Review: Trickstuff's Powerful & Pricey Maxima Brakes

Sep 12, 2019
by Mike Kazimer  
Trickstuff Maxima review

Trickstuff's Directissima brakes already had a reputation for being incredibly powerful (and expensive), but the German company decided to take things even further. The Maxima is the result, which they claim has more power than any other brake on the market. It's also likely the most expensive brake on the market, with a price tag of 1100 Euro for the set.

Power is great, but it doesn't mean anything without modulation – skidding's fun and all, but not every single time you breathe on the brake lever. According to Trickstuff, “The Maxima doesn't help you by being able to lock up a wheel even stronger. It helps you by needing way less finger power to get there.”


Trickstuff Maxima Details

• Intended use: downhill / enduro
• Four piston caliper
• CNC machined from 7075 T6 aluminum
• Tool-free reach adjust
• Brake fluid: Bionol sunflower oil
• Weight: 302 grams (actual, front caliper w/pads, hose, and lever)
• MSRP: 1100€ (set)
www.trickstuff.de

Can brakes be beautiful? The Maximas present a very strong case – they're fully CNC machined from 7075 aluminum, and it's hard to not want to take a moment to sit and stare at them every once in a while. There are weight-saving cutouts on the lever blade, below the reservoir, and even on the backside of the lever body.


Trickstuff Maxima

Trickstuff Maxima review
Oooh, shiny. The Maxima brakes are a sight to behold.
Trickstuff Maxima review
Two 16mm and two 17mm stainless steel pistons are found in each caliper. The pad shape is the same as Hope's V4 brakes.


The lever blade pivots on a total of four sealed cartridge bearings – two at the main pivot point, and then two more where the lever pushes the piston into the master cylinder. The caliper is also machined from 7075 T6 aluminum, and houses four stainless steel pistons.

Hydraulic disc brakes typically use either mineral oil or DOT fluid, but the Maxima brakes are filled with something a little different – sunflower oil, or Bionol to be more specific. Created by Danico, the initial boiling point of Bionol is said to be 300-degrees Celcius, which is higher than mineral oil and DOT 5.1. It's not only for Trickstuff brakes, though; Bionol will also work in any mineral-oil operated brake.

Trickstuff equip the Maxima brakes with Goodridge's braided stainless steel line, which is designed to remain expansion-free even under hard braking, creating a more solid feel at the lever. The line diameter is 6mm, which means it may not be compatible with frames that use internal cable routing, but if that's the case, the brakes can be purchased with lines that don't have the outer plastic sheath, reducing the diameter to the typical 5mm.


Trickstuff Maxima review
Bleeding the Trickstuff's isn't overly difficult, but it's not the quickest process.


Installation

I installed the brakes on a Specialized Stumpjumper EVO in order to ensure that I'd be able to rack up as many miles as possible. Overkill? Likely, but I was curious to see how they'd work on terrain that wasn't always super steep. Don't worry, I rode plenty of silly steep stuff, too, and also put in a bunch of bike park laps.

Installation was in the middle of the road as far as difficulty goes. It didn't take long before I realized that the Goodridge line wasn't going to fit in the bike's internal routing passageway (the 'naked' line option would have been the way to go here). Time for some stick-on cable guides. With that minor hiccup out of the way, it was bleeding time (for the brakes, not me).

After a little internet sleuthing I found the English language instructions and got to work. It's fairly straightforward, but it is more involved than SRAM or Shimano's procedure, and Trickstuff recommend taking the brake entirely off the bike to accomplish it. There's a screw-in fitting for the caliper and the lever, but for some reason they're different sizes – it seems like it'd be simpler to make just one size fitting, but that's a fairly minor detail.

I did run into an issue with the lever body – a few drops of oil would occasionally make its way out of the vent hole located in the reservoir top cap. It turns out the interface between the rubber diaphragm and the thin aluminum top cap is a bit finicky, and if it's not positioned perfectly, or any fluid makes its way above the diaphragm and underneath the top cap, oil seepage can result. I'd more than likely inadvertently forced some fluid above the diaphragm when I bled the brakes, and that's what was coming out of the vent hole. Take extra care during the bleed procedure, and if for some reason you do need to take off the reservoir top cap, keep in mind that those bolts are very tiny, and don't need to be torqued down very hard.

