Review: The 155mm Revel Rail 29 Wants More Uphill

Jul 20, 2022
by Alicia Leggett  
Revel Bikes has been on my 'want to try' short list for a few years now. The small brand out of Carbondale, Colorado, was launched in 2019 by the folks behind Why Cycles, and is made up of enough industry veterans that they seem to have skipped most of the trial and error that most brands encounter at the get-go. After hitting the ground quickly with the Rascal 130mm 29er and the original 165mm 27.5" Rail, Revel has not stopped for breath and now offers four different mountain bikes, plus a gravel option and a dirt jumper.

The latest mountain bike release, the Rail 29, comes with 155mm of rear travel and, as the name suggests, bigger wheels than its predecessor. Revel says the Rail 29 represents everything the brand has learned in its three years, and I've had the opportunity to find out exactly what that means.
Revel Rail 29 Details

• Wheel size: 29"
• Carbon frame
• Travel: 155mm / 160mm or 170mm fork
• 65-degree head angle
• 436mm chainstays
• Sizes: S, M, L (tested), XL
• Weight: 31.74 lb / 14.4 kg (size L, no pedals)
• Price: $5,999 - $10,999 USD
revelbikes.com


Revel offers four builds plus a frame only option, ranging from the roughly $6,000 USD GX Eagle kit all the way up to the top-end nearly $12,000 USD XX1 Eagle AXS build with all the glitter and glamor you'd expect at that price point.

My XO1+someextras build was plenty dreamy, weighing in under 32 pounds.

The Rail 29 is currently available for pre-order, with shipping estimated to begin later this summer. Customers can place orders online directly through Revel's website or through any Revel dealer if they'd prefer to work with local bike shops. A glance at Revel's dealer locator shows representation on all the continents barring Antarctica, though it's likely that actual bikes in stock are much harder to find.

My test bike came with something pretty close to the $8,299 USD XO1 Eagle build, with the aforementioned SRAM XO1 Eagle drivetrain, a RockShox ZEB Ultimate fork, a RockShox Super Deluxe Ultimate shock, and Revel's own RW30 wheels. The one I rode, however, diverged from the stock options with its Trail One cockpit, TRP DH-R Evo brakes, and a Crankbrothers Highline 7 150mm dropper post.



bigquotesUnlike some of the Rail 29's long-travel peers, this 155mm bike felt more about enjoying the ride rather than straightlining through a course, readily hopping around and changing direction. Alicia Leggett




photo


Frame Details

Right off the bat, the Rail 29 is a looker. Mostly straight lines with a few subtle swoops, the slightly sparkly "Lead King" colorway I tested is named for one of Revel's local trails and looks nice and clean, while the other option, "Shred Velvet Cake," is a brighter but still tasteful option, in my opinion.

photo
photo
Yep, there's dirt on it. I think that means it's been used properly.

Compared to the original Rail, the 29er version has larger bearings for improved durability and an emphasis on serviceability: the whole many-part suspension linkage can be taken apart for maintenance using a single 6mm hex key.

The lines are all internally routed using molded guides that run all the way through each section of frame, meaning that pushing a cable through the frame is maybe even easier than externally routing it. I didn't notice any rattling or other problems at the ports, either.

There's space for a standard 24oz water bottle in the usual front triangle spot, and there's another accessory mount on the underside of the downtube for a second bottle, a tool, or whatever else you might want to put on those two little bolts.

The frame also has robust protection on the underside of the downtube and around the chainstay, plus a bonus piece at the bottom of the seat stay. The seat stay piece became unstuck from the seat stay, but that was easily fixed with a bit of electrical tape.

Other details include SRAM's Universal Derailleur Hanger, a BSA threaded bottom bracket, and an ISCG-05 chain guide mount.

photo
All internal, easy routing.
photo
R for Revel.


photo


Geometry & Sizing

The Rail 29 is available in sizes S, M, L, and XL. The L frame that I tested had a 1228mm wheelbase, 469mm reach, 108mm headtube, and 630mm effective top tube. All sizes have a 65° head tube angle and short 436mm chainstays, and Revel varies the actual seat tube angle - 69° on the smaller sizes and 70° on the larger ones - to maintain a 76° effective seat tube angle throughout the size range.

At first glance, those numbers look a bit conservative. After all, aggressive trail and enduro bikes these days often sport 64° head tube angles with increasingly steep seat tube angles in the 77° and 78° range. On those bikes, I consider my ideal reach to be between 475mm and 480mm.

However, it's important to remember that none of those numbers on its own determines how a bike will behave, and none of those numbers change independently of each other. The CBF suspension design (more on that later) is quite efficient and performs well with relatively little sag, meaning that the bike tends not to sink back into its travel when climbing or on the flats. With that in mind, the 76° seat tube angle actually puts riders in a similar position to where a rider would sit on a bike with a steeper seat tube angle but a softer lounge chair feel.

With that 76° seat tube angle, there's more space behind the handlebars than on a bike with a steeper seat tube angle, so it makes sense that the reach is relatively compact, too. And, with the rider centered over the bottom bracket and only 436mm of chainstay in the back, it follows that the head tube angle isn't especially slack. If the front end were slacker and longer, the rear end would have to be extended to keep the bike balanced, and then it would be a fundamentally different bike.

Rather than make it the longlowslack bike park enduro crusher that's become omnipresent in recent years, Revel has made sensible geometry choices for what this bike is: a versatile, efficient trail bike that can hold its own in the tech while still being able to tackle the high alpine and have some fun along the way.

photo

Suspension Design

One of the biggest talking points about this Revel Rail 29 is the use of the Canfield Balance Formula (CBF) suspension layout. The CBF system is based on the idea that bikes perform best when the drive forces intersect the middle of the bike's suspension pivot action, when the chainline points directly at what's called the center of curvature.

The point around which a bike's rear axle pivots is called the instant center, which is at the pivot on single pivot bikes but can wander quite a bit on multi-pivot bikes. If that point is plotted and connected with lines to the corresponding points on the bike's axle path, the intersection of those lines is called the center of curvature. CBF puts the center of curvature right above the bike's chainring, where the drive forces are also centered, for the entirety of the bike's travel.

The Rail 29 leverage ratio moves from 2.9 to 2.4 through the bike's 155mm of rear travel. It's compatible with a coil shock, and compared to the original Rail, Revel has downsized the yoke at the lower shock mount to fit more coil shock options. The anti-squat is notably high, starting at 130% and moving down to 95% at bottom-out, only dipping below 100% when the bike passes 105mm of its 155mm of travel - unsurprising numbers, given the way the bike's responsive pedaling personality.



photo


photo









Test Bike Setup

The Rail 29 came with a pretty interesting non-stock cockpit setup: some carbon bars from Trail One Components, a spinoff project from Worldwide Cyclery that donates $1 from each purchase to trail advocacy, as well as a short 32mm Trail One stem and ultra-fat Trail One Hell's Gate grips. The setup worked well enough, so I didn't do anything to change the cockpit setup beyond adjust the levers to fit my hands. I've actually added those grips to my list of favorites. They're fatter than I usually run, but the shape and texture work great, and the compound is soft enough that I never wanted to let go.

I rode a few different suspension setups, but in general, I like the feel with pretty open compression and medium to fast rebound, running the RockShox Zeb Ultimate fork with 57psi, seven clicks of rebound, four clicks of high speed compression, and 13 clicks of low-speed compression. I settled with the RockShox Super Deluxe Ultimate shock at 147psi (for 30% sag), three clicks of rebound, and 13 clicks of compression.

I tested the bike in the Pacific Northwest from May until July, giving me plenty of time with it in the mud, the hero dirt, and more recently, the moon dust.


photo
Alicia Leggett
Location: Bellingham, WA, USA
Age: 26
Height: 5'10" / 178cm
Inseam: 33" / 84cm
Weight: 148 lbs / 67 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @alicelego_




photo

Climbing


I'll start by just summarizing: the Revel Rail 29 climbs very well.

In terms of both efficiency and geometry, the bike felt quite responsive to pedaling, both on dirt road climbs and on techier trails. The climbing position is upright and centered over the bike, with the shock sitting relatively high in the travel and the seat tube angle putting the rider right over the bottom bracket. The moderate reach and head tube angle mean that even with the rear of the bike - short chainstays and all - weighted, the front end was not prone to lifting or wandering when the trails pointed uphill.

With its 155mm of travel, the Rail 29 isn't the bike to grab for a full-on cross country race, but honestly, it's the bike I'd choose for all-day high alpine missions and long days out on the trails, if I'm looking to put a lot of elevation gain behind me. My test build carried its weight nicely, and I can't think of a single point during the months of testing when I wanted the bike to be lighter or more efficient.

This was my first time riding a bike with CBF suspension, and I'm happy to report that it does what it promises. Whether riding the bike at 25% or 35% sag (or 28-30%, where I typically rode it), the suspension stays impressively quiet, despite staying sensitive enough to keep traction up over roots and dust. It stays similarly calm when up out of the saddle, whether that's grinding up a steep spot or sprinting across flats.

Does it have less traction when climbing than a bike with a less firm pedaling platform? Maybe a hair, but it's actually kind of odd that it doesn't feel like it compromises traction for efficiency in the way that I've come to expect when I meet a bike that pedals this well.


photo

Descending

My main impression of the Rail 29 is fun.

The Rail 29's favorite thing is cornering. It's easy to lean over and carve through flow trails, and it loves to change direction quickly for any and all side hits over rocks and roots.

Once I figured out just how little input it takes to turn the Rail 29, I started to lean into how much fun it is hopping over sections of trail. My riding style is on the lighter side, finding skipper lines rather than staying planted through the choppy stuff, and the Rail 29 played to my strengths quite well. I also loved that any small bumps on the trail could translate into very real airtime. It felt like keeping the bike on the ground would be keeping it from living up to its potential.

