Review: Transition's New Sentinel V2 - Now With More Travel

Apr 28, 2020
by Mike Kazimer  
When Transition launched the original Sentinel back in 2017 its geometry numbers turned heads. After all, at the time there were only a few other companies making 29ers that were that long, that slack, and with reduced offset forks. It turns out that the trend caught on, and those geometry numbers look a lot more normal now than they did just a few years ago.

Version 2.0 launches today, and while it isn't a drastic departure from the original, there have been a few noteworthy tweaks and design changes to ensure the Sentinel remains fully modern. The most obvious change is the look of the carbon frame itself – it's more angular, with fewer swoops and curves than before. Think more fighter jet, less Ford Taurus. It's a look that matches the 27.5” Scout that was released this past February.
Transition Sentinel Details

• Wheel size: 29"
• Carbon frame
• Travel: 150mm rear / 160mm front
• 63.6-degree head angle
• 440mm chainstays (size L)
• Lifetime warranty
• Weight: 31.25 lb / 14.17 kg (size large)
• Frame colors: Ti Grey, Loam Gold
• Price: $5,449 USD as shown, $3,199 frame + Float X2 shock
www.transitionbikes.com

Along with the updated shape, the Sentinel now has 150mm of rear travel, 10 millimeters more than the original. To go along with the extra travel, the new frame's leverage curve is slightly more progressive in order to provide more support and prevent unwanted bottoming-out on bigger impacts.

The bike that I've been riding for the last two months is the GX build, which retails for $5,499 USD. Highlights include a 160mm RockShox Lyrik Ultimate, Code RSC brakes, SRAM GX drivetrain, and Stan's Flow S1 wheelset with a Maxxis Assegai up front and a DHR II in the back, both with EXO+ casing.

The Sentinel frame with a Fox Float X2 shock is priced at $3,199 USD. Along with the GX model, there's also an X01 version for $6,599, and an NX model for $4,499 USD.

bigquotesThe new version is no slouch when it comes to straight-line plowing, but now I'd categorize it as more of an aggressive all-rounder rather than a downhill specialist. Mike Kazimer






Construction and Features

The Sentinel's frame is constructed using Toray carbon and a latex EPS molding process. That means the carbon is laid over a latex covered EPS form, then put into a mold. The mold is then heated, which expands the foam, putting uniform pressure onto the inside of the frame to prevent any unwanted wrinkles or voids.

There's internal cable routing for the derailleur and dropper lines, and the brake line is run externally for easy servicing. Two bolts under the top tube can be used to mount a tube or tool holder, and there's new integrated chainstay protection. Tire clearance has also been increased – up to a 2.6” rear tire will fit without any trouble.


Transition Sentinel V2
There's plenty of room for a water bottle, and the brake line is routed externally for easy access.
Transition Sentinel V2
The Sentinel uses an expanding collet design to keep the main pivot hardware in place. I did have it loosen up on me once, but applying some Loctite to the main pivot bolt prevented any further issues.


As seat tube angles get steeper, the ability to fit a dropper post with plenty of travel is more important than ever. To ensure the Sentinel made the grade, Transition shortened the seat tube length even further, which means there's enough room for as much drop as possible - the OneUp dropper on my test bike has a whopping 210mm of travel.

The Sentinel is devoid of any flip chips or multi-position shock mounts, but that doesn't mean it's a one-trick pony. It's possible to run a 57.5mm stroke shock (stock is 62.5 mm), which would reduce the rear travel to 140mm, and the bike's press-in headset cups means that the frame is compatible with angle-adjusting headsets – geometry tinkerers should be able to achieve a slacker or steeper head angle without much trouble. What about getting even more travel out of the rear end? That's not recommended – the clearance between the downtube and the shock reservoir would get a little too close with a 65mm stroke shock, and issues could arise at full bottom-out.


Transition Sentinel V2
The integrated chainslap guard keeps things quiet. Yes, there's a little heel rub - riding flat pedals in the mud will do that; I'd recommend applying a strip of mastic tape or a protective sticker.
Transition Sentinel V2
There's clearance for up to a 2.6" tire.

Transition Sentinel V2

Geometry & Sizing

As I mentioned, the Sentinel's geometry numbers were modern enough that they didn't need a drastic revision. There have been a few changes, though; the head angle has gotten even slacker, and it now comes in at 63.6-degrees. The chainstays measure 440mm on all sizes – that's 5mm longer than before, although it would be nice to see those change depending on frame size. I bet the rider on the XXL size wouldn't mind a longer back-end to go with that 521mm reach...

The seat angle varies slightly depending on the size, but on the large its 76.9-degrees. Props to Transition for publishing the seat tube angle at multiple heights, along with the actual, 70.8-degree angle and the amount of seat tube offset, numbers that are all too often missing from geometry charts.



Transition Sentinel V2

Suspension Design

According to Transition, the leverage ratio on the new Sentinel V2 has a 23.5% total change (2.81 starting and 2.15 ending), with approximately 15% change from sag to full travel. The initial leverage ratio was increased for better small bump compliance, and the increase in travel along with the increase in progression is claimed to help improve the amount of support on sequential bigger hits.

Anti-squat sits slightly above 100% at sag, and then drops off as the bike goes through its travel.


Specifications
Price $5449
Travel 150mm
Rear Shock RockShox Super Deluxe Ultimate
Fork RockShox Lyrik Ultimate RC
Headset FSA No57E
Cassette SRAM GX Eagle
Crankarms SRAM Stylo 7K DUB
Rear Derailleur SRAM GX Eagle
Chain SRAM GX Eagle
Shifter Pods SRAM GX Eagle
Handlebar ANVL Mandrel
Stem ANVL Swage 40mm
Grips Sensus Lite
Brakes SRAM Code RSC
Wheelset Stans Flow S1 Tea
Tires Maxxis Assegai 2.5" / Maxxis DHR II 2.4" EXO+
Seat ANVL Forge CroMo
Seatpost OneUp Dropper Post




Transition Sentinel V2





Test Bike Setup

I ran a little above bodyweight in the RockShox Super Deluxe shock, which put me at 28% sag. After a few rides, I ended up installing one more volume spacer in the shock, for a total of two. Up front, I ran 78 psi in the Lyrik, with two clicks of high-speed compression and four clicks of low-speed compression from fully open.

The touchpoints of the bike worked perfectly for me – the 30mm rise bar, the Anvl seat, the Sensus grips, the tire selection – I didn't need to swap out anything at all. It doesn't hurt that Transition is based in the same town I live in – it makes sense that the parts would be appropriate for where I ride.

Testing took place entirely around Bellingham, Washington, where trail conditions ranged from wet and sloppy to primetime perfection. Typically, I would have thrown some Canadian adventures into the mix, but unfortunately, the current COVID situation has taken that off the table for the time being. Luckily, I live close to miles and miles of top-notch trails.


Me.
Mike Kazimer
Location: Bellingham, WA, USA
Age: 37
Height: 5'11" / 180cm
Inseam: 33" / 84cm
Weight: 160 lbs / 72.6 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @mikekazimer


Transition Sentinel V2

Climbing

Yes, the Sentinel's head angle sits in what used to be downhill bike territory, but that doesn't mean it climbs like a big, sluggish gravity sled – far from it, in fact. The overall weight is very reasonable, especially considering the lack of any lightweight carbon components, and it felt more energetic on the climbs than I'd expected.

The 76.9-degree seat tube angle is in-line with the latest batch of bikes I've been testing, as is the 613mm top tube length. Those numbers, combined with the 30mm rise bar meant that I felt right at home the moment I sat on the Sentinel.

It's on straight ahead, technical sections that the Sentinel's length and head angle are beneficial – there's a level of slow-speed stability that makes it easy to maintain forward progress on tricky, chunky climbs.
There was minimal pedal bob during seated climbing, and a small amount of motion from the shock when I shifted my weight forward during out of the saddle efforts. Overall, I was content leaving the shock in the fully open position for the vast majority of the time. I'd put its climbing manners on par with those of the new Norco Sight, and a little behind the Ibis Ripmo, which has a shorter wheelbase and a slightly more efficient feeling suspension design.

Now, in saying all this, the Sentinel is still more focused on the descents than the climbs. It's very manageable on tamer terrain, and I was perfectly content pedaling it around for 4-6 hours at a time, but it also isn't going to deliver that super snappy, turn-on-dime feeling that would come with something shorter and steeper.


Transition Sentinel V2

Descending

Fans of the first generation Sentinel won't be disappointed by the new one. It has all the capabilities of the original, and now there's a little more margin for error courtesy of 10 millimeters of additional cushion for those moments when things don't go exactly as planned.