Actually installing the levers onto the bike takes a little longer too, since there are two bolts for the clamping system. It's not nearly as convenient as a clam-shell design, but it does look snazzy once everything is in place. Trickstuff also offer adaptors to accommodate Shimano or SRAM shifters.


Trickstuff Maxima review
The tool-free reach adjust isn't indexed, but it's effective and easy to access.
Trickstuff Maxima
Trickstuff's rotors have a chamfered edge that's designed to make wheel installation easier.

Performance

Bedding in the Trickstuff pads takes a little longer than it does with SRAM or Shimano's offerings, so don't be surprised if the brakes don't instantly feel super powerful. It wasn't until partway through my first ride that the full power really emerged, but after that it was game on. Trickstuff weren't kidding about their creation – these brakes are seriously strong.

Thankfully, the power delivery is smooth, and there's enough modulation to prevent locking things up every single time the lever is pulled. If you do want to skid, all it takes is pulling the lever a little further and the pads will ferociously clamp down on the rotor no matter how steep the trail or how fast you're going. This is hands down the most powerful set of brakes that I've tried.

What sets the Maxima brakes apart from a set of SRAM Codes is how easy it is to access all that power – you don't need to pull very hard at all before they engage like an old-school bear trap snapping shut. They don't offer quite the same level of modulation as the Codes, but they also deliver more power, more easily. While the clamping force ramps up more quickly than the Codes, the Maxima brakes aren't quite as 'grabby' as a set of Shimano Saint brakes - there's a little bit more modulation before the pads really start to bite down on the rotor.

Riders who have a more on/off braking style will find a lot to love about the Maxima brakes, since a light tug on the lever is all it takes to dump some speed before a corner, or to rein things in when the trail gets steep. It did take a couple rides to get used to having that much power so readily accessible, but using the brakes soon became second nature. The only time I really thought about it was when I switched back to a set of less powerful stoppers and had to re-adjust my braking technique.

Steep, sustained rock rolls are a good way to suss out a brake's modulation – brakes that are too grabby can lead to unwanted skidding, and brakes that fade can lead to scary high exit speeds. There weren't any issues at all with the Maximas, and I was able to creep down long rock rolls without any trouble. There wasn't any fading or pumping up during the test period, and even on rides with big, non-stop descents, dropping upwards of 5,000 vertical feet in one instance, the brakes didn't misbehave in the slightest.


Trickstuff Maxima review


Pros

+ Silky smooth lever action
+ Extremely powerful
+ They're gorgeous


Cons

- Very, very expensive
- Time consuming bleed process
- 9 month delivery time


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesTrickstuff's Maxima brakes deliver more than enough power to slow down the biggest riders on the longest descents. They're beautifully machined, the lever action is silky smooth, and they're a surefire way to stand out from the crowd. Of course, with a price that's three times more than other top-level competitors you'd hope that would be the case. Mike Kazimer






203 Comments

  • 337 4
 Wait 9 months, explode your bank balance, your life will slam to a halt - sounds vaguely familiar...
  • 54 1
 I think I'll take the brakes. Cheers.
  • 46 5
 If these don't cry and scream like sram brakes they might still be worth it.
  • 23 5
 Comment of the year
  • 30 15
 Can you imagine, the rotor in the article is mounted in wrong direction. What a review bonus Smile
  • 11 11
 @cvoc: you know that it's a question of brake pads and rotors, right? The brakes themselves have nothing to do with the wailing.
  • 15 1
 Do you still get to sleep for the next 2 years after buying these?
  • 1 3
 @cvoc: I have one set of guides that has always been crazy noisy on the trails, since the day I bought the bike.
  • 1 0
 @ctd07: Depends, after you check your bank account
  • 3 0
 I thought the whole point was to not use them, let alone spend $1M dollars
  • 3 0
 go on the Scots!
  • 2 0
 @ctd07: easily!
  • 9 0
 @k0ctaheb: Actually, the rotor is mounted correctly, look again
  • 1 0
 @ctd07: could you sleep knowing that you have a pair of these clamped onto your handlebar??
  • 1 2
 @k0ctaheb: lol nice catch
  • 6 0
 @k0ctaheb: No it isn't. Thats the correct direction.
  • 2 0
 Are you on drugs?@k0ctaheb:
  • 2 0
 @cvoc: it's not the crying and screaming I object to with SRAM brakes, it's the shitting the bed part...
  • 27 1
 I know they are expensive af, but honestly I´ve tried Direttissima and it is unbelievable, touch them...just touch the lever, omg that feel, that machining, you just stay amazed and try to stop mouthwatering becase this is real fetish.
And the power is outstanding
  • 24 4
 I tried a prototype in Februari. These may be pricey, but they're worth it. They're on another level compared to the competition.
  • 60 9
 Pricey isn't really applicable here. Ridiculously overpriced fits better.
1100€ AND I get to wait nearly a year? Where do I send my credit card information???
  • 21 5
 > They ARE pricey, but FOR SOME PEOPLE they're worth it.