I hesitate to describe things using their opposite, but here we go: There's a category of long, heavy, modern enduro bike that I've been riding quite a bit lately. That category of bike feels like it has endless traction and can plow through any choppy line like a freight train, gathering speed until I hit the next corner and barely make the turn, thanks to the bike's seemingly unstoppable momentum. The Revel Rail 29 does not do that. Instead, it wants to take the high lines and feels less glued to the ground, breezing up and over obstacles rather than through them, but snapping easily through the corners. The rock crushy enduro bikes and the Revel Rail 29 are made for similar terrain and have similar goals, but accomplish those goals in very different ways.

I don't feel that the Rail 29 makes any true compromises, but it's worth mentioning that no single bike can have all the ride characteristics, and the Rail 29 trades a degree of high-speed stability for its snappy handling and ability to play around. That trade-off is well worth it, in my opinion.

While it's not exactly meant to be an enduro bike, I did race the Rail 29 at the recent Galbraith Enduro here in Bellingham, WA, which featured a twisty mix of rocky, rooty, and pedally stages. When put against the clock, the bike came out about how I expected, about one second off the pro women's podium (and it was definitely me, not the bike, that lost that second). It's plenty capable of running just about any enduro stages, it just isn't quite as comfortable on the steep-and-rough as longer, slacker, more grounded rigs.

The CBF suspension does a good job of staying sensitive at the top of the stroke, absorbing chatter while still feeling supported. Even with high anti-squat and the bike's efficient, firm feel, I found the bike's energy level on the descents to be incredibly fun, not remotely unmanageable, and even better as speeds increased. I've wondered if I would feel the same way if the bike were heavier, as I've found similarly energetic but heavy bikes exhausting to ride in the past, but I think in that case, slowing the rebound on the shock would tone it down enough to keep it in the fun type of lively zone. I'm also curious to see how the bike would feel with a coil shock.

I'd love to see what Revel can do if the young brand does decide to add an even longer travel 29er to its lineup and fully enter the bike-park-capable enduro category, but for now, the Rail 29 is more than enough to impress.

photo

photo
Revel Rail 29
Ibis Ripmo 2
Ibis Ripmo


How Does It Compare?

In some ways, the Rail 29 is its own beast when it comes to the relatively long travel for its compact length. Still, the Ibis Ripmo V2 is a similar concept that has some almost identical geometry numbers and shares the Revel's pedaling ability.

The 147mm Ripmo more or less shares the Rail 29's head tube angle - 64.9° to the Revel's 65° - and the chainstay length is just a millimeter off, at 435mm for the Ripmo and 436mm for the Rail 29. The Ripmo, however, is longer by about a centimeter on the wheelbase and by 7mm in reach for size large. That, combined with a less poppy suspension feel, translates to a bit more propensity for straight lines on the Ripmo's part.

I've found that the Ripmo feels best running a bit less sag than recommended: 28% or a bit lower, biasing the rider's weight toward the front of the bike and making it a bit easier to ride aggressively over the front end. The Rail 29, in comparison, feels comfortable at a wide range of shock pressures, maybe in part because of the whole 'CBF makes the bike feel good anywhere in the travel' claim and maybe because on the more compact bike, the rider is already pretty close to the front end, so there's less forward-backward movement required and the front-back balance doesn't feel as critical.

Between the two bikes, it feels impossible to pick a clear winner. Both are excellent bikes. However, I'd say that the Ripmo, while not by definition an aggressive enduro bike, is a bit chargier on the descents and the Rail 29 is the more agile of the two.

Other comparisons I can think of include some of our 2021 Fall Field Test bikes: the Specialized Stumpjumper EVO - available in both alloy and carbon - has pretty similar numbers when run in one of its steeper configurations, and is an excellent all-around performer, though I'd give the winning points to the Stumpy in terms of stability at speed and winning points to the Revel when it comes to its climbing ability and playful feel. The 140mm Propain Hugene is one of the few trail bikes I've ridden that might rival the Rail 29's pedaling ability. The Propain, too, feels a bit more stable at high speeds than the Revel, but the Revel wins that round in terms of traction. Finally, if we're talking about all-around personality, it's hard not to mention the SCOR 4060 ST, which was also part of the Fall Field Test and pedals quite well. The two strike the same balance between agility and plantedness on the trail - that is, leaning more toward agility - but the SCOR has a much longer front end and a shorter back end, with a 485mm reach in size large and 433mm chainstays across all the sizes. In general, the Revel is a bit more balanced fore-aft than the SCOR.


photo
photo

Technical Report

TRP DH-R Evo brakes: The TRP brakes that came specc'd on this bike are my all-time favorites, so of course I had to mention them here. I've never had a problem with inconsistency or durability despite riding many, many sets of them. They're powerful, they modulate nicely, and the intercompability with Shimano makes life easier when searching for pads or a bleed kit.

Revel RW30 wheels: Revel's USA-made carbon wheels are noteworthy for a few reasons. For one thing, they held up to some hard riding and even survived a soul-crushing rim strike that I was sure would break something. But beyond seeming durable, they're made with so-called FusionFiber technology, which Revel and collaborator CSS Composites say makes the wheels fully recyclable, unlike most carbon products. Rather than the carbon being epoxied and cured like a traditional thermoset carbon wheel, the FusionFiber is bonded together using a polymer-based glue, resulting in a product that retains a bit more compliance than most carbon and that can be chopped up and melted back down to be recycled, FusionFiber creator CSS Composites says. I'm no composites expert and am not exactly in a position to assess those claims, but the verifiable piece - the ride quality - is there.



photo



Pros

+ Balanced, fun all-arounder
+ Impressive climbing ability without sacrificing the descent
+ Customizable build options

Cons

- No inexpensive build kit options
- Same chainstay length across all sizes
- Not the rock crushing enduro bike some might have hoped for




Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesThe Revel Rail 29 is a seriously solid performer. Long after I'd ridden it enough to write this review, I kept grabbing it to go out for more rides - it was just the one I wanted to ride any time I didn't have specific plans to ride a different bike. While I wouldn't recommend it to those looking at the all-XC or all-DH sides of the spectrum, it checks enough boxes on the smooth climbs, tech climbs, flow descents, and rough descents that I feel it would work well on the vast majority of bike terrain for the vast majority of people, and it manages to do that without ever feeling boring. I don't want to sound hyperbolic, but I really feel that Revel nailed it - Railed it? - with this one. Alicia Leggett






Author Info:
alicialeggett avatar

Member since Jun 19, 2015
738 articles

297 Comments
  • 252 3
 Great review @alicialeggett. You gave a solid impression of the bike's personality, which seems to be lost on a lot of reviews.
  • 107 0
 Love the detailed comparison to multiple bikes - good stuff!
  • 48 0
 Yes, it's great to see so much on what the bike actually feels like to ride.
Let's have more of that in general please Pinkbike?
  • 17 0
 Huge +1 for this. Very well done.
  • 5 1
 @alicialeggett @kootenayrider:
I couldn't agree more about the comparisons. Very detailed and lots of bikes. Excellent!
  • 5 0
 100%. Half way through I was thinking 'this is the best review I've read in a while'
  • 102 1
 Great review Alicia! And I loved that you compared it against multiple bikes too.
  • 21 0
 I agree. I really like the multiple bike comparison, especially across different travel categories. Bikes these days really can ride different than their travel numbers suggest, so it's nice to see a more broad comparison.
  • 36 0
 The paint on every Revel bike I've seen in person looks so fantastic. They are crushing it in that department (never ridden one so cant comment on that)
  • 7 0
 Yes it does. In person the paint work is stunning. I saw a rascal in the green with the half matte half gloss thing they do and it is incredible.
  • 8 1
 tested a Revel Ranger a few weeks back, can confirm that their bikes look amazing in person
  • 30 1
 Interesting to see the pendulum swinging back towards fun on the trail vs outright speed. A lot of the new enduro bikes are amazing like the Megatower, Enduro, etc. They pedal really well for what they are and smash through everything, but also dull the experience and can make anything less than EWS worthy courses a bit boring. Great review that makes me want to go ride!
  • 9 0
 I hear that. And also goes to show it isn't the particular geometry but how it all comes together. For example, my Spire is ridiculous on paper but when you ride it, even in more 'trail' terrain, it is incredibly fun. You can't judge a bike by the angles only.
  • 2 0
 Agreed. It’s great that enduro race bikes are so good at what they’re meant for, but that narrows the bandwidth a lot.

I also prefer my daily driver to balance big-line ability with a more nimble, usable package.
  • 4 1
 Yeah. I am currently on a RAAW Madonna and have come to the conclusion that it‘s actually „too much“ bike for my daily riding.

Actually made me want to try a light „short“ trail bike with 27,5 wheels.

Not many bikes like that available anymore. Santa Cruz 5010.

Any other suggestions?
  • 6 1
 @stuggidavid: GG shred dogg
  • 2 0
 @stuggidavid: Trek Remedy. Such a fun bike to ride.
  • 1 0
 @stuggidavid: Can you get Vitus bikes where you are? The Escarpe 27 is very well priced and reviews suggest it's a taut suspension platform.
  • 6 0
 @stuggidavid: transition Scout.
  • 1 0
 Thx for your suggestions. Will check them out
  • 2 0
 @stuggidavid: Ibis Mojo
  • 1 0
 @stuggidavid: I run a raaw jibb with a 160 fork. Feels about perfect for my riding
  • 1 0
 Bird Aether7
  • 1 0
 @stuggidavid: Pivot Shadowcat, but not quite "short" traveled at 140 mm..
  • 1 0
 @stuggidavid: Canfield Balance, Banshee Rune, Revel 27.5 (on sale now)
  • 1 2
 @stuggidavid: If you do get a 5010 get the V3, not the V4 (I'm perhaps a bit biased as I have one but it's an absolute blast!

That said the Rail 29 is currently top of my list for my next "bigger" bike.
  • 1 0
 @stuggidavid: Canyon still do the Spectral in 27.5. Light, short-ish in M and S sizes.
  • 19 0
 SHEEEEEEEEEEESH WHAT A STUNNER
  • 32 17
 For those looking to buy a similar bike, but spend less money, Canfield makes this bike in aluminum … the Lithium.

