Review: SRAM GX Eagle AXS Wireless Drivetrain

May 27, 2021
by Mike Kazimer  
SRAM GX AXS review

SRAM's wireless electronic shifting technology trickled down to the GX level earlier this year, opening up the door for more riders to ditch their cables and make robotic 'zzzt' noises ever time they shift.

The design of the new GX AXS Eagle derailleur and shifter are nearly identical to to the more expensive X01 and XX1 level AXS components. The ergonomics of the shifter are exactly the same, and on the derailleur the only real difference is the pulley wheel cage material – it's steel on the GX derailleur, aluminum on X01, and carbon on the XX1 derailleur.
GX Eagle AXS Details

• Compatible with all Eagle drivetrains, 10-52 tooth cassette compatible
• Overload clutch system
• IPX7 waterproof
• Derailleur weight: 454 grams (w/ battery)
• Shifter weight: 68 grams
• Price: $600 USD (shifter, derailleur, battery, charger)
sram.com

We've covered the basics of SRAM's wireless drivetrains multiple times, but in case you missed it here's the quick rundown: The shifter and derailleur communicate via an encrypted wireless network that's proprietary to SRAM. The shifter is powered by a CR2032 battery with a claimed life of two years, and then there's a rechargeable battery on the derailleur that will shift for 20 hours before needing a top up. Inside that derailleur is a small electric motor and a gearbox that allows it to move the chain up and down the cassette. There are also two clutches, one that's located in the same position as SRAM's non-motorized derailleurs to help keep the chain from flapping around, and the Overload clutch that lets the derailleur move inboard in the event of a large impact.

The shifter and derailleur are compatible with any of SRAM's Eagle 12-speed drivetrain components; all levels, from SX to XX1 will play nicely with these parts, and the derailleur can accommodate up to a 10-52 tooth cassette. The $600 USD price tag includes a shifter, derailleur, battery, and charger, or those parts can be purchased separately at $370 for the derailleur without the $55 battery, and $150 for the shifter.


SRAM GX AXS review
The high- and low-limit screws are tucked away on the underside of the derailleur body.
SRAM GX AXS review
This little plastic tool comes in handy when setting the B-tension, a crucial step to ensuring good shifting performance.

Installation

One of the biggest benefit of SRAM's AXS drivetrains is the ease of setup. Granted, running cable and housing isn't exactly the hardest task, but removing that step from the equation makes for an extremely quick installation process.

Once the derailleur and shifter are mounted, all that's left to do is pair them, which only requires pushing and holding two buttons, one on the derailleur and one on the underside of the shifter. Next, it's time to adjust the derailleur's limit screws and B-tension (you'll need SRAM's easy-to-lose plastic tool to make this step easier), and then fine tune the shifting at the shifter. It's like the electronic equivalent of a barrel adjuster – holding the button on the underside of the shifter and then actuating the shift paddle to move the derailleur in the desired direction is the last step for dialing in the drivetrain.

If you're upgrading an existing drivetrain and only need to install the new derailleur and shifter the entire process can easily be accomplished in well under 30 minutes. Along with the ease of setup, AXS also eliminates the potential for contaminated cables and housing, removing a factor that can lead to a decline in shifting performance.

SRAM GX AXS review
SRAM GX AXS
The shifter's action can be customized using the AXS app.

Performance

SHIFTING
Zzzt. Zzzt. Zzzt. That's the sound of the derailleur moving the chain up or down the cassette, a task it does quickly and smoothly every single time. I've been going back and forth between a bike with an XX1 AXS drivetrain and one with a GX AXS drivetrain, and the shifting performance is identical - I can't distinguish any difference between the amount of time it takes a shift to occur on one versus the other.

Compared to the cable-actuated GX Eagle shifter / derailleur combo, the wireless components take the win when it comes to the speed and ease with which the shifts occur. Now, neither option is going to have a detrimental effect on your ride experience – or at least it shouldn't – but there's no denying that it takes less time and effort to shift with the GX AXS components.

Shifting under load is possible, although the smoothness of those shifts isn't quite at the same level as Shimano's Hyperglide+ drivetrains. Years of not shifting under full power meant that I didn't typically shift while mashing on the pedals all that often, but I did do some experimenting to see what happened if I shifted at less-than-ideal moments. In those instances, shifting to an easier gear under power felt smoother than shifting to a harder gear, which is good news, since that's when panic shifts typically happen – at those moments when the trail suddenly steepens and you find yourself hunting for one easier gear.

Over time I've grown accustomed to the shape of the AXS shift paddle, and now I don't have to give shifting a second thought. I have it set up to shift up the cassette when I push the top of the paddle, and down when I push the bottom of the paddle, something that can be customized using the SRAM app. It's also possible to adjust how many gears the derailleur will move through when the paddle is held down.

A different rocker paddle shape is available for $20 that comes a little closer to mimicking a traditional shifter shape, but I still think there's still potential for other designs – Zirbel's 'Twister' concept is very intriguing, as are the custom setups that World Cup XC riders are running with SRAM's Blip buttons. After all, when the constraints of needing to pull a cable in a certain direction are removed all sorts of doors open up.

SRAM GX AXS review

DURABILITY
As you can see from the pictures, this derailleur hasn't had an easy life so far, and yet it's shifting as consistently as the first day I installed it. Those scrapes are from close encounters from rocks, and more than once I've heard the secondary Overload clutch feature do its job when the derailleur took a hard hit. It's obviously still possible to damage the derailler in certain scenarios, but the fact that it can partially swing out of the way during a side impact will certainly help with longevity.

On the topic of clutches, I do think the main clutch tension could be increased a little. I never dropped a chain, but I did notice a fair amount of chain slap noise when riding through rough terrain, or after a larger impact. An adjustable clutch is still on my wishlist for all of SRAM's derailleurs – that's one area where I prefer the design of Shimano's derailleurs.

SRAM GX AXS review
The battery's small enough that it's easy to carry a spare.
SRAM GX AXS review
Green means go - one push of the AXS button on the derailleur shows the battery level.

BATTERY LIFE
The AXS battery's life is said to be 20 hours, so you'd need to be out on an extra-mega mission to run out of juice. A quick push of the button on the derailleur is all it takes to check the battery level – green means go, red means there's 50% or less battery life left, and blinking red means you better hope there's an outlet and a charger nearby.

So far I've been able to remember to charge the battery, and haven't had to singlespeed my way home...yet. Carrying a spare's still not a bad idea if you're planning an epic adventure, just in case. The battery is smaller than a pack of Tic-Tacs and only 25 grams, so it's not exactly a burden.

WHO'S IT FOR?
Who's the ideal candidate for GX AXS? Well, I see it being well suited to a rider who's not technology (or battery) averse, someone who wants to give wireless shifting a go without shelling out the $800 required for the X01 AXS components. There's something novel about not having any cable or housing to deal with, and there's no denying that it makes for an extra-clean looking cockpit. For the rider that's already planning to make a drivetrain upgrade, GX AXS is the least-expensive fully wireless option currently on the market, and it matches SRAM's X01 and XX1 AXS components when it comes to shifting performance.

However, GX AXS is a harder sell when you bring pesky things like weight and price into the equation. The GX AXS derailleur and shifter weigh a combined 522 grams and retail for $600, while the regular GX shifter and derailleur weighs 462 grams, even with cable and housing factored in. You'll also save over $400 by going the wired route, a cost savings that shouldn't be overlooked.





Pros

+ No cables and housing to deal with
+ Precise, effortless shifting
+ Customizable shifting options
Cons

- Going wireless still isn't cheap
- Heavier than 'regular' GX Eagle
- Charging batteries is one more thing to remember





Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesGX AXS is currently the least expensive fully wireless mountain bike drivetrain on the market, and the good news is that its performance is indistinguishable from that of its pricier siblings. It's not the way to go if you're looking for the absolute best price to weight ratio - cable-actuated drivetrains still reign supreme in that department - but it is a compelling option for anyone looking to make the jump into the wireless world. Mike Kazimer








387 Comments

  • 486 31
 It's not the price that keeps me away from battery-powered stuff on my bike. It's the fact that I enjoy that my bike is a simple mechanical device and I don't see any need to change that. Bikes have become MUCH more complicated mechanical devices over my life, but I'm still happy that they're mechanical devices. There's a beautiful and elegant simplicity in them that brings me joy.
  • 68 7
 Amen to that
  • 53 10
 The crisp feel of a mechanical shift is something that just puts a smile on your face. Same could be said about any pre-2000's sports car. Driving my father in-law's E36 M3 will always be one of my favorite in-car experiences for the same reason.
  • 35 11
 couldn't agree more and pure mechanical bikes = more ecological, less crap going to the garbage (ie electronics)
  • 62 3
 Increased complexity = more things that can go wrong = less ability for the end user to repair. Soon they’ll be asking “why do you want a derailleur, when really you just want a different gear?” And start a subscription program with a free derailleur and 1000 shifts per month for $50. (See John Deere)
  • 25 0
 To me its not the amount i need to pony up to get it. but what itll cost if something fails. sounds stupid but its something i think is overlooked a lot. you cannot repair your bike cheap if its fitted out with all this electric stuff.
  • 32 0
 Jack Moir had a photo of his enduro with AXS on a bike rack in his insta stories with a captio like "remember kids to take your AXS batteries with you when leaving for a 200km drive to the riding spot" (of course the derailleurs battery was missing in the photo...)
  • 8 0
 @reo-driver: Do you think he got charged for battery?
  • 9 7
 i see a purpose for electronic shifting on road bikes, not on mountain.
  • 45 2
 I drove 20 minutes from my house, grabbed my buddy with his fancy electronic shifting, we got to the trailhead and guess what? He forgot his battery and we had to drive back to his house to get his battery. What are the benefits again? They certainly don't outweigh the possibility of this happening.
  • 14 0
 Yeah exactly, I just wanna hop on my bike and not have to worry about if I charged that or linked this.
  • 24 16
 This makes your bike more simple by removing the shifter cable(s) and eliminates ever having to tinker with your drivetrain. I've run Di2 for over 5 years now on two bikes, zero issues. I can't wait for Shimano wireless. If you like simple, then this is your answer.
  • 9 3
 @RecklessJack: thats why im running a 50 dollar 9 speed derailleur with a clutch
  • 8 3
 @Charlotroy: Counter point: What are used cables and housing?
  • 13 0
 I agree. I prefer mechanical. Also batteries are the worst. We put up with them for things like phones and cordless power tools only because the alternative is even worse. Here, the mechanical alternative might take a few more minutes to install, but is otherwise just fine.
  • 17 10
 @kcy4130: Is it though? The moment you install cables and housing on a bike they start to wear and performance declines. Yeah they feel great at first but depending on how often and where you ride they will eventually feel like mush. Electric shifting will always feel the same. Perfect.
  • 4 2
 @tbubier: just use the old shimano air lines system. No compressor, no shifting
  • 9 1
 @tbubier: Yeah that's a good point, but thats why there are cable tensioners on the shifter. Yes the cable will eventually wear out, but then you just replace it which takes less than fifteen minutes once its all done. Also, personally I would hate to smash a $200+ derailleur, but thats just me. There are pros and cons to both.
  • 41 28
 Geez. What a bunch of technophobes. It’s a product that’s every bit as durable and more reliable than the one it replaces. Everyone here is always crying about bike companies making incremental changes and no innovation. Well, here is innovation. In five years, it will be standard, and everyone will be outraged that a $4,000 doesn’t come with at least NX-level AXS.
  • 14 2
 @TheR: no im just poor and i ride hard
  • 4 0
 @TheR: Well if sram made a stronger clutch, we wouldn't have a problem.
  • 8 0
 @Thendeb: microshift advent, baby
  • 16 3
 @tbubier: Battery life degrades over time too, requiring more frequent charging. Also some of the performance degradation is due to wear and impacts causing the derailleur pivots to get a little loose, not just from the cable. So axs will degrade in shift quality somewhat too.
  • 2 5
 @mior: I’m not sure where riding hard comes into the equation. But poor, I get it.
  • 6 0
 @Jvhowube:

