Review: We Are One Composites’ Canadian-Made Union Carbon Wheels

Jan 10, 2020
by Mike Kazimer  
We Are One wheel review


Based in Kamloops, British Columbia, We Are One Composites have built up a loyal fan base over the course of their relatively short history. The company was started by ex-pro World Cup racer Dustin Adams in 2017 after he decided to embark on a new career path and begin manufacturing high-end carbon rims.

There are currently four different rims in We Are One's lineup, with intended uses ranging from XC/gravel all the way to downhill. It's the Union wheelset that's tested here, which is aimed at enduro / all-mountain riders. The rims have a 30mm internal width, and they're laced to a set of Industry Nine's new Hydra hubs.

We Are One Union Details

• Intended use: enduro / all-mountain
• 32 hole, 2-cross lacing
• 30mm internal rim width
• Industry Nine Hydra hubs
• Weight (29"): 1,905 grams, 894 front / 1,011 rear
• Laid up and molded in Kamloops, BC
• Lifetime warranty
• Price: $1,640 USD / $450 rim only
www.weareonecomposites.com

Industry Nine's 101 hubs are also an option, and while they have 4-degrees between engagement points vs. the Hydra's .52 degrees, they'll also drop the price of the wheelset from $1,640 down to $1,425 USD.


We Are One wheel review
We Are One wheel review
The Union carbon rims are hookless and have a 21mm height with a 30mm internal width.


We Are One wheel review
We Are One wheel review
Industry Nine's hubs have a whopping 690 points of engagement.



Details
“Compliance” has been a buzzword recently with regards to carbon wheels as more and more companies try to find that ideal balance of lateral vs. radial stiffness. That desire for more radial compliance was part of what inspired We Are One to create the Union rim. They also wanted it to be lighter and stronger than the Agent rim, its predecessor. The result is a hookless hoop that's 21mm tall, with a 30mm internal width. We Are One doesn't paint or sand their rims, but the finish on these has to be seen to be believed. It's smooth and slightly glossy, and you can see the individual fibers when the light hits it the right way – it's about as pretty as a rim can get.

That rim is laced to the Industry Nine hubs with 32 Sapim spokes in a two-cross pattern. The rear Hydra hub has a 115-tooth drive ring that's paired with six individually phased pawls to create 690 points of engagement. That equates to a near-instant response when you stomp on the pedals – there's a minuscule .52-degrees of movement before a pawl engages.

We Are One wheel review


Ride Impressions

All those ratcheting pawls in the Hydra hub can sound like a swarm of angry insects when you're coasting, and if you like loud hubs the Hydra fit the bill. Personally, I prefer a hub that's silent over one that screams, which is why I added a few drops of Dumonde Tech freehub oil around the drive ring, which quieted things down nicely.

I've had a few different tires mounted on the Union wheels over the last few months, and in all instances installation was trouble-free, and no air compressor was required. My tire pressures hovered in the low 20s, typically 21psi in the front and 23psi in the rear with some variation depending on the tire and trail conditions.

The Union wheels have a nice and neutral feel to them, which may sound like faint praise, but I'd much rather have wheels that are easy to forget about over ones that are harsh and jarring. That was the overall theme during my time with this wheelset – once it was installed I really didn't need to think about it at all.

As far as overall stiffness goes, I'd put the Unions somewhere in the middle of the carbon wheel stiffness scale. Quantifying ride feel is a tricky proposition, but I'd say We Are One hit the sweet spot with these wheels. They don't mute the trail as much as Zipp's 3Zero Moto wheels, and they're not quite as rigid feeling as Race Face's Next R carbon wheels, which puts them in a zone of stiffness that's very easy to live with.

The rapid engagement from the Hydra hub is a nifty feature, but is it worth the extra $215 USD over the 101 hubs? That's up to you and your wallet; personally, 4-degrees between engagement points is plenty for me.


We Are One wheel review
We Are One wheel review
The stickers are fairly low key, and they're easy to peel off if you want to fly under the radar.



Durability

The Union wheelset held up extremely well during the first couple months of testing – I didn't even need to look at my truing stand – but while my local trails have plenty of roots for pinging rims against, there aren't really that many sharp, square-edged hits, the type that love to crumple aluminum and shatter carbon. For that, I headed to Moab, Utah, to really test We Are One's durability claims.

As it turns out, these are some legitimately tough rims. In one instance, I seriously mistimed the speed I needed to clear a poorly constructed gap jump on the side of the trail and fully cased the landing. It was a violent impact, one that I was sure would inflict at least some damage. I pulled over, gave the wheel a spin, and... nothing. It was still perfectly true, and all of the spokes were still tensioned. That story remained the same for the rest of the trip, which included plenty of hucks to flat and high-speed shenanigans through jumbles of sandstone chunder.

The hubs have also fared well, and even with all of the mud baths and rainy rides that winter in the Pacific Northwest brings they're still running smoothly without any play.





Pros

+ Good balance of stiffness and comfort
+ Excellent impact resistance
+ Handmade in Canada with a lifetime warranty

Cons

- Not all that light




Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesThis isn't the lightest (or the heaviest) carbon wheelset out there, just like it's not the softest or the stiffest, facts that place it smack dab in the middle of the myriad of carbon wheel options currently on the market, at least as far as ride characteristics go. What sets We Are One apart from the crowd is the impressive quality of the Union rim and the attention to detail that goes into the wheel build itself. The result is a tough and reliable wheelset that should last for season after season of hard use.  Mike Kazimer








291 Comments

  • 249 24
 Not the lightest, not the heaviest. Not the stiffest, not the softest...a bit like alu, but for a lot more money!
  • 65 1
 Do not dare question progress.
  • 49 9
 Good, another wheelset that costs a fortune & weighs more than a decent set of aluminium wheels.

Sounds like a great purchase....
  • 134 36
 And one big problem it seems nobody talks about:
destroy an aluminum rim - it will be recycled
destroy a carbon rim - it will go to the landfill

For some odd reason that issue is hardly ever raised in any review of carbon frames an other carbon bits...considering that we as riders should be interested in conserving the very nature we ride in, we all tend to forget that not only our tires make an impact. It is all our choices!
  • 31 32
 @Heidesandnorth: and that's even worse for the AXS derailleur that get smashed, and leaves highly polluting LiOn batteries somewhere in nature...
  • 12 1
 @AAAAAHHH: surely you would just use the battery on the replacement AXS mech/keep it as a spare. And if you didn't replace it like for like, you could sell it on to another AXS user? Are LiOn batteries not able to be recycled (genuine question).
  • 9 0
 @v7fmp: In principle yes, but in practice the batteries in small devices are often not recycled. Many people even throw them into the trash so they end up in the landfill.

