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Review: The New Fox Proframe RS Helmet is Packed With Safety Features for Enduro Riders

Oct 11, 2022
by Matt Beer  
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Back in 2017, Fox launched the original Proframe, a lightweight full-face helmet that went against the grain at the time by going with a non-removable chin bar layout. Up until now, that popular helmet has remained unchanged. For 2023, Fox re-established the needs of enduro racers and went back to the drawing board to bring out the burlier Proframe RS.

Lightweight full-face helmets have often left substance or coverage to be desired, but those are two factors that Fox’s new Proframe RS doesn’t sell short on. The 820-gram Proframe RS acquires a more square shape than its predecessor and the styling is riddled with angular lines leading to large intake vents.

Fox Proframe RS Details

• Fidlock chin strap closure
• BOA fit retention
• MIPS Integra Split
• EPP and EPS construction
• Weight (size M): 820g
• Sizes: S, M, L
• Colors: Bark, Black, RTRN Black, Black Camo, Black/Red, Black/Yellow, Vintage White
• Price: $359 USD
• ASTM F1952 DH certified
foxracing.com

Fox has added a bucket load of features at the price point of $359 USD. That will get you a DH-certified helmet with an updated MIPS interior, a BOA fit system with a Fidlock chinstrap closure, all of which are available in a multitude of colors, from loud fluorescents to black camo.

Starting on the outside, you’ll notice the massive vents through the chinbar and brow, while under the visor is enough space to mount a GoPro. To deal with the rigors of enduro racing, the visor quickly snaps up into two higher angles, providing space for goggles to be quickly stashed.

Inside the helmet, two different density layers of protective foams, EPP and EPS, take care of low and high-speed impacts. Secondly, the inner EPP piece makes up the structure of MIPS Integra Split, a system that can spherically glide on the outer layer of EPS.

In addition to that rotational system, the “Split” name comes from the inner EPP shell being made up of two halves that can articulate between 10-15mm on sets of elastomers which Fox calls “woofers”, offering a further degree of rotational safety. You’ll be glad to know that this version of the MIPS system also remained quiet for the entirety of the test as well.

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PERFORMANCE

ADJUSTMENT

Fox counts up to 624 adjustment variations using the three shell sizes, four occipital steps, and fifty-two BOA clicks, which is a nonsensical stretch of marketing mathematics. However, those four vertical positions allow the BOA dial to pull the front of the helmet onto your head. Once set to the preferred clocking, the BOA dial can be reached on the fly to alleviate any pressure as your ride goes on and then quickly cinch it back in for descending.

Fox includes two sets of cheek pads with the Proframe RS that lock into the button-style snaps built into the chinbar. A thoughtful addition is a small loop that holds the cheek pads to the chin strap, should they become dislodged from the snap. I didn’t have the chance to play with a GoPro mount, but the three-position visor looks to offer plenty of real estate to house the camera without blocking your line of sight.

Finally, a Fidlock strap closure makes quick removal and installs of the helmet with gloves or bulky jackets that may be tricker with a traditional D-ring closure.


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FIT

Claustrophobes need not worry with the Proframe RS. Looking out of the helmet, the chinbar is sufficiently out of the way and gives a great peripheral window. Around the ears, there is a ton of open air, allowing for a normal level of hearing, especially compared to a fully enclosed DH specific helmet. That makes climbing more manageable and easier to pick up on your surroundings while making low-speed maneuvers.

Helmet shapes are personal, but I generally find that Fox helmets are a bit too oval in the XY plane and leave space around the forehead area for my head shape. I’ve also noticed that oval shape on the Speedframe half-shell trail helmet too. It’s not a fault of the Proframe RS, but just a note in general about how Fox shapes their helmets - they certainly work for plenty of riders.

There are only three shell sizes to choose from, so I opted for the medium. The size wasn’t the issue as much as the shape was. When the BOA dial system was cranked down, my forehead would bump against the roof of the helmet before contacting the lowest point on the brow. With the dial really tight, I did have some discomfort due a small raised section on the plastic occipital cradle towards the upper-middle section.