The Canfield lithium also has more tire capacity in the rear end, but does not have room for a water bottle inside the frame triangle.

These bikes run a touch large, at 6 foot with long arms I’m riding a medium.
  • 6 1
 There is a significant difference on the stack height of the Canfield Lithium vs Revel Rail 29 (or other bikes in the market). The YT Capra is the only bike that's somewhat close to that same height.

How does the Lithium compare to other well known bikes? Have you owned a Ripmo ?
  • 8 2
 @PJSANAB: To offer a littler perspective on your question, I came from a 2020 Commencal Meta AM 29 last season, and have previously owned a 2017 Enduro 29 and 2018 Santa Cruz Nomad and now ride a Lithium. The Lithium is a big heavy metal bike that both provides a ton of confidence on the rockier tracks, but does not feel like an absolute bruiser like the Meta AM. It also feels quite a bit more well rounded than the Meta AM and pedals significantly better. I am quicker on the climbs, and my descent times seem to be rather close to the Meta as the Lithium tends to drive out of corners a little faster (more active feel in the linkage). I would say this bike feels like a cross between my 2018 Nomad and 2017 Enduro 29. It has the calmness in the chunk that the Nomad had, but with the "Big Trail Bike" feeling my 2017 Enduro had. I have not ridden a Ripmo before, but from what other say, id say the Lithium would be bigger and heavier hitting vs the Ripmo, but with better pedaling kinematics than the Ripmo.
  • 10 3
 yeah its a heavier bike with no bottle mount..
  • 2 0
 i'm 5'9 and run a large, whcih for me is perfect.
  • 3 4
 @MillerReid: It has one on the downtube, I just run a Fidlock bottle (has a cap to cover the nozzle) and it works great. You can reach it while climbing. It is heavier, but they can build around 33lbs with similar spec to the one Alicia reviewed.
  • 8 1
 I own this bike, and I agree with review, its like a ripmo, but I think it has more traction on the climbs. I don't get why people complain of the tire clearance. There's more than enough room for a DHR II 2.4. What more do you need. It shouldn't be a concern if you want to buy the bike.
  • 3 1
 IMO the Lithium has the better more aggressive geometry:
geometrygeeks.bike/compare/revel-rail-29-2022-l,canfield-bikes-lithium-2021-large
  • 3 1
 MDE does a Damper with similar sus setup and in alloy and customise geo if you want. www.mdebikes.com/damper
  • 5 0
 @wobbem: Never heard of MDE but their linkage surprisingly doesn't perform anywhere near the same, even though it looks so similar visually. linkagedesign.blogspot.com/search/label/MDE%20Bikes
  • 1 1
 Gna be challenging to steal the yt jeffsy buyer away tho...esp a 1 year old xx1 build in pb classifieds waaaaay less
  • 3 0
 @cogsci: difference is mainly in a sloping vs a constant antisquatcurve the Damper is a very good bike, i would love to try the Rail though as the CBF seems like a great system. ( the linkageblog file of the Damper is actually not correct, basing analysis on pictures is kinda hard with shortlinkbikes, it is actually not digressive at the end)
  • 4 2
 @MillerReid: yeah, no bottle mount struck it off my list.
  • 2 4
 @IMeasureStuff: ahhh, that’s a real shame, we’ll miss you Wink
  • 11 13
 Weak two year warranty
Unstable company, went out of business with no replacement parts
Uses cheapest frame bearings
No torque specs ( you have to guess how tight to tighten everything LOL)
Riot plagued frame alignment issues
Riot and Balance and plagued with cracked head tubes. My Riot cracked little after 2 years use and they told me tuff sh!t we have no replacement parts and would not warranty if they did.
  • 3 2
 @in2falling: huh? went out of business??
  • 7 8
 @Chippps:Yes they pretty much shutdown from like 2018 to 2021. They are now back to building their Wal-Mart quality bikes with cool suspension design and no support.
Forgot to add all the poor Riot owners got stuck replacing the Cane Creek DBAirCS, shock should have never been put on the bike not enough leverage to drive it (harsh as hell with no LSC/HSC on). Probably did extensive testing in the parking lot and on the pump track LOL. And the other shocks they offered probably had to be replaced/rebuilt every other year from premature wear from frame alignment issues, that the knowingly shipped to everyone.
  • 12 5
 @in2falling: If you are gonna smear the name, at least get the story right. Canfield never went out of business, Chris and Lance split off and restructured between 2018 and 2019, Chris holds the patent for CBF, and Lance gets the bike company. This is why they are now Canfield Bikes versus Canfield Brothers. While I have not personally owned another Canfield outside of the Lithium and Tilt, many of my friends still ride pre-2017 Jedi's, balances, and hardtail's with zero issue. I understand why you have a chip on your shoulder because you cracked your frame and they didn't give you a new bike, and that surely sucks, but it doesn't make their bikes cheap Walmart bikes at all. It just means your experience sucked, and now you feel the need to tell everybody that will listen to you. I just did a complete overhaul on my Lithium after putting 1200 miles on it in the last year, riding everything from Whistler bike park to Bootleg Canyon, and there are zero issues with the frame, linkages, bearings, or any hardware. Zero alignment issues with the frame, and the bearings they use are top notch. I did some hear Riot/Toir owns complain about frame alignment issues and blowing shocks, and while I haven't experienced that on my new Canfield, I've had three different specialized frames have a alignment issues and blowing shocks up. My thinking is that 2015-2017 Cane Creek shocks were just pretty crap when it came to tolerances. Once I swapped the Cane Creek out of my 2015 Enduro Elite (blew up 3x inlines and 1 DB Air in 6 mo tha) to a RockShox Monarch, even though it still had a frame alignment issue it didn't blow the shock up. Those shocks from that time period were just pretty much crap from Cane Creek, so give credit where credit is due.
  • 6 4
 @in2falling: Yah like everything you said was untrue entirely. Literally everything.... They still support older frame spare parts, honor warranties, are the nicest dudes to deal with, and their newest offerings are really really well built.
  • 8 3
 @dmackyaheard: Everything I posted here are facts

1) Can you get replacement Riot frame parts? Could you after 2 years of use? Did they have inventory to warranty replace frames or frame parts in 2018?
2) The knowingly shipped many mis-aligned frames, some really bad
3) They used/use cheap chinese frame bearings
4) Many many stories of Riot and Balance frames head tube/top tube cracking, they even warned about using a 10mm longer fork on the Riot. Probably because they knew head tube/top tube was weak and would crack?
5) No published torque specs. Did you guess the torque on your Lithium rebuild?
5) Cane Creek DBAirCS should have never been offered or put on the Riot

Yes I have a chip on my shoulder and had really bad experience with them and letting it be known.
Glad you are enjoying your Lithium, hope it lasts, don''t have any issues and they support you if you do.
  • 4 0
 @dmackyaheard: Have to agree with this. I have a 2017 Balance for my bike park beater and it's been great. I abuse the absolute hell out of it and it's never complained. I've certainly broken components on it, but nothing to do with the actual frame of the bike. It's super fun to ride and the rear suspension just soaks up everything.

I've rented a couple Revels as well, there's a dealer locally, and they ride very similarly, which is to say, well.
  • 4 6
 @in2falling: Going out of business is simply not true. I am friends with their Marketing Manager and I know Lance personally. Like I said, never owned a Riot/Toir, but I know plenty of people riding them without issue. I am sure there are frame failures and misaligned frames out there, but name a company that doesn't have broken frames coming through the door. If it failed within the 2 year warranty period, I would understand your situation a bit better, but if its outside of the warranty period, it is really their discretion. I assume when you purchased the frame, you were wise enough to understand the warranty it was coming with. Also keep in mind, with exception of Lance, the company is comprised of all new staff since their restructure, and myself and people I know (I have about 7 friends who ride Riots, Balances, Jedi's, Lithium's, Tilts etc.) have received nothing but great service and good follow up if there is an issue. I am sorry you had the experience you had, but slamming a company that is nearly entirely new with a new trading name seems a bit unfair.
  • 6 2
 @in2falling: Also, here are the torque specs for their current bikes. canfieldbikes.com/pages/mtb-frame-faq
  • 5 1
 @in2falling: saw a balance split in two on the downtube coming down a lift, didn’t see the rider, guessing they weren’t feeling too good
  • 2 2
 @mknott9: All frames snap under the right circumstance. Anyone who has been around a bike shop long enough has seen carnage at some point. That statement is the same as "I saw a car engine stop working one time" "then they put it on a tow truck"
  • 4 4
 @dmackyaheard: cracks sure but catastrophic frame failure is pretty unacceptable nowadays
  • 4 3
 @mknott9: That happens more frequently than you think, and from pretty much all brands. Listing one particular company to add fuel to the fire about a particular company doesn't hold much water.
  • 4 4
 @dmackyaheard: not adding fuel just giving a real world example of the apparent quality of Canfield bikes. I haven’t seen any other frames split in half.
  • 2 1
 @mknott9: You've not seen much of their apparent quality then.
  • 3 1
 @cougar797:
"If it failed within the 2 year warranty period, I would understand your situation a bit better"
Failed after 2 years and 2 months (1500 miles) of light trail riding.
Yes, the 2 year warranty period is wonderful example of how long they think their frames are going to last. Most bike mfg have a lifetime or at least a five year warranty.