AXS is actually quite good in this respect because you can just pop out the battery. Phones and tablets with their soldered batteries are horrible, though.
  • 20 0
 @AAAAAHHH: Who smashes a derailleur and just leaves it there? Especially when you can reuse the battery...

Lithium batteries can be recycled to a large part but those processes are not up to scale and economical as far as I know.... maybe that changed in the last 2 years.
  • 34 3
 @Heidesandnorth: Break a We Are One rim and put it up on your wall as a testament to your gnarliness. An entire season of abuse riding lift serviced downhill multiple times per week in the rocky northeast US and my Outliers (last gen DH model) are as true as the day they came! Amazing wheels!
  • 18 16
 @Heidesandnorth: The amount of material in carbon bicycle frames and parts is not significant. If you would like to make a case that is persuasive, show us the numbers.
  • 6 2
 @Heidesandnorth: spec-geo actually it doesn't. I cracked my first we are one rim by bashing it off a rock. With some duct tape surgery my daughters now use it as a hula hoop. I guarantee it will last longer than they want to play with it. 1 year in and it's still going strong.
  • 17 1
 @metareal LIFETIME warranty well worth the price!!
  • 54 15
 @Heidesandnorth: One big problem with people that don't know what they are talking about is made up facts. You CAN recycle carbon, and it can be fixed. Maybe not wheels in some cases, but definitely frames. Should we not use leather seats because leather can't be recycled? What about DOT fluid, that can't be recycled either. Should we not use HYDRAULIC BRAKES because the oil is bad for the environment? Maybe educate yourself before virtue signaling on a bike forum.
  • 24 4
 @Heidesandnorth: Yea- thats the reason lot of people drive with their car to the trailspot (even 3-10km) to the trails instead of just cycling there.

One destroyed carbon rim is impacting the enviroment way less than constantly driving your bike with your car around.
  • 10 28
flag mhoshal (Jan 10, 2020 at 6:10) (Below Threshold)
 @Heidesandnorth: you're right it is our choice so dont preach to us you're as bad as vegans!! Good for you that you wanna be some save the world but don't cram it down other peoples throats. You're also a hypocrite in my opinion because you're making these statements on a petroleum and lithium based device which has huge impacts on nature.
  • 22 0
 I go through 2 alu rear rims per year. Even if I never have a hard impact, I just ride hard enough that that's all the life an alloy rim can give me. That's $200 in rims per year, plus any build costs.

I'm starting to think a $500 carbon rim that can shrug off these impacts (not catastrophic ones, but just the daily beating of hard riding in rocky terrain) would be a cheaper option for me, especially given the warranty.
  • 6 2
 @gumbytex: and they ride miles better.
  • 4 3
 @Heidesandnorth: Hey carbon is always better.
  • 10 3
 @Heidesandnorth: All of the rubber from Mountain bike tires is polluting native trout streams.. we should all hike barefoot only.
  • 13 7
 @mhoshal: Oh, judging from your reaction, I hit the spot!
Following your logic, nobody should ever point out anything to you, that you might not like - you feel preached to. Ok, but then it would be nice to leave me alone with your dissent, I feel you preach!
@JohanG: Does it matter how large the amount of pollution is? If that would be the guide, nothing would ever change...
  • 1 0
 ..
  • 5 0
 @metareal, but it's Canadian.

We don't just make apologies up here.
  • 7 14
flag WastingLifeHere (Jan 10, 2020 at 7:39) (Below Threshold)
 @gumbytex: Probably just need learn to ride or your wheel builder SUCKS??? Post up a video of how “hard” you ride we’d all love to learn from your sickness!
  • 6 3
 Do you get a new free alloy rim when you wreck one?
  • 25 16
 @mhoshal: >I don't usually get preachy, but since you pigeonholed vegans as all being preachy, here is a little fact for you cow eaters to ponder. The biggest CO2 polluter (over all transportation industry combined) is Methane coming from the factory farms.
Be a man and hunt for your meat instead of buying it in little clean plastic trays.
  • 2 0
 Except you probably don't have to true them - ever. Unless you really smash them.
  • 2 0
 @Squarepedaler12: With what process can these rims be recycled? Keep in mind these are epoxy-resin thermoset structures
  • 2 0
 @gumbytex: Thats a lot of coin per year.. Makes feel great about the nox carbons I've been on simce 2015 and going strong
  • 37 1
 @RimCyclery: I think what you meant to say is the biggest Greenhouse Polluter... there is far less tons of methane produced by cows than CO2 from transportation. However, methane is 23 times more potent a greenhouse gas than CO2. So, yeah.... we're f*cked.

Then we can get into plant farming problems, pesticides and fertilizers polluting our water. Along with erosion and water table depletion. Destroying ecosystems for farmland, yada, yada, yada... So yeah, we're f*cked.

The real root problem is there are simply too many humans on this planet for it to be sustainable with our current (or so far proposed new practices) of feeding ourselves or meeting our general energy needs. There needs to be a real paradigm shift in how we live, and I have yet to see anything that will accomplish what's needed... So yeah, we're f*cked.

And my cynicism is to the point where I'm certain that even if there were a "perfect solution," you'd be hard presses to get people to change, and down the shitter we go as a species anyway... So yeah, we're f*cked. And good riddance to us!
  • 3 0
 does not dent
  • 3 0
 @Heidesandnorth: There is no winner in the alloy/carbon fight when it comes to environment.
  • 16 0
 @Heidesandnorth: "destroy a carbon rim - it will go to the landfill"

No, no - it has to be thrown in the ocean. I don't make the rules.
  • 1 2
 @Heidesandnorth: and I can get a replacement aluminum rim for a fraction of the carbon cost, relace and off we go. Five or six aluminum rims for the cost of carbon, that’s still too much for me, but get it down to $200 a rim and I’d buy.
  • 1 0
 @krka73: Well said and yes we are.
  • 18 0
 Nothing like alloy - these don’t bend!!! I’m a fairly heavy rider at 200lbs and ride quite hard which results in me typically going through two rear rims a year (been riding 15 years).