I also found that the cheek pads, as cushy as they were, could have been placed farther to the back of the helmet to alleviate my best chipmunk impression. A clever feature on the cheek pads, though, is the small elastic that the chin strap threads through, so you’ll never lose them, should they become dislodged.

Goggle fitment wasn’t a problem, and even larger framed goggles like Smith's Squad XL worked without any issues. At the back of the helmet, there is a clearly defined portion for the goggle strap that guarantees you won’t droop them too low.

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VENTILATION

Airflow was the first talking point that I took note of for the Proframe RS. I immediately noticed a huge increase over other helmets that I’ve spent time in recently, like the POC Octocon and Smith Mainline. Most of that fresh air came through the forehead vents, which wrap around the sides - almost one hundred and eighty degrees. There’s also a decent amount that passes between the jaw and cheek pads to help hot air vent out the back of the helmet too.

Fox’s “ionic” moisture wicking liner did a good job of pulling any sweat away from my field of vision, and I was content to leave the Proframe RS on while climbing all but the most savage, sunbaked climbs.

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PRICE

Considering all of the safety and fit features packed into this helmet, I’d the Proframe RS is worth it. Helmets are one place I wouldn’t skimp on and the MIPS technology in this helmet is very crafty, plus you have the minimalist BOA cord fit system and the self-seeking Fidlock buckle. There are also enough bright and neutral paint options that should fit your style without needing to rethink your whole wardrobe.

Other popular options on the market, like the Smith Mainline and Troy Lee Designs Stage, ring in at a lower price point; $310 and $299 USD to be exact. Given the safety updates to the MIPS system, and the quick BOA dial adjustment, I wouldn’t shy away from spending the extra cash.

If I were to get extremely picky, I might be worried about the longevity of the BOA system, given its location on the back of the helmet. The dial does protrude slightly from the shape of the helmet and could be the first point of contact if dropped. BOA dial replacements are readily available, but the easy-to-locate position is a tradeoff for being exposed to the dreaded dropzone.

WEIGHT

Sitting at 820 grams, the Proframe RS still sits in the lightweight full-face category, but trends towards the upper end of the spectrum with the likes of the Smith Mainline and POC Octocon. Compared to the lightweight Specialized Gambit and Troy Lee Designs Stage, which are lighter by 150 grams or more, the Proframe RS offers a more secure fit and substantial increase in shell thickness. The two weight classes could almost further subdivide the options in the enduro full-face category, because the Proframe RS steps up the perceived protection another notch.

If you don’t reach downhill speeds or speed enough time at the bike park for Fox’s burly Rampage Pro Carbon DH race helmet, the Proframe RS is a valid compromise for full facial coverage.


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Colours: Bark, Black, RTRN Black, Black Camo, Black/Red, Black/Yellow, Vintage White




Pros

+ Dual density layers and MIPS Integra Split are excellent additions to this style of helmet
+ Massive amount of airflow through front vents, around cheek pads and behind ears
+ MIPS liner is silent

Cons

- As is the case with all helmets, the fit won't work for everyone - I had trouble with the shell shape and occipital cradle.
- Price & weight are on the higher ends for this category.





Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesIf the overall shell shape works for you and you're in the market for a DH-certified enduro helmet, then Fox's Proframe RS should be at the top of your wishlist. It's tough to beat the trifecta of weight to ventilation to protection. Although the price point is higher than most, the overall package is well thought out and offers unrivaled safety features in its class. 
Matt Beer





Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
389 articles

108 Comments
  • 89 2
 who would have though safety equipment and its selling point is "packed full of safety features" what an absolutely incredible time to be alive
  • 8 3
 If it's got the same break away visor technology that lets it pop off when you so much as sneeze, I look forward to watching the bullet heads rolling out of the lot.
  • 11 1
 well they still havent fixed the insect trap around the ears. ive had multiple flies, bees, mosquitos and sometimes butterflies get sucked in there mid way blasting thru and thinking "should i undo my helmet while doing machchicken speed or wait till they just bite my ears and crash...hmmm?"
  • 7 0
 @mininhi: if you're going fast they just rattle around a while, then blow out the back.
  • 8 2
 I'm the Fox safety technician, I make sure that everybody safens up and stays safe in a safe way!
  • 40 7
 Having worn and wrecked 2 full faces this year, (bad news) one being a full on DH helmet and one being of the "enduro" category I can say with absolute certainty that the safety of one is far superior to the other and if you're riding in a place that requires a full face helmet why go with the lighter option? The enduro ones although slightly cooler to ride around in are still hot, and just don't offer the protection that the full fledged DH full faces do.
  • 21 4
 Exactly, if I need a full face, then I'm gonna use a full-on full-face. If I need ventilation, then I can either suck it up, or use a half shell.
  • 9 0
 This is exactly why I love my 100% Aircraft 2. It has the protection of a full-on DH helmet with the ventilation of an enduro helmet. I raced a couple enduros in it this year and it really wasn’t too terrible to climb in (one of the races had temps in the 90s).
  • 6 2
 Agree. Tried a Stage, had a slower speed front wheel washout in a berm and the side of my head was the first thing to hit the hard packed dirt. Didn't suffer any apparent injury but the hit was hard enough to not want to buy another one and updated my D3 to a D4 instead.
  • 50 0
 @dirtpedaler: Didn't suffer any apparent injury, so the helmet did its job. If the helmet gets destroyed, but my head doesn't, that's a win.
  • 5 3
 Bell super dh has been a good option for me. It’s got enough ventilation and spherical mips has been amazing. ATSM rating for dh. I haven’t had the chin bar off in 3 years now. The only problem is with a low brow my goggle options are limited.
  • 15 1
 That's bad news on 2 trashed lids - I hope what was inside them is ok now! For uplift days, I totally get what you're saying. But for those of us doing enduro style riding (and amateur racing) a DH lid is just too hot. The risk with having that big hot DH lid is that you think "it's warm today, I'll take the half shell" then knock your teeth out or worse. Lots of my riding is fairly tech, but only 100m descents (and climbs back up), so being able to leave the lid on for the climb is pretty helpful in terms of faffing
  • 5 0
 @Jaib06: pretty strong statement against helmets that are simply... a compromise between DH full face and half shell.
I get easily hot and where I ride, a DH full face will only lead me to riding blinded by my sweat. In those cases I'm happy the Met Parachute exists.
To each their own!
  • 18 0
 Bikes parks = full DH lid.

Enduro trail riding = lightweight ventilated enduro full face. This is the place where I used to wear a half shell and most still do. But the new lightweight full faces are so good I don't bother with half shells anymore. My face/nose/teeth are far more protected than they ever have been. On really hot days I put the cheek pads in my pocket and it genueily feels like a half shell.

I broke a Bell Super 3R a couple years ago but it did it's job super well and protected my face. Now I use a Kali Invader.
  • 11 0
 Because it’s safer than a half-shell, which is what this is competing against. It’s simply not practical to wear a full DH helmet for big climbs or when it’s hot out and you don’t have a lift or shuttle.
  • 11 1
 Disagree with "slightly cooler". The difference from my Giro Disciple (full DH) to my Fox Proframe (first version) is night and day. On warm to hot days, I want to take the Giro off the second I finish a run whereas I can climb in the Proframe as long as it isn't 35C in direct sun on a fire road. When I bought the Proframe I figured I'd still use my half shell for "low risk" trail riding days but honestly I've only used it once or twice in the last year. I use the Proframe for every trail ride and for shuttle days that have some pedaling. Giro full DH helmet only for bike parks.
  • 5 0
 @dthomp325: Yep. I have half shells, light full face, and DH helmet. I live in a place that is brutally rocky, so even low speed crashes can do some damage to your face. The light full face is a nice compromise. It absolutely provides more protection than the hall fshells, but I live in the desert and there is no way I'm wearing my DH helmet for a 10 mile pedal.
  • 4 0
 @rrolly: Should have added that I'm old, 60, and seem to be having a trend where my head has been hitting the ground first when I crash. I'm still an adrenaline junky so I'm riding rowdy trails. All good, the new lightweight full faces are great. I've hit my head a lot over my lifetime.
  • 6 0
 Individual crashes are anecdotes. Trust me, you don't want to climb in a DH helmet.
  • 2 2
 @ultimatist: I don't, it goes in the pack or hangs from the bars if I'm pushing up. It's hot where I live and I don't wear the half shell when I climb either.
  • 2 0
 @gotohe11carolina: ASTM DH1952 are only bare minimum standards, interesting but unknown to us would be the actual test results
  • 1 1
 @Uuno: I think that's a very fair point, it's all where you ride, and how hard you ride.

