith Mainline and TLD stage both have MSRP at $300. ICS Trigger full face with mips is $289.
  • 1 0
 and? They seem to compete across the board.
  • 2 0
 @ultimatist: This was meant to be a reply to another comment. So its a bit out of context. Smile
  • 2 0
 This would go great with a set of Oakleys and body armour worn over a t-shirt.
  • 1 0
 There are time the Specialized engineering teams knock it out of the park, this isn’t one of them. This is a TOTAL RIP OFF of a Fox Proframe.
  • 2 0
 With no thumbnail image, I thought it would be Luke's blaster shield.
  • 3 1
 The glossy bits look awful
  • 7 5
 $300 and no fid lock. Specialized continues to disappoint.
  • 1 0
 Once again a big bike company only makes a helmet up to 62cm. Us melon heads are out of luck again.
  • 2 0
 Goggle strap position incorrect, way to high
  • 2 0
 I'll take my TLD Stage all day!
  • 1 0
 There is a reason for lack of mesh in mouth vent - it allows you to use hydration system without any problems.
  • 5 3
 ehh ugly
  • 1 0
 comparison to the Kali invader?
  • 6 0
 The Kali Invader is $225 and does not pass the DH standard. It was concieved as a full face trail helmet from the very beginning and therefore ventilation and comfort were job one. It's perfect for all day use, whether you are going up or down, while adding the security of a strong chinbar.
  • 3 2
 Dentists on Kenevos can now look badass at the rail trail
  • 1 0
 Looks like a fox proframe
  • 2 0
 Looks like a melted fox proframe
  • 6 6
 Looks interesting. $300USD is steep.
  • 4 3
 Pretty standard for a helmet of this style and quality. Especially considering the economic climate we live in today.
  • 3 2
 @CamC127: Fox Proframe and IXS Trigger FF are both cheaper with the same or better/more features and the same or less weight. And thats only the two that I can think of right now.
  • 1 0
 @BenTheSwabian: oops, replied to the main comments instead of here. The Smith Mainline and TLD stage are both $300 retail. The IXS Trigger FF Mips version is $289. So, not far off. I think the Proframe is the one leading in the pricepoint/feature ratio. Doesnt fit my head though. Large is too big and the medium doesnt fit my head well. Today i just received my second Stage helmet. Gave the first one up after denting it when putting my head into the ground.
  • 1 0
 Compared to the $2000 Stilo helmet I had for tracking my car it’s a bargain. I’m protecting the same head.
  • 1 1
 Some would say you should of priced it at $299.99
  • 3 6
 So light that it weighs as much as the two-piece Bell Air R. Yeah, I'll take that two-piece for less money.
  • 5 0
 Bell Super Air R not DH rated.
  • 2 0
 @nickfranko. My first XC FF was the Super 2r. After a few rides of taking bar on and off, I just left it on. Now I’m on a TLD stage. I just don’t think a removable chinbar can hold up in a crash compared to a fixed one. I honestly don’t think it would have saved my face the way my Stage did last year. Better than nothing, to be sure. So I’m not actually hating on it.
  • 5 3
 the two piece bell is the minivan of the helmet world. Not great at anything, kinda miserable at everything
  • 3 1
 @Bro-LanDog: Hey now! I've been a minivan driver since 2002. Just took delivery of a spanky new custom configured Pacifica Hybrid. I stowe the seats and/or remove them, line the back, and the best stealth pickup you could ever imagine. Nobody looks at me, well except with the one I just got, drives like a car, and I can stash two big bikes, wheels on, inside, and 2-4 more on rack. Or dogs and bikes, or bikes and boards, or air mattress and bikes. Snow tires in winter. I'll always be a minivan driver. And I do not, nor likely ever will, have kids. Got over 300k miles on my '10 Grand Caravan and I'll keep that too until it disintegrates. Then I'll get a Cybertruck :-D
  • 3 1
 @Chuckolicious: You forgot, can speed all day long and never get pulled over.
  • 2 4
 @Chuckolicious: not suprised someone who bases their identity on a minivan would also tolerate cybertruck, or bell's removable chinbar helmet.
  • 3 1
 @Bro-LanDog: Ha! Well, as I explained, I moved past the removable chinbar setup a while back, which likely saved me from a life altering injury last year. But I don't base my identity on the vehicle I drive, I actually try to drive as little as possible and keep my vehicles for a long long time. I base my identity on my prowess at Beat Saber.
  • 2 1
 @carym: That's why I said that nobody looks at me. Most cops don't want to deal with what they think is a stressed out Karen with 3 screaming rug rats in the back. And final benefit, when I'm driving around Williamsburg/Navy Yard Brooklyn area, I fit right in. (Obscure reference). :-D
  • 3 1
 @Bro-LanDog: minivans are the very best at interior space to exterior size. Other than like a kei car or something. But really, such practical vehicles, tons of space and features and drive more like a car, so much better than all the SUVs
  • 2 4
 @Torbo24: no, cargo vans are. And they have far more payload capacity. Mini vans aren't even great vans, but whatever you have to tell yourself I guess. Enjoy your rolling compromise.
  • 4 0
 @Bro-LanDog: Show is on the dolly where the mean minivan touched you. (Couldn’t resist)
  • 1 3
 @Chuckolicious: people trying to justify mediocrity cuts me to the core, I can't shake it.
  • 3 1
 @Bro-LanDog: Honestly man, that’s a bit unhinged of you. Consider, the mere mention of a minivan prompted you to instantly become hostile with strangers on the internet and assume you have the authority to judge what is and is not mediocre for others. At least you admit the power it holds over you. Maybe take the next step and address it? Just a thought.

Anyway, I presented a legitimate use case for a minivan that is actually outside the normal parameters of the design. I’ve successfully executed over two decades and close to 3/4 of a million miles. So, if you think I’m choosing mediocrity, what platform would you say rises to your high standards? I’ll rule out pickup right away. Nowhere near the flexibility that I require, poor fuel mileage, substandard safety, and poor road comfort in comparison.

I’m honestly interested in what you’d choose, so let me know.
  • 1 5
flag Bro-LanDog (Oct 27, 2021 at 8:21) (Below Threshold)
 @Chuckolicious: I'm not writing dissertations when my vehicle choice is criticized, check yourself nerd.
  • 4 1
 @Bro-LanDog: LOL, man, you got way bigger problems than me and my minivan. Best of luck to you, seriously.
  • 1 3
 @Chuckolicious: 3/4 million miles on the high road looks like
  • 3 1
 @Chuckolicious: Lots of people dig the mini van, lots of riders. Even a few brand reps I've known who work in urban territories. Don't let the haters get you down. It seems like you know what you like and you're happy with it.

This PB comments section is certainly.... a comments section.
  • 3 1
 @Grizzly134: Ha, yup! Gotta say, though, this was a new internet surprise for me. Someone tribalised and triggered against minivans! And here I've been scratching my head about all the North America Ebike hate. :-D
  • 1 0
 Bell helmets are uncomfortable............
  • 1 3
 @Chuckolicious: you're the only one tRiGgeReD that your minivan was criticized. Everyone else woulda laughed and passed it off instead of going on the defense.

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