Not the case once I got the Agent! After a whole year riding these, my wheel builder in town said they needed less than quarter turn to fix a minimal dish... These rims have changed my perspective on carbon and I will never go back to alloy. You say these are expensive, but I will be replacing the bearings in my hubs a few times before replacing the rims - something I have never been able to say. That’s even when my last two wheel sets were what I could consider the best alloy build laced up by the best wheel builder in Bellingham (hope pro4 with DT Swiss EX471). These will be cheaper (or just as expensive) in the long run, and they have already proven to be far less frustrating and bothersome than any alloy wheel I’ve broken in the past. Not to mention the neutral ride quality Kaz highlights in the review. Ride it to believe it!!!
  • 5 0
 @brappuccino: Open your eyes, chopped carbon fiber CAN and will be used in things like insulation, fiber wall reinforcement, concrete fill, and the like. If it ever even becomes and issue in the first place. It is an inert object substance. You know that creosote is a toxic byproduct of burning coal.... which can't be "recycled" but they put it in cement as filler and forever encapsulates it. My point still stands, we can't recycle leather.... so why use it? Keep in mind, this is your stupid idea of using only products with recyclability, not mine.
  • 1 0
 @gumbytex: that's where I'm at, as well.
  • 53 1
 @Heidesandnorth: If you take advantage of We Are One's lifetime warranty it will get recycled. We Are One holds all carbon scraps until they have a large enough quantity to send to a new company that is recycling carbon. No one ever talks about this but it certianly shoots the recycling argument down.
  • 1 0
 @nurseben: so I assume you save on the wheel rebuilds and replacement of any damages spokes by doing all that work yourself?
  • 9 0
 If I were to go to carbon wheels, this is the company I would support.
  • 3 0
 @endlessblockades: just a heads up Trek also recycles a very large volume of carbon fiber as well.

Not saying their wheels are better but just saying that just because alloy companies want us to believe carbon is bad doesn't mean it's the truth.
  • 13 0
 @Heidesandnorth: "destroy an aluminum rim - it will be recycled
destroy a carbon rim - it will go to the landfill
For some odd reason that issue is hardly ever raised in any review of carbon frames an other carbon bits"

It's hardly ever raised because it's not always true and it overlooks important information.

How often are aluminum frames or rims actually recycled? We're not very good about this in North America; hopefully it's better elsewhere and hopefully it improves here. Rims are sometimes recycled, but bikes (including rims) may be sold several times until they're worthless, at which point they may become landfill.

It's important to also consider the impact of initial production. Carbon has a lower impact than aluminum from raw ore - aluminum mining isn't pretty! - but higher than from recycled aluminum.

The entire argument about which material is more responsible hinges on recycling and recycled materials. I'm unsure whether frames and rims have high enough rates of each for aluminum to be the more responsible choice (in North America).

Another point to consider: my riding group destroys many aluminum rims for every carbon rim. Unsure about the rate across the entire biking community, but maybe it's similar. If so, aluminum has be several times more environmentally responsible to make up for the shorter lifespan.
  • 4 3
 @Heidesandnorth: So you have no support for your statements. If you took pollution seriously you'd be dealing with south Asian, south east Asian, and African peoples, not the West.
  • 8 0
 @Heidesandnorth: You're not wrong but I would be SHOCKED if even 10% of destroyed aluminum bikes and parts are actually recycled. Most bike shops/people just bin broken stuff.
  • 2 1
 @JohanG:
@heidesandnorth

Indeed Johan. Reduce your impact by assessing what, how much, and how often you consume. And how you commute throughout your week.

Since I switched to carbon (2 yrs on my set) I stopped destroying aluminum rims so which is worse? Destroying a couple carbon carbon rims once every 5 years or destroying 2 alu ones yearly. And bullshit that aluminum parts get recycled. They mostly end up in a landfill too.

And I’m sure @heidesandnorth goes a decade between bikes and only purchases tires in the hardest compounds to minimize impact.

Anyway,carbon bike components are not killing the planet.
  • 7 2
 @Heidesandnorth:

Yeh i think no one talks about it because we are sick of people going on about it. A company releases a quality product made of carbon and all some people moan about is how it can't be recycled! Its a pathetic argument. Can your breaks, mech, seat etc be recycled ...no because they are made up of different materials. Do you sweep up the nano particles of rubber that come of your tyres...or what about the drops if oil that come of your chain...
I flew to Whistler from England a few years back to ride bikes. The flight was 13 hours. Some how that is fine but the carbon rim i destroyed when i was there is totally not fine. There are far bigger problems with the world than not being able to recycle a rim.
  • 5 0
 @StraightLineJoe: We might as well try to be environmentally responsible in everything we do ... but yeah, let's not be penny wise and pound foolish. We can probably do orders of magnitude more good if we pedal our carbon bikes to the offices of our government representatives and urge them to enact stricter environmental laws.

That said, do any of us actually do that?
  • 1 1
 @RimCyclery: is it? I’ve heard it’s not. Show you’re work Preacher.
  • 1 1
 @Heidesandnorth: Ride in a lot of landfills, do you? Until they start disposing of broken carbon parts in your local trails, you'll be guilt free!
  • 3 0
 @RimCyclery: the biggest CO2 polluter is methane. Hmmmmm.
  • 1 0
 @mhoshal: "lifetime"
  • 1 0
 @nurseben:

Ben my carbon rims were about $200 ea and 2 years later they're both rock solid. And i'm not destroying alu rims every season now. The future is now.

Also, good luck on the Pistola build. I found it fascinating that in the Blister/GG interview (embedded in their TP review) that two of the 3 GG employees interviewed are on Pistolas as their daily driver.
  • 1 0
 @Squarepedaler12: It can be fixed, sometimes, but aside from 2-3 academic engineering labs, busted CF ends up in landfill or bike cafe furniture.
  • 1 0
 @brappuccino: pyrolysis that requires a tonne of energy.
  • 2 0
 @Heidesandnorth: Enve recycles all their wheels that don’t meet quality standards in house. Carbon is recyclable. However maybe the manufactures should jump on a program that gives people a few bucks to turn in their broken or used hoops for recycling.
  • 4 0
 We gotta hand it to Leo from Pole. Started the environmental impact of carbon to promote his CNC bikes and here we are making it a main issue when really it isn't. Making/recycling aluminum for even pop cans makes way more of an impact than the odd broken carbon rim. 4 recycled aluminum rims a season is much worse than 1 quality carbon rim that will stay on your bike for a few seasons.
  • 3 1
 @Tmackstab: EXACTLY. The story, as it was told to me, is that Leo really, really wanted fancy carbon bikes, couldn't afford the molds, the factory wouldn't offer any modified payment plans, so Leo abandoned the carbon plan. He still wanted something fancy, though, so concocted a "sour grapes" marketing plan about carbon being bad and preached the environmental virtues of his fancy, expensive, and heavy aluminum bikes. That's a second- or third-hand story, to take it for what it's worth.