Don't you mean HE had to drive back while you started your ride?!?!
  • 3 0
 @TheR: Agreed on the innovation and awesome tech feat of creating the AXS systems. I'm sure SRAM torture tested the durability and make no assertions to the contrary, but 'more reliable' is impossible unless there is a "belt-and-suspenders" backup system for if/when/just supposed the electronic system doesn't behave.
  • 15 3
 Buddy got AXS while back. Three weeks in smashed $700 derailleur, out $700. Two week ago 20 minutes into ride battery dies, forgot to charge. LOL
  • 2 0
 @mior: I am willing to accept 50% of your statement on face value
  • 2 0
 @mior: This guy gets it! Psssht Psssht Psssht. Ah the sound of early 2000s.
  • 3 0
 @twozerosix: Seems they put it through its paces here, and it seems to be every bit as durable as the mechanical stuff and performed flawlessly. I know people have posted horror stories here about batteries going out (meh, I’m skeptical), but what is the belt-and-suspenders back up system if you break a derailleur hanger on the trail? Or a cable. Stuff goes wrong with all of it, potentially. Not sure why it’s any worse just because this is digital.
  • 1 0
 @tbubier: lol im not old enough to remember i heard about it in a magazine
  • 1 0
 @TheR: might break it
  • 6 2
 @kcy4130: I’ve been running my AXS drivetrain for over a year now; no depreciation in battery quality. I;ve replaced the housing and cables on my second bike, and it’s required a few tweaks here and there to keep it shifting properly. Literally zero adjustments to my AXS. Not saying it will never require maintenance, but so far, less wasteful and zero maintenance for the AXS.
  • 5 3
 @TheR: I think the batteries-died examples are likely a handful of very loud voices and that the system works as advertised, and if you are a conscientious rider (like, do you lube your chain) then having fresh batteries isn't a big deal. However, it is pretty simple to carry a derailleur cable and a hanger in even a small pack. My greatest repair moment was fixing a broken derailleur in a race with an extra shoelace. Not sure what kind of redundancy is afforded in AXS if the electrical system stops working.
  • 8 1
 Less buttons. More riding.
  • 3 1
 @twozerosix: I guess so. Not sure what’s going to go wrong outside the battery, though. It doesn’t seem like there are any issues here.

No matter the part, no matter the precautions you take, stuff can happen. Nothing is catastrophe proof, and this AXS stuff doesn’t seem to be any more or less prone to catastrophe based on this review. So I’m not sure what the fear is. I get cost being a barrier, but I’m not understanding the old-codger, mechanical purist stance from some people here. It seems like a rationalization for fear of the unknown or most likely not being able to afford it. (Or not wanting to pay for it). Hell, I’d respect it a hell of a lot more of a dude were to say, “You know what? I can’t afford it and it’s not worth the money for me,” rather than read all this absurd “mechanical or die” stuff. They’re jus lt spitting into the wind. I’m telling you, in a few years, it’s going to be standard.
  • 2 0
 nah dude it's expensive
  • 1 2
 @TylerJamesHall: yeah but have you driven a ferrari?
  • 8 0
 @mior: i currently run xt 12spd. But if i ever mess up the derrailler for instance i could buy a deore level and itll work with my shifter and cassette. With this you cant. With gx eagle axs you allready have the cheapest part. And its a lot of money for a new one.
  • 6 0
 @reo-driver: I've forgotten my gloves, even my helmet at home. I'd sure forget my AXS battery.
  • 4 0
 @TheR: I carry a spare hanger and derailleur cable on every ride. They take up no space and weigh about 10g together. Never had to use the cable but the spare hangers have come in handy several times.
  • 3 0
 @jwboushelle: Is it true you can assign sounds to the upshift/downshift? If I can assign beeps and boops to my shifters my life will be complete.
  • 1 0
 @tbubier: bruh sound effects time
  • 2 0
 @VtVolk: Generally, I do, too. But there was an occasion where I was in Moab, and I broke one two miles into my first ride. I had ordered spares from the manufacturer the week before, but they didn’t come in time. So there I was with my boutique, direct to consumer bike without a spare hanger. No one in town had one. I was out of luck and had to rent a bike.

Moral of the story: shame on me for not having a spare. If you go out with an electronic shifter without having it charged, shame on you. Net result is the same, yes? Stuff happens. I don’t think one is more or less likely to happen than the other. Just be prepared — any lack of preparation can’t be blamed on the system.

And also... couldn’t you just have spare batteries in your pack as easily as you have a spare hanger? Takes up less space than a spare cable. Or is the battery part of the shifter unit, and you use a cord to plug straight into the wall?
  • 4 1
 @TylerJamesHall: riding a bike is a sensory experience. Feeling a nice shift through the cable is a pleasant part of that experience
  • 11 2
 But let's be real, who DOESN'T want a wireless dropper?
  • 2 2
 @mnorris122: Instead of wireless, how about some kind of hydraulic line substituted for the cable. It would be heavier, sure, but I'm sure it would be super reliable!
  • 1 0
 @VtVolk: Like the Rotor drivetrain?
  • 2 0
 @TheR: "So there I was with my boutique, direct to consumer bike without a spare hanger."
I think I found your problem.
  • 1 0
 @waxman: Clearly. I take full responsibility. I wish the derailleur hanger I ordered had gotten to my house before I left. The point is, anyone can find themselves high and dry for whatever reason. It’s not limited to not charging the batteries on your AXS derailleur/shifter.
  • 2 0
 @twozerosix: I have had AXS two years now. Ride 2-3 times per week (10-15 miles per). I have only charged the battery twice... and both times it wasn't because the battery displayed a low level... it was because it had been an incredibly long time.
  • 4 0
 Agree 110%.
Not sure whats wrong with a bit of cable.
Seems to me its solving a problem that doesn’t exist.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: yeah all things being equal and if someone wanted to give it to me, I'd certainly ride/race it and be happy.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: agree with you! People probably said the same thing about dropper posts… now look, everyone has one
  • 8 6
 @TheR: it's not an innovation, they just replaced the medium of shifting with something that can get glitches like every electronic device. And you are depended on a charger. They didn't fix anything, it's more expensive to replace, not user serviceable, has the exact same disadvantages as a traditional system, it's heavier. An innovation would be if somehow they solve the issues of the traditional system, not add complexity for no reason and most importand no advantages
  • 3 1
 @Jvhowube: I’ve driven to the trailhead with a buddy who only then realized his shift cable was broken, he hadn’t bothered to check his bike over before we left home and he didn’t have a spare. Nobodies perfect and Shifter Companies are not responsible for user error.
  • 4 2
 @TheR: because it's the same shit plus the glitches of electronics. That's why
  • 3 3
 @tfriesenftr: they are responsible for shitty electronics though, cable is an easy fix. Glitches and dying batteries aren't.
  • 4 0
 @VtVolk: f*ck that. I don't wanna faff with routing anything around the BB, much less a hydraulic line.
  • 1 0
 @in2falling: 2 days at work. No big deal for me if this happens.
  • 6 3
 @enduroNZ: They said the same thing about dropper posts, carbon frames and wheels, 29-inch wheels, boost spacing, and probably any number of things I’m forgetting, and yet, here we are.

@adespotoskyli: You’re making up hypothetical problems that based on the evidence in this review don’t exist. This thing seems to work just fine. Sure, something could go wrong, as with any other component you have on your bike, but all these electronic glitches you’re talking about don’t seem to happen as routinely as you imagine. You’re a technophobe. Nothing wrong with that. I’m not buying one either, at least not for now. I’m a cheapskate.
  • 9 1
 @TheR: you should check some owners threads and see what the issues are and then come back, I don't expect a pink bike review to tell me what the issues and limitations of electronics are when used outdoors. Routinely you mean one charging a month plus having to be sure your back up battery is charged as well. compare that I change my shifter cable once a year just in case and carry a spare cable with me that needs no special attention is exactly the opposite of routine. one importand thing you ignore is it didn't solve any issues of a traditional system, it added more. It's the same low hanging exposed mechanism costing 6 times a regular der. So not an innovation but a new whole level of issues and expenses.
  • 1 0
 @mior: Is the clutch adjustable on those?
  • 1 0
 This Comment is the gold standard for comment gold!
  • 5 2
 @TylerJamesHall: His E36 is FULL of electronic nannies that control all aspects of the driving experience. I mean, it has conveniences like power steering and ABS for god's sake.
I'm afraid that if that's your idea of a mechanic-feeling car, you haven't felt a very mechanical car. I suggest you drive something like a Caterham 7, you'll see what a mechanical car actually feels like. Or, if you can't find one, an older-gen Miata which has been gutted for track use.
  • 1 1
 @adespotoskyli: Fight the power, man.
  • 3 0
 AXS is also just straightforwardly worse. It's heavy, offers no features except button customization, and you have to charge it. It's left me stranded in the woods once, and another time I had to delay a ride because the light had turned orange prematurely. I miss mechanical.
  • 3 0
 @nattyd: Wanna sell your AXS?
  • 3 1
 @Baller7756: I would if non-AXS was in stock and I could sell it for MSRP.
  • 3 0
 @TheR: no I just don't buy in to bullshit that much but have you found the issues this innovation solved yet? I'll be waiting
  • 1 4
 @warmerdamj: shimano has wireless
  • 1 0
 @mtb-thetown: drivetrain bleed? No thanks
  • 3 0
 there’s nothing simple about faffing about with cable tension. AXS is way more simplistic to use.
  • 1 0
 the battery lasts weeks without charging. that’s on your buddy @in2falling:
  • 8 2
 @Jvhowube: I hear you. The same thing happened to me and a friend: at the start of the ride he noticed he forgot his helmet and we had to drive back home to get it. Since then I don't wear a helmet anymore, I prefer the simplicity of riding helmet less over complicated stuff to pack.
  • 4 0
 @konamat: This is dumb. With AXS there's an equivalent thing that offers 100% of the functionality without charging. What's the equivalent for a helmet? Get better arguments.
  • 3 2
 @moroj82: For like 4 months... now my battery life is like 2-4 rides.