When I reviewed the aluminum Sentinel back in 2017 I wrote that it, “prefers to plow straight ahead rather than pop off trailside features – smashing straight down the trail is its strong suit.” The new version is no slouch when it comes to straight-line plowing, but now I'd categorize it as more of an aggressive all-rounder rather than a downhill specialist. It's well-suited to my favorite types of rides – big, long adventures with a focus on steep and rough trails that can only be accessed after a sustained uphill grind.


Transition Sentinel V2


My slight change in tune is partially due to the fact that there have been a number of even more DH-oriented 29ers released in the last two years, bikes like the Specialized Enduro or Raaw Madonna, for instance. Those two models, in particular, feel more single-mindedly focused on crushing downhill laps, with more travel and a stoutness that allows them to blithely smash through obstacles.

The Sentinel has a comfortable, carvy nature to it, and I never felt like I was getting unduly knocked around on rough descents. Frame stiffness is hard to quantify without putting on the lab coat, and the aluminum Stan's wheels likely played a part in the equation, but I was impressed by just how comfortable the Sentinel felt on the trail. Big hits were dispatched without a fuss once I'd added an additional volume spacer – the end-stroke ramp up was smooth, and in the instances when I did use all the travel it never felt like I was hitting a wall.


Transition Sentinel V2
Transition Sentinel
Ibis Ripmo 2
Ibis Ripmo V2

How does it compare?

The Ripmo and the Sentinel were both updated this year, so let's take a moment to see how these sequels stack up. On tighter, slow speed climbs the Ripmo takes slightly less effort to maneuver – its steeper head angle (64.9 vs 63.5) and 25mm shorter wheelbase make it feel a little zippier than the Sentinel.

Once the trail heads downhill, the Sentinel pulls ahead - it's more assured and stable on really steep sections of trail. Both bikes are competent descenders, but it's the Sentinel that feels most at home when gravity takes over. When it comes to price, a Ripmo frame and shock are $200 USD less than a Sentinel.

There's less of a difference when compared to the Norco Sight. The geometry numbers are nearly identical – the Sight's reach is a little longer, and the seat tube angle a little steeper, but the wheelbase dimensions are within a millimeter of each other. The Sentinel is a little lighter thanks to its full carbon frame, and the Transition's rear suspension offered more mid- and end-stoke support when both bikes were set up with similar amounts of sag.


Transition Sentinel V2
The 210mm OneUp post came in handy on extra-steep trails.
Transition Sentinel V2
Underneath the lower shock mount is a tiny swimming pool for ants.

Technical Report

The Sentinel's GX build kit is a pretty close match to how I'd choose to spec my own bike – going with the workhorse GX drivetrain helps keep the price down while leaving room for goodies like the Code RSC brakes and Lyrik Ultimate fork. Gram counters could easily shed weight by swapping some of the aluminum parts out for carbon, but even if I had unlimited funds there's really not much I'd change right away.

Super Deluxe knock: The Sentinel's RockShox Super Deluxe shock had an annoying knock that was audible at slower speeds. At first, I thought it was cable rattle or possibly something in the frame, but switching to a Fox Float X2 shock confirmed that the Super Deluxe was the source of that racket. It didn't seem to be affecting the performance, but on quieter sections of trail it was very distracting.

According to RockShox, a new tune has been developed to specifically address the concerns of noise. For riders who purchase a Sentinel prior to the change being implemented in production, this tune is retrofittable to the current Super Deluxe shocks. Transition says that, "If you feel like your Super Deluxe shock is affected, contact us by email or via live chat on our website and we will help to ensure the issue is resolved as quickly as possible through a RockShox service center. This retrofit will be done at no charge to customers."

Loam swimming pool: Transition have always touted their 'loam shelf', the part of the frame in front of the chainstays where piles of loamy soil like to accumulate. It's a good way to show off your local trail conditions on social media, but I'm not so sure about the new feature, the loam swimming pool. There's a pocket underneath the lower shock mount where water collects after a wet ride or a bike wash, and you need to flip the bike upside down to get it to drain. Lots of bikes with this frame style have windows / ports to allow water to escape, but not this one.

Maxxis Assegai / DHR II tire combo: I'm a big fan of this tire match-up for most of the year here in the Pacific Northwest. It's a slightly faster rolling option compared to dual Assegais, and there's loads of traction in firm to soft conditions.


Transition Sentinel V2


Pros

+ Great all-rounder for riders with the right terrain
+ Relatively light considering the build kit
+ Wide range of sizes, room for long travel dropper posts

Cons

- Knocking noise from Super Deluxe
- Water pools up underneath lower shock bolt
- Not the mini-DH / smash-through-everything bike some riders may be looking for



Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesThe new Transition Sentinel isn't a drastic departure from the original, but if anything that's a testament to how far ahead of the curve that first version actually was. With a little more travel and all the latest frame features it's fully modernized and able to take on a far wider variety of terrain than its geometry numbers suggest. 
Mike Kazimer








360 Comments

  • 95 9
 As someone who has gone through getting a new bike every year for almost 12 years, just to try new things.....I'm still on a 2018 Carbon Sentinel and I can say that I still have no plans to replace it. It's incredibly versatile for what a bruiser it was intended to be. Easy up and stable down. Really don't see the allure to go to 150mm and a half desire steeper head tube when it absolutely rips the ways it is. And more importantly, a little longer chain stay is something I personally wouldn't want being the way it is, it still keeps the back end manageable in squirmy sections. Love Transition bikes, and their attitude and I'm just still smiling big on my 2018 model. That said V2 is a sharp looking frame.
  • 14 0
 I've been on a 2019 and agree it is a killer all-rounder. I'd personally love that extra 10mm. I feel like I could use a little extra margin of error on big jumps and drops.
  • 5 1
 The same opinion
  • 6 1
 Agree with you. Just throw an EXT on the old sentinel and you're good to go!! New frame is very sharp though and I like the idea of lifetime warranty.
  • 21 47
flag hamncheez (Apr 28, 2020 at 9:27) (Below Threshold)
 the OG carbon Sentinel isn't exactly a looker....
  • 3 2
 @mdeppi: That's my thinking with my '18 Slash. Everything else is dialed and modern and working great. The shock is the last component to upgrade.
  • 25 1
 @hamncheez: that dark red frame sentinal is one of the best looking bikes ever
  • 11 4
 @nfontanella: Mike is right, despite the AL looking great the overly curvy carbon looks like a Ford Taurus
  • 2 0
 @nfontanella: I concur, tho I'm biased cause I just bought a used 2019 in that color. Looks great, more importantly it rides great.
  • 56 3
 "new bike every year for almost twelve years"..... Nice flex bro
  • 24 0
 @intensecp:
LOL. New not necessarily meaning brand new, perhaps I should have stated different as most were used, just new to me. I'll wear my Carhatts out until they burst into flames. Literally the only thing I spend any money on is mtn bikes and dirt bikes. Thrifty has its benefits.
  • 3 8
flag thenotoriousmic (Apr 28, 2020 at 12:08) (Below Threshold)
 This is one 29er I’d actually buy but at 6ft 3 I shouldn’t be stuck between a large and a XL when they also make an XXL.
  • 8 0
 In a few months, the new V2 will keep looking better and better to you and waking you up at night. The latest and greatest models does that to everyone.
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez: I’ve heard them described as banana bikes haha. That said I still think they’re sexy, but not as beautiful as my aluminum
  • 1 0
 Same here, brother!
  • 2 1
 @thenotoriousmic: just pick one, I’m 6’ 3” and owned large and XL, they’re both fine.
  • 5 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I'm same height and on an XL and i definitely wouldn't get a large but would consider an xxl
  • 5 0
 I have a 2019 Patrol and have the same opinion. I think they nailed the SBG geo the first time and are now just following trends.
  • 8 0
 @thenotoriousmic: you aren't, the large is too small for you.
  • 5 1
 @floor-tom: the right size is the bike that feels and works best for the rider. Height is only one part of the equation, used across the industry because it’s a convenient way to tell a stranger over the internet what bike will work for them. Leg/torso/arm length, weight, trail type, and riding style all matter.
  • 2 2
 @thenotoriousmic: How can you be between those two sizes? The seattube won't work at all for the Large and it'll be real close on the XL unless you have short legs. At 6'3" you could very easily get away with the XXL or do the XL if you aren't yet accustomed to longer reaches and your legs will work with the seattube.
  • 3 0
 Yep. 2019 Sentinel in the Ron Burgundy colorway. Love the bike. Not in a rush to find anything else.
  • 1 0
 my brother jokingly texted me: there is a new Sentinel out, get rid of your old one!