The scorecard for the machined Poles:

• Geometry and kinematics: This is not related to the manufacturing technique.
• Strength: Failed on the Pinkbike huck-to-flat test, though the rear triangle has since been redesigned.
• Stiffness: I haven't heard anything noteworthy one way or the other.
• Weight: Heavy.
• Price: Yikes.
• Environmental responsibility: Uncertain.
• Aesthetics: They certainly look cool.

The more environmental choice would be buy a cheaper bike and donate the several thousand dollars you save to an NGO or similar.
  • 2 1
 @RimCyclery: you are conveniently forgetting that cows produce fertilizer in your calculation vs transport industry and co2 emission. If we are going to use math, let's use it properly....
  • 1 0
 @Heidesandnorth: it would be inaccurate to suggest that aluminum bike parts are widely recycled. They certainly can be, but most systems for waste removal would have them end up in the trash. Unless a business owner or individual is responsible and takes their parts to a scrap yard (for which there is likely to be no refund) that shit is getting buried in the ground with the rest of our trash.
  • 1 0
 @Heidesandnorth: There is a fairly large amount of carbon recycling but is hard to find those facilities. Unless you can take your alloy rim to the metal recycler (which are easier to find) you're still left with the issue and that is what do you do with your used part. Presently our infastructure is more geared towards metal because we've been doing it longer. cyclingindustry.news/where-can-the-bicycle-industry-go-to-recycle-its-carbon-waste
  • 1 0
 @Raytruant: virtue signaler, what is your point? Stop arguing dumb points. What is the difference between carbon rims or leather saddles/seats in a landfill? And before "derpa dur leather can be recycled" what about foam helmuts, or plastic goggles, or plastic bar wrap. You should stop with the nonsense. Carbon rims are not our problem.
  • 2 1
 @Lone-Wolf-Productions: how exactly do they recycle carbon? The energy consumption alone wouldn't make it feasible. I have a feeling it's similar to what we do in Canada with lots of 'recycled' material...
  • 1 0
 @Tmackstab: commencal started it way before pole even existed.
  • 1 1
 @Shartriloquist: Same. I have the last gen Enduro rim and you have to WORK to break one, and I am not easy on wheels (6'3" 190lbs and I race)
  • 4 1
 @Lone-Wolf-Productions: Also, why is no one talking about a 'made in canada' product that employs a team of people and adds stoke to the whole scene? Disclaimer: Have been abusing WR1 Agent 29 on Hope's since mid 2018... bomber!
  • 1 0
 @nurseben: it usually is 80-120€ per rim for manufacturing in quality asia factory. The rest is margin, markup, overhead. Even manufacturing in Canada shouldn't be 4 x asia prices but hey, they gotta live.

Once upon a time a bigger player like YT, canyon, giant sells their OEM carbon rims in aftermarket you can expect lower prices. Without markup for middlemen
  • 2 0
 @JohanG: Land fill waste that is un-recyclable is still waste. over time it builds up. GG crew claims the version of carbon they use can be recycled.
  • 1 0
 @makripper: you would have to ask them exactly How it is done as I’m not privy, but I know it’s a somewhat new process and it’s only feasible if you have a massive amount of carbon to recycle. I’m sure it’s better than it going to the landfill.
  • 1 0
 @5poundplumbbob:
Only hiking 'Free Willie' style is good for the environment. No sunscreen on your plumbing though because that's also bad.
  • 2 1
 @JohanG: D. Trump, get out of this body!
  • 2 1
 @Squarepedaler12: You should get into politics. Saying such a quantity of bullshits in 4 lines is virtuose.
  • 3 3
 @Heidesandnorth: Thanks and props for your comment. You`re completely right. Everyone here doesn`t seem to have common sense and don`t want to understand what`s obvious. It`s terrific actually how many stupid blind dickheads this planet features. Cheers Bro`
  • 2 2
 @teamweee: Grass provides fertiliser not the cows. The grass doesn't need a cow to shit all over it for it to be fertilised, its quite happy fertilising itself.
  • 5 0
 @mhoshal: I think we should all revert to cannibalism. It would solve just about every environmental and socioeconomic issues we currently have.
  • 2 0
 @Raytruant: they do in-line , solvent based recycling near me with great success. The recovered fibers have little to [generally] no damage to the fibers and are all in full lengths. The rest is pellatized for injection moulding and filament core for 3d printing.
  • 1 0
 @softsteel: What are you babbling about?
  • 1 0
 @Heidesandnorth: that's why I refuse to buy carbon can beers.
Relax, carbon bikes are not a threat
  • 3 0
 @Heidesandnorth: You could argue that a good carbon rim could easily outlast an aluminium rim 3 to 1 maybe 4 to 1. Could that not be beneficial? Just asked myself that question, seeing that I know a few people including myself who destroy alloy rims every year. One of those guys picked up a Easton carbon havoc wheelset in 09'. Mostly DJ and Freeriding since with trail riding mixed in, dude rips. There still going, not even a broken spoke, watched them case a 30ft double to the back of the lander that would have exploded any alloy rim made except maybe an OG TrailPimp @900+grams per rim.
  • 1 3
 @RimCyclery: Got a link for that? Sounds like some vegan bullshit, pun intended. Do some actual research and eat burger, you sound kinda cranky.
  • 1 0
 Spoken like someone who clearly hasn't ridden these rims.
  • 2 2
 @R-M-R: First - I do not own a Pole Bicycle or have any affiliations with Pole Bicycles in whatever way.

Honest question. Why repeat a story that you admit is hearsay? Just to shit on them? Make yourself look big? Screw with their business? I don't understand.

That'd be like me repeating a story that was told to me about RMR. "I heard he embezzled funds from Structure Cycleworks and that's why is he is no longer employed by the company". "That's a second or third hand story, so take it for what it's worth".

Yeah, I made that up. But can you envision the damage that can occur with gossip and rumors. Just imagine a potential employer catching wind of this.