For me, my rides are either a "winch then plummet", or a XC/Trail loop, so I only really need two polar options, and a middle option would be a master of none, however, I'm glad that the option does exist for those that need a middle ground.
  • 4 0
 By your argument why not ride in a motocross helmet? But we know that they’re overkill for DH and less safe in bike crashes. Too much helmet is a thing.
I’ve got all three helmet types actually (Enduro, DH and MX) and mostly use the Enduro lid because I feel safest in the one that is most natural (lightest weight and least muffled hearing).
Pick the helmet for the activity I think.
  • 5 1
 @dirtpedaler: Umn... what am I missing here? It did it's job, you came away unscathed, and this is a bad thing? My stage saved me from a life altering jaw destruction injury, chin bar cracked, but all I got instead was a couple stitches in my lower lip. Think I decided to get something else? You insane? Had a Stage replacement 2 weeks later.
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: Not missing anything and I'm not dissing the stage or this new fox. Just decided to update my D3 with a D4. Also had a faceplant with the stage with goggles on that left me with a massive black eye. Still not sure how that happened, but could have been the helmet itself that caused that injury. Anyway, thought I would agree with a commenter and share my experience, if you read my comments you'll notice that I said nothing bad about the Stage or the Fox.
  • 3 0
 @dirtpedaler: No worries then. Just seemed like you were unhappy with how it performed.
  • 1 0
 The difference is not even remotely slight. I can pedal up the largest climbs on a hot summer day with a proframe on. I can't go 10 minutes with a full DH lid.
  • 21 3
 Nice dent you got in the back of the helmet lol. Ive had the original proframe for about 3 years, and been very happy with it. This seems like a decent update, but for the price, if i were buying a helmet today, it would be the TLD stage.
  • 7 0
 I love my stage, it’s a really great helmet
  • 2 0
 @ZanderShredsMtb: mine too, though the clips holding the pads in feel like they're going to break every time I pull the pads to wash them
  • 3 0
 Mine saved me from a life altering, or potentially ending, injury. Will never leave home without it! (the replacement, that is)
  • 7 0
 Man I love my OG proframe, and my current speedframe helmets. At the end of the day this will work for some people and not for others solely based on head shape, but so far my head has loved Fox helmets to the point where I'm a huge fox fanboy. I don't even have any other fox stuff, but I'll keep paying full price for their helmets and tell my friends how good they are as long as they fit my head.
  • 11 2
 Have they fixed the problem where the chinguard breaks off and you smash your face? That’s what stopped me buying one
  • 2 0
 for real, looks like a different chinguard design though and it looks much stronger
  • 2 0
 I owe my teeth to the 1st gen Proframe, it did sacrifice itself in the process though...
  • 1 2
 First gen proframe chin guard breaks if you look at it wrong... I own a Smith Mainline now. Squeaky as hell, but way more comfy than my proframe. Doesn't flow air as well though :/ would like to try the Aircraft 2 at some point.
  • 2 1
 @mnguyen1224: Agree! I bought a second proframe thinking that my cracked chin guard must have been an anomaly/unlucky accident, and managed to crack the second chinguard after a weeks use in a very slow speed off. Barely knocked it and boom, a crack.
  • 9 0
 Would be 3x more likely to buy if Loic Bruni were in it.
  • 5 0
 While I whole heartedly agree with your sentiment, it's still a "DH rated Enduro helmet" not a true DH helmet, which by today's standards are more like "Hardline rated DH helmets".
  • 5 1
 OG Proframe served me well on a huge crash. Went too far right on the weird "hip" in the middle of Banana Peal at Trestle and landed flat. My rear shock rebound was too fast for the impact which sent me OTB at 25-30 mph onto my face and chest. Broke a few ribs and was spitting out dirt but the Proframe held up great, no face injury. I have been riding "enduo" helmets (a Met Parachute and now the Proframe) at Whistler and Angel Fire for years. My son also, the Bell Super 2R and now the Super DH.
Can someone explain to me why the "real" DH helmets are so much better? Other than "I'm so rad I need it." I get that a stick would come through the openings on my Enduro helmet but impact protection is going to be equivalent. The 3/4" of dual density foam is the same no matter what you wrap it in. You are not going to get more energy dissipation in a harder shell. The MIPS is the same .
  • 4 0
 Dang, I thought the knob on the back of it was the new HIT concussion piece that came out recently. Got stoked for a second that a partnership was already made to help get the product out there!
  • 8 5
 I picked one of these up at my LBS the other day on a whym. Fwiw, I have a 59cm sideways Stewie head shape and the first proframe did not work for me. The original proframe in medium would fit my head but the chin bar was 1/4" off of my jaw. This one has a longer chim bar and the boa retention system makes it easy to get the fit a bit more dialed in. I concur on the fit of the cheek pads, although I typically like my helmet cheek pads to start off a bit too big/firm so that they fit right once they break down. My only complaint on this helmet is that the liner is pretty complicated and I wonder how it will hold up over time. The boa closure system acts like a halo, so I find the forehead fit good, but the balance between depth and top of the head vs forehead fit may be out of balance for some. I am a voracious head sweater, so I plan on adding a trax factory sweat buster to this to alleviate my liner complexity concerns and take up some of that forehead fit. This is replacing an ixs trigger mips FF that gave it's life protecting me. That was not a bad helmet, but it was a bit on the slim side for the riding I was doing and this feels more substantial. It does feel like it's significantly more premium and built with better materials and methods then the v1 proframe. Matt is bang on, the mips system in this is silent, and it does not shift around or shake due to the mips liner like most of those (bell super dh, tld stage). Putting goggles on seems to lock it in place even more, although it stays put just fine with out them. No feedback on fit or performance with glasses, my name is not Jerry, although I guess I do ride like one from time to time.