No need here, best bike I´ve ever ridden. I also bought it as kind of a mini-DH in mind (what it also is capable of doing) but it´s still so versatile. Geo was REALLY ahead of it´s time back then.
  • 2 0
 @adamdigby: I’ve ridden the old XL sentinel and it was too big. I’m closer to a large but that’s a tad bit smaller than ideal.
  • 3 0
 @adamdigby: I’m 6’ 3” with a 33-34 inch in seam and the large is more than fine with a 180mm dropper. Maybe 2 inches of post showing below the collar, no more than they show in their product photos or the bike used for this review. And now larges come with 210mm droppers. No problem.
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Same height and I went with XL. Took longer than I would've liked to get used to but once you do, it's awesome. No way on the XXL.
  • 1 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: That explains it! I am ~6' 4" with a ~38.5" inseam and use 5.10 Impacts while riding on 165mm cranks, so seat tube length and angle is very important to me. I also prefer large reach numbers and stack height.
  • 3 0
 The new leverage curves are worth the upgrade in my opinion! Though, I prefer more playful bikes...
  • 1 3
 Untill you ride something else thats faster less sluggy and more inspring. I though the sentinal was and absolute weapon, until i road a couple of mates bikes and realised its a flaw magnate. Yea yea yea set up tyre etc- been there done that. Its pretty good but not the best.
  • 40 1
 I like the less bubbly frame style they're going for with the new models of bikes. I have the Sentinel V1 and it's a great bike, I'm not sure I'd be one to fork over a wad of cash for a .2 degree head angle change and 10mm more travel in the back though.
  • 46 1
 @CascadeComponents has a rocker link coming out that'll get you that extra travel and progression for a lot less money.
  • 2 0
 @dlxah: I'm strongly considering trying one of their links when they're available.
  • 2 0
 @dlxah: I'm holding out on this for my v1
  • 1 1
 @dlxah: Does it change shock dimensions at all? If so I'd like to see if it's a slightly more standard size for a wider variety of shocks. I'd love to run a Marzocchi bomber CR on my V1 but they don't make a 57.5 stroke shock.
  • 1 0
 @Ajorda: They're still prototyping it. Check out this thread for all the details: forums.mtbr.com/transition-bikes/sentinel-140-150-link-1108173.html
  • 2 0
 @dlxah: do tell mate!
  • 3 2
 See if fox van r from 2008 has the stroke your looking for. It’s the same shock @Ajorda:
  • 1 0
 Yeah, the sharper lines looks better to me as well.
  • 2 0
 @freeridejerk888: Throw a progressive spring on it an I'm sure it'll perform just fine.
  • 4 0
 @freeridejerk888: they had metric trunnion shocks in 2008?
  • 2 0
 I think you’ll notice the shock rate more than the 10mm travel. Orbea did this with the Rallon to generally positive reviews.
  • 2 0
 It’s the same shock as this “new” marzocchi one. @leadsledpaintrain:
  • 3 0
 @freeridejerk888: And the Van RC is still specced on bikes as recently as 2016. Not really sure what you're getting at here. Besides that, Van RC is still an amazing coil shock.
  • 1 2
 I’m getting at I hate when someone changes the name and slaps a different color dial on it and precedes to call it the new bomber shock. Actually make somthing different @Ajorda:
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: Of course it's something similar, it's sold and marketed by Marzocchi, who are selling beefed up versions of FOX's old stuff.

The Bomber CR is similar to the Van RC, but was released for a bunch of trail bike sizes and strokes. Much like the Van RC, it's meant as a budget friendly starter coil.

You're not going to get a $600 shock for $300. The lack of features reflects the price, much like how the old Van RC is. I'd rather pay $300 and get 1 or 2 less adjustments and insane reliability, whereas I pay $700 for something like an Ohlins and rebuild at the same interval of an air shock.
  • 1 0
 @Ajorda: The Van36 was gem of a fork, but just the weight penalty. 5.53lbs compared to Fox 36 4.32lbs. The CC Helm is 4.97lbs which is not too bad, but don't know how the fork is.
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: Wasn't the Van 36 meant to compete with the Rockshox Totem? Sort of the Single crown freeride fork?
  • 1 0
 @Ajorda: Not really in my opinion. The Totem was much burlier, heavier, and more travel @180mm. More for the freeriders hucking big features. The Van36 was more of a enduro type fork.

I rode the Van36 for a long time. The small bump compliance while still having enough support for bigger hits was great. Air has taken over, but I do think that if some fork companies put the coil forks with pro EWS riders and they started winning, coil would instantly become popular again. Coil rear shocks have become more popular of late on EWS.
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: I think it's become more popular because racers found they don't need the ramp up while charging through rough sections, I've talked to quite a few racing friends and they all say a coil feels much more comfortable when things start to get really rough, not only that, but there's less chance of the coil blowing out in the middle of a 30 mile race day.

I've got the Rockshox Boxxer coil on my downhill bike and actually prefer it over the air, but I'm a utilitarian person, along with a "set and forget" mentality. The service interval and the ability to just not worry about how much air I have in the fork or my sag settings is great to me. People are digging the Marzocchi Z1 coil, I think the new Rockshox enduro fork will see a coil option as well.
  • 36 0
 Loving my new Scout, and if you like wagon wheels you can't go wrong with the Sentinel. The new frame designs give me wood compared to the curvy ones of the previous gen.
  • 12 1
 Seems I might be on my own here then when I say I prefer the old design language.

Those curvy frames were divisive but they sure were unique and I love 'em! Glad I got one.

There are more than enough straight/angular brands out there!
  • 2 0
 Sweet mate! The Scout was on my short list. Love the new frame style too. How does it ride?
  • 6 0
 @Ktron: same here I think the older frames had a unique look to them, these new ones look generic & boring to my eyes
  • 2 0
 @mybaben: Sublimely.
  • 1 0
 @f*ckingsteve: LOL. Nice! Cheers.
  • 29 1
 I like the term "Aggressive All-Rounder" for a new category of mountain bike. It sounds like the kind of thing I'm looking for, in general. We can add it to XC, Trail, Downcountry, Enduro, All-Mountain, Upduro and Downhill. Should make everything a little more crystal clear going forward.
  • 1 0
 Assuming it would be the same as long travel trail bike
  • 45 1
 @cuban-b: no, Long Travel Trail Bikes have 150/150 or 150/140 but the same angles as the Agressive All-Rounder Bikes which sit firmly between 160/150 and 160/155 mm of travel. Anything more is Enduro, with some exceptions of course. On the other hand, All Mountain Bikes are legally required to have a head tube angle steeper than 65 degrees, because that’s what old people ride.