You're a smart guy - just think first.
  • 1 1
 @RimCyclery: How about wetlands? We should do something about those then seeing how they are around 30% of methane produced globally. Hell pockets of methane trapped at the bottom of a lake have escaped and killed off small villages and animals by there shore because of the rapid loss of oxygen.
  • 1 1
 @MikeGruhler: what does that have to do with mountain biking?
I'm more concerned with wildness study areas shutting down our trails.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: shhhhhhh pointing that out is like pointing out that the sky isn't really blue, it is just every color except. Common sense and logic is lost on the "recycle carbon" types.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: Everyone is normally equiped with a brain at birth; why don`t you use yours?
  • 37 1
 I feel like the only reason to buy carbon wheels is for the lifetime warranty.. which in the light of changing standards seems like a bold move to me.
Am i missing something here?
  • 68 0
 Dude, if you're not destroying at least one rim per ride you're obv not shredding hard enough, bro!
  • 15 0
 @Ttimer: lol what was i thinking, my bad
  • 15 3
 Need to be careful reading these wordings, most lifetimes warranties are for the 'lifetime' of the warranty... as long as they deem fit to honour it... not the human purchaser's lifetime
  • 41 0
 "I broke the rim" - "So it's dead?" - "Eh, kinda?" - "See, that was the lifetime"
  • 18 2
 @ctd07: Aye, like Santa Cruz's Lifetime Warranty (actually 7 years) like you said it's lifetime of the product not lifetime of the buyer
  • 7 2
 Good to hear. Would be sad if some of these products are intended to kill the owner before the product itself breaks and would be turned in for warranty.

"The rim is broken."
"What happened to the rider?"
"Dead."
"Good. Sorry this won't be covered under warranty. Hehehe..."

Planned obsolesce is soo previous decade.
  • 42 0
 @wowbagger, you could always lace the rims up to different hubs if standards changed enough that that was necessary.

Regarding the warranty, We Are One’s terms say, “If you break a rim while riding, we send you a new one. Period. It is that simple.”
  • 11 0
 I'd say the main reasons are lateral stiffness (not life changing but it does improve tracking in corners) and not having to true the wheels nearly as much.
  • 1 2
 @Ttimer: bro, I kill at least 3 sets per ride, maybe 4... how about you?!
  • 1 0
 @jeremy3220: Interesting. I don't ride with carbon rims but some "experts" claim that it is the other way around. Less stiff components (wheels, frame, fork etc) supposedly track better in corners and even though stiffer rims remain true even with unbalanced spokes, such a situation preserves and even exaggerates the imbalance (as a laterally bending rim actually moves with the spokes and as such reduces the imbalance in spoke tension) which eventually causes a wheel failure. Interested to see what others' views are on this.
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: They honored my rim replacement very quickly during the typically slow period between xmas & new year.
  • 3 1
 @mikekazimer: unless the wheelsizes change again Big Grin

Maybe I just haven't ridden enough of the carbon wheels yet to see the difference, maybe I'm being cynical here, it just seems odd to me that I'd spend a frame's worth of money on something that has numbers and (to me) performs as near as makes no differnce as a 500ish bucks set of alloy wheels.

Then again, my first reaction to ever seeing a dropper post were "wtf who'd ever need that in their life" so who am I to judge..
  • 2 5
 @Ash-Ash: if you cant afford to buy new wheels every 7 years, it may be time for a new hobby. Or maybe stick to walmart bikes.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: More radially compliant rims might improve tracking but less stiff laterally won't. There's nothing worse than weak flexy wheels in the corners. Stiffer carbon rims do help but nothing earth shattering over good stiff alloy rims.
  • 10 0
 @mikekazimer: thats assuming the shape of the wheel (rim) doesnt get updated. Round wheels are overdue due for an industry change.
  • 7 0
 @JDFF: I predict they will follow the example of oval chairings.
  • 3 0
 @DJ-24: potentially. May also go octagon, especially as tires develop new 8 sided bead attachments.
  • 4 1
 @JDFF: Let's not dumb this down. Make it 28.99 sided.
  • 3 11
flag 5poundplumbbob (Jan 10, 2020 at 6:39) (Below Threshold)
 @mikekazimer: "If you break a rim while riding, we send you a new one. Period. It's that simple." Translated: a) The rims cost less than $47 to make. b) The company really doesn't care if it's around in five years due to giving too much away c) they're really not telling us everything in the "details"
  • 3 1
 Carbon wheels also have a unique ride quality that I personally love, but the lifetime warranty is great. I’ve found they are stronger than most middle weight alu rims too. Our riding group has a mix of WAO, E13, and Noble Carbon wheels and they have all been fantastic for the last year, and all sport the lifetime warranty. Most bigger companies have their carbon pretty dialled these days so it seems to me like price is a big factor too. Not sure why anyone would pay for ENVE anymore when the 3 companies listed above are cheaper and awesome.
  • 3 0
 @Ttimer: i'm not even having fun on my ride unless i'm leaving bits of aluminum, carbon and rubber in my wake
  • 4 0
 @arrowheadrush: Pfft... I break my wheels before I even leave home. You're not wrenching hard enough.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Im still on hope pro 2 evo hubs.. Cant see it being necessary anytime soon.
  • 3 0
 @ctd07: This:
> most lifetimes warranties are for the 'lifetime' of the warranty... as long as they deem fit to honour it... not the human purchaser's lifetime

I bought some SixC carbon cranks with my Nomad. They cracked and failed at the pedal threaded insert. No warranty for you. We'll give you a new crank for replacement cost though Big Grin
Never buying RaceFace again.
  • 4 0
 Go ride a really nice set of carbon wheels for a couple months. I'm sure you will find what you are missing.
  • 12 0
 @enki: You don't buy RaceFace because you trust their warranties. You buy RaceFace because you got a nice deal and you take your loss when it breaks.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: haha f*ck ain't that the truth. Get this man a beer
  • 3 0
 @jeremy3220:
There is definitely a thing as too much lateral stiffness. I have ridden a carbon rim set up that was nearly impossible to ride in wet conditions, with absolutely no traction every time you hit something not straight on the wheel would just instantly jump sideways.
  • 3 0
 @Ash-Ash: I'm reading on Santa Cruz's website:

Lifetime Frame Warranty
Santa Cruz Bicycles will repair or replace at its option any frame it determines to be defective. The warranty will be in effect for lifetime of the original, registered owner.

Am I missing something?
  • 2 0
 @c0-w: No you're not.
  • 1 0
 my bike came with carbon wheels. I noticed a big difference in rotating weight and lateral stiffness. rear is 28H. front is 24H. they feel stiffer and more compliant than my raceface atlas wheels on my DH bike.
  • 3 0
 @c0-w: People who spend all their savings on a set of carbon wheels just don't have that long left to live. According Santa Cruz, about seven years.
  • 2 0
 @Chris97a: That's true and these aren't that. I'm on a set of WR1 Converts and they ride way smoother than the Derby they replace. It's remarkably noticeable.
  • 1 0
 Yeah-- theyre a great option if you never want to true your wheels.
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: can attest to this! We Are One guys are great, my only issue was bending my stock wheel while waiting for my free rebuilt wheel to arrive...
  • 3 0
 @alexsin:
The ones that were insane still were Ibis with aluminum I9 spokes. Silliest wheels ever. I know man are very reasonable as far as stiffness.
  • 1 0
 They are always true and ride great. I have the 942's on my Ripmo and don't even think about them. There are a lot of rocks where we ride so they get abused.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: agreed.. But their turbine cranks have been stellar for me..
  • 1 0
 @bohns1: Yeah, I didn't mean to say their products are necessarily bad. Just that it is best to leave it up to your own judgement whether you can trust a product. If it breaks, just don't bother with warranty but just buy someone elses product.
  • 1 0
 @ctd07: We Are One's warranty is pretty simple. It only applies to original purchaser, but if you break their rim while riding for any reason, you get a new one. For all other reasons, 50% off.

www.weareonecomposites.com/page/warranty
  • 17 0
 How much of that weight is in the hubs as opposed to the rim? I don't recall I9 hubs being all that light. These rims laced to DT 240s might be a very attractive option if you don't need instant engagement. Use CX-rays or superspokes for spokes while you are at it.