FTFY

Most people will spend 20% of the price for 90% of the functionality.
  • 21 0
 @ssteve: you're right they're eyewateringly expensive but you have to put it into perspective: this is a very small business that manufactures very small numbers and therefore doesn't have the economy of scale on their side.

Good work should pay good money, I am in no doubt that these are worth it for people who can afford it and want it.
  • 17 1
 Excuse me, but there's people paying +9K for bikes... Priceywhat?
  • 9 3
 @f00bar:
Or spend 100 % of the price for 190 % of the functionality.
200 € for more then decent brakes which can stop you allright.
900 € for the rest of the bike to accelerate you in the first place.
  • 20 0
 Pricey, BUT, brakes are a component that I keep for a very long time. I’ve been running the same set of XTs for 7 years on multiple bike builds. I could justify splurging on something like Trickstuff knowing I’ll probably be able to run them for 10 years, more than I could justify wheels or a fork that are equally as expensive and will likely be incompatible with a new frame in 3 years.
  • 4 0
 @wowbagger: yeah but other small companies like Intend arent even that expensive.
And he ships from his home appartement.

These brakes are as expensive as his custom new air shock.

They look gorgerous but 1100€? Nah.
  • 7 0
 @NotNamed: Intend’s Areo rotors are roughly twice the price of Trickstuff’s.
  • 1 0
 *Aero
  • 9 0
 @NotNamed: You do realize that those brakes were, mostly, engineered by the same guy that runs Intend and that the amount sold is most propably on the same level (within a reasonable margin)? I would guess pricing is in no small part machine time, and those consume a lot per brake.
If I had money to burn, it could ge there. But alas, I don't Frown
  • 5 0
 @NotNamed: incidentally, Cornelius did (or maybe still does) work for Trickstuff and may or may not have helped design these.

You can't say that "other small companies like Intend aren't even that expensive" when they don't even offer a product you can compare.

Also: usually price is not something that is just made up for shits and giggles but represents the amount of work that goes into it - which looking at these I'm sure is considerable.
  • 2 0
 @NotNamed: funny you should mention intend as that's the guy behind Trickstuff brakes.

And no they don't make a ton of cash off these brakes they are very expensive to manufacture.
  • 4 0
 @ninjatarian: exactly. People will spend 1k on a fork or set of wheels no prob but brakes are just as important and these will last as long as you want them.
They have all parts in stock and can be FULLY rebuilt every single part is replaceable.

I'm poor but still managed a pair of their Piccola. Got tired of throwing away brakes that could not be rebuilt.

These are for people who are willing to make a long term investment.
  • 4 1
 @ninjatarian: If the brakes you have had satisfied you for 7 years and have performed to a standard you have approved of since purchase for 20%ish of this price how can you possible justify 5x the cost for 50% more life (maybe)... this has to be a joke.
  • 5 1
 @reverend27 I run Zees for 3 to 4 years hard. Thats 6 sets for this price point. Your "investment" starts paying off around year 18 to 24... Im on a spacebike using electromagnet counter inertial dampeners at that point.
  • 3 1
 @PinkStatus: lol ya sorry didn't get that out of my xt. And the slx I had before the piston cracked.

Look if you don't want don't buy.

For me they are more powerful then my xt by about 40% and weigh half as much.
I have my hands on them constantly and it's very rewarding.
  • 4 1
 @PinkStatus: and no my investment pays off every time I grab them and feel the perfect combination of power and modulation.