TLDR? Good dentist helmet for riding your ebike on. A+++ ADA and hygienist approved.
  • 7 19
flag pargolf8 (Oct 11, 2022 at 7:47) (Below Threshold)
 Are you always long winded and lacking substance?
  • 11 2
 @pargolf8: yes. I'm also sometimes sarcastic, drunk and/or belligerent. You know, feeling kinda wordy, may delete later type of #@$^
  • 1 1
 Damn, one day I'd like to be able to pick up a 500 dollar helmet on a whim. Goals, bro.
  • 4 0
 @pargolf8: Internet Dick of the Day award.
  • 4 0
 I can't see from the photos if there is anything stopping the Boa mechanism going into your head if you mange to crash on it. Is that going to be a problem in reality?
  • 6 0
 Best looking helmet i've seen in years.
  • 3 0
 If it’s DH certified then surely it’s been tested and is up for the job on par with a regular full face?
What am I missing here?
Genuinely curious why these lightweight DH certified helmets always get an asterisk.
  • 4 0
 These helmets likely just meet the certification, while the full on DH helmets blow past them. The testing basically involves dropping different shapes anvils on the helmets at different speeds (the flat one at 6.2 m/s, which is about like if you dropped it from 2m, the other two at slightly lower rates). If you decided to up the speed of impact of the test, the DH helmets would be fine to a higher speed than the enduro helmets, even though they both meet the current bar.
  • 2 1
 No! ASTM DH1952 are only bare minimum standards, interesting but unknown to us would be the actual test results
  • 3 0
 Silent MIPS....a problem I didn't know existed till I bought my SMITH mainline. It's a great helmet and superbly comfortable but man sometimes the MIPS liner squeaks and shuffles around so much it drives me near insane.
  • 1 0
 I have the same helmet and love it accept for the squeaks. I hope the fix it in next years model.
  • 2 0
 I crashed at Purgatory last week on a 12' drop during a rainy part of the day. Had my Pro-frame on, took a hit on my head/helmet and my shoulder. Snapped my visor off and scratched my Smith goggles. Walked away with sore neck, shoulder and a couple sore ribs. The Pro frame did its job and the MIPS is still intact. Just ordered a replacement visor and good to go.
  • 1 0
 Warning about warranty 28 days only for $359 helmet
Bought This helmet with defective on Boa system and missing parts like interior liner pads and you have only 28 days to return and get money back.
After 28 days customer service treats you very bad, gutted about this big company
Do not buy
  • 4 0
 I Just came here to say I love the front shot bit in the animation where the helmet seems to look surprised.:-D
  • 3 2
 Had a crush at 45 km/h with the old Proframe. It broke in 3 pieces. It did its job perfectly. I don’t understand the people that say it won’t protect you as good as a regular DH Helmet. If they have the ASTM certification it should work right?
  • 2 1
 DH helmets can absolutely be more protective, even while meeting the same base certification. Certification means it passes certain tests. You can half two helmets that pass, but one just passes, while the other is well-past the standards.
  • 1 3
 Read MarcusBrodys and my comment above. Answer is NO!
  • 3 1
 @JohSch: more like we don’t know. ASTM test only some parameters. They are met by both, full DH and Lightweight Enduro helmets. Beyond that, only manufacturers could/should tell us what other test they performed and how well they did on those.
  • 1 2
 @PabloMoll: it would be a miracle with its weight and the used materials if it would be as safe or safer as carbon / composite based helmets from around the 1000g mark
  • 1 0
 Anyone know if this replaces the standard proframe next year or is in addition to it?
I like my proframe and fits great as standard, but could use a new one, would prefer to wait for new Color’s then scoop up a leftover now.
  • 3 0
 This is a stand-alone lid, like the Rampage Pro Carbon is to the Rampage Comp.. the Proframe will still be available in the original shape and lower price for a season or 2 at least.
  • 1 0
 @Nikolais: thanks.
  • 1 0
 "all of which are available in a multitude of colors, from loud fluorescents to black camo."