It is important to set clear boundaries or the categorizations could get too convoluted.
  • 12 0
 @Upduro: username checks out
  • 3 0
 @Upduro: JFC. It's bullshit, but it's also true.
  • 5 0
 @Upduro: upvoted for the All Mountain/Old People comment.
  • 26 1
 Seems like geo is converging for this kind of bike. I'd be surprised if HA and STA numbers change too much going forward. Kinda nice to feel like owning a bike like this (or the previous Sentinel, or an Enduro/SB150/Sight/etc.) is getting more and more future-proof as far as angles go.
  • 15 6
 I think you'll see head angles back off a little, and reaches continue to grow a bit.
I bet a large with 500mm reach and 65 degree HTA will be popular in say 2-3 years.
After this - it's back to messing with handlebars; more backsweep (like SQLab) and upsweep (like Newmen) - you heard it here first.
  • 3 1
 @ratedgg13: The Bird AM9 is exactly what you describe and was released in early 2018
  • 2 0
 @Arierep: 100%. The bike engineer who convinced me of that rides precisely that bike and I ride a Rallon in XL (despite being 5'10) to get something similar.
  • 7 0
 @ratedgg13: just replying to this so I can look at this 2-3 years ahead
  • 2 0
 Check out Geometron. Chris Porter figured it out years ago @ratedgg13:
  • 6 1
 @westernsloperider: To be clear, not saying there aren't bikes already doing this (geometron, Aeris, etc) - I'm saying that the industry norm (like the Norco and Transition mentioned here) will move as a whole to longer reach and slightly steeper HTA. There are always a few brands way out ahead of these things, its more about what the majority of brands are doing trend wise.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: what are your thoughts on more handlebar sweep? I'm deep considering this as I occasionally get sore wrists.
  • 2 0
 @ratedgg13: Yep, Knolly's new Warden is this.
  • 3 0
 @EckNZ: I've been using Salsa's carbon rustler bar at 11 degrees with a set of ergon ga2 fat grips - really helps with my wrist issues. I'm going to be trying the SQLab 12 or 16 degree bars this summer, and maybe the Newmen 8 degree upsweep if I can find a way to get them in Canada. If you check over at NSMB, theres a lot of riders there that swear by bigger backsweep bars (and thats techy shore riding). Worth a try?
  • 1 1
 @islandforlife: I know! If Knollys weren't so ground huggy I'd buy one (I'm more into poppy bikes than ground huggy).
  • 1 0
 Agreed. If you look at what Giant did with the new Reign 29. It mimics this "normal" geometry.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: Have you tried the new gen? Not like they were... much more balanced. Think they really figured out to get the best out of that 4x4 set-up... they're pretty amazing now. Poppy, fun, yet still so active, not sure how they did it actually.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: with an EXT storia its definitely poppy. I've got one on my fugitive and it's the best jumping bike I've had. So balanced.
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: +1 I am riding a 2019 Fugitive and its a magical mix of pin-it and playfulness.
  • 1 0
 @teethandnails: Fugitive was the best bike I'd ever owned or ridden... and so my 2020 Warden arrives very soon!
  • 2 0
 @ratedgg13: I had problems with my wrists for over a year. And a couple of months ago i bought my self the sq lab bars with 12 degree sweep and also ergon ga3. I have regular bars with ergon grips on one bike, and the sq lab bar on the other with a standard sweep bar. Both of them really helps and my wrist pain is gone!
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife @MattInNZ yeah I demo'd the new Fugitive (in both LT and ST) at my LBS. Loved the geo, but they just aren't quite right for my riding style.
  • 25 0
 What I really need in my life is for @CascadeComponents to release their Sentinel LT Link and save me $5500. The Gen 1 Sentinel was perfect in every way except the very linear suspension.
  • 4 0
 I had no idea about this. Thank goodness for Pinkbike and the comment sections. As soon as it comes out, I'm buying it.
  • 4 1
 It lets Oncoil it bro! So sick so easy to bottom out!
  • 1 0
 Pre-ordered the link for my V2 Hightower after all the glowing reviews for the Mega/Nomad links...10-15 mins for a swap and can always put the shorter link back in if I decide to...can’t wait!
  • 21 1
 Obviously this is going to get compared to the sight. My biggest gripe as far as numbers go is that the STA gets slacker as the bike gets bigger. Norco did the opposite which is the right move. Us tall guys running 210mm droppers often find our weight pretty far back over the rear wheel while climbing so the 78 degree on the XL sight is something I love to see going forward. Transition put a 78.2 on the small but unfortunately this number goes down to 76 on the XXL.
  • 4 4
 It's even worse for us tall guys because it is an actual seat angle of 70.8 degrees. I have the current SBG Smuggler and a Geometron G16. Smuggler has an effective 75.3 degree seat tube angle and the Geometron has a 77. Riding each bike is an insane difference...because the actual seat tube angle of the Smuggler is around 70 degrees. Vs the actual seat tube angle of my Geometron is 77. My phone angle app shows a very clear difference, and you tell by riding both.
  • 13 0
 @gbeaks33: the seat-tube on the g16 is offset, so the actual and effective angles can't both be 77.
  • 4 0
 Norco also increases the chainstay length as the bikes get bigger. Guess aluminum stays have more than one advantage.
  • 6 2
 Note that Transition measures their STA at something close to saddle height, Norco measures at stack. So for XL (my size) Transition measures at 78cm from BB, not at stack. 76.4 at 78cm is plenty steep; the perception that STA gets slacker as size increase is entirely due to measuring at higher saddle height as well, as all ACTUAL STAs are the same (70.8 ).

Given listed effective TT numbers, I think actual STA for tall guys will be pretty close to identical between Sight and Sentinel.
  • 1 6
flag gbeaks33 (Apr 28, 2020 at 11:07) (Below Threshold)
 @thegoodflow: I don't think Geometron lists an effective seat angle. The geo chart just says seat angle. But does it matter? Put your phone up flush against your exposed seat post at full extension with an angle app - isn't that your seat angle? 70 degrees vs 77 degrees is a massive difference.
  • 7 0
 @gbeaks33: Nope, not really how it works. I know of no full-sus bike that has a straight seat tube from BB center, seat tube is moved forward but also slackened. Hence difference between actual and effective.
  • 3 0
 @Drew-O: Nope. Norco measures at a nominal saddle height per size. I don't think they publish the numbers they use anywhere though.
  • 3 0
 @cole-inman: Except that they increase the chainstay length by moving the BB shell forward in the front triangle.
  • 1 1
 @cole-inman: They do it in the frame. I wanted the XL chainstays for my L but they are identical. Frown
  • 16 1
 I love bikes, I've broken a lot of bikes. I love lifetime warranty, Transition is making a great case for owning a stellar bike that I can count on.
  • 18 3
 Haha, the old carbon frame did look like a Ford Tarus.
  • 5 1
 Reminds me more of the SN95 Mustangs vs the new edge Mustangs.
  • 4 0
 With the ability for “straight line plowing”. I’d say it was the CLI addition of the Taurus.
  • 14 0
 I kept reading seat tube angle in the geo chart as "stangle". Like dang, this bike's got a good stangle
  • 1 1
 @wpplayer18 you win! haha!
  • 9 0
 Was kind of waiting for this one before choosing a new bike this year. Now that I see it, definitely still thrilled with the Madonna. Wheelbase and CS length are the same in my size, with the Sentinel having a hair less reach and a lower HTA. With that as a comparison, I'm sure it'll ride great. Even without the Madonna's extra-low BB.

But $7600 CAD for a GX build? Wowzers. An aluminum model will likely still be up in the 6k range. Even if I were a fan of carbon frames in this segment of bike (I'm very much not, but that's me), that's still a tough sell.

Looks great though!
  • 3 0
 Can't actually by a Madonna though..
  • 4 1
 you can blame the exchange rate for that. Same bike same price last September would have been 7K CAD or 600$ less .. which is still quite expensive but in my opinion it could be worth it as there's nothing to change in the build. It already has good brakes, good suspensions, good tire, okay wheels and good drivetrain. The Norco sight C2 is also 7K CAD and is a SLX build with fox performance, which can't compare to RS Ultimate series. You'd get a much better value out of the transition in my opinion and I still think that the sight is a great build / price.
  • 2 1
 @maxgod: disagree. It’s actually a performance elite with grip 2. Amazing fork. I admit I haven’t experienced the ultimate RS, but can’t see it being noticeably better.
  • 3 2
 @CircusMaximus: fair enough but the rear shock on the sight is the X2 performance with LSC and LSR only, which is not on par with the RS Ultimate that would be equivalent to the X2 factory.
  • 10 1
 @mikekazimer Pros: lifetime warranty

Transition has always been great (and my LBS North Shore Bike Shop too for often stepping up) at helping customers out even when beyond their warranty timeframe... now it's just more official!
  • 12 2
 Need ineffective top tube and stance geo numbers please
  • 6 0
 in parsecs
  • 12 2
 looks great, especially that seat angle. but $3200 for a frame?!?!
  • 9 2
 $69 cheaper than a Ripmo
$300 cheaper than an SB140
  • 11 1
 I'm not sure why that surprises anyone. That seems to be the going rate for a carbon frame these days.
  • 11 4
 I think you misheard @onespeedbrian ... it's 300 dentures cheaper, not 300 dollars.
  • 12 3
 @TheR: mostly cuz i am an aluminum fan. but also cuz guerrilla gravity manages to sell american-made carbon frames for $2200 (sans shock).
  • 3 2
 It'll be cheaper in 10 years as a used frame. That's my plan, unless I score a Banshee Spitfire V2 frame before then. That's what I currently have my eye on. I don't even consider frames till they're 5 years old Smile
  • 7 1
 Yeah, I'm having trouble figuring out which companies are "boutique" when every random brand has $3000+ frames.
  • 7 0
 Good opportunity to get last year's NX build for $2600. Or GX carbon for $4000.
  • 4 0
 @savagelake: Well there you go. Gotta compare apples to apples. Guerrilla Gravity seems rather to the the exception than the rule.
  • 2 1
 @onespeedbrian: Ripmo Frame is 2999$
  • 3 1
 @savagelake: GG bikes are awesome! You can only get the X2 on the Gnarvana not the Smash, so $2825 with the same shock on it. 8.1lbs for a size 2 VS 7.05lbs for the Med Sentinel. So you pay almost 400 bucks for that one pound! (the Sentinel keeps its NUTS higher up on the frame so that might matter to some) Smile
  • 1 0
 @Warburrito: good luck with that plan, I put a crack in mine and know of 5 others that had the same fate. In itself defence I was using a trail bike on more enduro and dh trails.
  • 3 1
 Lifetime warranties aren't free.
  • 3 0
 @kazwei: Not with the same shock as the Sentinel. Ibis tacks on $270 for the X2
  • 2 0
 @bigtim: More like 0.3 dentures cheaper. Your dentist-to-plebian conversion rate needs some filling in.
  • 1 0
 @onespeedbrian: yep, you're right
  • 2 1
 @stiingya: ... and GG bikes are made in the states by some good folks who pay takes here, buy groceries here, etc...