Peace.
  • 3 1
 @PinkStatus: and also it's weirdly satisfying when I take it to my lbs and the mechanics swoon and won't quit pulling the levers marveling at the action.
  • 1 0
 @ssteve: like waiting? @polebicycles
  • 2 0
 Can buy em on bike24 for 932 euros if that makes anyone feel better? Still a 29-30 week wait time according to their website.
  • 1 0
 @ssteve: and they leak too, great!
  • 1 0
 @christiaan: you didn't read the article fully did you?
  • 1 2
 Let's face it, they are ridiculously pricey !!! Now they have proven they have a good product, they should scale up, join forces with other small component brands and maybe one day get some oem sales to drop the prices even more...
  • 1 0
 @tomhoward379: Brakes are overrated anyhoo! Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @arrowheadrush: but when has a company getting bigger/making product cheaper ever resulted in better products?
  • 1 0
 @tomhoward379: never. but at the end of the day, most companies are in the business of making money.
  • 1 0
 I think they could do a lot more business if they partnered up with another brand such as OneUp... do the hybrid consumer direct model, selling on the big online sites too. More affordable, more sales, more profit, everybody wins.
  • 3 1
 @B650wagon: but they can barely cope with demand as it is. If they sell on the online sites, they risk the brand being devalued if the resellers start discounting. They would also have to find a different/more CNC and anodisers to cope with demand which brings in potential QC headaches/costs. As long as they are paying the bills and salaries of the workers, whilst maintaining a legendary reputation for being the best, why change that? Profit isn’t everything.
  • 1 1
 I think you missed the point, the first part of the plan would be to partner, raise funds for expansion based on the new selling model, build a larger production line, buy more materials for less, better faster tooling.... then produce more for less quicker. Maybe they don't need to partner, but I think it would make sense. And they should consider using SuperMagnesium too. This model is clearly working for companies like OneUp and Revel bikes
  • 4 1
 @B650wagon: Maybe they should just keep doing what they are doing, grow if they see opportunity or decide it is necessary. And not take business advice from random pinkbike comments?
  • 1 3
 @wowbagger: I agree......quality does cost somewhat more but there's a limit. Sometimes, however, that's the load of manure GmbH usually flog when they're trying to bend you over. Don't believe me? Then go look at Cornelius' wibbly wobbly upside down forks that you have to pay a king's ransom to get an anodized colour that doesn't gag you, never mind the piss poor engineered legs of the fork.

With the same amount of money, go get 5 sets of the new Hayes Dominion and put 'em on all your bikes with pieces to spare plus a good dinner to buy off the ole lady when you roll 'em in the door.
Using pinky fingers only on the levers all the way down the mountain and silently you can feather the power smoothly. If you want the rotors at a bargain, get them from Brakestuff as he builds fo both Trickstuff and Intend!!!
  • 14 5
 I'm very happy with my XTs (and frankly I just couldn't afford them) but I could look at them forever, they are just such a grand piece of engineering. If I had them I'd probably constantly be going off trail all stunned and in awe.
  • 7 0
 Someone pls explain to me:

If for example have magura mt brake caliper,
one piece same caliper piston size (except 1mm on one pair of pistons),
then haveing same master cylinder diameter
then have same lever ratio,
then same pad compound

Will both brakes have the same performance?
Really, whats the difference? its hydraulics, lever/ratio stuff

Btw trickstuff lever is great looking stuff, but love magura caliper more :-)

how much pad/rotor clearance trickstuff/maxima have?
  • 4 4
 I imagine it is because of the tighter tolerances and attention to assembly, everything pivoting perfectly, no line swell just adds up to it being more efficient
  • 7 0
 If you had all the things the same a you say, and the same rotor (also especially broken in similarly), i suspect other than the lever feel (shape and travel), it would be very similar 'performance'.

I'm always struck by this issue in brake reviews. this whole modulation/no modulation stuff largely comes down to pad compounds and break ins, in my view (initial 'bite' is all about compound and break in). Of course you have different force with different piston arrangements, levers and ratios (and fluid volume maybe?), and you feel vastly different power with different rotor sizes. But often that doesn't mean sh*t if you have a bad/weird compound and/or screwed up the break in. Swap rotors and compounds around and the main differences you get between brakes are just lever feel.

I'm with Magura not because they're perfect, but because i think its the best performance to price ratio, and because I can get different lever shapes that suit my hands. My biggest beef with scam and shimano are the shape and size of the levers (and dot fluid)

But if I took a money is no concern approach, I would have trickstuff brakes on all my bikes, mainly because the feel is so good, and it's a touch point, something you really notice on any bike you're on is how the brakes feel at the lever.
  • 5 0
 Some people on the german boards are using trickstuff levers with magura calipers. Takes care of the potentially fragile Magura levers, seems to work well and saves money compared to pure Trickstuff. Especially if you already own a set of MT5/7.
  • 2 0
 I’ve got intend Aero 2.25mm discs in mine. It’s tight with new pads, but fits.
  • 7 0
 @S851: a very quick answer can be found by purchasing 2 sets of Shimano brakes.
These are the exact same brakes, but for some reason you will find one brake that performs perfectly flawlessly, one that is utter crap, and two that work average.