Cable tension on a 1x system is incredibly easy. One barrel adjuster. Move it one way, the indexing moves one way. Move it the other way, the indexing moves the other way. Literally no more complicated than adjusting indexing on AXS, which I've had to do just as often.
  • 3 0
 @Jvhowube: This hasn't happened to me yet, but it probably will. I have had it cut out at the far point of a 30 mile ride, leaving me with a single speed. And then there was another time I was leaving to ride and noticed the battery light was red and had to wait to charge it.

Offers no advantage whatsoever. It's just complicated for it's own sake.
  • 3 1
 @nattyd: i don't understand the sole argument saying that because you can forget the battery, the product is dumb. We have all forgotten something once in our lifetime before going to ride, going to work, going to school, going on holidays... It happens once, maybe twice, we learn, and most likely it doesn't happen anymore. I was being sarcastic about this.

Tell me you prefer the mechanical simplicity of a cable actuated system, or you don't like batteries because it's ecologically worse than cables, yeah I'll respect that.
  • 1 0
 Upvoted but I am running AXS and won't go back. Your points ring so true but my biggest frustration is a ride with gears being a PITA.

AXS has been so reliable, smooth, consistent shifting and it keeps my stress levels low. I love enhancements such as these and I don't think its actually even complicated. Setup is a couple of button presses (app is a bonus) and i charge the battery every couple months, where it usually is 50% or so (it lasts ages based on my riding up to 50 xc miles a week!)
  • 2 0
 @Jvhowube: That could happen with anything, been on rides where people forgot shoes, helmets, wheels, packs, etc.
  • 3 0
 The simplicity ship has sailed on modern mountain bikes, compare it to a bmx and it's rather obvious it's not an elegantly simple mechanical device. Compared to bleeding brakes, multiple suspension components to service at different intervals, pivot points to maintain, dropper posts to service and so on this seems like a rather trivial thing to get your panties in a bunch about. I'll wait for the prices to come a bit closer to mechanical derailleurs but if it works better I'm game.
  • 2 0
 @twozerosix: Where do we sign up for the shifting subscription? How much does it cost per shift when you go over your limit? AT&T and T-Mobile are already developing their own wireless derailleurs that run Android.
  • 2 0
 @TheR: With my latest bike I ended up with AXS, but was by no means part of my search goals - just wanted the Grip2 damper that came with that bike. In retrospect, I love it and will never go back to mechanical, so long as it's not cost infeasible. Charging batteries is an afterthought - they last weeks, if not months. I carry a third in my pack, always keep it charged, and cycle batteries whenever one turns red. That's it. I honestly think the technophobes are actually just that - scared of what bad things could happen with electronic shifting and I'm not here to hate on that but I'm not an evangelist, and let me tell you: there's nothing to fear. It works great, fewer headaches/hassles.

Now all the maintenance I do on my bike is just replacing fluids on suspension and brakes with proprietary tools and liquids
  • 2 0
 @kcy4130: I've owned my AXS setup for over a year now and charged my batteries 2, maybe 3 times riding for ~2 hrs ~2x/week. The sort of degradation you're talking about comes from dozens, if not hundreds of cycles At that point you'll have replaced pulleys, cogs, etc - a $50 battery is nothing to worry about on that timeframe.
  • 1 0
 @in2falling: I've become a big AXS fan in the ~year I've owned my X01, and I'll hand over the concession that replacing broken parts is pricey. Realistically though, how often do you break a dereailleur? I see that as a one-in-a-million chance, but I live in the land of silt and clay - not rocks jutting out everywhere
  • 1 0
 @Rogueuniform77: They have plans for wireless. But no, they do not have wireless.
  • 1 0
 @VtVolk: about once a year ive used my spare shifter cable to fix a friend’s bike on a long ride.
  • 1 0
 @adespotoskyli: No cables — therefore no stretching cables, no slow or touchy responses, no adjustments, no cables snapping out on a ride. Just set and forget (other than the battery!), and get a smooth, precise shift every time.
  • 3 1
 @premiumfrye: Thats the way it’s going to be for everyone. They’ll end up with AXS because their bike comes with it or whatever, and eventually everyone wont have it any other way. There will be hold outs, like the 26 for life guys, and the guys who won’t buy “those cheap plastic bikes,” but it will eventually be the standard, especially after Shimano and others get in the game. And who knows?

As for your comment about breaking derailleurs, I think you’re right. All kinds of rocks out here where I ride. I might bend or break the hanger every so often, but I’ve never destroyed a mech.
  • 2 1
 @adespotoskyli: Maybe you should check some owners threads and see what the issues are, or maybe listen to the people here who do own electronic shifting. We own it and are all saying its great, you do not own it and are saying its bad. It removed all shift cable related problems and simply requires you to plug in a charge cable every few months and go watch TV. The only problem I see if that I need to find something else to do while you change your dirty cables. My di2 is going on 5+ years with the same battery, so it has cost me zero dollars over that time.
  • 2 1
 @Explodo Well said. I'm fortunate that I could buy it and replace it if I broke it. It would sting a little each time, but it wouldn't be a big deal. I'd also just buy a spare battery to keep in my riding bag with shoes, helmets, etc.

However, I just don't want it. Nothing against people that do, but those people are never going to understand simply not wanting it for reasons unrelated to cost, durability, or performance.

This ethos of minimalism and experience needs to be voiced as much as possible to combat the consumerism and social-media-edit culture that currently prevails in our sport. Kudos for the comment and stoked it got so many upvotes.
  • 4 0
 @rcrocha: 'Basic' plan is 1000 shifts per month, and ten cents each once you go over, but you can save! and buy an expansion pack of 250 shifts, which also includes a dozen "3-at-a-time" shifts. If you think you might be shifting more than usual, just upgrade to the 'Gold' or 'OilSlick' plans, which gets up to 10,000 shifts per month!

If you are a REAL pinkbiker however, and think everything is too expensive, you can opt for the 'Core' plan, which is unlimited shifts but SRAM sells your riding and shifting data to China, and you have to listen to an advertisement if you need the 52t.
  • 1 1
 @TylerJamesHall: definitely doesn’t put a smile on my face when I’m trying to change gears with freezing numb hands. That effortless shift is a game changer in the colder months. Can’t wait for it not to be ridiculously overpriced.
  • 3 0
 @TheR: my set ups are and always been set and forget and use no batteries. What causes slow and unresponsive shifts is bashed up mechs and hangers, you get that with or without a battery unfortunatelly. the cable once it stretch it's done untill it needs replacement. But have you checked how many people have issues with the axs? I bet not
  • 3 0
 @TheR: I've got piles of zees and saint mechs plus hangers, can't imagine how much would cost me if I paid axs price to fix my mech every time, I would go single speed instead
  • 3 0
 @warmerdamj: I'm concerned more about the problems not those who praise the thing it cost an arm and a leg to get it. If you have zero issues good for you! I have zero issues with 10 times less cost and not having to remember to charge one more gimmick, and it's spare battery just in case.
  • 3 0
 @thenotoriousmic: so you don't brake in freezing weather untill you get the new effortless wireless brakes? Give us a brake, If you can't shift in freezing weather you shouldn't be out in the first place.
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: bring it ooon!
  • 1 0
 @adespotoskyli: lol i think the batteries would explode gee i love southern cali
  • 1 0
 @adespotoskyli: haha when and where?

I’m not saying I can’t do it just that it sucks and in those situations I’d love an effortless electronic shifter. I also can’t un do my shoelaces at the end of the ride with cold hands.
  • 1 0
 @mior: which one?
  • 1 0
 @FionnS: which what
  • 2 0
 @mior: Sorry, which $50 9spd derailleur has a clutch?
  • 2 0
 @mior: says in the blurb. "No clutch for extra smooth shifting."
  • 1 0
 i said the same thing until i had axs on one of my bikes; now i must have it on both. see you there, eventually, partner.
  • 2 0
 @plxmtb: Yeah, nah. I've been using it for 7 months. I still think it sucks. Literally the only added value is programmable controls. I've never heard another credible reason for it to exist.
  • 1 0
 @adespotoskyli: Unless you roll around on an NX drivetrain and don't ride your bike very often the cost of electric is not that outrageous. There are mechanical drivetrains that cost just as much or more. I actually picked up both my Di2 systems on the Pinkbike buy/sell. They were basically new and cost me considerably less then a top level mech set back then. The people selling them didn't like the fancy-ness either, I bet they have spent way more on drivetrains then I have in the last 5 years.
  • 1 0
 @solf: There looks to be an on/off dial on the pivot that normally has a clutch though
  • 1 0
 @mior: Thank you Sir!
  • 2 0
 @solf: copy and paste error. seller also sells clutchless version
  • 2 0
 @adespotoskyli: I'd argue that it solved all the issues related to cables (routing, degradation, tensioning). But I agree with your larger point: that AXS drive-train is further refinement of a somewhat inherently flawed concept VS game changing innovation.
  • 2 0
 @warmerdamj: I mainly use zee/saint mechs for their compact size, first time bought an slx 12 spd as it was the only available mech I could get as I wrecked my saint. It's quite bulkier than a saint and hangs low so it's life expectancy won't be much. For some reason I go through a lot of mechs/hangers my riding sucks I guess...
  • 2 0
 @Assclapp: I'm quite used to refresh my shifting cables once a year, basic maintenance. But keep up with constant charging of batteries, apps and all the related issues, no way, I have enough on my everyday life to get sick of it, makes no sence to bring this in my hobby, get away time. Also the cost or replacing parts is another issue, I have a tendency to wreck mechs, miles tend to eat cassettes and chains so I'm all ok with pretty basic, workhorse type of consumable parts. It's not an investment
  • 1 0
 @mior: Looking at the Microshift website, it seems that the clutched version is called the RD-M6195M
www.microshift.com/models/rd-m6195m
This is what the photo on the Amazon listing shows, but all the rest of the listing indicates the clutchless version - model number and the description.
The clutched version does appear to be only $55 anyway
www.modernbike.com/microshift-advent-rear-derailleur---9-speed-medium-cage-black-with-clutch

I will try one for sure once I can find a European seller with them in stock, thanks again.
  • 1 0
 @premiumfrye: This has not been my experience. My battery life was down under 20 hours after a few months. Now I have to constantly monitor it. I haven't had to replace any other parts yet.
  • 2 0
 @TheR: I bought AXS because Specialized literally doesn't sell a high end Epic without it. What the industry forces you to buy is not the same as what is good. I would much rather have XTR or mechanical XX1. My mechanical drivetrains had better tactility and never left me stranded in the woods with a single speed. I see zero benefit to AXS.