www.pinkbike.com/forum/listcomments/?threadid=178278&pagenum=1
"anyone else having issues with their balance frames? in our riding group everyone either has a knolly or a canfield and so far 4 of the 5 balance frames have cracked
one of the guys uses it pretty much for cross country only and the top tube cracked above the weld to the bottom tube, the others have hairline cracks around the shock mount welds and two of them the brace for the rear triangle started to contact the seat tube"
  • 2 5
 @in2falling: We get it, your frame failed outside of warranty, Canfield Brothers didn't do anything for you. That sucks, and I feel for ya. I would probably be pretty irritated, and there are companies I am pretty much against buying their stuff because I had way too many issues such as Ohlin's and Cane Creek. But, the facts are the facts and Canfield is a different company from what you experienced, so talking smack on PB when you really don't know is happening with the new /current isn't cool. I am not trying to talk you into buying another Canfield, because it sounds like you are pretty checked out on them, but I will also point out that what you experienced sucks, and its not like that anymore.
  • 6 1
 @dmackyaheard: I’m not sure why you feel the need to defend a company whose products seem to be at the least annoying to deal with and at the worst outright dangerous to be riding.
People are simply sharing their experiences, not hating.
  • 3 0
 @dmackyaheard:
"Canfield Bikes offers a Two Year Limited Warranty"
canfieldbikes.com/pages/warranty
  • 1 2
 @in2falling: Yeah, not uncommon, I recognize my frame has one more year of warranty left.
  • 3 2
 @mknott9: Because the company that @in2falling is mentioning is not the same company, they are different staff with different bikes. Their previous bikes we fine, but their new bikes are pretty damn awesome. Half of the time when you call them for something, Lance Canfield picks up the phone and helps you out. I have had nothing besides great service from them. They remind me of Knolly. I ran the dog **** out of my Knolly Fugitive for 3 years and got amazing customer service the whole time, and Canfield has been the same. I worked in a bike shop for years and had to deal with Specialized, Giant, Santa Cruz, Pivot, and others, and I can tell you Canfield (and Knolly) are far easier to deal with than some of the bigger brands. If they were literally the same organization as before, or they offered zero support for my current bike, it would be a different story, but first hand experience says differently.
  • 4 2
 @dmackyaheard: So it will probably maybe last another year?
If it is such a new great company with great reliable frames why is the warranty still so short?
Please point out other bike mfg with a short 2 year warranties?

www.huffybikes.com/warranty
MTB: Aluminum Frame: 10 years
  • 2 3
 @in2falling: Why are you so hell bent on telling me and the world that Canfield Bikes aren't good, when you have only owned a Canfield Brothers bike? A friend of mine is going 7 years on his 2015 Balance and over 4k miles with a bearing replacement and regular maintenance and another friend got his Toir second hand a few years back and hasn't had any issues either. What you experienced is not common. I like my bike, I like the way it rides, and have had zero issues with it. The warranty period doesn't bother me either, as I keep them a couple seasons and sell them on. It might bug other people, but not me. Also, are you really comparing a huffy warranty to anything? Rocky Mountain only offers 5 years, Santa Cruz is lifetime... Who cares. Again, Sorry your bike broke, but it's not going to impact my view of the company. I hope you can move on one day.
  • 5 2
 @dmackyaheard: Concur! I have heard of some issues but no problems with mine. I got a Riot, Balance, and EPO and have had them 5-6 years and not one single issue with any of them! Riot and Balance on the original bearings still too. I ride in Utah and am a clyde too, still going strong and no desire whatsoever to replace them yet, still ride awesome and ton of fun!
  • 4 1
 @in2falling: "www.pinkbike.com/forum/listcomments/?threadid=178278&pagenum=1"

Everybody in this thread you posted is saying that Canfield took care of them when their bikes broke. Shit breaks. I broke my Kona frame recently, and they are not going above and beyond. They also aren't screwing me. They don't have any frames to replace it, and would only offer crash replacement if they did! I can't really expect an MTB company to offer reasonable prices (which Canfield does) and give everybody free frames out of warranty. SC? Sure. But you're paying for that upfront with a higher cost.

You should call the company, Lance answers the phone a fair amount of this time.
  • 3 1
 @TheRamma:
"Canfield Bikes offers a Two Year Limited Warranty"
canfieldbikes.com/pages/warranty
"Failed after 2 years and 2 months (1500 miles) of light trail riding."

"Another Cracked Frame"
www.youtube.com/watch?v=jkBTde1tAvY
"Canfield has been impossible to get a hold of for the past 18 months now"

"reasonable prices (which Canfield does)"??
"paying for that upfront with a higher cost."??
Canfield Lithium ( 2 year warranty)
$2,299.99
Ibis Ripmo AF (7 year warranty)
$2199.00
  • 4 1
 @in2falling: www.youtube.com/watch?v=jkBTde1tAvY
Yeah, I watched that video a while back. The dude comes off a bit like a whiny choad. He's being extra dramatic when Canfield tells him that the won't have frames until the end of summer. And makes it sound like they're telling "two different stories" because his shop (DTC Brand?) heard they would have new frames by then. That exact thing happened to me with Kona, a few weeks ago. And they're so much bigger of a company. He's also complaining about a frame lasting 4 years of park riding. He's also dishonest, saying they have been impossible to get ahold of for 18 months, and then shows you the communication they've had.

He's saying how much the company sucks, and glosses over Lance Canfield getting him so new linkages (no idea if it was free, discounted, or retail). Also manages to make getting free, nice pedals from Canfield into a passive-aggressive comment about the company getting rid of its stock (on pedals they sell to this day.) f*cking choad. I love how he points out all the crash damage on his bike and talks about how much he's crashed it. But the head tube was definitely from MaNuFaCtUrEr DeFeCts.

Frames have a lifetime expectancy. 4 years of mixed trail and park on an enduro/AM bike isn't terrible. It's more than I got from my Kona before it cracked, and I do very little park on it.

You should check the pricing on the Ripmo AF, they have big, red letters saying $50-100 in container surcharge fees will be added. The AF is one of the best values in MTB, and Canfield is matching it. Small, alloy focused companies like Banshee and Knolly come in at higher prices than Canfield when I recently compared (although not a huge amount). None of these companies are pricing like SC, which is the company whose warranty people seem to love.

Never dealt with Ibis, but I doubt they're just no questions replace a frame with a crack in it after two years of riding. Hard to call that a manufacturer's defect. Their warranty gives them lots of outs, and I bet they'll use them. Check the comment section here...

www.pinkbike.com/news/ibis-announces-7-year-warranty.html

Lots of people giving really different experiences, many cracked their frames and didn't get a warranty! What almost no one ever says, who has a cracked frame, is "I rode the shit out of it, overforked, and it cracked after two years." Internet stories are best taken with a grain of salt, every manufacturer has them. Yours is just another.

Like I said, you should call Canfield. More effective than whining on the internet about Chinese bearings.
  • 3 1
 @in2falling: Enjoy your Ripmo. You sound like a broken record at this point.
  • 13 4
 A lot of EWS riders have been downsizing on 2021-22 models because they prefer shorter bikes. A lot of MTB legends (Jared graves comes to mind) have spoken out about bikes becoming excessively long and slack. It’s nice to see bikes like this and the ripmo buck the trend a bit and achieve really good climbing/descending performance with somewhat less extreme geometry.
I expect we’ll see the industry as a whole start to move in this direction geometry-wise as well.
  • 9 1
 But here we have a 5'10" reviewer on the L rather than the M frame. She's in their recommend size range but the L is still quite big for someone her size so maybe what the pros ride doesn't transfer that well to what the rest of us ride.
  • 6 0
 @PhillipJ: this seems to be a PinkBike thing. They all bump up 5-10mm of reach vs most size charts (and what I’d personally run). Since they’re consistent in that preference, the comparisons seem pretty spot on.

But yeah-I ride lots of steep stuff and don’t love bikes as long (5’9” and prefer reach between 450 and 460).
  • 3 0
 @wyorider: I'm 5'10" and I think 460-470 with 65 +/-.5 degree head angle is my sweet zone. I ride east coast, so most descends are under 1,000 and often require a techy climb. Being able to hit quick uppy downy tech trails, and smash rocks is equally important. This bike seems right in the wheelhouse. My Forbidden Druid probably eats rocks better, but a similar concept.
  • 2 0
 @PhillipJ: but modern enduro/AM standards 469 reach is fairly short for a size large
  • 3 1
 There is a theory that the ultra-longlowslack bikes are much easier to ride fast for riders of average skill. The pros might see things differently.
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: I’ve found this to be true even for me. Starting with 500 reach, now I’m favoring 460-465 reach after 4 seasons. To each their own.
  • 2 1
 @Ttimer: You forgot a part of that: "easier to ride fast in a straight line"
  • 2 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: It’s great modern bikes have low enough standover that riders can shop by reach these days.

I had a previous generation Slash and loved the bike, but had to get a large for the reach I wanted (455ish) and standover was snug.
  • 1 0
 I have personally decided I like slack but don't care for the absurd reach myself. As a 5' 11" individual I really like that 455mm reach. Most are way up from that on the recommendation charts for my size range. I wont however turn down a 63-64 degree head angle as I've found it to have very few negatives.
  • 2 0
 @cougar797: I like 64 as a good compromise for a mix of steeps and jumping.
  • 13 2
 Ms Legett, your riding skills seem to be equally sharp as your writing skills. Thank you for the balanced view.
  • 10 1
 A 27.5” Rail is pretty high on my shopping list for my next bike. Everything I’ve read about CBF sounds super enjoyable and playful to ride.
  • 8 0
 cbf is magic.
  • 13 0
 They're on sale right now... just sayin
  • 2 0
 Everyone raves about CBF but there doesn't appear to be anything out of the ordinary in those anti-squat and leverage curves. I don't understand what the difference is between this and any other linkage that achieves the same kinematics - even a single pivot could be designed to give you those curves.
  • 4 0
 @boozed: I don't think the leverage curve tells the whole story of how a bike rides. It's also about how aft end of the bike moves over terrain and what forces it applies to the rest of the bike. Simply measuring how much force is applied to the shock as the suspension compresses can't tell that story.
  • 3 0
 @boozed: biggest difference I have noticed is how when you are on the brakes in rough terrain the suspension is still super active
  • 7 0
 @boozed @Libikerdad: Braking and pedaling stay very active all through travel. That is the magic. The first time you ride CBF you wont really notice as it just feels like a normal sensitive but ramped platform. Then after a bit you'll find yourself pedaling through really choppy stuff easily to hit that next booter option and realize you haven't been able to do that before. Or as you break through a rock garden to set up a tight turn you'll eventually notice you have traction for days and no pedal kickback at all leaving you very poised. Then you'll pedal the burly 165mm bike back up to do it all over and realize your chunky trail sled has no business getting up that well when your so damn out of shape.