So yeah similar stuff can lead to different performance when the factory/assembly takes care of creating variability between each products.
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: huh. that's good to know, didn't realise that was possible..
  • 15 0
 First: Pad clearance is 0,2mm on each side

Second: All you have to do is compare the size of the master poiston surface to the surface of piston in the calliper


e.g.
Shimano XT 10mm master piston / 2x22m piston = 78,5mm²/759,88mm² = 1/9,68

Trickstuff Piccola 9 mm master / 2x22mm piston = 63,585mm²/759,88mm² = 1/11,95

the higher the ratio, the higher the braking power
  • 2 0
 @telephunke:yup, running shimano levers with magura calipers. But thinking going back to magura levers with newer shaped blades
  • 2 0
 I have the Trickstuff Piccola and the first time ever I bolted them on squeezed the lever and tightened the bolts and was done. No rub first try. Never happened with any other brake I've had.
  • 1 0
 @Trickstuff: thanks for accurate specs. These brakes remind me of Brembos on a Lambo. Love the attention to detail.!
  • 1 0
 You can use a trickstuff lever with Magura or Shimano caliper, and answer yourself that question ( less expensive and awesome combo)
  • 1 0
 In general: yes, they will be in the same ballpark. However, things like lever stiffness, cable stiffness and lever leverage (think Shimano's progressive leverage ratio) also play a role.
  • 3 0
 @entrecerros: just because I love the look and power of a Lambo does not mean I am going to buy one. Same with these brakes. They set the bench mark on quality and power. Something I can respect and admire.
Its very popular and cheap to run Shimano levers and Magura calipers. Powerful but is not going to have the bling factor of Trickstuff brakes.
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: Have any links to those message boards? Interested in what fluid they're running, I suspect the Bionol should be same for either Magura or Trickstuff, and vice-versa on the mineral oil, but curious what all they're doing.
  • 6 0
 They're beautiful, they seem like they can be a lot of hassle to install/service, they're ludicrously expensive, they take 9 months to order....but yes, I desperately want them.
  • 5 0
 "Actually installing the levers onto the bike takes a little longer too, since there are two bolts for the clamping system. It's not nearly as convenient as a clam-shell design, but it does look snazzy once everything is in place."

You're OK with internal routing, but think this is worth a call out? Because the arguments for & against internal brake routing are literally the same: more work to set up (and way more for internal routing vs a simple 2 bolt clamp) but looks nice in the end.
  • 4 0
 sometimes people get carried away with the IF THEY COULD and forget to answer IF THEY SHOULD in this case it doesn't matter because no matter the cost people need to see what is possible, that is how progress works this whole sport is a result of people pushing the limits of what's possible
  • 3 0
 I wouldnt necessarily say they're " OVER PRICED " I think it just legitimately takes alot of time and money to build these brakes and they aren't going to out-source a product of this quality to any other factory to have them mass-produced. There's a difference between over-priced and expensive.
  • 5 0
 How much are brake pads and do they also take nine months to get hold of?