Not to take anything away from the good folks who make products in other countries, but it makes sense to buy local.

If Transition made their frames in the USA, I'm curious if they could compete with GG.
  • 1 1
 @mattvanders: yeah... I haven't made the move to that new fangled carbon yet...it may not play well with my long term plans.

I did, however, just pick up an aluminum Mongoose Nugget frame that I'm excited to build up. Pretty beefy.
  • 3 0
 @nurseben: I work at a shop that carries both brands. We sell A LOT more Transitions
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: if only the gnarvana didn't have a 450 mm chainstay.
  • 1 0
 @5afety3rd: "I work at a shop that carries both brands. We sell A LOT more Transitions"

Why would you expect anything different? They are not apples to apples in any way...
  • 2 0
 @Artnshel: if only the new Sentinel had 160mm of travel...? Smile OR go with a smash and get 5mm less travel and 6mm shorter chain stays?

JKN, but we didn't really get the "Super Sentinel" everybody was talking about. But I'd guess Transition built the bike they thought they would sell more of??

Both brands have some wheel size/travel/chain stay length restrictions. Also both brands are doing more than one model with the same front triangle so I'd guess that also creates a hurdle.
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: That's a fair point. And I also expected more travel from this bike .
I didn't know the Sentinel shared the front triangle with the Patrol?
  • 1 0
 @Artnshel: front triangles look similar, but definitely not the same. a similar rumor floating around that the sentinel and smuggler are the same front triangle, also not true.
  • 1 0
 @Artnshel: With the Scout, though I guess I should say that's what "I think" and have no proof of. But it fits the way the geometry has changed on the Sentinel, (shorter XL) and how both bikes are said to do 140 or 150mm.

In the end I think both Transition and GG make some great bikes. Can't really go wrong! Smile
  • 1 1
 @savagelake: i think gg is great, but rear is aluminum so not an equal comp
  • 1 0
 @LuvAZ: "i think gg is great, but rear is aluminum so not an equal comp"

also doesn't cost as much

Crazy thing is GG only made their first Carbon frame last year, and their first XL carbon frame a couple months ago... Think where they will be in 19 years!

And on that note crazy that Transition has grown so much in just 20 years themselves...
  • 9 0
 My last transition bike’s paint job chipped so easily. It drove me crazy to see little paint chips everywhere.
  • 25 0
 trailside snack
  • 5 0
 Agreed. really my only complaint.
  • 4 0
 Same here atrocious paint quality curious to see if that has improved at all
  • 3 1
 Just get the carbon frame and powder coat it :p
  • 3 0
 Paint just isn't that durable and I'll bet most transition owners ride their bikes hard. I blasted the paint off my TransAm frame for powder coating and it blasted to bare metal easy, same as most bike paint. With carbon I'd be tempted to scrape it off like dangerholm and seal the raw with UV wax.
  • 3 0
 same - my patrol paint was unbelievably wimpy. i know it's just aesthetic but it speaks to the quality.
  • 2 0
 @delamar: I would love to see the how to video on that
  • 2 0
 @delamar @Longtravel: I Dangerholm'd my Wreckoning. Just finished it last weekend. Painted on the decals and some 'unique' graphics. High gloss automotive clear over everything, and it looks super cool. But it was a TONNE of effort and time! You could say I found out why custom paint work costs so much.. Lol
  • 2 0
 Ridewrap (Invisiframe, etc.) is your friend if you're concerned about paint... my last two Transitions and Norco Range looked as new as the day I bought them as the day I sold them.
  • 1 0
 I agree that paint quality is an issue on transitions. I have looked at a few used carbon transitions and the chipped paint made me think twice.
  • 3 0
 It doesn't bode well that the cover shot in this review already has paint missing from heel rub and what looks like a few chips/scrapes in other places.
  • 1 0
 @bmxslinger: Very cool that you did that! I custom coat stuff every day, yeah it is a lot of work, sometimes it can take hours to get a part on the rack, then 5 minutes to coat. Never had to scrape paint off carbon fiber though!!
  • 10 1
 Paint chips everywhere on that test rig. I guess TR have not improved paint quality.
  • 7 1
 Wait so how does the Sentinel pedal compared to the Ripmo? I get that the geometry is a bit easier to get around on the Ripmo (that was included in the review)...but is this really going to pedal close to the Ripmo and its EXCELLENT implementation of DWLink?? If we are talking about All-Arounders...for many of us that means a bike that isn't just a shuttle sled. One of the magic things about the Ripmo is its ability to pedal like a 125mm bike of yesteryear and yet still have some room to smash. No small feat.
  • 4 6
 The v1 sentinel was a pig for all around riding. Survive the climb, pedal strike city on both of the bikes I got to demo and mandatory climb switch on dirt road climb, and straight line all the things on the way back down.
  • 12 2
 Alloy. Now. Thanks TBC!
  • 4 1
 Yep, shame about the absence of an alloy model. Alloy bikes were the meat and potatoes of Transition for years.
I've considered several times over the last 2 years to buy an alloy Sentinel (always ended up not doing it because people kept telling me they're awful climbers), I guess this new version will be out of my radar.

On the other end, wouldn't be surprised if Transition has a more "Patrol-ish" 29er in the sleeve, or even actually releases the Patrol as a 29er
  • 2 0
 @Arierep: exactly my thoughts. Right until 10mins ago i was sold for a used Banshee Titan next year, but if TBC brought an alloy Version of this one, with similar looks also, i might reconsider.
  • 2 0
 @Arierep: They might yet release an alloy model
  • 1 0
 @zanda23: What makes you say that?
  • 5 2
 Nah, they should just skip that, for a simple reason:
since all the muppets are buying effin stupid carbon for no reason but looks, transition does not put any effort in the development of a reasonably light aluminium alloy frame (bitches!). And then you‘ll end up with a 4,2kg frame without shock in size m.
Look at Norco sight, gt force 29 and v1, it is quite ridicilous. So no, just cut the crap and buy from companies who put real effort in aluminium frames and enjoy no disadvantages whatsoever compared to carbon for 1000€ less. Banshee is a good call.
  • 1 0
 @Arierep: Nothing whatsoever, but companies don't always release both carbon and alloy simultaneously.
  • 1 0
 @ArturoBandini: True. I don't think the MK1 Sentinel was the worse offender, it was supposed to take a beating, was stiff in a good way and I never heard of one cracking. I think the title goes to the alloy Hightower, go check that one
  • 1 0
 @zanda23: agree, but there seems to be a trend lately for carbon only models:
- Megatower
- Enduro
- new Scout
- Strive
- I heard somewhere that Norco cancelled the Sight frameset alloy
  • 1 0
 @ArturoBandini: one disadvantage of aluminum over carbon: easier/possible to repair...
  • 1 0
 @Muckal: I have a titan, IF you have any doubt. I thing can tell you in advance. The bike is a beast.
  • 1 0
 @franciscof40: thank you, thats basically what everybody says. I'm a bit afraid it will be too much of a bike for 80% of the stuff i ride. Back home i ride a hardtail for that reason. Then again i could ditch the DH Bike for park riding probably and use the Titan instead. However, what's life without a DH bike?
  • 2 0
 Nope, they shouldn't do that and here is why.

Developing a good alloy frame (in a league with Liteville, Nikolai, RAAW, Commencal, Pole, etc) takes lots of resources, which a niche brand such as Transition probably isn't going to invest after already blowing their R&D budget on the carbon model. Therefor they would probably end up making a very mediocre, underdeveloped alloy version of this frame.