Regarding "compliance", how can anyone even talk about this without relating to rider weight? "Sweet spot" for your weight by definition means that they will feel soft to a heavy guy and very stiff to a light rider.
  • 7 0
 we all know Kazimer's height and weight - it's the same as Levy's Big Grin
  • 7 1
 Yeah, I know Aston left pinkbike but I’d love to see him still do rim reviews. If they hold up to him, you know they hold up to most other riders.

This is by no means meant in a bad way, but I remember watching the snakeskin bike video and Mike Kazimer looked like a stick figure next to Bryn Atkinson.
  • 3 0
 they come standard as 32 spoke so that adds some weight, their rims are a little heavier than some other brands, but they make up for their suburb durability! if you get a flat and need to keep racing on the rockiest stage of your enduro? these rims will take the beating and likely wont break (seen it, and done it. still on my original rims)
  • 1 0
 Agent rim only was slightly under 500 g iirc. I would expect this to be around the same.
  • 1 6
flag Boosting (Jan 10, 2020 at 17:34) (Below Threshold)
 @Upduro: Same goes for when he claims to be a suspension tinkerer and most of his reviews you can tell most of his complaints would be solved by suspension tuning...
  • 18 0
 @Boosting, really? I'd love to see an example of that.

Also, I may not be a heavyweight, but I ride hard and often, and I've broken multiple carbon rims over the last five years. These ones held up extremely well, which is what I detailed in the review. I put in a ton of miles on all of the gear that I test and I stand by my reviews.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: do you think running a combo wheel set such as a convert 28h up front with a Union 32h out back would make for a comfortable ride??
  • 19 0
 Hydra hubs may be state of the art piece of equipment but I wonder if you will suffer from pedal kickback more than on regular hubs?
  • 6 1
 The biggest suffer is going deaf with that hub outback
  • 2 4
 State of the art pawl hubs, which means: expensive, but same ole design as every other pawl hub.

I’d take DT or KC any day.
  • 5 4
 Pedal kickback isn't really thing, it can only happen if the bike's suspension is compressed while it's not moving. As in, if you pick the bike up and drop it straight down you might get pedal kickback. If the bike is moving more than a few miles per hour, the hub is spinning fast enough that you would have to reach an insane shaft speed on the suspension to get kick back. It's a complete non-issue unless you're doing trials type riding on a full suspension. @TheBearDen - a little lube on the drive ring and they're basically silent.
  • 5 1
 @Satanslittlehelper: ride your bike on a DH course with and without your chain. You'll find pedal kickback is a very real and noticeable thing.
  • 3 0
 @dthomp325: depends on the bike....
  • 1 0
 @TheBearDen: I like the sound. Makes me feel like I’m goin real fast. And alerts people that you’re comin.

@pakleni: nah. Even on my linkage driven single pivot I can’t tell the difference between hydra and the DT Swiss hubs they replaced.
  • 3 0
 @TheBearDen: The Hydra rear isn't that loud.
  • 20 1
 a DT350 option would be nice
  • 6 0
 You could just buy the hoops and dt350 hubs and get your LBS to build them for you. But I agree as I am also a fan of the DT350
  • 2 0
 Considering the kind of money these complete wheelsets go for and the prospect that required tools are affordable and not likely to go out of style, I'd recommend to give it a shot and learn to build your own wheels. Make yourself a cup of tea, start easy and slow and put it away when you loose concentration or start to get bored. No need to rush anything. If you take small steps I don't think anything is likely to go wrong. Maybe have your lbs doublecheck your wheel before you go out and ride it. It really isn't that hard and actually a nice experience if you don't feel any stress and allow you to put it away when you're bored. The first ever wheel I ever built was a rear wheel that I rode down the Megavalanche and it actually survived Smile .
  • 1 0
 Before they revamped their wheel lines, you used to be able to choose between Hydra, 101, Chris King, Onyx, DT240, and DT350... and as you built your wheels they would show weight and cost with each. Not sure why it they only offer i9's now... maybe a better deal on hubs with exclusivity.
  • 4 0
 @islandforlife: Other hub options are still available through our custom build programs. Simply email with your request Smile
  • 1 0
 More of a question for dt rather than WAO Smile
  • 2 0
 @BicycleHub: Great, but why not available on the site?
  • 4 0
 I'm having mine built up with DT350's at this very moment. Give them a shout, they'll build just about anything you want...
  • 15 0
 I’ve had a set for two years. Ride Bromont among other places. I’ve broken a rim. The customer service is through the roof. Took a picture of the crack, sent a picture and had a new rim 6 days later.
The rim held air, finished the day without issues. Things break (carbon, aluminum) but it’s how the company stands behind their product which i feel is an important purchasing metric. I believe they also offer crash replacement for non original owners.
  • 17 4
 anyone riding with 23 psi in the rear ?? I just don't understand how one can get away with such a low pressure. I ride an alu tubeless wheel at 28-30 in the rear and I'm 165 lbs, if I go lower, I just destroy my rim
  • 3 0
 rim impact protection. I run my ex471 about 26 in the rear and 23 in the front.
  • 6 0
 I am ca. 143lbs and I ride my tubeless rear wheel at 23 psi and sometimes even lower. I've killed only 2 alu rims in the last 5 years. I think it has also a lot to do with your riding style. I am hopping and skipping all over the trail instead of smashing right through ;-)
  • 1 0
 @mtb-scotland: How are you getting on with the 471's? I'm thinking of having a set built, solid and reasonable weight. I'm using 2.4 tires FWIW.
  • 18 1
 No idea how people ride such absurdly low pressures... I usually ride 27 to 29 psi, any lower than that and you can literally feel the tire folding on the turns
  • 2 0
 @mtbgeartech: used both 26 and 27.5 version without any issues. I have cut up the huck norris mind you on some poorly judged moments. I have used conti baron 2.4, DHR 2.4 WT, maxxis tomahawk, DHF 2.5, minion SS, and currently on Michelin enduros F&R
  • 5 1
 How do people not get all kinds of tire squirm that low...?
  • 33 1
 @Charlotroy, it depends on multiple factors, including rider weight, riding style, terrain, rim + tire width, and tire casing construction.