It just does all the things well. Every one.
  • 2 2
 The techniques that have been developed to measure how active the suspension is on a bicycle - anti-squat and anti-rise - appear to be fairly unremarkable when it comes to this design.

If they don't tell the full story, what measurements do we have that does?

How do two bikes with the same leverage curve have different suspension forces, all other things being equal?
  • 2 0
 @boozed:
I wondered about this myself. The anti squat graph on the lithium is nothing special and pedal kickback is basically the same as the GG Gnarvana which is a burly horst link design. What are the objective differences in the CBF system that make it special? The instant center? Not bashing on it, just want to know what makes it different mechanically vs a well tuned Horst link.
  • 2 0
 @dirtdiggler: the cbf relies on this instant center of curvature if I recall. So I think it has more to do with the fact that it doesn't matter where in the suspension it's working whereas a lot of other designs are optimized for a certain sag. There is a whole site dedicated to describing it far better than I ever could
  • 10 0
 Crazy timing I was looking for REVEL reviews last night and surprised to find nothing from PB.
  • 1 0
 Sounds like a great Hinton bike to be honest Wink
  • 3 0
 @HMBA106: haha i'm actually looking for a Ranger frame to build up through Vicious
  • 1 0
 @map-guy: I rode just about all of the trails in Hinton earlier this month on my Rascal while visiting family and had a blast! A Ranger would probably be great there.
  • 2 0
 @sdm9465: Nice! I just creeped your ridelogs and you had some great local guides. Rascal is a beauty too, Hinton is full of hidden gems!
  • 7 0
 Love the company, their ethos, and the bikes. As a previous Rascal owner I can vouch for CBF being the real deal. My only gripe is with the geometry and sizing - there is no way an XL with those conservative STA, Reach, and Stack numbers will be fitting for someone 6'7". If they build a XXL and I'll jump back on the Revel train!
  • 7 0
 Tbh their XL is small for anyone over 6’2”
  • 2 0
 I agree on the numbers, but, then, 6’7” is definitely not XL territory in any sizing thing, be it clothing or bikes.
Usually I’d say, that once you hit 6’4”, your first look should always be at the XXL.
  • 9 0
 @RevelBikes is giving one away as a fund raiser too!
go.rallyup.com/revelrail29/Campaign/Details
  • 1 0
 Lol, some crazy conditions in that sweepstakes - "Canadian winners will be required to correctly answer a mathematical skill testing question as a condition of receiving a prize."
  • 1 0
 @ccrida-pnw: anything to help me brush up on math!
  • 6 0
 As someone that owns a ripmo, I will say the revel looks a much, much better. Used to be hard to beat Ibis value ($5200 for a carbon bike w/ Fox factory suspension and Deore), but those days have sailed. Sounds like we have a contender
  • 7 0
 Super Fantastic review! @alicialeggett
Funny to describe relative to what it’s not a-la Hitchhiker’s guide’s "The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don't."
  • 6 0
 Hah, I like that sentence and am kind of honored to have anything I ever wrote compared to Hitchhiker's Guide.
  • 2 0
 Love this! Another one "...a cupful of liquid that was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea."
  • 5 0
 I too love the trail 1 grips, bars and stems. For those interested: Grips, I've read that some people find them a little thick. I can see that. I have always liked grips a little thick. I compare them to ODI.

I simply can't tell one stem from another. suffice to say, i love the way this stem looks.

The bars are my faves. They are similar to oneup, but I find them a little more stiff, which i prefer. That is not to say they are stiff bars, they are not, just stiffer than oneup, which were may favorite until I rode these in carbon.
  • 1 0
 Another spinoff from Worldwide Cyclery is Ketl. They make some of my favorite shorts. Better pricing, good zippered pocket, slim knee pad friendly, not too long, etc. I hate shorts that go way past my knees like a NWD video from 20 years ago.
I don’t like my latest purchase due to Velcro vs button but I’d still recommend them.
I even bought some of the 9” shorts to use for hiking and fly fishing.
  • 1 0
 Grips - the inner plastic tube is a little flexible which feels weird on big moves, took them off after ~100km. Very comfortable if the flexing doesn’t bother you.

Stem - mine was not made properly, the bottom half was marginally undersized and wouldn’t slide onto steerer tube. Sits on a shelf looking pretty aka paperweight. Pretty sure it was from the first run, hopefully qc is better now. Note; if you like to slam your stem the short one will hit your frame.

Carbon bar - stiff and a little harsh, scratches easily. Also on the shelf.

I put the stock Specialized 31.8 alloy bars and stem back on my bike. Deathgrips for life now.
  • 15 10
 "meaning that pushing a cable through the frame is maybe even easier than externally routing it"

Nope. Nope. Nope.

Because no matter how "easy" it is to push a housing or hose through, having to disconnect one end, and likely need to do a bleed, is never easier than just using zip-ties.
  • 7 8
 so what you're saying is don't bother and just make it hard af? cmon man, internal routing is here to stay
  • 3 2
 I run Formula Curas that have zero-bleed disconnect- when I internally route the cable I disconnect it from the caliper, run it through the frame, then connect it to the caliper.
  • 3 0
 @Mtmw: what frame do you have that actually has tubes of a large enough diameter that the connector fits through? Do the hoses then rattle like crazy.

It's a nice idea, but the size of the connector seems like a problem to me.
  • 4 0
 @mariomtblt: Transition still runs its rear brakes externally. I love 'em for it.
  • 4 0
 @the00: I have a Ripmo but it doesn't matter, Cura speed lock connector is narrower than the hose. It's a 30 second thing.
uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20190101/a1cc9d025150bedbe33ce002df3d190c.jpg
  • 2 0
 @Mtmw: Wow that's pretty awesome. Too bad its integral to the lever and we can't adapt that to all brakes. Great job on that Formula !
  • 6 1
 "it doesn't feel like it compromises traction for efficiency in the way that I've come to expect when I meet a bike that pedals this well"

I have to wonder if that expectation of compromise says something about the common perception of what "pedals well" means. The common refrain is that more platform, more anti-squat, means it's going to "pedal well", and perhaps it feels that way on smooth parking lot tests or fire road climbs. But many of us ride trails where the climbs are decidedly not smooth, and if the platform is so firm as to be a detriment to traction when it matters, that's not "pedals well", that's just "pedals stiffly". "Pedals well" needs to be a combination of both platform (which doesn't not necessarily always mean more than 100% anti-squat) and traction, which it sounds like this bike has.
  • 5 0
 Agreed. It'd be nice if reviews could also address how a bike climbs a ledgy, intermittently steep, mildly chundery trail. For example, Bitterbrush at Hall Ranch for front rangers. Other than that, however, this was a good review.
  • 2 0
 @muumuu: the rail29 would absolutely annihilate that climb. It’s the best technical climber I’ve ever ridden.
  • 5 0
 @muumuu: I think with so much bike media coming from 2 particular geographies (PNW and UK) often what 'climbing' is gets missed. I'm with you that to me climbing is much more about traction/getting up/over things. I don't really care how a bike climbs on something smooth....because that's about your legs not your bike.
  • 12 4
 wheres that 490+ reach in L everyone wants? thats right... on an XL where it belongs.
  • 6 0
 Especially for a do everything trail bike. Horses for courses and all that. I like how Alicia is framing that paradigm as "shorter, agile, nimble, poppy...fun" vs "traction, stability, bruiser"...rather than "Oh its geo isn't super modern and stability is an issue".
  • 3 3
 @Svinyard: i was on longer reach bikes for a bit in 2020-21 but came back to around 470-5 ish in larges and bikes are so much better.
  • 2 5
 What is it with you and being unable to accept that not literally everybody likes the same things you do? Your constant moaning is getting old.
  • 3 3
 @Muscovir: Thats your opinion, and the consistant upvotes i get for the "same things" would say otherwise.

Why does everyone have to want 490 reach then? brands are pulling their reach numbers back now - so now what?
  • 2 3
 @Muscovir: woops, downvoted heated's post by mistake.
Heated has a point, Several brands like Commencal are shortening their reach.
you obviously follow him to much lol chill out champ
  • 2 2
 @HeatedRotor: I'm not the one going around constantly shouting and preaching in the comment section how everybody except for me is wrong. My point still stands. What's it with you and all the negativity? Where's the problem with letting people enjoying the things they like? Go ride your damn bike dude.
  • 2 1
 @mtbtrekracer: No, Commencal is actually the only brand currently doing that. If that is even true. All we know for sure at this point is that they have a prototype (-of which we don't know the size). So they might or they might not. At this point, no one can tell. Commencal themselves said that they only expect for that prototype to reach serial production in 2024 and that they are currently only in the phase of testing different principles. In a year from now, that same prototype bike could have 530mm reach and a 62° HTA.