I'm not a luddite. I love my progressive geometry, carbon frame, dropper post, 29" wheels. Always have. I'm just able to differentiate actual benefits from useless gimmicks that require more work and add no value.
  • 1 0
 @nattyd: What's all the extra work AXS requires?
  • 1 0
 @nattyd: Honestly, though — has it ever really left you stranded in the woods? Really? I’ve been stranded in the woods with a single speed because of a broken cable. Lesson learned, but it’s no different than a dead battery. And frankly, I’d rather carry a spare battery and replace that trail side than a cable.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: Yes, actually, really. Like 20 miles from home. Do you want me to send you the strava file? It's called "Involuntary singlespeed". I've never broken a cable mid-ride in like 40,000 miles of cycling.
  • 1 0
 @warmerdamj: Charging, removing batteries for transit, remembering to not leave them in the charger, keeping track of the covers. Since my battery life is now under 20 hours, if I drive to a ride, I pretty much always have to remove the battery.
  • 1 0
 jesus f*** i made a lot of people mad
  • 1 0
 @nattyd: more importantly which gear was you stuck in though?
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Actually got pretty lucky here. It's a very climby ride and I was in the second-lowest (32x42). Enough to get up the climb without spinning like a maniac. Not ideal on the flatter stuff, but I got home.
  • 1 0
 @nattyd: All these problem are really just the steps you take to charge the battery, not 4 separate problems. As for leaving the battery off when you travel, I don't know why you would do that. If your battery drains while installed but not in use then you need that battery warrantied. I think you are making a way bigger deal out of this then it really is.
  • 2 0
 @warmerdamj: dude, it’s literally all over the AXS material that you should detach when traveling because otherwise the system will stay awake the whole time. Why weigh in on something you clearly have no idea about.
  • 1 0
 @nattyd: No it won't and nobody does that. I'll continue to weigh in as I ride AXS and Di2 with zero issues without ever removing a battery for travel, thanks.
  • 1 0
 @nattyd: No need to send a Strava file. If you say it happened to you, it happened to you, but I still suspect a lot of people are full of crap here regarding this issue. Hell, I don’t believe most of them have ever even used an electronic mech.

I admit it doesn’t happen often, but cables have snapped on me on several occasions. And as I said, shame on me for not having a spare on hand. Shame on you for not having an extra battery. The point is, regardless of the tech, you should be prepared on the trail by bringing a spare whatever. I contend it’s easier to pop open a battery compartment than it is to break out the cables and run through that whole procedure, but whatever floats your boat.

The other point is, things can go wrong no matter what you’re using, so the argument that a specific thing can go wrong with a certain piece of technology doesn’t really justify the technophobia I’m seeing here, especially when that problem is so easily remedied with a simple spare battery.
  • 2 1
 @TheR: spare batteries need charging as well, spare cables don't. There are other issues that can go wrong with electronic gizmos that mechanical stuff don't suffer from
things can go wrong but what goes wrong without a warning? electronics. Why increase the failure rate by making it more complex without any gains in performance? It's useless and needless. It's still the same exposed primitive rear mech. Not a new tech, it's a new whole lot more issues for no reason
  • 2 1
 @adespotoskyli: Dude... there is no increase in failure rate. Your fears of "electronic gismo failure" are unfounded... just like the cable failure rate is far and few between.

I liken it to carburetor vs fuel injection. Sure the carburetor works fine, but the fuel injection is a little more refined and efficient. The fuel injection system will likely be difficult to diagnose and fix diy when it does eventually fail, but it beats adjusting and fine tuning the carburetor on a regular basis.
  • 2 0
 @Baller7756: As a person who makes a very good living working on electronics reliability... there are ALWAYS electronic gismo failures. You don't build something with a billion transistors and a bunch of antennas and then subject it to all forms of whether and stress and not have failures. How many and when? Only time (and reliability testing) will tell.
  • 3 1
 @TheR: I love technology. It is my livelihood. I just try to evaluate it from an objective standard:

-does the technology offer a compelling advantage?
-does the advantage justify the costs?

For the vast majority of mountain bike tech (prog geometry, dropper posts, big wheels, tubeless tires, wider tires, wider bars, 1x, etc.) I have been an early adopter and a proponent.

In my view, electronic shifting does not meet this standard. I can imagine that someday it will: automatic indexing, shifting, adjustment, trim, etc), but right now it just emulates the previous technology. I don't think that cuts it. I resent being forced into a buying a thing because it's what the industry wants to push, while simultaneously being gaslit about my criticisms.
  • 2 1
 @warmerdamj: "To prevent battery depletion and to protect the components, install the derailleur battery blocks and battery contact covers before transportation."

www.sram.com/en/life/stories/getting-started-with-axs

I ignored this for awhile also, but now the choice is either remove or charge after every other ride, because otherwise I'll just get stranded in the woods.
  • 1 0
 @Baller7756: you probably missed all those who already own it and are complaining about how ridiculous of an idea it is. Do some search and come back. Fuel injection's efficiency is actually measurable in l/100km how is axs efficiency is measured exactly?
  • 2 1
 @adespotoskyli: Easy on the attack bro. I do own an XX1 AXS setup on my Transition Spur. I have of course owned and still own cable actuated systems on other bikes. I build, setup, and maintain my bikes myself.

I do feel I'm qualified to offer my opinion of both systems. Without a doubt the AXS experience is superior. Ease of setup, shift quality and consistency, shift response time, tactile feel, shifter throw distance, shift configuration capability, unbelievable battery life, etc. The only negative is the cost difference.

The efficiency is in its precise shifting, and precise fine adjustment capability. How can this be measured... IDK chain/cassette wear perhaps.
  • 1 1
 @Baller7756: on 2 strokes you do fine tune the carb depending on temp and altitude pretty often on carbed bikes. It's not a issue. Neither is putting a half/quarter turn on the shifter every now and then. No biggie. Unless you are totally mechanically retarded. Maybe that's where the axs comes in.
  • 1 0
 @Baller7756: all of my systems work consistenly when are not worn out, bashed or bent, shift response time on a cable actuated system is immediate and is depended on the shifter quality, an xt/xtr or xx1/x1/xo1 class all offer what you describe, ease of set up? The same minus the cable trim when it stretches. Battery life? I take what you say with a grain of salt, in any case you can't surpass once a year cable refresh. Chain/cassette wear has nothing to do with how the derailleur moves, cable or servo actuated chain and cassette don't know the difference, it's when it's kept clean and lubed that gives you more miles. Don't see how you exactly quantified superiority of axs vs xx1 but as you said, you are entitled to your own opinion.
  • 1 0
 @solf: a run to the charger every other ride makes more sense to some people, also the bling factor of triple the price. Go figure
  • 1 0
 @nattyd: I really like the idea of electronic shifting but after recently trying it the performance doesn’t justify the cost. I was hoping for an effortless wireless switch but they’ve made the shifter to emulate a traditional shifters feel so there’s still a lot of resistance when you push the thumb paddle and it’s quite an awkward shape as well. Might as well run a cable at least that way you can control upshifts under load. Make a better shifter that takes no effort to use and I’ll be onboard.
  • 2 0
 Just purchased this for a new build, GG Smash, over at evo.com for 20% off, $480 for AXS, that works for my credit card Wink
  • 137 0
 So can we say it's AXSessible ?
C'mon I'm french and trying to make jokes here
  • 41 0
 You can say its not AXsessible as it is out of stock
  • 5 2
 We should have AXS these puns...
  • 3 0
 You might be French, but are you also honorable? youtu.be/f9zX_P7UZag
  • 43 0
 Argh, I'm legitimately angry we didn't run with this headline.
  • 3 1
 @brianpark: don't AXSaggerate.
  • 1 0
 Well, if they are in stock, but it is a good question to AXS.
  • 1 0
 @Boxmtb: they ship to dealers every 2 weeks...
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Don't tell me you guys never thought about this one.
  • 1 0
 *laughs in french*
  • 71 3
 Sram should fix the ratios in their 10-52 cassette before releasing something like this. The 42-52 gap in shifting SUCKS, Even if it’s just a bail out gear. You can’t fine tune the drivetrain with a larger or smaller chainring, going larger makes you use the 52 more and shift thru the gap more and smaller to avoid the gap makes the 52 useless. Shimano has it figured out with the 39-45-51, until sram changes it I’m never buying another one of their drivetrains, 42-50 is still a big gap. I’ve got an xo1 on a new bike and I’m choked to have spent that much on something that sram was too cheap to make properly and just threw a pie plate on their existing cassette.

Stack the climbing gears that people spend most of their riding time in and add a bit more gap on the other end, it’s not like these are getting used for optimum cadence in a road race and needing a tight shift into the 10 tooth...
  • 10 9
 I hear you. Im running 2021 GX Lunar and frankly I hate it and want to burn it. The ratio is just weird. I mean did they even test it? You ride up a hill and go from struggle to spinning. It need not be.
The shifter is also weird. Like the two levers or not quite aligned right for your fingers.
As for the cranks. Jesus. I have never had cranks flex that much. Maybe 5+ mm of inward flex. They rubbed my frame. Swapped out those pronto.
I hate it. But nothing else was available.
I wont be buying Sram again. Huge disappointment.
  • 5 0
 @ilovedust: wait crank flex? I’ve used all manner of square taper Chinesium for cranks and it’s always the frame that bends, not the cranks.

They must be terrible.
  • 5 0
 @GilesSTurner: chinesium always wins
  • 1 0
 I'm running the gx 10-50 with a 30 tooth. When I wear it out it seems like a ztto 9-46 with a 28 tooth chainring could be a good option. I'd get a higher top end than I have now, a smaller jump to the bail out that would still be lower than a 32*52. Maybe I'm missing something though. www.aliexpress.com/item/4000512189858.html?spm=a2g0o.cart.0.0.644a3c00bSnM4z&mp=1
  • 4 1
 its about percentages. 42-52 is a 24% jump. 10-12 is 20%. if you make it more, that will suck too.
  • 3 0
 Agree. The shifting quality is great but that 42-50/52 gap is so weird. I’m also not a fan of where the downshifting paddle is.
  • 1 0
 where i live u need ultra-low, 1 to 1, and high
  • 9 1
 You know they still make the 50 tooth version
  • 4 0
 You can also just run a Shimano cassette and chain with a SRAM derailleur and shifter. That's what I have on my hardtail and it seems to be the perfect compromise
  • 1 0
 @johnnyboy11000: does come OEM though. Buy a new bike and it will always come with the 52.
  • 1 0
 I like mine just fine! I ride lots of steep stuff in SC, and I appreciate the granny gear a lot personally.
  • 1 0
 @GilesSTurner: In one of the recent huck to flat videos, one bike’s crank flexes so much that you can see the entire underside of the pedal.
  • 1 0
 @GilesSTurner: trust me, its the cranks. My frame is solid. I too have used all types of cranks and some flex more than others. But they all flex.
...and as if by magic, spotted this evening, both my GX 5 month old jockey wheels have seized up.
Absolute crap.
  • 1 0
 Try a E*thirteen 9-50 cassette, closer spacing on the large cogs and you get the benefit of being able to run a size smaller chainring for better clearance.
  • 2 0
 @whambat:
E thirteen is still a 42-50 spread (same as sram 10-50) which sucks marginally less than the 10-52. Personally, if I’m gonna spend money to replace my stupid expensive xo1 cassette due to a lazy engineer and an aggressive marketing dept I’m going micro spline free hub and shimano or a garbaruk 10-48. For what this stuff costs and the near monopoly they have on OEM parts SRAM needs to try a little harder.