Alloy frames should be left to companies that specialize solely on aluminium rather than carbon, or companies big enough to be able to afford a proper R&D process for both alloy and carbon.
  • 4 0
 This is from the transition crew over at the vital mtb q&a session:

“ We know a lot of people are looking for alloy options, and it's something you will see more of from us eventually. We can't share any specific timing or details yet, but we hear you, and we aren't ignoring the category. We're a small company and when we develop something we want to make sure we do it right. --Sam”
  • 1 0
 @Brz: so no full review tomorrow? Frown
  • 1 0
 @Muckal: Probably a new smuggler or patrol first, before anything else.
  • 5 0
 I think this was one of your best reviews in a while Pinkbike. @mikekazimer thanks for taking the time to distinguish this style of bike from the others. its not easy to articulate but it is what makes these bike so amazing and fun to ride. comfort is what sets the transitions apart and it is a the key philosophy to the party in the woods motto that most transition bikes abide by. you hop on one and feel at home right away and from that place you are ready to pop and drift whatever.
  • 4 0
 "Props to Transition for publishing the seat tube angle at multiple heights"

They only use one height per size for effective seat tube angle, which is what everyone else does to derive their effective seat tube angles, except without publishing that height for each size. So super good on them for publishing the heights, but that phrasing makes it seem better (multiple heights & angles listed per size) than it is.
  • 8 0
 How about "props to Transition for actually listing what height they are measuring their seat angle AND to use a reasonable and usefull seat height VS other companies using stack height or some other bullshit to make their STA's seem steeper"

better? Smile
  • 1 0
 Assuming they're using the same bottom bracket on all their bikes, which is probably pretty safe, you should be able to use the heights for every size. You have four now. Yay, geometry!
  • 6 0
 Gets slacker and more travel yet becomes less downhill oriented and now its a "all rounder". What have you been riding kaz? Downhill bikes with dropper posts?
  • 8 0
 Pretty much. I go into more detail in the video, but compared to bikes like the Specialized Enduro, Raaw Madonna, etc... the Sentinel does feel like more of an aggressive all-rounder.
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: fair enough! I think it has alot to do with just our mental state now. We have appected the slow slog climb where as in 2017 i think most bikes with 140mm of travel where probably a lot quicker up the hill. Not down though lol
  • 3 0
 I'm curious about this too. I own the past generation, and felt it was amazing all around but definitely enjoyed the steepest and roughest portions of trail the most. I found it a touch sluggish pumping through flatter sections, on berms and jumps. This is longer, slacker, and has more travel. Can the kinematic changes have that big of an effect?
  • 1 1
 He did have a dropper on a demo just listen to the podcast
  • 1 0
 The bike absolutely Fu($sss on the downhills. Monster truck feel and playful flicability all at the same time.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Could it be considered an all-mountain bike?
  • 7 0
 Please tell me that this means the Smuggler will Be 150mm front 135mm rear .
  • 2 0
 You can make it happen now by long shocking the rear.
  • 1 0
 @kinematix: but old frame lol
  • 7 0
 Dear Transition Bikes, You are rad af but plz make an alloy version. Thx x x x
  • 5 1
 I'm just going to say it, I hope transition does not go exclusively carbon. I want to see the new models of the sentinel and the scout in alloy I know that there is a lifetime warranty on carbon frames but I have had both carbon and aluminum bikes and I feel like aluminum holds up for the long haul.
  • 9 2
 Looks like this Sentinel has it's Sight pointed squarely at Norco.
  • 2 0
 Who copied who?!
  • 4 1
 @f*ckingsteve: If you go by that logic then it's better to start throwing Mondraker, Chris Porter and maybe Pole names into the mix.
Some outlets were celebrating the MK1 Sentinel's geometry as "pioneering" at the time when in reality several brands were already doing the same
  • 2 1
 @f*ckingsteve: Crappy pun, Steve. Is this your first day??
  • 2 0
 @Arierep: exactly

"Lars at Transition contacted [me] after he’d read that article and tested with shorter offsets and longer bikes. He wanted me to help put into words what he was feeling on the trail, to clarify in his own mind why it was better when the industry orthodoxy seems to think it should be worse and also to justify his theory up the food chain at Transition I guess."

singletrackworld.com/2017/11/interview-chris-porter-on-losing-his-mojo-suspension-mtb
  • 9 1
 @velocitajano, might as well pull from a Pinkbike article, right? "The initial push for the geometry change came from Lars Sternberg, Transition's resident tinkerer. With a little bit of downtime on his hands as the 2015 season came to an end, he stumbled upon an article describing Chris Porter's experiments with running reduced fork offset. Inspired, he raided his parts stash and began experimenting..."

www.pinkbike.com/news/transitions-new-speed-balanced-geometry-2017.html
  • 3 0
 Have the 2019 Sentinel. Love it! Was lucky enough to borrow one to try it out. I actually wasn't immediately impressed by it. It was a bit of a departure over the Kona Process 153 I was riding at the time. Mainly the HT angle and the long wheelbase. I was doing laps at my local trail system and after about a half hour or so, I had made friends with the bike and was sold on it.
  • 1 0
 Definitely agree that the first impression was kinda "meh"/WTF? BUT sure does grow on ya!
  • 7 0
 The swimming pool needs to be at least 3 times bigger than this!
  • 7 2
 Good looking bike, but I feel their prices have jumped alot and I'm bummed out they are not making an alloy version of the scout of sentinel.
  • 3 2
 Price jump for sure. I would be surprised if some alloy doesn't come along.
  • 8 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: honestly I would like to buy one. But they are now priced the same as a santa Cruz CC frame. One of the things I liked about transition is they were a bit more affordable.
Still love what transition is doing as far as geo. But bring back the metal!
  • 7 5
 Transitions carbon frames have been $3200 since 2016
  • 2 1
 @cuban-b: They were US $2999 in 2019?
  • 3 0
 @cuban-b: your wrong. They were 2999 last yr for a carbon sentinel
  • 10 0
 @stiingya: $3200 is the new $2999!
  • 2 3
 tHey ShoULd gO DiRecT tO coNSuMeR!!!!111
  • 1 0
 @pdxjeremy: Every model has has an Aluminum version so far...just be patient. Carbon is the way to sell bikes like crazy and use the $$ from those sales to fund the alu run shortly after. They aren't a huge company like SC, Spesh or the likes... they don't have corporate parent companies that can fund a simultaneous run of both frame types... Isn't that why we've loved Transition all along?

Just give em some time
  • 2 0
 @RideTahoe707: past models had an aluminum version. So far their 2 new bikes do not.

Perhaps they don't want aluminum taking up their carbon sales and are switching the release order? (Wonder if profit margin is higher fir the carbon?) In the past the metal bikes came first I assume because they were trying to get new bikes to market ASAP. And then the carbon bikes came when they were ready...