Right now I only see black and black with a splash of colour on Fox's website, will more be released later?
  • 2 0
 I just added all the colours from the Fox press release into the review. Not sure if all colours will make it to all markets.
  • 2 1
 @korev, yes, the remaining colorways will become available over the course of the next 3-4 weeks.
  • 3 0
 I’ve been happy with my original Proframe, and this looks to have addressed the shortcomings.
  • 1 1
 'Inside the helmet, two different density layers of protective foams, EPP and EPS, take care of low and high-speed impacts. Secondly, the inner EPP piece makes up the structure of MIPS Integra Split, a system that can spherically glide on the outer layer of EPS.' Sounds like Speherical MIPS, used by Bell for at least the last four years.
  • 3 1
 @Hellchops, this Integra Split system is different again from the above aforementioned. The two layers you mention are connected using five circular elastomers (Woofers) that are the drivers behind the glide and rotational management of this system (see the yellow Woofer in one of Matt's photos above). This is the first Integra Split helmet to market, and we are stoked that this new technology by Mips will be the benchmark moving forward.
  • 2 1
 @Fox-Head-Inc:

Have you sent some helmets to Virginia Tech to crash test? (And show with data just how great of a helmet this is)
  • 1 1
 @Fox-Head-Inc: I can see they're not exactly the same. Precisely how the EPS and EPP layers are connected is a secondary function to the main purpose/concept, which is to have the outer EPS layer move 'spherically' around the inner EPP shell. MIPS has named and executed differently, but it is obvious that the concept is the same.
  • 4 1
 Any benefits on this over the IXS Trigger FF?
  • 8 4
 It's heavier and more expensive so....no
  • 2 0
 MIPS and duel foam?
  • 2 0
 @Gdg1: You can get a Trigger with MIPS
  • 2 0
 @islandforlife: So you can. Looks like that option was added after I bought mine. For the record, I'm a fan of the Trigger.
  • 2 1
 @Gdg1: MIPS and dual foam on the Troy Lee Stage too. With an adjustable visor.
  • 1 0
 @Gdg1: I use a Kali Invader but bought a Trigger for my son, great helmet and one of the only manufacturers that makes a true small fitting helmet for jr's (or people with really small heads).
  • 4 0
 Had the IXS now on the RS. The RS is even more ventilated. It's quite noticeable. But the best thing is that the BOA cradle on the RS doesn't need to be loosened to put the helmet on. On the IXS I had to back it off each time. Visor on the RS is nicer. The IXS was pretty clunky.
  • 3 1
 good on you fox for using a fidlock buckle. i wont buy a helmet without one.
  • 1 0
 I have had two fidlocks break. The plastic logo cap separates on the latch side and then the buckle can open. Buckle has to be replaced. The cap is pinned on. If you turn the latch over you can see the four pins from the underside.
They are convenient…with risk.
  • 2 0
 My proframe made horrible sounds while ridding,love the helmet but it is a pain is the ass.
  • 2 0
 yeah definitely looks like a full face
  • 9 8
 I've seen the chin guard fail on this helmet already. Not fit for purpose describes it perfectly.
  • 4 4
 "Downvoted for telling the truth". Sums Pinkbike users up perfectly.
  • 2 0
 another company with no XL option, no love for people with a bigger brain