With tighter spacing in the easiest few gears you can fine tune with front ring size and dial it right in.
  • 2 0
 @ilovedust: I want jockey wheels with SKF MTRX bearings in them, so they wound never rust out. I wish someone made them. Couldn't be much more expensive than the X01 versions now.

Still better than my SLX derailleur where the clutch crapped out, and then seized less than a month after service and was so rusted out inside that I had to replace it (With GX, since the only derailleurs available are XTR and cost more than GX shifter and derailleur). I could blame myself for not sealing it back up properly, but I was careful and if it didn't hold up to that level of care, it ain't for me.
  • 1 0
 Absolutely agree, that gap jump from 42 to 50 drives me nuts!!! a 52/50-46-42-36 and then just something sensible at the other end. Another is just copy Shinamo ratios or something similar to it. I do disagree with the quality of the cassette, the cassette is a beauty and as lasted a long time so far.
  • 1 0
 @sitkadog: but with a smaller chainring and the E13, you’d still have the same top end, but less likely to need to drop to the bail out gear. Personally, I’d rather the big jump to the bailout gear so I can keep the steps closer in the other 11 gears. To each their own. Fortunately, we have choices.
  • 2 0
 @whambat: you’re missing the point. If you go to a smaller ring to make the rest of your gears more usable then you still have a huge gap to the “bailout “ and that gear gets so easy that it’s not practical on anything but say a very steep road. And when that very steep road starts to flatten out you are stuck between spinning too fast or lugging along. Sure, it’s nice to have an easy granny when ya need it, but not with a giant gap to 2nd. Why not have a reasonable spread across all the gears and still have full range ? Screw the stupid “bailout “ gear concept-Like I said before, shimano has it figured out with a 10-51 with 39-45-51 for the easiest gears. Plenty of overall range, and reasonable gaps where ya need em. Sram needs to catch up. Too bad they are stuffing this 10-52 on so many new bikes especially when alternatives are not available for months, and who wants to buy a new cassette when they just got one?... and it’d be hard to invest in AXS and hope that the shimano cassette spacing works with it.
  • 1 0
 @GilesSTurner: How safe are chinese cranks btw?
  • 1 0
 @mtb-thetown: YEP! you can mix and match any shimano 12sp with Sram eagle. I currently have a bike that has full XT and the der. exploded after 3 rides and a warranty replacement is 3 mo. out. yanked a GX mech off my hardtail and it works a treat. lol.
  • 1 0
 @MaplePanda: I saw that too....thought it was just me seeing things . I did a rewind to watch it a couple of times, looked like the cranks were flexing at least 5 degrees of rotation.
  • 1 0
 @ilovedust: sounds like your cranks aren’t even setup right
  • 2 0
 @sitkadog: eh, like I said to each their own. I’m glad you like the Shimano options. I have a bunch of trails with crazy steep climb sections. I’ve never had a problem upshifting after a steep section. The more you set your gearing to stay in the middle of the cassette, the better your chain line, and the longer your stuff lasts.

If you look at a gear chart, that even 6 tooth jump on a Shimano isn’t such an even jump based on gear ratios. As you get to the larger cogs, big jumps in tooth count aren’t as as big as on the smaller cogs. So, that jump from 39 to 45 is bigger than the jump from 45 to 51.
Here’s Sheldon Brown’s calculator:
www.sheldonbrown.com/gear-calc.html

If you use it, you’ll see the jump from 42 to 50 is only 3.5 gear inches, versus the jump from 10 to 12 is about 15 gear inches. If you plot out a SRAM eagle cassette 10-50, there’s about an even 3-3.5 gear inch change in the larger few cogs. It’s like they actually looked at gear charts when designing their cassette instead of just counting teeth.

In comparison that Shimano 10-51, it jumps a difference of 5 gear inches, to 4.4, to 3.1, to 2.4 (all difference in gear inches between gears) for the shifts in the largest cogs.
  • 1 0
 @sitkadog: SRAM has solution for you... they sell a 10-50 as well as a 10-52.
  • 1 1
 There’s a lot of weak bitches exposing themselves in the comments here. Imagine complaining about the jump between the 42 and 52 tooth cog on your cassette? Pathetic you should have manned up and got of and pushed by then. Anyway they still do the old eagle if you don’t like the jump.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: im out my low range tops out at 32-40
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: what’s weak about wanting something that costs that much to work properly? If you camp out in granny all day or don’t actually ride in mountains the maybe it doesn’t bother ya, but if you are climbing fast, shift a lot and want to be in the right gear at all times then there is no arguing that the sram ratio doesn’t suck compared to what shimano is offering. Why have a 12 speed if ya never use all the range?
  • 1 0
 @sitkadog: I agree completely. I’d be fine with ten speed. I don’t use all the gears I’ve got. I’m ether grinding up fireroads or pushing up. I just find the bike just wants to wheelie or wheel spin when it gets that steep you need to be in that bigger gear and it’s faster and easier to walk. Give me a more reliable less temperamental 10 speed.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: microshift advent x. have the 9 speed and its f*ckin bulletproof
  • 1 0
 @T4THH: My Bucklos YX cranks (no prizes for guessing what it's modelled on) seems to be going strong, it's taken repeated 10 foot drops to flat with no issue. But then again, I'm super light, so your mileage may vary.
Buy IXF HT2 cranks if you're going to cheap out, then you don't have to deal with square taper.
  • 2 0
 @GilesSTurner: I'm super heavy so maybe I'll pass hahaha. Thanks for the reply tho!
  • 60 2
 I threw baked beans in my eyes... in hienz sight it was a bad idea
  • 2 0
 heinz
  • 2 0
 @8tom8: it would have bean a better joke if it weren't for your spelling
  • 2 0
 @labrinsky: dysleksic
  • 2 0
 @8tom8: with that spelling disability, it's best to refry from making more bean related comments
  • 2 0
 @labrinsky: I ate a clock.. it was very time consuming???
  • 2 0
 @8tom8: you should learn to time travel so you could go back for seconds
  • 54 1
 If this saves me the insanity-inducing torture of threading my cable through rear chainstay of my Norco Sight, I would pay triple. No more screams of anguish causing the neighbors to call the police, who arrive to find me lying on the garage floor in a tangled mess of fishing lines, magnets, and ruined cable housing, with tears running down my face as I struggle to thread the cable through an impossible internal routing line that makes the Deathstar trench look like a walk in the park.
  • 4 0
 If it's a newer Sight, just unbolt the dropout pivot. Makes routing 100% more possible. Wink
  • 12 0
 @huckbuckit: Now you tell me! Where were you in my darkest hour! This tip is nice, but it can't make my pain go away.
  • 41 8
 Can we have a new review series of what's in stock please?
  • 19 0
 That review would be a paragraph
  • 100 0
 Reviews to include:

- Whats hot in 3 spd front derailleurs
- Just how reliable are those Amazon prime forks as an alternatives to other out of stock brands
- How to justify buying the weird soft compound semi slick tyres because its all thats left
- How to grow and like a really bad bike just because it is currently in stock (the Titus El-guapo edition)
- How to live with riding a bike that is sized xxs and xxxxl
- Aliexpress, the risks and benefits with group bulk purchasing
  • 16 0
 The time you'd finish reading,it too would be out of stock.
  • 5 0
 Listicles to include "15 ways bike industry customer service reps answer emails asking when [ ] will be back in stock again"
  • 7 0
 I too look forward to a review of tire levers and cliff bars.
  • 10 0
 @usmbc-co-uk: Amazon is almost as trash as ebay now in terms of finding anything that isn't a cheap knockoff for sale. I swear I saw a "Faux" fork the other day with a Chihuaha head decal.
  • 2 0
 @carters75: Oh yes, the Faux is top of the line material, even comes with a special "Chihuahua" sticker and most likely made of plastic.
  • 1 0
 I'm finding current reviews useful for planning my 2022 purchases.
  • 9 0
 @carters75: Plenty of Faux Float 33 FAT4 Strep-Cast with Genuine Kasheenma Coat forks available.
  • 9 0
 @carters75: This one is just downright shameless. www.amazon.com/DFS-Civet-RLC-TP-RCE-TC-Suspension-Mountain-Bicycle/dp/B07F2KBWL3/ref=sr_1_13?dchild=1&keywords=fox+fork&qid=1622131051&sr=8-13

I love how they replaced 'Fox' with another obscure carnivorous mammal. LOL.
  • 4 0
 @BetweenTheCircles: Gotta love that kashima
  • 6 0
 @BetweenTheCircles: Holy $hit that thing has a carbon steer/crown! That's absolutely terrifying...
  • 1 0
 @nozes: incorrect statement. It was already out of stock long time ago....
  • 2 0
 @BetweenTheCircles: chinesium fork: $250. Rockshox judy silver tk: $150.
  • 3 0
 @BetweenTheCircles: I'm dead. This is exactly what I was talking about. I was looking for a 38 recently and checked Amazon and it was pages of Chinese forks. Scary thing is that someone who doesn't know better will buy that crap and get injured or worse.
  • 1 0
 @racecase: More like a sentence.
  • 1 0
 I managed to get 20% off a new in stock GX AXS groupset.
  • 1 0
 @BetweenTheCircles: that DFS factory lookin mint
  • 1 0
 @carters75: lol seth form berm peak put one on that giant hardtail, are they an upgrade from my crap suntour fork
  • 1 0
 Someone was selling 5 off the GX Eagle chains at the regular price on eBay. Keyword, was.
  • 1 0
 @BetweenTheCircles: Now I need some CIVET stickers for my 36...
  • 1 0
 @mior: Anything air is an upgrade from the XCT in my opinion. BUT probably less safe
  • 1 0
 @T4THH: prolly go with and alloy cheapo, not like im a red bull rampage rider
  • 1 0
 @T4THH: oh, no my suntour is better. its an xcm

/s
  • 25 1
 Another 2 month review on a GX AXS: Shifting performance is excellent - crisper than GX - and I won't have to change cables and housing every 6 months or so living in a rainforest and riding daily. This is a huge perk if you're inept with tensioning cables like I am. But it's expensive, and although there is a performance increase, there are better ways to spend cash on performance in my mind. The shifter takes time to get used to, but happens within a week of daily riding. I agree with the article that new shifters should be explored and there is no reason to mimic old levers. I ride from home most of the time which means I can't forget to leave home without my battery but I'll admit that the first time I drove for a ride (only 10 minutes) that I did forget my battery at home which left me with a single speed... Ghetto fix for that: I tie a piece of webbing on the bars when the battery is in the charger and not on the bike so I can't leave home without it. Battery life is great though. I charge every 3-4 rides and the battery is still at 2/3 whenever I put it in the charger.