They look rad mind!
  • 4 2
 Its written that they use hope V4 pads
  • 1 0
 @winko: ah yes good spot!
  • 1 0
 Pads are £18 a set, couple of days lead time.
  • 3 0
 @winko: no they are a brake pad manufacturer, at least this is the background of trickstuff. And their pads have won several test in the last years. So they just use the same shape as they do not believe in creating tons of different standards (dedicated standard for each brand is just a selling point) so they use what exists...
  • 17 11
 Rotors fitted the wrong way round...
  • 1 0
 yikes
  • 18 1
 Ha, good catch. That's been corrected. Don't worry, I didn't run it like that. I'd had the brake and rotors off and must have zoned out when I re-mounted them for the photos.
  • 3 1
 There a few few innovative companies in Freiburg, which is odd baring in mind that Baden-Württemberg has the really backward rule about not riding on trails less than 2 metres wide... There are a few good local official routes like the "Canadian Trail" though.
  • 2 0
 I've been wanting to try trickatuff pads on my sram brakes, but they dint have any distributors in the US. Unfortunately the shipping cost more than the pads themselves. I'd definitely give the pads a tet if they had a cheaper way to get them to me.
  • 2 0
 Owning a pair of diretissimas (and not direCtissimas) on my darkmatter. I can really say, they're amazing. Not to imagine the maximas. But all jokes aside bout the price. The waiting time is what stops me from buying another pair. I waited from december til june last year.
I guess i would go for a pair of mt7 but the lever is just so f*cking ugly...
In terms of brakepower they are definitly better (and also more modular) than mt7 and saints. Not even gonna start talking about any of the sram garbage.
Also brakepads are around 20€ and they can be sgipped from many onlineshops, so there isnt the typical wait time.
Cheers
  • 1 0
 Have you had a look at the Formula Cura 4 pot? Probably the most beautiful brake next to TS and Hope. And according to all reports the power/quality is excellent.
  • 2 0
 "What sets the Maxima brakes apart from a set of SRAM Codes." How about comparing them to something more relevant like Hope? Closest I've gotten to a set of Hope's is squeezing them in the bike shop but the modulation in the lever reminded me of a brembo MC from my moto days.
  • 1 0
 Hope brakes are almost like scaled down moto brakes, best feeling and probably highest quality stoppers I have come across so far
  • 1 2
 They suck these days. They’ve got no power and the levers are absolutely shit. I’d love to still be rocking hope they’re made ten miles away and I try to support them as much as possible but I’m not going back to hope brakes until they make some big improvements. Everything else is amazing though especially their custom service.
  • 2 1
 Love to have a set. Wonder how theyd compare to a set of codes with a 240/220 rotors. I put 220 rotors on with my codes and they have a lot of extra power. A touch less modulation but only ever so slightly. Still a great feel. Can only imagine if i had a 240 rotor up front
  • 2 0
 They look lovely! Way out of my price range sadly... but to be honest I normally find my brakes stop the wheel fine, Its the tires that keep me sliding
  • 7 2
 Magura mt7 ..best for me
  • 2 0
 It would be nice to see a lab test / comparison of these compared to other brakes, for us bike nerds Smile With lots of nice graphs Smile
  • 4 0
 Pretty sure this has been done, think it was enduro mag?
  • 3 0
 @PB-J: But they got weird results - the guide had more torque than the code
  • 1 0
 see enduro mtb mag
  • 1 0
 Yup, they had the Dirtessima brakes in there.
  • 4 2
 @Jacquers: Would consider those tests with a grain of salt, its more about how a brake feels out on the trail, have gone thru a few different brake setups and wouldnt say what they come up with in those tests are representative of real world use, maybe rough idea at best
  • 1 1
 I really like the chamfered edge on the rotor as I have cut my thumb many times installing the wheel from a sharp rotor, I wish all companies would do this. the thing I don't like about these brakes is the stainless steel pistons, many companies use ceramic pistons as it sheds heat much better. I would have liked to see different pistons but other than that these are cool brakes!
  • 7 0
 Are your rotors made by Gillette or Wilkinson?
  • 2 0
 @Mac1987: bic! hahahaha
  • 1 1
 TRP makes a great brake, the TRP Quadiem, which is far less expensive, probably on par with anything out there.

Some folks got the money (orthodontists) for this kind of thing, certainly back in the day a custom brake may have been necessary; early hydraulic disc brakes, but today not so much.

Nice looking brakes, kudos to Trick Stuff for making trick stuff.
  • 1 0
 Sorry no, the Quadiem looks nice but is not even in the same power league as the MT7 or Saint and at roughly twice the weight of the Maxima. It also isn't great value because Zee and MT5 are cheaper and more powerful. The only thing the Quadiem has going for it (except for the looks) is the very solid lever which might be more resistant to crash damage.

As ridiculous as the price is, these trickstuff brakes are special in that they combine the feel, looks and quality of Hope with unmatched braking power (something that Hope lacks).
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: Lever design is what lets hope brakes down, if you can modify the lever to get right out on the end of it they are the business.
  • 3 1
 "Directissima" sounds Italian. Being a German company they should give it a German-sounding name. I humbly suggest Fähkenstähp.
  • 3 3
 Chances of ordering Maximas and getting them after Trickstuff has introduced the next generation of brake seem pretty high. I bet the next version will be the Optima as they follow names through the Nissan line.
  • 5 1
 Uh the Optima is a Kia
  • 2 1
 Let's go with Altima then.
  • 2 1
 If I had spare cash lying around I'd get a pair and some ti cane creek eewing crankset with the new hellbender bb because hey, why not, eh?
  • 3 1
 1ke brakes and no solution for centering the calipers? Even Hayes CX mechanical brakes has it.
  • 3 1
 Aah thats just a gimick
  • 3 1
 Wow I came here looking for dentist jokes, you lot have failed me. Only one.
  • 1 0
 My dentist’s timepiece is the same colour as the Trickstuff reservoir lid. And my dentist vacations in Italy regularly. I’m half waiting for him to call his drill “the Maximus.”