Something's different... But fir sure I'd like to still see AF versions...
  • 6 3
 Anyone else feel like most bikes are converging on the same thing? There seems to be virtually no different in frame shape and geometry between one bike and the next, and with the exception of a few, all seem to be using the same sort of suspension design. The two bikes it was compared to are basically exactly the same. No?
  • 6 0
 you're not a detail oriented kind of guy, huh?
  • 2 1
 No.
  • 5 0
 I always see review notes along the lines of "the brake line is routed externally for easy access". Which makes me wonder, how often are people replacing their brake lines?
  • 3 1
 Dude, I'm swapping brake lines out on my bikes all the time. Blew out a rear brake on one of my bikes, and figured I'd just harvest the one off my Fuel EX to get it running in a pinch, only to find out it was routed internally and i'd need a bucket, a bleed kit, and an hour to do so.
  • 3 0
 my thoughts exactly. I've never needed to change a brake line on any bike i've owned.
  • 3 0
 I usually tear down my bike every spring to replace pivot bearings, and remove everything from the bike for a deep clean. It’s nice being able to throw the rear brake back on without bleeding it if it didn’t need it. It’s also nice when you replace a brake to be able to go for a ride 10 minutes after opening the box and worry about shortening the hose and re-bleeding the brake later.
  • 6 2
 External rear hose routing is great on that side if you run your rear brake on the right but not so much if it’s the other way round
  • 5 1
 Exactly! I hate that my v1 doesn't really suit UK brake setups
  • 3 1
 So many bikes out there like this. It's frustrating because it's so easy to address.
  • 5 3
 @commental: Like by putting your brakes on the right way? Wink
  • 1 1
 @pacificnorthwet: I have them the right way. It's you guys who've got it wrong. Much like some of your spelling. ;-)
  • 6 0
 Will there be a metal version?
  • 1 0
 @TransitionBikeCompany @mikekazimer Also wondering this - will there be an alloy option in the future?
  • 9 0
 Sentinel AF.
  • 1 0
 Check the Judas Priest one. It's metal af.
  • 5 0
 That loam swimming pool is an issue on the original version, probably should’ve been fixed for v2
  • 2 0
 Great looking bike but in the carbon frames why don’t it come with frame protection at key points? YT and Nukeproof are the only companies that come with protection that I’ve seen so far. If your gonna spend some dough at least protect it in key areas imo. But still great looking bike
  • 4 2
 Everything else aside, why more bikes don't have externally routed brakes baffles me. I don't give a toss about clean lines; I'd rather be able to service / swap / faff with ease rather than messing about with an internally routed cable filled with nasty fluid.
  • 2 0
 Love the new look. Glad they didn't go full Aztec or full Tesla pick up with the linearity. Also glad they didn't name it Cyber Sentinel, Mega Sentinel, or Super Sentinel. But the look of my 2019 makes me think of a classic bottle of champagne or pinot(same colorSmile rather than a Ford taurus. And once you ride it...Let's say I am still enjoying the taste.
  • 3 0
 Wow, that is a good looking bike. I also like this reference height for actual STA. It's missing some anti-squat and leverage curves, but overall a solid review.
  • 1 0
 They do make good-looking bikes with clean lines, for sure.
  • 1 0
 Anti Rise as well which was to low and made it stink bug on the steeps
  • 2 1
 @TheR: then they dirty those lines with cosmetic pinstriping, especially on the new frames which already have built in pinstripe shaping. But they're shrinking--at this rate the next new one will truly be clean.
  • 3 0
 I could ride the small or medium - take note banshee, canyon and everyone else putting 2010 seattube lengths on your 2020 bikes
  • 2 1
 Looks good and the geo seems pretty dial aside from the seat angle which gets slacker with size. They just need to make a metal version and reduce the seat tube length on the XXL. I look forward to testing one and comparing it to my Pole!
  • 2 0
 No, they need to go longer on the XXL seat tube length! Tall people don't fit anything below 490
  • 1 0
 @adamdigby: Not with the current crop of +200mm dropper posts you don't!
  • 1 0
 @SintraFreeride: I am 6' 4" (193cm) and have a 38.5" (~98cm) inseam and wear 5.10 Impacts to ride. I need all the seat tube I can get. I would still have the post ~ 70mm out of the frame with 165mm cranks and SDG saddle even with the 490mm seat tube. I don't understand why companies make XXL bikes and then chop the seat tube a ton so people can size up, what about the people who have no option to size up that the XXL is aimed at?
  • 1 0
 @adamdigby: Having 70mm out of the frame isn't above the minimum insertion is it? There are a few 220mm droppers though it sounds like you might need a 260mm dropper.
  • 2 0
 @adamdigby: what's the problem? You have an exceptionally long inseam, and your seatpost is 70mm from being fully slammed? That's not an actual problem aside from your aesthetic preferences. I'm also 6'4, but with a 36" (34 pant) inseam. So, the seat-tube on the xxl would be perfect for me. Of course there will be some compromises to make the frames fit a wide range of different body types / proportions. Sounds like everybody wins.
  • 1 1
 My problem is only if they decide to go shorter on the seat tube like @SintraFreeride is wanting. 490 works, as would 485 but when they start getting towards 465 like the Enduro's XL, the post begins to feel quite flexy under butt while leaning and I have found it is a detriment to my riding comfort. Now I have never ridden a newer 200mm+ post so maybe they beefed up the design compared to the reverb that my flexy experience was with on an older model Patrol, making my worries unfounded. *Correction: I did not know they had seriously increased minimum insertion depths on these longer posts. So even if my legs were 1010mm I would have more post insertion than I was using back in the day. Good news!
  • 2 0
 @adamdigby: gotcha. Yeah, my current bike has a 500 seattube, and 500 reach. I have a 180 one-up dropper with maybe ~50mm of post showing above the collar. I could have fit the 210 dropper but I really just don't see the point. More drop isn't going to change how I ride, but it will be less durable. I've never noticed post flex in a negative way, but I'm not heavy. I'd guess you're noticing the narrow stanchion flexing more than you're feeling the lower post flex. It's worth pointing out that the Enduro has a 34.9 post which should significantly increase stiffness and durability of the long travel droppers. In not usually one to push for new standards, but in this case it seems to be short sighted to release a new frame with 31.6 especially with there really short seat tubes. There's no reason not to- the frame will still be backwards compatible with 31.6 or 30.9 posts.
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy do you maybe have a video of the knocking noise? I know of a few cases (me included) from other bikes where a knocking is present and it would be very nice to get to the bottom of the issue.
  • 2 1
 @mike kazimer it would be really useful and importsnto know the maximum seatpost insertion for all sizes, on every bike review.

Also why post the chainstay lenght as 440mm (size large) if it's the same size for all bikes? Kind of implies that:it differs, yet it doesnt.
  • 2 0
 when is that going to change? We freak out over 10mm here or there (prob rightful so) but we're cool with the same backend on an XL as on a Small?
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: some bikes it does. I am not cool with ANYTHING
  • 2 1
 @getsomesy: lol. Norco seems to have been killing it lately. I like that they have made the different chainstay length work on the manf side. Is there another brand that does it?
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard:
Banshee has long and short dropout options. I think mondraker and propain dh bikes do. Transition dh bikes used to. Nicolai bikes does.
  • 1 0
 This si a sharp looking bike and I think its really cool they offer a XXL carbon frame. But with that said, no more alloy ? Neither the new Scout or Sentinel has alloy option... I want a XXL but I dont have a carbon wallet...
  • 4 0
 Thanks for building an XXL option at last Transition, GIDDY-UP!
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer you mention the leverage rates and percentage progression for the v1, what about this bike, the V2? I love my V1 but the only things i'd change are the progression rate and increase in travel... Thanks!
  • 1 0
 Sorry Kaz, but did u grow and inch and gain 10LBs during quarantine? I feel like ur stats look diff than usual... I’ll still love u if u got bigger, just asking for a friend.
  • 11 0
 Ha, nope, I've always been 5'11". You might be thinking of Levy's stats - he's shorter, and he pretends he weighs less than me.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: it’s the low cal diet donuts
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: He also pretends he's faster.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Ouch! My bad. Sorry I confused u with that heathen! ;-)
  • 1 0
 The knocking noise comes from bottom out protector, you can put a tighter oring before this bottom out protection piece and put a small amount of glue so it holds it in place.
  • 3 0
 Not the knocking I'm describing in my comment. It happens anywhere in the travel and doesn't happen under slow, light movements. So it has no deal with the bottom out potector.

In the AMA Sram guys said it's the counter measure spring, but it's not that either, the shock still knocks with the aircan (and CM spring) removed.
  • 1 0
 @Primoz:I have that issue on my patrol and it’s super annoying. I thought maybe it was ifp pressure but I topped mine to 250psi and it didn’t make a difference. Maybe it’s air in the damper? It feels like the valves are somehow hanging up. Reminds me of the sound the brain on the epic makes. Almost like the tune is too heavy. Who knows.
  • 1 0
 @Primoz: Sorry, I was wrong. It's the stroke reducer that's ratteling. It rattles under fast movements because of the orientation of the shock. I had the same issue on my Capra but wasn't that noticeble because the shock sists almost horizontaly. Here is the video of fixing this issue. youtu.be/856tuFFdzXg
  • 3 0
 @kwdog: I was told by Bird (the sellers of my bike) that the UK RS centre says it's connected to the IFP somehow. A friend of mine with the same issue is in contact with a german service guy who's supposedly very good and is in the process of investigating things. One theory is that something is moving, a seal, a shimstack, maybe the compression unit, making a noise after a quick movement when it hits something else.

@easyslorider: again, no. First of all, my shock is a 230x65, so max travel for the ETE size. Meaning no stroke reducer. And both my and my friends shocks are horizontal or almost horizontal. Plus I had issues with the noise when the bike was new, it went away a bit, but is now very loud again after i did the 200h service. Nothing was wrong with the bottom out O-ring, so no, this is not the issue. Plus said friend of mine shot a video of the shock making the noise with no aircan on it. And the noise is present on movement, your rattling would be present by just shaking the bike around, not moving the shock. Which is the exact opposite of what I/we experience.