There seems to be a misguided notion that tire pressure is somehow an indication of how hard you ride, which simply isn’t true. It’s all a matter of experimentation and figuring out what works best for you and where you ride.
  • 1 0
 Where are you riding? I’m 220lb and run 20F//22R most of the winter with CushCore and Schwalbe snakeskin tires. I’m consistently surprised by the lack of rolling/burping too.
  • 2 0
 @stiingya: tyre inserts do wonders to prevent that.
  • 6 0
 I hear ya! I ride where it is very rocky. I am 200lbs before kit. If I were to ride at 23psi my rims would be toast. I always run 32ish psi in rear and 28ish in the front. I had my sidewall collapse once carving into a sizeable hip jump leading to a massive crash. I always now error on too much pressure rather than too little. I switched to carbon rims last year for durability as I was going through a couple wheel builds a year with MK3 rims (made out of cheese apparently). Last season was bliss with no wheel explosions.
  • 4 0
 Cushcore, problem solved.
  • 1 0
 @DrPete: please tell me more about it! I weight about the same, and suffer from sidewall roll. What kind of trails do you ride?

I'm riding an enduro bike, with 2.6" butcher tires, and if I run them below 25 psi the rear of the bike feels loose and imprecise. I am a pretty average rider, not looking for the fastest times or anything.
  • 2 0
 @Caiokv: if you don't have a tyre insert you'll suffer. even the simplest huck norris helps prevent a lot of it.
  • 1 0
 @mtb-scotland: I will look into getting one soon then, thanks!
  • 1 0
 @aharvey: So true! Thinking about making the switch to carbon rims for the season as well. I seem to be going through an average of two rear wheels a year with constant truing in between. Any of my friends that have been crumpling aluminum wheels and made the switch to carbon seem to not have an issue again and smash through rock gardens without a single thought
  • 1 0
 For winter riding on greasy rootfests i have gone down to below 19 psi.
  • 2 0
 Your tire sidewall thickness is going to play a huge roll in this. Exo sidewall for instance is not something that will do well out back with 23psi and a 180+ rider on it where there's a good amount of agressive trail being ridden. But swap that to a double down or maybe even exo plus and you are probably gonna get away with it.
  • 3 0
 i run 22 in the rear and 20 up front, 29x2.4 and im 180lb. if you go through alloy rims like chewing gum then you need to try WR1 rims. they will take the beating, trust me
  • 3 0
 I run 23 PSI rear/21 front on 2.3 Tires on We are One Agents with a Huck Norris Insert in the rear. I've killed one rim in the year I've had them from dropping about 4' directly onto a sharp rock in the wrong spot. The rim cracked, but was still holding shape and I rode it home. I submitted the warranty claim on Monday, and had a rim in hand by Wednesday.
Great warranty, and even with one rim broken, they've held up better than any aluminum wheelset I've ever had. Great product, great company.
  • 2 0
 @Caiokv: and the drag is no fun uphill.
  • 1 0
 I'm the same weight, ride rocky trails all the time, and run 21 front, 24 rear.

29er wheels, 30mm internal rims and 2.5-2.6 tires allow that to work. Last bike was 27.5 with 23mm internal rims. Had to run a little higher pressure due to the lower air volume.

Since I get sendy sometimes, I've cased a wheel once or twice (or more!!) and they've done okay.....with 900g or heavier tires. On the 27.5 rear wheel I ran a Huck Norris which I only noticed when I cased it and didn't munch a rim and/or tire.

Sounds like you're a prime candidate for some sort of foam protector in your tire. And if you aren't breaking the rear tire loose on ledgy up-moves, keep running a little more air.
  • 2 0
 Been riding my 29er We Are One Agent rims for nearly 3 years now, The last year I've added a Rockstop tire insert, and now run my rear tire with 18-20 PSI all the time, which feels great. Have had some pretty nasty big hits too and no punchers or damage to the rim. Only problem I've had is that sometimes the odd spoke becomes loose when riding for hours on rocky, chattery terrain. 10/10 from me!!! Keep up the great work @WeAreOne
  • 15 3
 Definitely better than those Enve rims Paul Aston reviewed.
  • 9 3
 These were not smashed by Paul on an e-bike though. But still, just like most wheels out there, probably better then Enve rims.
  • 5 2
 But you dont get fancy stickers on them !
  • 12 0
 like them so much i got two of them
  • 12 4
 I am still a big fan of the lightbicycle rims.. well manufactured since they started, even though they are made in China... have them on three of my bikes, and never and issue, even riding in the Himalayas. But even if there is something, they have a great warranty policy and customer service.. of course, there is always the ecological aspect..
  • 3 3
 The LB wheels didn’t perform well for me. I’ve broken three LB rims, Two on the same rock. I later bounced an enve rim off that rock and yes it are a horrible sound but the rim survived.
  • 10 0
 @specialev: Geez dude put some air in your tires!
  • 11 0
 Ya, everyone here whenever there is a rim review says, "WeAreOne are better/cheaper/lighter review those!" Well, these rims are neither light nor cheap.
  • 23 0
 @specialev: maybe stop hitting that rock?
  • 2 0
 I have a bunch of friends on LB. I am actually on the fence about a building up LB 933 (39mm external width) on a set of Hope hubs. My other option is to go with Stan’s Flow, which have always worked well for me.
  • 5 1
 I've built up 7 sets of Light Bicycle rims since 2012, everything from from fat, plus, trail and road bike. I'm 210 pounds naked and have NEVER had a problem with them. I'm not suggesting they're bombproof, because really nothing is, but they are solid and a great value. They also have a LOT of different profiles to choose from, finish weaves, hooked or hook-less, asymmetric or symmetric and you can also order them with different color decals or NO DECAS like I do.
  • 4 1
 Same, I have 3 pairs....work perfectly. Seen everything from XC to DH runs. Haven’t broke, one pair is over 5years old.
  • 4 0
 @krka73: You ride naked?
  • 8 1
 I know someone who bought light bicycle (LB), over having a set hand built in Canada because LB was cheaper. He ordered whatever LB rim, on a DT 350 hub.