Joking aside, these look like tremendous (if, yes, very expensive) brakes. It sounds like they’re absolutely stellar performers on the trail. Ultimately, if the price is something that people will actually pay - and, critically, the quality of the product is exemplary - then good on Trickstuff for knowing their audience. It takes some guts to stake that position in any consumer market. As someone above put it well, good brakes (if not brake pads) aren’t really consumables as far as bike parts go, so really pricey stoppers is a lot more palatable for me than, say, certain carbon rims, ceramic BBs, or ultra-high TPI tires.
  • 2 0
 I think something is wrong with the site. Next to the sizes, it says "in stock". Must be a glitch?
  • 4 1
 Serious question: are you guys f*cking your bikes?
  • 6 0
 You aren't?
  • 3 0
 Brakes are overrated. You brake, you lose.
Sram for life :-)))
  • 7 8
 Don’t buy these unless you speak German. Trickstuff makes a point not translating anything in English. For the price you pay, it is unacceptable to not have a user manual in English.
  • 15 0
 F*ck, I post this and just realized they finally published manuals in English. Nevermind, my bad. Frown
  • 3 1
 Of course they have a manual in English, what are you talking about? I think they should make it easier to find, though, maybe link to it on the webshop.

Under Service -> Englisch on the main Trickstuff page you will find the general manual and bleeding instructions for Maxima/Diretissima/Piccola.
  • 65 0
 You could also learn German in those 9 months that you have to wait for them.
  • 16 0
 said by a french.... Big Grin
  • 2 0
 @Ttimer: until recently, they did not have manual in English for the Diretissima brakes. I know because I bought them last year! Smile Last time I checked for English manuals though must have been late spring this year.
  • 1 0
 @cvoc: haha. except for the grammar.
  • 1 0
 They do have a manual in English. Also, these guys are top lad who always replied to my questions really fast, in english, and they always tried to find the best solution to my problem.
  • 2 1
 Why are people braking soo much these days?
  • 1 1
 @Minikeum: I agree that they should have had them up earlier. Maybe they didn't expect to sell much internationally.
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: maybe.
The new manuals are great though, very detailed so I’m happy! And I feel bad for posting such a negative initial comment Frown
  • 5 0
 @Minikeum: took us a while. but more traanslations will follow.
  • 2 1
 Can’t seem to get over the fact the lever cap looks like a cheap pedal reflector.
  • 1 0
 Cant unsee
  • 1 0
 Won't the internals get gunked up in the long term due to the sunflower oil? Sunflower oil tends to get sticky.
  • 5 0
 Hey @Jacquers It is based on plant oil but it is still refined. Pure sunflower oil would not be as good as Bionol.
  • 1 0
 Anyone try Bionol in other mineral oil brakes? Would it improve Shimano brakes?
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: I read somewhere there are people running that and Redline Likewater. For the Bionol is the first time I see it can reach 300ºC,not so many specs out there. I´m curious about Redline Likewater cos is very liquid. Some people argue about viscosity being the X factor in shimano/magura weird lever feeling .
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: used in on Magura & Shimano and stiff is seriously good. The higher boiling point helps that the oil lasts much longer and also the typical change in colour that indicates the wear of Shimano and Magura oil takes much, much longer.