So my take: -1 for simplicity, -1 for price, +1 for performance and +1 ease of maintenance.
  • 23 0
 I put a GX axs on with slx cassette and chain to get the best of both, especially the hyperglide shifting under load. Zero issues so far
  • 11 1
 I've heard of a few people doing AXS shifting with Shimano cassettes and chains, and they all seem to say the same thing: best of both worlds.
  • 1 1
 @big-red & @Mattcon20: Nice, I was going to ask this question. My other question is whether or not aftermarket cages will still work (e.g. Garbaruk)
  • 4 3
 I have this setup (axs with XT/slx chain and cassette) on 3 ebikes. 1 year and about 4K miles combined zero issues here.
  • 18 1
 @PHX77: mf really has 3 e-bikes
  • 31 4
 Yes, MF really does. MF is 40’s, never married no kids and this is MF’s main passion in life.
  • 3 0
 @PHX77: MF, the holder of a boulder, money folder
  • 1 0
 @T4THH: MF got the babes, babes just be holdn' his shoulder. One one two three three fit harder than scalding water.

->more rap lyrics pls
  • 1 0
 @DaFreerider44 you unfortunately missed the reference - youtube.com/watch?v=okYZpiuvQi4
  • 26 2
 Do we really need more batteries in our lives?
  • 11 0
 No, as a semi-Luddite I hate dealing with more batteries and charging. But if Fox or One Up made a wireless dropper...
  • 5 0
 It's clearly less about need and more about want with this tech.
  • 1 0
 @fraserw: like carbon... and I run a lot of carbon Smile
  • 1 0
 And more button cell batteries because they’re too lazy to make a sealed unit with inductive charging, yay!
  • 20 0
 SRAM GX wireless low frequency radiation fields will melt your brain.
  • 7 0
 Tin foil helmet?
  • 8 0
 Did you experience this first hand?
  • 1 0
 Havana Syndrome!
  • 10 0
 it‘s a shame that 2 months is considered a long term review. I got Eagle AXS on my bike for 19 months now. Force eTap AXS on my gravelbike for 15 months. and ran into several problems. as there is no spare parts from SRAM, only complete derailleur, cage and jockey wheels. it‘s a bit of a pain really. spent more on replacement derailleurs than most spend on an entire drivetrain.
  • 2 0
 Is there a common nature of the failures? Motors I assume?
  • 3 0
 Exactly, no spareparts for these extremly expensive parts.

If you f.ex. bend the derailleur cage you're screwed.

For Shimano M8000 it's a 20€ fix on the other hand...
  • 2 0
 @Assclapp: no problems with motor. but bent cages.

Once I had to take the X01 apart out on the trail because I had a major mechanical. bent rear axle and everything that comes with it. made a little mistake reassembling it. instead of getting the stupid plastic housing for a few quit I had to buy a new one for 560 €. (sold the broken derailleur for 240 € lol so it wasn‘t that bad)

But the worst is the Force eTap front derailleur just completely dead. first three times I was able to pair it again and get going for a few hours. but when this didnt work any more I had to upload new firmware 25 k into my ride. two weeks after tho, just dead. not even LED flash when you press the button on the derailleur. after riding on 46T ring only for 4 months it suddenly started working again. totally weird.
  • 2 0
 @tedchalk: I hope the commenters saying that AXS glitches are hypothetical only will read your comment.
  • 1 0
 @tedchalk: This detail in your data paints a clearer picture. Fair to say you have had fewer (one, related to direct immpact) issues with the MTB groupo in 19mo of ownership?
  • 1 0
 @Assclapp: I‘m on third Eagle derailleur
  • 9 0
 Appreciate the trickle down of tech, but I'll stick to my 11x XT Der/Shifter plus X01 cassette combo. Super light and all the gears I need. In fact the cassette/Der combo alone is 367g lighter, all that weight in the middle of the back wheel.
  • 10 0
 Love the GX AXS stuff really don't plan on going back to cable anytime soon! Also if you travel with bike on plane taking the derailleur off and on is so so so so much easier! A point that doesn't get brought up enough.
  • 15 1
 I love axs because its waterproof and it doesn’t rust when its getting covered by ocean spray when i’m shuttling in my yatch. I hate poor people.
  • 7 0
 Love the shifting, very precisee and on point every time, never a mis-shift. Only issue I have is the ergonomic of the stock paddle. Who ever signed off on it should be beat with a bat. I replaced it with the updated paddle and its a bit better but not quite as good as the mechanical shifter.
  • 3 2
 Ya, why the f*ck didn't they just mimic the current shifter set-up and make the throw only like a 1mm, so like you're hitting a button, but still feels like you're using a shifter... seems pretty obvious. And since it's electronic they could have added a couple more adjustment options to it that may not be possible when it's pulling/releasing a cable.
  • 2 0
 I never liked the stock paddle either. I replaced it with the $20 upgrade a few months ago, and I’m unsure about this one too (too easy to accidentally touch the large paddle area, causing an up shift). SRAM could definitely do better in this regard.
  • 3 0
 I absolutely love it shifting with thumb and index is a game changer
  • 11 0
 One pound derailleur. Lol.
  • 7 2
 I recently tried AXS for the first time (dropper and shifting) and I really did not like it. The shifting was no smoother than a properly maintained mech and the shifting was slower. I went into this eyes wide open assuming that all the good stuff I had heard about it was true (better shifts, smoother shifts, quicker shifts, etc), but I was disappointed. The servo making noise was also super annoying. For the dropper, it lacks the modulation of a cable if you need to slowly raise/lower the seat for whatever reason.
  • 5 10
flag Assclapp (May 27, 2021 at 9:47) (Below Threshold)
 sounds like user error
  • 5 0
 @Assclapp: he’s right. Maybe you just need to learn how to properly adjust cables. I’m not against inmovation but the derailleur itself is the problem
  • 6 1
 @Assclapp: User error. It is the push of a button. That was the problem. I pushed the button and it did what it was supposed to do, but it did not do it in a way that was vastly superior to a cable. Luckily this was a demo bike.

Sounds like your pockets are lighter and your shifts are slower. My condolences for your losses.
  • 2 1
 Slower? While you’re up shifting 1 gear with your 1 1/2” lever push, I’ve already shifted 3 gears with my AXS.
  • 1 0
 @chicane32: so that is a valid point. Multiple up shifts is for sure a pro for AXS. If I was shifting over a single gear, my experience was that the AXS seemed a bit slower than the x01 on my current bike. Was it a big deal? Not at all. But if the upside is faster smoother shifts, I am not sure it accomplishes that except in certain use cases. Everyone with AXS getting upset that someone’s opinion doesn’t align with their own.
  • 7 0
 Who is living in this fantasy world where money is no object?

I love riding; 2,000+ miles a year.

However, I got a wife, 2 kids in dance, and a mortgage.
  • 2 1
 "Who is living in this fantasy world of riding 2,000+ miles per year while having a wife and 2 kids?

I work to have no financial constraints; get to spend whatever I want with impunity on my hobbies.

However, I have executive responsibility and put in 12+ hour days at the office."

Wink The grass is always greener.
  • 2 2
 @KJP1230: Live somewhere with close trail access. I know people that log this many miles in a year and still have all of those things because it takes 5-15 minutes to drive to the trails.
  • 7 0
 @HB208: drive to the trails? Savages.
  • 1 1
 @waxman: I could ride my bike, I just prefer to have the extra time on the trail Smile
  • 2 0
 @HB208: 1/4mi from my door to the trailhead
  • 1 2
 we all are mate! the world has printed 20 trillion dollars in the last 12 months. so much money everywhere! no way anything bad could come of this.....
  • 8 0
 I've just never looked down and thought "man, I really need to lose that shifer cable."
  • 8 0
 Nobody cares if it can't even be purchased.
  • 1 0
 My LBS in NJ received 10 sets. I think they still have some.
  • 4 0
 I put SRAM GX AXS on my Shimano XT Hypergilde+ drivetrain - works a treat. Super cool "pzzzt" sound for shifting, and I can shift under load all day and it hops right into gear. Between the hyperglide+ and AXS, shifts are instantaneous. I absolutely love it.
  • 5 1
 After 7-months of using XX1 AXS, I've gone from "meh" to "$#&@ this garbage". My battery now gets less than 20 h per charge (60 h nominal), and has left me stranded in the woods with a singlespeed on one occasion.

I would not recommend AXS to anyone. It's expensive, heavy, offers no advantages over mechanical, and adds a whole bunch of new logistics (charging, remembering the battery, taking it off the bike and using covers for transport). It's just straightforwardly worse than the mechanical equivalent.
  • 12 6
 being honest do we really need AXS? How much of difference does it make? Only a bling factor thing?
  • 16 13
 everything above Deore and non AXS GX has been bling factor for ages now. Its like Sora level stuff w road bikes 15 years ago. Sora bangs out the shifts reliably with totally fine ergonomics, you only gain bling and tiny weight savings above that.
  • 5 1
 If you want it,you need it. It's the law.
  • 11 1
 It's not necessary, but it is the best shifting performance I've ever experienced.
  • 8 5
 @freestyIAM: Sure. If you forget about the fact that higher groupsets are lighter, more precise and more durable then everything you wrote is true Wink .
  • 3 0
 @freestyIAM: Ehhhhh, the functionality of XT is a better than Deore. X01 is also a few hundred grams lighter than GX and feels a bit more crisp. Now, if you had said XT vs XTR or X01 vs XX1, I might have agreed with you.

The cost vs performance benefit just gets lower as you go up in groupset levels. The 2.5x price difference between XT and XTR is not worth the weight savings IMO.
  • 9 2
 @goroncy: XTR is more reliable than Deore? And I did acknowledge the tiny weight savings. As for precision, if you are missing shifts because you are on Deore and not something higher then your technique is crap. I stand by my assessment that everything above that level is highly marginal gains, i.e. bling.
  • 6 2
 @freestyIAM: As you go up in $ in cassettes you get more shift ramps which allows for smoother and faster shifts and HUGE weight savings often (which is rotational weight). As you go up in $ on chains (especially with SRAM) you get huge gains in durability. As you go up in $ on derailleur manufacturing tolerances get tighter which means faster and more reliable shifting and often the ability to rebuild more parts.

So yeah spending $ does get you actual increases performance and longevity.
  • 5 2
 It shifts soooooooooo good. Plus cockpit looks way cleaner.
  • 6 6
 If we were honest with ourselves about price and value, none of us would be riding any bikes over $2K. This whole sport is an excuse for us to spend motorcycle money on a child's toy.
  • 10 1
 @dudeyouwin: If you can't tell the difference between a $2k bike and a $5k bike you should ride more. Not that you need to spend $10k, but you definitely can start to notice differences.