But no other brand is currently shortening reaches. Actually, the opposite is true.
And I must know what I'm talking about as I'm one of the admins of the geometry database of another online bike magazine.
  • 1 2
 @Muscovir: based on your first paragraph, you know very little about what brands are doing.
  • 2 1
 @HeatedRotor: ...says you. Case in point lol.
  • 8 1
 good looking bike. good weight. good value. if the links stay together, it's a winner.
  • 4 0
 Good review, glad PB has a reviewer who appreciates what some shorter chainstays bring to the table! Smart that Revel is adding ISCG tabs to this bike (27.5 Rail doesn't have them). Wish they went a step further and followed Canfield/Banshee/GG's lead, making them splined in and replaceable.
  • 6 0
 I love Ibis bikes, owned 5 and still have one. Tried a few others and CBF is the only one I like better. Had a Riot and on a Ranger now.
  • 2 0
 Same, haven't ridden my MOJO 3 since I got a Rascal. Bike handles everything including days at the bike park.
  • 1 0
 How does the CBF compare to Ibis DWlink on like a Ripmo? Seems like that Ripmo v2 is the absolute gold standard for an aggro trail bike that does everything mostly. Not full on enduro tho. If I was buying today, that'd be on the list...tho the Ripmo isn't super good looking frame tho. Is the Rail a super competitor to the ripmo? It certainly looks like a beauty.
  • 2 0
 @Svinyard: I own a Revel Rascal and a Ripmo V1, they feel similar in terms that both are very efficient. The CBF is more active and provides more traction during rocky climbs or downhills. The CBF is not harsh on the feet on descents, the Ripmo you definitely feel that trail feedback which is a trade off to it’s liveliness.
The Ripmo feels more sporty to me and comes alive quicker and it’s on the ready to attack position and this might be due to the geometry.
They both jump very well, the Ripmo pops out rocks or natural features easier than the CBF.
The CBF feels better landing the jumps and is more comfortable for longer rides.
CBF feels better braking, and is hard for me to explain.
Both are great, it comes down to preferences and the terrain you ride.
  • 4 0
 "Rather than the carbon being epoxied and cured like a traditional thermoset carbon wheel, the FusionFiber is bonded together using a polymer-based glue"

I know this probably came straight from Revel or CCS, but thermoset plastics ARE polymers, so saying "polymer-based glue" doesn't actually explain the difference. Pretty sure they are using a thermoplastic (also a polymer) epoxy, as thermoplastics are re-moldable; unlike thermosets which don't re-melt into a re-usable state.
  • 1 1
 I’d also say thermoplastic has been around for decades. If their version is good, yay.

But waaaaay too much word salad about a manufacturing technique that’s been used on bike frames and parts since the 1990’s.
  • 3 0
 @wyorider: What other frame uses it besides GG?
  • 5 0
 Great review and great job comparing it to several bikes. I have a Rail 27.5 and absolutely love it. I will say, FOMO has me drooling over the 29 version. Great job PB
  • 4 1
 Glad there's another option for a daily driver bike for folks who live in the mountains and ride hard. Purebred Enduro race bikes have gotten long, slack, and squishy enough to be race-day specific (think Megatower, Enduro, Slash). At race speed a bigger bike is the better choice, but for daily use on the same terrain (including some park days) a bike like this, or the Stumpy Evo, or the Ripmo, or the Giant Reign are a better and more rounded choice.


Even the price is reasonable(ish) at 6k starting for a solid build kit (Santa Cruz, take note).
Also-some companies have abandoned this segment as their enduro specific bikes have gotten bigger-looking at you Trek.
  • 6 0
 These comments are the most positive comments I have ever seen on PB article!
  • 3 1
 Interesting review. I was wondering a little how this bike would ride, but assumed it would be a little more trail bikey vs my Canfield Lithium, and it seems to be just that! Its cool to see more companies using CBF, as in my humble opinion, it is the best linkage available for most people in most places.
  • 6 0
 Woot woo! My favorite writer and photog coming together!
  • 4 0
 I appreciate that!! And Paul killed it of course.
  • 5 3
 Great review. But availability... I called both Revel and a local shop when I needed an emergency trail bike as a back up to my temporarily-off-the-trail belt drive singlespeed. It was pretty clear I wasn't going to be able to buy a Revel this calendar year unless I was already on the waitlist. So like a good desperate consunerI bought a barely used Ripmo on Pinkbike...
  • 4 0
 Probably couldn't hurt to call some dealers. Many of us have bikes booked since last year which are to be delivered now and through the rest of the year. Wink
  • 1 0
 Oh no, it's almost like companies are still trying to recover from global supply chain issues... You giving up on Shimano and Sram too?
  • 3 0
 Alicia's comparison to the group test is perfect. I would love for all reviews to include a few charts to show where bikes rank against each other based on the reviewers thoughts.
  • 2 0
 I spent a few months on a Canfield Tilt (the shorter travel Lithium). I can say with absolute certainty, the CBF suspension is on par with both DW Link and Switch Infinity. It has that "hover bike" effect, never riding into its travel, each pedal stroke feels like you are being propelled forward and it creates a very lively and poppy/fun bike, generating their inherent playful feel. The Ibis Ripley is more playful than the Ripmo, which I find is more the wheelbase and shock tune. I'm on a 22' Stumpy Evo currently and its a bruiser of a bike, and I agree, has more of a heavy feel even in the neutral geometry and definitely does not pedal as well going up hill when the shock is open compared to the CBF on the canfield. But when you lock out the shock on the Stumpy Evo, it climbs like a hardtail with a little more traction. That being said, I totally agree with the review. If you want a playful bike that can handle bigger hits, get the Revel. If you want a bike that's more damped, get the Stumpy Evo or the Ibis Ripmo.

My honest opinion: I MISS the way the CBF felt on the Canfield. It just felt so supportive. The Stumpy Evo does feel a bit lazy in comparison. I've found myself eyeing the new Revel Rail 29 or a Canfield Lithium. But damn, the SWAT box is so good to have!
  • 1 0
 I have the same stumpy as you. I upgraded it to sub-30 lbs, but it still has that heavy squishy feel in the back. Felt so disheartened, I could not afford a new DW link bike so I bought a hardtail instead haha.
  • 1 0
 I had a 21' Evo and sold it because of the bike feel... Bought a Revel Rascal (couldn't wait for the Rail 29) and I 100 % love it. CBF is awesome. Super nimble, poppy and fun.
  • 1 0
 @SethWest1: Yep, I traded up from a 27.5 SB5 to a Rascal because I wanted a feel similar to riding on the Switch Infinity platform, I'm not disappointed. Despite it's geriatric scooter moniker, the bike is a blast to ride on just about anything I take it on.
  • 1 0
 Does the CBF pedal as well as DWLink?? I was under the impression its a bit better on the downs and a bit more active on the ups (not as pedal friendly unless on super chunky climbs). Maybe that's all wrong, i've never ridden a CBF. These revels are beauties tho...Ibis should take notes lol.
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: I have never ridden a DWLink blessed bike. So I can't make the comparison. I love the Yeti Switch Infinity platform and I can say without hesitation the CBF pedals just as well as the Yeti platform. I live in Central VA and we don't have many bike parks here. 98% of my downhill riding requires lots up pedaling up hill and most of it's technical, not fire road. So when searching for a new bike I wanted something that was efficient uphill and a hoot downhill. I can absolutely live with the compromise the Rascal allows.
  • 1 0
 @teo7z: lol. Revel should have waited and called their EBike (if they ever make one) the Rascal instead lol
  • 2 0
 I rode a ton of bikes before buying my "dream build" in early 2020 and the Revel & Ripmo were my two top picks out of ~30 test ridden bikes. I was lucky to get to demo them at the Evergreen festival at Duthie and ride them over the same terrain on the same day. I agree with everything in your review, you said it all and said it better than I could. My only cross-ride note between the two: at least in 2020, the Revel didn't support a bash and had a significantly lower BB. On a couple of very steep rolls the Ripmo would clear but I reliably hit the chainring on the Rascal.

I ended up on a Ripmo for situational/financial reasons but that low-BB anxiety definitely stuck in my head. Revel will forever be the bike that got away, still can't believe how well it cornered. I really hope they put out a dedicated mixed wheel bike in the future.
  • 1 0
 which linkage design pedaled better?
  • 2 0
 @Svinyard: First thing I should say is I rode everything else and nothing was in the same ballpark as these two. I rode Tallboy, old and new Yeti Switch Infinity (fast but harsh), every retuned horst link in existence. At the top end, everything pedals well. It's a matter of qualities.

The RipMo has a springier, livelier quality that belies its big bike nature. The Revel has this sort of... flatline thing where you can pedal through things like you're on a rope. I don't want to say it makes them dead, it just makes them into a harmonic. I think if I rode on rocks I'd take the Revel platform and for loam/PNW the Ripmo. But it's splitting hairs, they're both incredible.

I haven't ridden this new 29'r Rail and it looks like an improvement.

Bike comparison notes: The Ripmo is two pounds lighter, it's huge. Ripmo yoke design is apparently hard on X2s, lots of shock maintenance, consider a coil if you are a lighter rider.
  • 1 0
 @Mtmw: is there anything that's fun like these Ripmo/Revel bikes but also can handle bike park laps? Seems like there is the enduro category now that has these heavy 160/170/180mm bikes but I'm guessing they all suck at going uphill? Its not like their components are different tho and travel is similar. You'd think there'd be one out there can have a good time on PNW trails (flow too) but also survive a week in Whistler? Maybe a dumb idea and best to just rent a DH bike lol.
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: I'm the wrong person to ask, I don't ride park but I do ride 1500 meter days on a trail bike and I built my Ripmo like a downcountry bike, dual dissectors all summer. I've seen people build the aluminum sentinel like a park bike with big wheels and inserts but at the end of the day, the kind of tire/wheel weight you need to survive bike park abuse is hard to pedal. If you do it you probably want two wheelsets with DH casing on one and trail tires on the other.

If you can do it, get an old DH bike and N+1
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: If you don’t mind 27.5 inch wheels, I haven’t ridden the 29 inch Rail but took the 27.5 inch Revel through a few weeks of park riding in Colorado last year and it didn’t miss a beat.

I wasn’t going flat out on every back diamond I could find but took it down every open blue trail and at Trestle last July, played around on the dual slalom, stretches of one or two black diamond trails (Rainmaker and Boulevard?) and I never ran out of travel.
  • 3 0
 @Svinyard: what you want is a canfield with a coil - *slightly* longer/more aggro geo - but not crazy with shorter stays retained, a little burlier in alloy and coil seems to suit this platform really well, adding a degree of stability and CBF being naturally supportive with a tendency to ride higher in the travel.