  • 1 0
 @matbeer - This and the Specialized Gambit - which would you choose or how do they compare?
  • 1 0
 Gambit fits very strange for me. Very oversized for each shell. I should have been a MD but the SM was the closest. Even then it didn't cinch up securely. Dial to tighten and loosen works in reverse to what you expect. Huge FOV and very light though. But it also feels incredible thin and flimsy. The chinbar flexes quite a lot which isn't confidence inspiring. Supposedly carbon fibre but I think it might just be plastic with a cosmetic layer on top. The RS is big, secure, solid. Much heavier feeling. Even better venting than Gambit.
  • 1 0
 I ride the Gambit. The fit is bit different from Dissident and took a bit to figure out the sizing, but have had it since it came out and am very happy with it. Tried the RS and none of the sizes fit my head at all. It's also noticeably heavier. I use my Gambit where I'd gone with a half shell before. The RS is closer in weight to my DH lid so I can't see doing a full day in it too often.
  • 1 0
 @MrDuck: I was pretty bummed out after I tried the Gambit. I was so sold on it given how light it is. And even more strange because I've had a bunch of Prevails and I loved them.

I found even a full day in a 600g helmet was quite tiring on the neck. So I totally get what you mean.
  • 2 0
 does the RS stand for rockshox?
  • 1 0
 Typo: "Considering all of the safety and fit features packed into this helmet, I’d the Proframe RS is worth it."
  • 1 0
 What retailers even carry fox now after what fox did to them after the sale?
  • 1 0
 I just bought a Proframe this summer and now I wish I had waited. Sweet helmet update!
  • 1 1
 So basically Fox threw in their version of the Roc Loc and charged an extra $109 for it. Fantastic.
  • 1 0
 Does it creak though as the previous model?
  • 1 0
 It has mullet channel flow through technology, awesome!
  • 4 5
 I break too many helmets to buy a 360 dollar one. Its been one or two new helmets a season.
  • 3 1
 This is a huge gripe of mine, how much a decent helmet costs. I know people will say "you cant put a price on safety" which I get where they're coming from, but you can and they have. Anyone who rides hard or pushes their limits is ganna take some dings to the head. Its not feasible to buy a new 300+ helmet every single time. Luckily some offer crash replacement discounts, but even then they're not great.
  • 9 1
 If your bouncing your head around that much, spending more on a helmet might be wise.
  • 1 0
 Some companies, f.ex. Bluegrass offer a 50% off Crash Replacement policy.
  • 1 0
 @JohSch: Didn't know about the crash replacement. It seems that Fox has a 20% replacement policy. Will probably get another dropframe with that.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: The last one that got damaged was a POC Coron. Definitely should invest in a nice helmet but that was 200 dollars, we are approaching 400 for non-carbon enduro full face.
  • 2 0
 @howejohn: im not in disagreement the helmets are over priced, just saying you sound like the target user of whatever super helmet is available.
  • 1 2
 The hole in the front - dangerous. Surprised they haven't changed it this time.
  • 1 1
 Which "substance" is desired??







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