Also, how the F is a MTB a childs toy but a motorcycle isn't? They make children's motorcycles, ya know?
  • 2 0
 I almost always end up running xtr shifters. After all, that’s where the magic happens. I honestly can’t tell the difference between my bike that runs xtr shifters with deore mech, and my bike that has xtr all around.
  • 2 2
 @HB208: I can tell, I'm just using that example in relation to AXS. Do you need it? No. Can you notice it's better? Yes!
  • 2 1
 @dudeyouwin: Rolleyes yeah sure bud. Where you honest with yourself when you bought those Control Carbon wheels or T-Lab X3 you have?
  • 2 0
 No way, nor was I honest with the wife!
  • 4 2
 I own it. It's exactly like mechanical except it shifts slightly worse and you have to charge it. I find the tactility to be worse as well, but that's a matter of taste. Would not buy again.
  • 2 0
 @nozes:
Sounds like the Fred Beckey Axiom... "If you carry it, you will need it!"
  • 1 2
 @Afterschoolsports: most the action happens at the derailleur, the shifter is mechanically much more simple. That’s why they’re cheaper than derailleurs.
  • 1 3
 @NorCalNomad: cassettes aren’t rotational weight, they’re unsprung mass. It’s also just not a good spot for weight being far away from the center of mass
  • 2 2
 @emptybe-er: huh, last time I checked on every single bike with a cassette...*checking notes*...yup it rotates.
  • 1 1
 @NorCalNomad: so cranks, pedals, chainring... bearings? are also rotating mass? Does all that stuff spin fast? Crunch some numbers and run them through centrifugal force equation. You’re welcome
  • 2 1
 @freestyIAM: it’s not marginal gains. Next time your in a bike shop if you can find a bike with deore on it. Go give it and inspection. Grab the bottom jockey wheel and give it a wobble and watch how much play there is in the pivots from new. Do the same with the brake levers or the shifter paddles and see how cheaply and poorly made it is and imagine what it’s going to be like in 6 months to a year. It’s overpriced junk that falls apart. XTR looks like deore only with better paint but they actually improve everything from the tolerances to the materials so it performs better than deore and lasts longer before falling to bits. It’s still shimano though so it’s still overpriced ww2 tech so don’t expect miracles.
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: you cann swap xt/xtr jockey wheels to any deore mech, and it's the shifter that makes the difference in "feel" not the mech
  • 2 0
 @adespotoskyli: shifter doesn’t make any difference apart from feeling physically nicer to operate. Cassette and mech that makes the difference and a high end chain will keep things running nice for longer.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: when you test an xtr or saint shifter on any mech you'll see that the shifting performance and feel is on par with a high performance drivetrain. , Tried it on an slx, xt, sunrace and a garbaruk cassette, with zee, saint and slx 12spd mechs, shifter makes all the difference no matter the mech. Precision, feel, crispness, engagement, lever free travel, stoutness. But an slx shifter with an xtr mech is as good as the shifter's performance, mediocre. And a fresh chain
  • 2 0
 @adespotoskyli: makes no difference. It’s all in your head. A shifter just pulls a cable a certain length. Your mech doesn’t know if it’s being operated by a deore or XTR shifter, it will perform identically with ether. Your just paying for a nicer feeling shifter. The cheaper shimano shifters don’t have the rapid release or the ability to shift down twice at once which adds a load of friction so you usually get a lighter shift with the cheaper shifters.

It’s the cassette and mech that makes the most difference because they’re the parts that actually do the work. Like an x01 mech is structurally stiffer than any other mech so it’s more precise as it doesn’t flex as much when pulling the chain from gear to gear same with the cassette, xx1 / x01 cassettes are machined out of high quality steel that lasts forever and the tolerances are so much higher so everything fits together better which means your chain finds an easier route to the next sprocket and a high quality chain will keep your cassette running smoothly for longer.
  • 2 2
 @thenotoriousmic: not in my head, actually all went through my bike, and derailleurs do the least on shifting precision, it's shifter first a quality cassette like an slx and above all the shifter, you regurgitate marketing jargon. The stiffness of the rear mech is as good as the hanger allows, hangers flex by design, it's the place the most amount of force is applied, don't confuse the poor finished and shitty designed parts with the expensive bling. Above slx is just bling and weight games
  • 1 1
 @adespotoskyli: I don’t really think you understand how your mech works. An SLX mech is pretty poor quality, there’s a lot of play in the pivots even from new and this only gets worse as your mech is rattling around as your taking hits. If you have a lot of play around the pivots on your mech then your shifting isn’t going to be as smooth or as crisp as it would with say an xo1 mech which is a lot stiffer and lasts a lot longer before developing play. Mech hangers aren’t designed to flex at all. They need to be as stiff as possible for the same reason you need your mech it be as stiff as possible and play free. It’s not just bling. Which is why sram are going to release direct mount rear mech for extra stiffness. The hanger is just designed to save the frame incase of a crash if yours is flexing when you change gear then you’ve got a poorly designed or cheaply made mech hanger. A shifter just pulls a cable a set amount. This set amount is the same whenever it’s a deore shifter or an XTR shifter the only difference is how it physically feels to use.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: try to push inwards or pull a derailleur from the bottom jockey wheel, the system flexes with minor imput, the weakest point is the hanger as it is the further from the force pount. Parallelograms are the stiffest and most solid constuction on the mech and the least to give in an event of breakage and have as much play in the pivots to move without much friction, that's it. the pins are pressed and secured on one part move freely on the other, I took apart mechs and replaced springs. the whole system is under constant tension from two springs, the parallelogram spring acting against the shifting cable, and cage spring in tension with the chain plus the clutch mechanism, when in constant tension any play is eliminated especially when the tolerances are just enough to allow movement. mech has to move just enough as the chain to grab on the cog ramp and it's job is done. An slx is on par with a saint xtr on build quality but a bit heavier and less refined finish. You are chasing ghosts and over thinking it. As I already told you, try a good shifter and any mech and then the opposite, if you get a precise, solid shifter you get crisp index and quality shifts, if you have a sloppy shifter, nothing will make it work
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: also would see sram or anyone else's claims presenting a new standard in skepticism.
  • 3 0
 I have the GX AXS and find it slightly more finicky than a traditional derailleur while shifting under load. Not a big deal, just have to keep that in mind while performing a shift.

Has anyone noticed the derailleur arm move forward slightly while first applying load to the pedals? While holding both brakes, I feel the cranks slightly rotate (maybe 5-10 degrees) and the chain under my chainstay move slightly. This is the derailleur arm moving under load. An odd sensation when first putting power to the pedals starting from a stop.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, I also find AXS to be more finicky than mechanical, even after tinkering with the indexing a bunch.
  • 1 0
 Your chain may be too short, and/or your B-tension sounds off. As well, there should be no issue shifting under load, that sounds like your limit adjustments are out as well. .
  • 1 0
 @Simann: It sounds like he's describing squat.
  • 1 1
 @nattyd @Simann:I did remove a single link, since I have a 52-10 the chain has to be long for the largest 52t, but was quite slack while on the smallest 10t cog. I don't believe the chain was cut too short, it still shifts the same as before... not "bad", just have to let off while pedaling to allow it to shift. The b-tension is set using the SRAM tool. Again, the slight pedal movement/derailleur arm take-up when beginning from a pedal isn't terrible, but is noticeable.
  • 6 0
 So let me understand this one.

CABLE AND LINERS are worth almost 450usd, but they cost like....... 15USD?
  • 4 2
 For those concerned with battery life/charging, if you run the AXS app on your phone it gives you plenty of warning on when the battery needs to be charged. Mine is good for about two months of riding 3-5 days/6 hours of riding per week.
  • 11 1
 My shifter cable have not bothered me for a year, and I don’t need to consult any other charger dependable device either.
  • 2 0
 I installed GX AXS on two of my bikes recently after learning the "hot" setup is to run AXS with a Shimano cassette and chain - and I have to say it works a treat. Shift under load? No problem. Set-up was amazingly easy - bolt on, pair the shifter, new chain to length, set the B-tension, limit screws, and it just works. The 30 min. set-up is accurate. A pro wrench who works on bikes every day could probably do it faster. No muss, no fuss. Just easy shifts.

After nearly 3 decades of running Shimano shifters, I got used to the AXS shifter quickly. Thumb to downshift, index finger to upshift.

My 3rd bike runs 12 spd XTR and don't find the shifting any better or worse. I do like the zero-effort required to shift or use an Reverb AXS (if going wireless, may as well go all the way...).
  • 1 0
 Has anyone else had experience mixing and matching? This sounds like the best of both worlds...

Can you run a Shimano cassette/chain with a SRAM crank/chainring?
  • 2 0
 The only problem I’ve faced with my axs derailleur is that it wont stay in gear when jumping or riding larger repetitive bumps. Often times even a small bunny hop will cause it to shift out of gear. Other than that I have nothing to complain about.
  • 2 0
 Whoa! Seems rather problematic for a bike designed for mountains and bumps and stuff.
  • 1 0
 That seems strange. Perhaps something needs adjustment? I just rode my AXS equipped bike on some of the rockiest trails in central PA (Rattling Creek) where having to pedal through flat rock gardens is common - and didn't experience any of that.

Might sound silly, but is the shifter close enough to the grip that you might be bumping it without realizing it?
  • 1 0
 @IanJF: Hey sorry for the late reply but I figured out the issue almost immediately after posting this. The B tension is kind of touchy but once I got that figured out the issue was resolved. I haven't had any issues since and have been riding the bike hard. Thanks for the response.
  • 2 0
 Friends and I were riding in a "far from a large metro area" riding area but an area that is still famous with multiple shops. They smashed & destroyed their electronic derailleur on their MTB tandem six miles from the truck and had to walk back. Worse, it was day 2 of a 5 day trip and no shop within a 2 hour radius had a replacement derailleur for them so they packed up and drove home. Considering I travel to much less well known areas with sometime only one small shop, I prefer to keep things simple and stick with major players.
  • 2 0
 I applaud SRAM for providing this tech for those who find it interesting. Having said that, it's hard to fault my deore 12 speed mechanical. Effortless shifting, super reliable. The addition of an XT shifter has provided amazing 2x upshift functionality with a slight penalty to shift effort.
  • 2 0
 I have GX AXS on my only bike that still runs a SRAM drivetrain. After using it for a while I can say that it shifts better than SRAM cable actuated drivetrains, but it's still SRAM. There are still shifts that sound like the bike is exploding (shifts under load) and there is also still the inevitable one gear in the middle of the cassette that is slow to shift into/out of, but overall it is better. My other two bikes run Shimano XT 12spd. The shifting on them is crisper & just as quick as AXS if not quicker, smoother as well.