Even put it in a brake of an e-biker that only dragged the brake and even there the oil lasted at least twice the time as the Shimano mineral oil.
  • 1 0
 @homerjm: Bionol is a lot thiner than Shimano and Magura. The lever feeling of a Magura brake ist much different with Bionol and also the fading when braking in steep terrain is reduced.
  • 1 0
 @listeryu: I was talking about that thing many Shimano brakes does,the bite point variation thing. Some people argue about Shimano&Magura oils being too dense for the job. For Magura brakes I can´t speak a thing,never touch one. Redline oil is fully synthetic oil,not mineral like Shimano&Magura. The boiling point is not so much different between those oils (Bionol included). Just check this docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1sjPSmOYbhjDBFxcvXVw1ufKfowEBu1AKh8sB6T8e24Y/edit#gid=1073048767
  • 1 0
 Best of both worlds, I use their power +pads in my e4 calipers. The pads made a massive difference to the power on the hopes
  • 2 0
 Formula cura 4 mut sutelys
  • 1 1
 Accidental hit send.. anyway, what I wanted to say is that formula cura 4 must be more powerful than this, given it's 18mm pistons.
  • 1 1
 @ondrejaugustin: Actually no, the formula cura 4 has a larger master piston and so has less power.
  • 2 0
 Which riders use trickstuff? I think the Hannahs? Who else?
  • 4 0
 The Athertons
  • 3 0
 Nina Hoffmann
  • 9 3
 German dentists.
  • 1 0
 Sick mick hannah ????
  • 1 0
 Seems like the ideal choice for very heavy people who need a good set of brakes but don't want to spend too little money.
  • 2 0
 If only...
  • 4 3
 1.100€ for slowing me down? No thank you.
  • 4 3
 Dat price is reasonable for a dentist.
  • 1 1
 Which rotor size did you use? Can I archieve the same power with a 223 disc on normal DH brakes?
  • 1 0
 I run 225 Hope rotors on Codes RSC for DH. On steepest tracks they still overheat and fade leaving me without proper bite... Then is why I ordered the Direttissimas.
  • 2 0
 @qreative-bicycle: What pads are you using? from experience saint brakes with metallic pads are outstanding and almost perform better with some heat and punishment, codes with metallic pads glaze over. Am on hope v4 now and yet to try on some long dh runs.
  • 4 0
 @zyoungson: I started by Saint brakes on organic, then metallic and switched to Codes RSC.
Saints have a good bite but I also overcooked them. But the thing I hate from Shimano is the lack of membrane, everything that heats up the circuit is changing the contact point on your next lever push... You're nerver used to the same contact point and it makes things very dangerous in some track sections!
The RSC may have less bite on metallic than Saints but the consistency and contact point adjustement are so much better.
  • 9 0
 If you go from 200 to 220 you increase the leverage by 10%. So you increase your power by 10%
The Maxima is more than 20% stronger than other brakes. So if you swap your direttissima/MT7/Saint for Maximas it would be more like going from 200 to 240 and staying on the same brake.

At least when we speak about power. Modulation and haptics are something else. We think that the Maxima is the best option but that is really hard to measure as every finger is different and everyone has a different riding style.
  • 1 1
 @qreative-bicycle: How would you compare the saints, codes and direttissimas? Also what pads were you running in the codes. According to trickstuff themselves, rotors and pads being equal, codes should have about the same power as direttissimas.
  • 1 0
 at least no one complaining about micro bearings
  • 1 1
 They look really nice but I still go for Saint with stainless steel wire mesh hydraulic hose and sintered pads.
  • 1 1
 1600$ in Canadian money.......ill stick to my formulas RO...they are lighter and probably every bit as good!!
  • 1 0
 slightly less than what i paid for my bike when it was new. godamn
  • 1 0
 Modulation is what is modulation? The stronger the better
  • 1 0
 Or just buy a magura mt7 pro. As powerful as that and 4/1 price
  • 1 0
 anybody got experience with formula curas?
  • 1 0
 Yes, they are great once bedded in which can take some time, if they had bite point adjustment it would be great but it won´t take long to get used to the change so no big deal for me.
  • 1 1
 "Pricey" is the understatement of the year
  • 1 2
 I'm glad doctors, dentists, and investment bankers finally have a brake upgrade worth buying!
  • 1 0
 Xt 12 sp groupo ftw!
  • 2 3
 Yawn.. zee still best brakes out there.. in fact you could buy 4 sets with rotors instead of these overpriced brakes.
  • 1 2
 Rockshox ultimate forks, Maxima brakes? marketing speak in full swing..
  • 1 0
 I would buy the Diretissima, just for the better name. (assuming i was a millionaire)
  • 1 1
 @Ttimer: At least naming is probably representative on the brakes. forks, not so much..
  • 2 1
 @zyoungson: I absolutely love my Rockshox Ultimate forks. I'm getting ready to sell my MRP ribbon and Factory Fox 36 to buy another 2020 Lyrik Ultimate.
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