Something is wrong in the damper.
  • 2 0
 Knocking - clicking on my RS Super Deluxe RC3 2018, 250x75 mm:
photos.google.com/share/AF1QipMnbQIU6RJWeEPt1F_UDsUQ32ysiCHUyY1VXZHoV0EX13Ud5P8-BElCoyOoA6tGeQ?fbclid=IwAR3ZatDFanwq7K8BMWDV0VoGvSEQB4jDyNA3IiYk-bE0ycCArD3KBgSK_hY&key=a01SdGo0RTRYLXc2RlQ3SWVoYkE1bEoxVkVyenVB

If someone finds out what is causing problem, please report here Smile

@mikekazimer is knocking sound on this Super Deluxe similar to my?
  • 3 0
 @Andrazzz is the friend of mine I was mentioning.
  • 3 0
 Nice bike. a bit grey / sad, but seems OK; Any RAW ALUMINIUM version???????????
  • 1 0
 Is this using the SRAM UDH (Universal Derailleur Hanger) thing? Looks like it might be from the photo, can you start putting this in the listing in future so we can see whether it is getting good take-up please?
  • 4 0
 @mikekazimer - any comparisons to the Yeti SB150?
  • 2 0
 Just got the Alloy GX. Wicked bike!! Not in no hurry to shell out another 2600 hunnys for this one.
  • 1 0
 When I saw the new Scout, I was really hoping the new Sentinel was going to share the same frame design. Stoked. Well done, Transition! ????
  • 2 0
 So it’s got more travel, more progressive and slacker than the original but now it’s more versatile?
  • 3 0
 Leverage curve is a helluva thing.
  • 2 0
 In context with other bikes now & riding expectations. Yes.
  • 5 2
 Pls also a alloy frame ... I am not a dentist Frown
  • 4 3
 "Great all-rounder for riders with the right terrain"

It's great for everything! IF "everything" is limited to this specific thing...)
  • 2 0
 60% of the time, it works _every_ time!!!
  • 4 0
 They all look same now.
  • 1 0
 Spec looks spot on. It's a pity Transitions cost so much more in Europe. At least 20% more expensive here in Ireland than in the States.
  • 6 7
 honestly, transition should just go direct sales only. They seem counter-culture enough to pull it off and flaunt the mainstream bike industry model. Be FOR THE RIDERS.

$5400 for a GX build isn't for the riders. My full carbon capra pro race X01, fox factory build cost $5400...
The GX build should cost in the $3k ballpark if you remove the margin for shops.
  • 13 2
 that "GX build" has such a good set of components. just referring to a build kit based on the drive train is kinda funny. You have a lyrik ultimate and code RSCs on there, it would honestly almost be a waste of money to go up to the top build. Most GX builds have lower end suspension and brakes, just sayin...
  • 2 1
 @cdkozeluh: carbon wheels and fox factory 36 front and x2 rear, as well as code rsc's and sram eagle x01 on the capra pro race.

what were you saying about it being a 'good' build for $5400...
  • 6 0
 Honestly people should just get their friends to take wedding photos with their iphones. It is pretty much just as good and who could ever need any service making them perfect. Everything you need to know is on the internet.
  • 1 0
 @JonRides: I see what u did there... I think.
  • 3 1
 IMO heel rubbing it’s unacceptable issue in a new and expensive model such as this.
  • 1 0
 As a former transition patrol owner... why do they always seem to be messy with the progressiveness of the shock? Seems like every year it’s a another updated thing....
  • 3 0
 Seems like a Sentinel LB
  • 4 1
 Looks like a Sight...
  • 2 0
 @transitionbikes where's my 2021 carbon patrol?
  • 2 2
 "and it felt more energetic on the climbs than I'd expected."

This has become a common thing to see in PB reviews. Perhaps some expectations need updating?
  • 1 0
 I thought I saw you pedaling one on Galby with Lars the other day. Happy to hear the trail manners are a little more lively
  • 2 0
 New styling and all the changes look great!
  • 1 0
 Which Version of the X2 will this come with, 2020 or 2021? (couldn't find it in the spec)
  • 1 0
 from the photos looks like a 2020
  • 2 0
 @crashtor: Sometimes they change the spec from pictures. But I verified that they'll come with the 2020, as it takes too long to get the new shock OEM. I'm imagining trying to adjust that HSC dial at the bottom of the shock 2021 ver. on this bike, and am slightly relieved. (Ordered my frame today)
  • 1 0
 Super sweet update. Looking to sell my 2019 gx alloy v1 to swap for this! anyone interested?
  • 2 0
 Sentinel AF version please!
  • 1 2
 Can you guys start putting seat tube angle in the bike details box at the top of the review, with the frame travel, HA, CS length, weight ect..? @pinkbike @mikekazimer @mikelevy seems an important enough stat to put up top
  • 1 0
 My question is why are there ants getting on his bike? Is Kazimer eating a PBJ while riding and dropping precious jelly?
  • 1 0
 Can't wait to ride this bike... the 2019 model was a game changer so excited to see the refinements.
  • 2 1
 It's like an Evil and a Trek had a baby, but the baby lost the interesting suspension design.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer what do you think about sticking a 170 fork on it? Burly, Alpine monster? Coil on the back and we are ready!
  • 5 3
 Come on Transition, you're killing me! MAKE SHIMANO GREAT AGAIN!! Fail.
  • 1 0
 I absolutely love my '18 Sentinel. Only thing would be a little more travel in the rear.
  • 2 0
 Its about freaking time.
  • 2 2
 Looks hot damn hot. How much science or technology please @TransitionBikeCompany?
  • 1 0
 Already getting pumped for the next Patrol!
  • 2 1
 Did you just call my friend’s bike a Ford Taurus?
  • 3 0
 maybe it's an SHO Taurus
  • 2 2
 Cleanest looking bike there is. I'd like to see more of these on the trail and less yeti's
  • 1 0
 Sounds like my gian reign has that same pool ????
  • 4 2
 Looks like a YT IZZO!
  • 1 0
 Totally, my first thought too!
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Scout.... what came first?
  • 3 1
 Looks like a cube
  • 2 0
 If Cube would drop their top tubes a bit it would be identical!
  • 1 0
 What is this? A swimming pool for ants? Big Grin love it
  • 1 0
 Such a nice, clean looking frame!
  • 3 3
 I'd be the guy on the XXL, and I'd like a SHORTER chainstay, 440 is about my maxed out for too long.
  • 2 0
 Really?? You wouldn't feel like the front wheel is too light? I'm 6' 3 and that was my experience with the 2018 sentinel i rode for a while. Ended up selling it because I just couldn't get comfortable on it.
  • 3 1
 @theelias09: I’m 6’4 with a +3 ape index and a long torso. I also ride bmx with a 343mm chainstay. On trail bikes I’m happiest with a 425-435 chainstay regardless of how long the front is. Long back ends lose a lot of pop and trail feel. Yea they’re stable, but if a rider’s style is pop and weave and bunny hop and hunt for gaps, the long rear ended hangs up, slows down the hop motion and just feels disconnected. I like how reach numbers finally fit, but there’s too many 445 and longer rear ends on XLs and bigger, which for me rules out the possibility of buying any of those bikes for how I like a bike to feel.
  • 1 1
 You're riding too slow... Smile
  • 1 0
 @theelias09: I'm also 6'3 and it feels perfect. Maybe your bars were too high? I really don't get the need for longer chainstays...
  • 1 0
 @downcountry: definitely the opposite of slow. I'm a fun is fast kind of guy, plowing and straight lines are fun, but gets boring. If i were buying a bike purely for racing, i'd likely go long and stable, but for a daily trail bike, fun, lively, capable, nimble is the goods.
  • 3 1
 Looks like a Canyon.
  • 1 0
 Give us the suspension analysis! We the people demand plot graphs!!
  • 1 0
 Can we get a Smuggler with that new frame design... please!
  • 1 0
 Good review and thanks for the reference seat height numbers
  • 1 0
 HMMM this or the new Jeffsey????
  • 1 0
 Where’s my carbon Klunker!!!!
  • 1 0
 Where is the Alloy version or just frame?
  • 1 0
 Grab me a towel.
  • 1 0
 Great looking bike!
  • 1 0
 Er 26 hunnys. Oops
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Scout Smile
  • 1 0
 Looks like a session!
  • 1 1
 Red text on a green background is a no no
  • 1 2
 Did they fix the Anti Rise numbers ?
  • 1 3
 Am I going crazy or did my comment saying GX was crap get removed?
  • 3 1
 Not figured out how down votes work yet? You've been here long enough... Wink
  • 1 0
 @kingtut87: ha, ha I'm just shocked people think GX isn't too flimsy , well the mechs anyway
  • 3 1
 @Kimbers: probably 3000km on my gx drivetrain, mostly trail riding but a fair few park laps as well and no issues for me. But maybe it falls apart in the mud and slop? Does seem a slightly daft thing to down vote.
  • 1 0
 @kingtut87: true I do ride in a lot of mud, but X7, NX and GX have all died on me, each time developed play in pivots
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