The thing about AXS that got me was for traveling with a bike. With AXS I don't have to worry about a cable getting messed up while in the bike bag AND can take derailleur completely off, store it in a separate (safer) spot during travel and then reassmeble much faster once I get to my destination. The AXS has worked fantastically for this.
  • 4 0
 I can't even remember to charge my Wahoo. I'd definitely forget to charge this.
  • 3 0
 Bought this 2 months ago, the kind of thing you don't need but deep down you know you need it. Honestly, its useless but makes me smile every-time I shift
  • 1 0
 Same. Aside from quicker shifts, it does nothing for my ride. But I f*cking love it and its cool robot sounds.
  • 1 0
 I have GX, X01 and force axs and I would never go back to cable. The shifting is perfect with zero faffing around not cable stretch and mud and grime don't affect the shifting at all. As for the battery life? its bloody good! I charge mine maybe once every two months, its never let me down! ever.
I love it the only bike I don't have it on is my DH bike, because yea its expense!
  • 1 0
 I have had Shimano Di2 on my road bike for 7 years and it has been flawless. Shimano isn't SRAM, but when the time comes to upgrade, battery life and the technology shouldn't hold people back. Everyone I know who has AXS love it and they will never going back to mechanical shifting. Reliability so far is a non-issue.
  • 3 2
 I can agree with electrical dropper after going crazy with failures. Seems like the axs dropper could be more reliable and simple...

In the case of the deraullier, it still doesnt make sense, its heavier, worse looking, Bulky. Sets off the balance of weights on the bike.... it basically is a piece of shit... i dont know why ive been on the verge of buying it just because of the addiction to have the next "new " thing... But in this case its just donwright incoherent.. Hope only millionares get this, since its shit and not worth it IMO
  • 1 0
 The AXS dropper is also super heavy. Like twice the weight of the lightest models. It blows my mind that World Cup XC racers are willing to tolerate an extra pound to be sponsor-correct.
  • 1 0
 I’ve been riding this group for a few months now. It’s great. I kind of thought it was solving an non-existent problem before I bolted it on, but you could say the same about indexed shifting, dropper posts or suspension. Now I’ve lived with it for a while, it’s definitely better. It’s never missed a beat, rain or shine. No cables to stretch or fray. No barrel adjuster twiddling. No never-quite-right-in-that-one-gear weirdnesss. I have got stuck once when I went out without checking the battery, but I’ve also driven 100kms to go for a ride somewhere with my bike in the car only to realize on arrival that my wheels are still in the garage. So that’s me, not the components! If you’re replacing a derailleur, I highly recommend it.
  • 8 5
 The cost of the shifter is what I paid for my entire Advent X groupset. I win.
  • 10 2
 Seriously... I can accept that the derailleur is expensive, that's complex technology with a lot of moving parts, bearings, servo, etc.

But $150 for a remote with 2 buttons and no other moving parts? Y'all getting robbed.
  • 12 8
 No electric crap ever going on my bike
  • 5 0
 What do you do if you want to go on a night ride?
  • 3 1
 @johnnyboy11000: a light doesn't stop your bike from being a bike when it dies, so it doesn't quite compare
  • 2 0
 @Dogl0rd: No electric crap ever going on my bike
  • 2 0
 @old-tube: you're right, I don't do night rides or use a light
  • 8 4
 Sorry, I can't go riding today. I need to charge my derailleur
  • 5 0
 you joke, but it takes like 10-20 minutes to charge the battery. I typically throw it on the charger while I am rinsing and filling my hydropack, and then I'm off to ride.
  • 2 1
 @KJP1230: Or keep a charger in the car and charge it while driving the the trailhead or while getting ready...
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: At some point I'll forget it in the charger.
  • 2 0
 I'm sitting here waiting for my X01 AXS kit to be delivered. Nothing else has been available for months so I bit the bullet. Hoping it works out!
  • 2 0
 So how does the wireless link work regards 10 riders having Axs? 100 riders having Axs in a group? Does it cross talk? Can you setup to shift your buddies setup?
  • 4 0
 Voice behind hidden camera: We've swapped the AXS shifters on these two bikes. Let's see what happens as these two riding buddies start this technical climb....
  • 1 1
 Just for fits and giggles, curious what the average cost of cables and housing replaced at appropriate intervals over the relative lifespan of a regular gx drivetrain would cost. Plenty of people are happy to pay their local shop to replace cables multiple times per year, there’s a significant cost there. Does that offset the price difference of axs, assuming it has a similar lifespan?

I bet it does.
  • 2 2
 As a technician that works at a shop that sees A LOT of electronic shifting in both road and mtn, I'm torn whether I want it or not. Customer comes in after riding their bike for 1,000's of miles but they have electronic shifting, we don't need to do much labor to their bike to get it performing great again because there is not cables or housing. That is a cool benefit that I've seen, and I haven't seen many catastrophically fail due to manufacturing or age defects.
On the flip, it is expensive to replace if you crash, there is the possibility of forgetting your batteries and so on. But, cables can snap at any time, mid ride, you better have a cable handy and the knowledge to run it and adjust it. Also, if a cable snaps, it could tweak your derailleur/chain pretty bad.

I still run mechanical, but I think I will soon make the switch to see how it is. I do love riding customers bikes around the parking lot that have electronic shifting.
  • 4 0
 I have never snapped a cable on any modern mountain bike over a decade and many thousands of miles. It took 5 months for AXS to leave me stranded in the woods 20 miles from home with a dead battery that lasted 1/3 of its nominal life.
  • 1 0
 Your a goober mechanic not a technician! For real Snap cables? well that's bunch of Bull-crap unless you guys buy cables made from YARN!
  • 3 0
 20+ yrs of wrenching I’ve only seen cables “snap” in drop-bar shift/brake units. And they never just snap, they slowly fray and eventually break if the rider is able to ignore the crappy shifting. It’s a non-issue
  • 2 0
 @emptybe-er: Yep, and mostly in that one particular generation of Shimano road shifters from ~2010
  • 1 0
 @nattyd: yeah you might be on to something, little too tight of a turn near the cable head on those or something, they always seem to fray in the same spot, like 1/2 or 1” from the head
  • 1 0
 @emptybe-er: That was their first generation routing the cable along the bar instead of out of the side of the shifter.
  • 1 0
 If SRAM were actually concerned about rider experience they would introduce Shimano's shadow profile to maximize consistent cable or wireless shifting. But sexy tech is way more lucrative for entice dentists and the like.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer minor typo, "adverse" should be "averse"

Thanks for the review!
  • 1 0
 are they going to mention that Sram has now covered the pulley with the cage or are they going to "turn a blind eye" on the previous error?
  • 1 0
 Who all runs a Sram derailleur and shifter with a shimano cassette and chain? How do you like it and do you really think it’s best of both worlds?
  • 2 0
 SRAM makes another wireless remote, what is that one for?
  • 9 1
 That one communicates with the shock collars on the factory workers to jolt them into making parts faster.
  • 1 0
 just set the limit screw so it it doesnt shift that far. I just tried it on mine and it doesnt shift up!
  • 3 1
 Can you program AXS for 11 speed cassettes?
  • 1 0
 No
  • 10 0
 This makes me angry. I am perfectly happy with my 11 speed ratios, 30 or 32 chainring, 10-42, good for me. But I'd love to try the AXS too, and having to replace the 2 cassettes I have just seems dumb. I can't imagine why I can't use the app to tell it to shift 11 speed gaps. It's software. If you can fine tune the movement by a hair, then the servo motor can move anywhere it's told. Zero reason other than SRAM not wanting to make it 11-speed compatible. No conspiracy, they just don't want to go there, 11-speed is dead to them.
  • 4 0
 @shorttravelmag: it’s pretty silly IMO. I use a 9-46t cassette and have no desire to step up to a bigger cassette. I hope that Shimano comes out with a wireless series and I’ll just use their 10-45t 12 speed, despite not needing the full 12.
  • 3 0
 @shorttravelmag: You're approaching this all wrong. Think less, spend more.
  • 1 0
 just set the limit screw so it it doesnt shift that far. I just tried it on mine and it doesnt shift up!
  • 2 0
 @monkey-man: I assumed the spaces between cogs on 11 speed was different than 12 speed? No? Maybe not, never thought about it really. One simple software option in the App, and 11-speeders are invited to the party. No new chains or cassettes needed.
  • 8 10
 I have had the XX1 AXS for over a year now...cleaner shifting, less thumb fatigue (I had UCL surgery on it), never ran the battery out on a ride, excreta, excreta...love the haters in this thread. Bet none of them have tried it...just like the e-bike haters hahahaha ha.
  • 9 2
 Dude you live in georgia
  • 2 2
 Same here! I've been a mechanical shifting proponent, loved the tactile feel of high quality XX1/XTR shifters. I've ran it all. And when I went XX1 AXS from XX1 mechanical, the difference in shifting performance was just on another planet. Shifting speed is faster, precision is much better, and not having to adjust cable tension is such a relief. Not to forget, swapping drivetrain on another frame is made that much easier!

I also agree on the paddle shifter (controller). Not having to puuuuuush to drop 3 gears is amazing. Just press and hold, BOOM, 3 gears down. Its made approaching uphill obstacles that much easier. You don't realize how much strength you use in your thumb until you don't have to.
  • 2 0
 Tried it for 6 months. Down to a third of the original battery life, has stranded me in the woods once, caused me to delay a ride another time. Offers no additional functionality or performance, is heavier and more expensive. My hands work just fine and I love the tactility of SRAM mech shifters. Hopped on a friends bike the other day and was amazed at how much better it is than AXS. Y'all are rationalizing.
  • 1 1
 @nattyd:

Buy an extra derailleur battery for $55, carry additional 2032 battery for controller, additional $2, keep both in your pack on every ride. Never be stuck!

As well, if you do not properly set up chain length (frame under full compression if full suspension) and hi/lo limits, it will shift like crap, like any other cable actuated system.
  • 2 0
 @Simann: Setup is perfect. To be clear, it shifts fine. I'm super particular about my bikes. Extra batteries... sure... but then you have to monitor the state of charge of those batteries too. Once again, more logistics were never an issue with mechanical
  • 2 0
 Wonder how it compares to Archer
  • 2 0
 Good to see what it looks like with some scratches
  • 1 0
 The chain slap could be from the super long chain you need to get round the 52t gear.
  • 1 3
 Wireless or not, electric shifting is great. No need to worry about thumb pressure or pedal torque. Sure a perfectly set up mech is close but this is next level. it's a brilliant piece of machinery, an engineering masterpiece.
  • 3 1
 thumb pressure or pedal torque? d'faq!? All these years, struggling with thumb pressure and pedal torque! Finally an answer!

The knots people tie themselves in to justify a thing that adds literally no functionality... My mechanical XX1 shifted under torque just as well as the AXS version. And if you were struggling to press the beautifully tactile mechanical shifters in late-generation SRAM, you have some seriously emaciated hands.
  • 2 0
 1 lb for just the derailleur - Is that a typo?
  • 1 0
 Never has there been a product that so adamantly identifies clueless suckers.
  • 1 0
 I dont care how good it is. Can we actually get it is the question?
  • 1 1
 I'm sure it's all very lovely and wonderful. However you can't get it until the year 2452! Out of stock until then!
  • 1 1
 Can I get the b-tension tool as a paper cutout so I can setup my shifting better?
  • 1 0
 Right up there with the girvin flex stem
  • 1 0
 Cons: still doesn't shift as well as cable XT
  • 1 0
 GX AXS + eThirteen Helix R looks like a pretty hot setup
  • 2 4
 looks like a shimano
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