Source: my 2020 balance does literally all the things you've mentioned and is super pedally for a alloy/coil/170mm bike. Its like a slightly more poppy alloy nomad.

The no bottle mounts in the triangle may annoy you, as it did me at first but I find a small hip pack with a bottle and windbreaker does really well (the highabove one with the fid lock bottle is suuuper convenient, if a little spendy)
  • 2 0
 @Svinyard: Check out the Orbea Rallon
  • 2 0
 @natebaier: How do those pedal? Isn’t it a more simplistic linkage?

I’m always under the impression that these DWLink/CBF linkage bikes have less compromises when it comes to a rowdy bike...but one that still can pedal well enough and have some pop. Likely not required for a dedicated enduro/park bike but important for something that can kind of do it all but pedal a bit still. Hell maybe that’s just a firebird lol
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: I have not pedaled the Rallon but have heard good things. DW link pedals far more efficiently than cbf. The new vpp as just as efficient as dw and more so than cbf. Of those three vpp feels the most composed on the downs. The revel rail29 is close imo. If you want to do it all, up and down, I’d check out the new Hightower.
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: I had the previous version of the Rallon (V2?) with the original 150mm linkage and it was incredibly efficient. Like XC bike efficient, and with a DHX2 and Fox 36 it was under 31 lbs. I'm now on a Revel Rascal, with a DVO Diamond up front, synthesis alloy wheels with cushcore and the bike is 34 lbs (same GX drivetrain and E13 cranks on both bikes). It pedals well and feels efficient enough but is obviously heavier and doesn't have the "snap" out of corners and up steep sections of trails the Rallon did. That being said I can comfortably pedal through 6" rocks and roots on the Revel that I could not do on the Rallon. The Revel has 30mm less travel but smooths out small trail chatter much better and is as composed as the Rallon through medium chunk. The Rallon could handle the big hits better but it wasn't by a lot. The thing I noticed the most between the two bikes is cornering. The Rascal will rail corners like no other bike I've ridden, off camber, berm, no berm, it doesn't matter, I can hit any corner with confidence at speed and it makes riding so damn fun. I was lusting over the new Rallon but I don't think I can step away from CBF, I love the way it feels whether climbing or descending.
  • 3 0
 Confused why the review lists this bike with a 170 fork when It ships with a 160 fork. If you run a 170 fork the HTA is 64.5, not 65 degrees as listed in the geo charts/review.
  • 2 0
 Sounds like a nice bike in size large. I’d need an XL though and I’ll never buy a bike that has the same short chain stays on the size XL as it has on the size L. Why don’t more manufacturers realize you need to make the back longer when you make the front longer to get the same balance? Best handling bike I’ve ever ridden is my ‘21 Rocky Mountain Element with 441mm chain stays and a much shorter front end. I’m looking for a bike with a long slack front end and a long back to balance it out. My ‘22 stump jumper with 438mm chain stays is not nearly as well balanced, and I have to run it in the high steep setting just to try to get a little of that front/rear balance back. I think they bike would be much better at around 446mm chain stays in size XL.
  • 5 1
 I just wonder if this would be that much better if it had a 78deg STA and a 64deg HTA.
  • 4 1
 Then it would be identical to every other bike on the market. You should get a sentinel if you really want that.
  • 2 0
 @plustiresaintdead: CBF is a pretty unique suspension setup.
Tweaking the angles to be more inline with what works on many other modern bikes might just make it that much better.
  • 1 1
 Less sag, so the dynamic (vs static) numbers are pretty close to the rest of the market.

Like bike weight, static geometry numbers only tell a small part of the story.
  • 2 0
 @wyorider: sag difference is minimal. Alicia ran 28-30% sag. Pretty typical
  • 1 0
 I'd be curious to hear the reviewer's thoughts on an Evil Wreckoning vs Revel Rail 29 comparison?

The geo's are within 1/2 degree give or take, but the Wrecker's wheelbase is around an inch longer than the Rail. The Wrecker has 10-11mm more travel, but every review says that it "hides" its travel well. (From my personal experience, I'll agree with this sentiment)

The Wrecker doesn't pedal like a 170mm enduro sled and retains quite a bit of liveliness, pop and that signature Evil character. I'm confident the Rail is a snappier climber, but I wonder how apart they are - for example, Bike Magazine (when that was still a thing) even compared the Wrecker to the Ripmo in their review - citing that the Wrecker would be perfectly suited for Galbraith as well as bike park days and could easily be a "1-bike" quiver.

Any thoughts to offer on Wreckoning vs Rail 29?
  • 1 0
 Ha. I actually compared the Evil Following to the Revel Ranger when shopping for a short travel bike. And indeed, the Ranger is a snappier climber and what I ended up going with. Can't speak for the Rail, nut the Ranger is an absolute gem and the CBF platform amazing.
  • 2 0
 Wreckoning is a party down hill (short chanstays mean it throws shapes like nobody’s business) but climbing performance is adequate, not awesome.
  • 2 0
 I have experience on the 27.5 versions - Insurgent including LB and Rail.

Rail pedals uphill better than the Insurgent, Rail feels less kinetic than an Insurgent coming downhill though.

Not slower with the Rail just it doesn't feel like a nearly out of control freight train like Evil bikes do, GPS times on the same trails for me show the Rail is consistently faster.

There are certain situations where I got reminded that the Insurgent is a single pivot bike, not horrible consequence/wet the bed type deals but reminders when sharp on the brakes, never get that with the Rail as it just feels like it will take more and more and more and doesn't give you the sense that you are hitting a rough edge somewhere in the setup.

Rail is better all rounded bike in my experience and opinion. Insurgent is a blast and serviceable uphill but not tons of fun to ride uphill.

Both frames ridden with air and coil shocks - Insurgent - Topaz, X2, 11.6, Storia and Rail X2 and Fast Fenix Evo
  • 4 2
 actual rider feedback on this rig is that its geo is pretty conservative and the ST angle is actually very slack. there are better bikes within the niche market at that price.
  • 1 0
 Do you think they're deliberately staying a bit conservative on the geo as a USP in the current marketplace?
With those short reach numbers, would a contemporary seat angle make the bikes feel very cramped when seated?
It's not the bike for me, but my pal has the 27 version and it rides (and looks) great - I'd love to give this a spin as a comparison point to other bikes.
  • 4 0
 @chakaping: The bike feels like a Yeti or Ibis from 7 years ago. I think that there is still a place for older geometry, it provides a more comfortable ride, but its less aggressive and not as confident to charge down the steeps or aggressive technical climbs.

Where this bike shines is that it has a proven (basically DW link) suspension feels very similar to an Ibis HD or any yeti. The conservative Geo makes it more comfortable for a full day ride in the saddle. Revel = Moab, Nicolai Geometron = Squamish etc.
  • 2 2
 @BoneDog: That's as I suspected, I was basically wondering whether they've consciously decided to make bikes with seven-year old (I'd say more like five) geometry, to tap into the "modern geometry is rubbish" crowd.
It's quite similar to my old Enduro 29, which was pretty perky and nimble with the Fox inline shock.
  • 1 0
 @chakaping: so just buy a 5 year old yeti and save cash for beer hahahahahaa
  • 1 1
 @BoneDog: I'm already on a five-year-old Orange, so I'm good cheers Big Grin
  • 2 0
 @chakaping: with bikes as expensive as they are it would be cool to understand the intent behind geometry/designs decisions more when buying a bike.

Instead all we usually get from the manufacturer/brand is "this bike is built to smash the ups and shred the downs and race better than anything ever with it's *marketing term* suspension and modern geo"

What I want to know is, "we chose this reach and this stack (or other specification) because we found that _____ " and "we don't recommend that you size down because ______"

This is too nerdy for marketing, but ultimately what we are buying is a design which is always some type of compromise decision
  • 3 0
 I read all of that, which says something. Interesting to hear what I’m missing on my big slack over-forked clobber hammers. Mind may have opened up just a crack.
  • 3 0
 Did I read that right @alicialeggett? You were ONLY one second away from a podium place at the Galbraith Enduro?!
Awesome! Congrats! You are fast!
  • 1 0
 @alicialeggett: Very informative review, great mix of the objective and subjective while still keeping the two separated as much as can be reasonably expected. And kudos for the performance in the Enduro!
The bike sounds great, good climber, agile and playful on the descents. If it wasn't for the too steep actual seat tube angle it would make it to my list of dream bikes.
  • 3 0
 TRP brakes are one of those things here on Pinkbike that get mentioned in a positive light/praised when on test bikes, but generally treated as nonexistent outside that.
  • 1 0
 Excellent writing @alicialeggett. Is it mandatory to have three cons? your review was overwhelmingly positive and if I were too lazy to read the whole thing, the pros/cons wouldn't do it justice. The third con isn't really a con at all, just an observation that you definitely flesh out in your writing. Either way, keep up the good work.
  • 1 0
 Responded earlier on the question about park riding bikes n a Rebel but wanted to

1) Add my thanks to @alicialeggett for the review
2) To share a sizing perspective - everyone is different but for the way my 5’11 is spread out the factory L frame and cockpit were just about perfect and
3) The Rail climbs (steep trails in Bentonville, some back country in Keystone) better than anything I tried last summer.

I like the company, I love the finish, and am excited to see a longer travel 29 er.

Now @revelbiles - any updates on a longer travel dual crown bike?
  • 1 0
 Fantastic writing Alica! I really enjoyed this article. I feel like I have a good idea in my head of how this bike rides and really liked the comparisions of pros and cons vs some of the other bikes you recently reviewed. Excellent job!
  • 2 0
 Well written review Alicia! Appreciate the discussion on the geometry tradeoffs and how they relate to bike's performance. Really give a sense of how the bike rides.
  • 2 1
 This seems like an enduro bike for almost all people not living on the coast riding super rough trails all the time. This was pretty informative www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqJ0XYdUPIA
  • 2 0
 I currently run the Revel Rascal, but have been eyeing the Shred Velvet Cake Rail 29. I am salivating!! And no, it's not a medical issue....
  • 1 0
 great review for sure, and definitely a very interesting bike. my problem is translating this for someone (me) who weighs a solid 70lbs more than the reviewer... will all of those qualities still hold true?
  • 2 0
 I was way into these until I got some feedback from heavier riders in them, flex was real bad in them if you're over 200#
  • 5 1
 Carbondale sounds like an AliExpress frame from an open mold
  • 2 0
 Everyone who has one seems to love them. I really appreciate Revel sticking to proper trail geo. Sick bikes, would love one some day.
  • 2 0
 Man that's a good lookin bike. After reading the ride characteristics, I really want to try one now. I love bikes that focus on fun.
  • 3 2
 Not sure I agree with the same Chainstay length across all sizes as a "CON", each mold costs a considerable amount of money. How many carbon manufacturers have multiple chainstay lengths across size runs?
  • 4 0
 Quickly becoming industry standard - this is a breakout year, lots of new models coming out with this feature. Santa Cruz, Pivot, Forbidden.. list is growing. Bigger brands will do it to stay competitive. It's a fair con IMO.
  • 3 0
 @dresendsit:

You don’t need different molds for longer chainstays, you design it into the front triangle pivot locations. Each front triangle is a different mold anyway
  • 1 0
 @Solorider13: wrong person
  • 3 4
 I would think climbing ability would greatly differ between builds with the RS Super Deluxe Ultimate and the Fox X2. I shopped the exact two bikes discussed here, and ending up with the Ripmo winning out due to the longer reach. Great article.
  • 2 1
 Why do you think that?
  • 1 2
 @plustiresaintdead: obviously depends on the shock tune, but SD ult is way more over damped than x2
  • 1 0
 If you get a DVO rear shock and want a different tune, they’re AWESOME to work with.

My waaaay too linear Reign Advanced 29 became the bike I wanted it to be with a DVO rear, tuned by them.

I’d do an Ibis with DVO squish-and get the shock valving factory dialed if needed.
  • 1 0
 great review, but i really want to see one non-drive side view of the linkage. and maybe the slo-mo vid of the suspension in action. otherwise good stuff
  • 1 0
 Huck to flat!! Huck to flat!! And would love non-drive side huck to flat.
  • 2 1
 Are those fork clicks specified in the same direction? 7 from closed on rebound makes sense, but 1 from closed for HSC and 4 from closed on LSC seems like a lot...
  • 2 0
 Definitely want to get on one of these soon. Geo/ bike looks awesome for an everyday driver!
  • 2 0
 Isnt epoxy a polymer based glue? I guess its not super important tgat just bothered me in the wheels description.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the thorough and informative review; this bike ticks all my boxes on paper and it's super-helpful to see that the numbers carry over to real-life!
  • 1 0
 This seems to be an excellent option for a longer travel trail bike for areas with open, fast trails like here in the Okanagan.
  • 1 0
 Great post! Here is my Revel Rascal vs Rail 20 long term review, I hope it's helpful! www.youtube.com/watch?v=sH6x0LlUxuk
  • 1 0
 The hell's gate grips at 30.5mm aren't what I'd call big, but look worth a try for smaller hands.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, I haven't actually measured and am probably wrong, they just feel way fatter than most others in that width range. Regardless, they feel really good.
  • 1 0
 Quality review. Bike sounds like a blast, though I personally like the idea of an alu version (current ripmo af owner)
  • 6 7
 Is Revel still limiting their rear tires to 2.4? That's a major oversight in my opinion. The Ripmo can take a 2.6. I've considered Revel a bunch of times, but that 2.4 limit always stops me.
  • 3 0
 Agreed. I was looking at the Revel Rascal a bit ago and had the same limits. If there was more tire clearance I probably would have pulled the trigger on it.
  • 2 0
 One of the only things I dont love about my revel rascal. Wish I could fit a 2.5 aggressor in the rear. Looking at that new Forekaster in a 2.4 though. It looks promising.
  • 2 0
 My Rail 27.5 has 2.4 tire limit but I have been running a 2.5 since day one with no issues...never tried a 2.6 though.
  • 6 5
 2.4 in the rear is the most you should ever need.... hence why brands do this.
  • 3 0
 @HeatedRotor: just an opinion! No one is allowed to say anything in the PB comments
  • 2 3
 @HeatedRotor is correct, especially on a rascal, maybe learn to corner a little more.

inb4 "I ride loose trails"

even in the moondust of Mammoth and the kitty litter of like Snow Valley I see people on 2.3 FRONTS so idk can't say that a 2.6 rear is a necessity
  • 4 0
 @mariomtblt: No one said 2.6. Its just a preference lol just because someone rides a 2.3 doesnt mean that someone else cant ride a 2.5 or a 2.4
  • 3 1
 @jmlight10: well the revel and the rail fit in a 2.4 just fine so no problems there
  • 3 0
 @HeatedRotor: Somehow, there are lots of bikes that DON'T limit you to such a narrow rear tire. It's like maybe some people like bigger tires, and some other people are maybe like you and think that your experiences are all that anyone needs.
  • 1 2
 @Explodo: The general reason some bikes allow that is usally just by design and whatever tire fits, fits.
2.6 tires roll around alot.. They move too much unless your using huge rims
  • 1 3
 @HeatedRotor: Agreed

Jeff kendalWeed put 2.6 frt n R on a bike when touring once. I would say thats the only time or reason to go above 2.4 imo
  • 7 6
 Trail one bars isn't that the kooky guy on YouTube brand..there just china made crap with there logo stickered on it
  • 3 1
 160mm/170mm allrounder? Hard to believe
  • 1 0
 The geo numbers are almost exactly the same as my 2019 YT Capra 29 which I found was a good climber.
  • 2 0
 Presta nut on the rear wheel is loose.
  • 1 0
 Aw ye Alecia you're the best, the comparison back to the field test is awesome. I love this bike too
  • 4 2
 I don't know what it is, but their frame aesthetics just turn me off.
  • 2 2
 Totally agree. The Revel dealer I buy a lot of other stuff from I told "I'd like to try one but can't get over the looks of the thing." Honestly though I think 4 bar bikes have such better lines/looks. My DW link bike I put in the ugly bike category.
  • 2 2
 Agreed. It looks a bit dated.

I’ve always been keen on Mondraker, the new “spindly” Rocky’s, and the Last Tarvo. Straight lines and open triangles.
  • 1 1
 One of the main reason I own a Revel over a GG is aesthetician, the bikes look great and I get more complements than any bikes I've owned previously. I terestingly can't stand the skinny tubes on Ricky's or Mondrakers.
  • 1 0
 @OnTheRivet: Yeah the gg is a whole nother level of ugly... mainly that adjustable head tube nonsense.
  • 2 0
 So many bearings though...
  • 3 1
 Meh-any dual link bike or lingage driven single pivot already has a bunch.

Also, the most loaded bearings (usually near the bottom bracket) need replacement a lot more often than the less loaded ones. So you can just do the high wear ones 2-3x before going all-in with $150 of bearings.
  • 2 0
 1 second from a podium?! Sweet riding Alicia!
  • 1 1
 @alicialeggett did you choose the L because you wanted something longer than the M or did they just send an L and you happened to like it?
  • 4 0
 I'm 5'10" and usually ride a size L unless a company runs particularly large!
  • 1 0
 Another winner from the crew at Revel. Innovative and impressive for such a new brand.
  • 1 0
 Dear @alicialeggett

I would like to hear more about the wheels. You just say "the ride quality - is there".

Thank you,
  • 1 0
 Very indepth review, well done.

The bike though? Meh. Not impressed by the value. At least not on paper.
  • 2 0
 Great review Alicia.
  • 1 0
 Any comparison to an Evil Offering @alicialeggett ?
  • 2 1
 $6k for a gx eagle equipped bike is cheaaap! (Compared to SC and others!)
  • 2 1
 Glitter and glamor?

Did you mean glitz and glamour?
  • 2 1
 Wishing there was frame storage like specialized and others.
  • 1 0
 That was very enjoyable to read Smile
  • 1 0
 You can really feel the 7mm 1/4 inch difference.
  • 1 0
 When does the enduro fieldtest start coming out?
  • 1 2
 Seems like a modern Ibis Mojo HD3? Nippy and fun with enough suspension to bail you out most of the time!?!
  • 2 3
 Sounds like at pace in the chunder it would get scary. No thanks. Good luck to you.
  • 1 1
 Does it creak as badly as my Ranger?
  • 2 0
 dude clean your bike haha
  • 1 0
 It's a known issue.
  • 1 0
 Beautiful bike!
  • 2 2
 Not an Enduro plow but comes with a Zeb?
  • 1 3
 Did I miss the test bike weight somewhere?
  • 2 0
 "under 32 pounds"
  • 3 0
 its in the side box near the top
  • 2 0
 She said it was sub 32 lbs talking about the build
  • 2 4
 Where is frame made???
  • 11 0
 where you learn english?
  • 15 2
 How is babby formed???
  • 5 1
 me likey bikey
  • 1 0
 If they don’t claim (loudly) made in USA or Europe, somewhere in Asia.
  • 1 1
 Revel is produced in Vietnam.
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: In the same factory as Yeti, Rocky Mountain I believe
  • 1 0
 @dmackyaheard: yep, www.pinkbike.com/news/what-does-the-vietnam-covid-shutdown-mean-for-carbon-bikes.html

"Several high-end bike companies source most of their carbon bikes in Vietnam. Ibis, Rocky Mountain, Evil, Revel, Specialized, and Intense all confirmed that they rely on Vietnamese carbon, particularly from one distributor that makes carbon parts in the southern part of Vietnam, where the pandemic is hitting the hardest and where the factories have shut down."
Below threshold threads are hidden







Copyright © 2000 - 2024. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.059530
Mobile Version of Website