The wheels came in, on DT 350 straight pull, and they were grossly over tensioned, to the point the spoke holes were deformed and raised - basically, the rim was damaged. Tensions were around 160 kgf I believe.

He fought LB to exchange them. They wouldn't - they wouldn't only replace the rims, and they would not address the fact they sent the wrong hubs. He was on the hook for rebuilding them when they arrived, which cost him money.

I would never buy from LB after seeing this happen to him. I don't disagree that they make good rims, but their service is wretched.
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: yup, and no saddle...
  • 3 0
 @privateer-wheels: well, I can't say anything about their wheels building skills. I just buy rims and build my own...
  • 3 0
 I also had a bad experience with LightBikes rim. Cracked it riding in Crested Butte, 30PSI with a Cush Core, and I never felt like I had a nasty case or anything... bummer. Crash replacement is barely less than full retail of a new rim, which was disappointing. I wouldn't build them up again.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: You used to be able to spec different hubs (DT350) that kept costs down... looks like they now have an exclusivity contract with i9 now... but you could always buy rim only, source your own hubs and spokes and have them built.
  • 2 0
 The last time I tried to buy LB rims, I had non-existent customer service. Multiple emails, etc - nothing. I would never buy from them here in Canada. On the flip-side, emailed We Are One and they were super responsive and helpful. They're awesome!
  • 1 0
 @jaydubmah: LB has been pretty solid for the last 5 years with customer service. I wouldn't write them off, maybe give them a second chance.
  • 9 1
 I'll gladly keep spending a little more money for a rim that will take a lot of abuse and is made In Canada, just a short drive from home. And, no, I'm not just beating the Canuck drum here. My We Are One wheels will be mounted to a carbon frame hand made in the Colorado, USA.
  • 18 0
 Lots of people will will tell you where they are made doesn't matter - and that's a matter of option I'm sure. But the fact that We Are One rims come with a sticker signed by a builder, who often times is someone who grew up in the same area I did, knocked around with some of the same people I did, and who I can verify actually rides a bike, and I know cares about the product - to ME that counts for a lot. Can't be said for a lot of rims, made by a factory worker who may not even understand or have ever used the product they are making. In many cases, they are a luxury these factory workers simply cannot afford and will never use - and that comes straight from the mouth of an Asian factory worker who I have spoken with. Now that's not every case, and there certainly are some great foreign made rims, but there is a good story behind We Are One. There are good people behind We Are One. And I believe in it, and them. So beat that damn Canadian drumb, in this case, it's justified IMHO.
  • 6 0
 There are a lot of comments about weight - We Are One offers lighter rims too. You just need to pick a width to compare apples to apples. Also, no comments about where your rims are made. I'm confident that the WR1 factory is responsibly treating workers and the environment. I am not that confident about the factory conditions in some of the other locations where carbon components are constructed.
  • 5 0
 These wheels feel very light coming out of berms, which makes the bike feel faster. That their warranty is "so long as you didn't drive over them" shouldn't be undersold.

Unlike some other warranty departments WeAreOne actually gets back to their customers right away, because lifetime shouldn't mean it takes a lifetime to get your wheels back.
  • 4 0
 Purchased this wheel set in early 2019 and have been nothing but impressed. The service from WeR1 was fantastic. I have had two incidents that I am sure would have badly damaged aluminum rims or lesser quality carbon rims. Cased hard on a sharply edged rock at St. Raymond QC and rode for a bit on some steep and gnarly rocks with a flat in NL (Ocean Side trail). Both times I was sure the rim was forked and lo and behold it was fine and true. I will be returning to WeR1 for my next wheel purchase. Giver bys!
  • 3 0
 I have 2 years on the WAO insider rims. Quality is excellent and they’re still spinning true. I’ve definitely hit stuff that would dent sturdy aluminum rims. If you add in the cost of rebuilding damaged aluminum wheels I’m financially ahead... plus the weight and performance are superior. If I was buying a new wheelset today these would still be at the top of my list.
  • 3 0
 Currently boarding a plane to fly back home and unbox my set of Unions!

Very very excited.

I’ve destroyed several carbon and aluminum rims over the past few years, so I’m beyond stoked to ride these worry free at the pressures I actually want to run.

We Are One have been amazing with their customer service. From building the rims to a set of 240s I provided, sending me proofs for custom decals, and answering a myriad of questions I sent their way.

Thanks!
  • 1 0
 Do they still do custom decals? Are they limited to just those little decals that come stock or can you have bigger ones as custom? I’d Like to have something similar to the Raceface Arc31 decals.
  • 1 0
 @pinnit2winit918: I’m not completely sure about different sizes... I just worked with them to get a colour swap done with the existing design. They used Stikrd for these, so perhaps there is a fair bit of flexibility available?
  • 5 0
 Would happily assimilate to this product
  • 6 0
 "WAO!" -Owen Wilson
  • 4 0
 I have the Agents and they have been spot on. Same as customer service. Go Canada!
  • 1 0
 I built up a pair of these hoops recently for one of my regular customers and was VERY impressed with them. Finish quality was great and the layup appears to be super uniform. After final true the spoke tension was really consistent. Some rims you can tell are just not that uniform in the layup because you can either get the wheel perfectly round, or the spoke tension perfectly uniform, but not both. These We Are One rims were just perfect in every way except affordability, and I can't really blame them for wanting to get paid well for a good product. I'll totally buy these rims if I ever get to where I can afford to spend $900 on a pair of rims.
  • 5 0
 Why two cross?
  • 1 0
 Why not? It's laterally stiffer (not sure how much, or if significant, though) and slightly lighter. I've built a few wheelsets over the years as 2x and never had an issue, as the spoke lengths are a little shorter, and made the wheels slightly lighter for no real penalty.
  • 4 0
 I'm just here for the "aluminium is life" comments.
  • 3 0
 Carbon Wheel reviews: where all the arm-chair engineers become arm-chair environmental scientists
  • 3 0
 Anyone know how these compare to a set of Nobl TR38’s?
  • 2 0
 The TR38's are 1mm wider internal and similar weight, but they are more dedicated to heavier riders and DH/Enduro Race rigs. Pricing is similar but Nobl offers more hub options through their site along with a standard 3 year warranty/5 year crash replacement or the option for a lifetime warranty for another $100. I would say these WeAreOnes are comparable to the Nobl TR36's which are lighter but designed for AM/Enduro. All the hub and warranty information above still applies to the TR36's. However I don't think Nobl's wheels are made in Canada.
  • 2 1
 @yupstate: love my nobl TR38s. I’m 235 and bash them around - no trying required in the 3mos I’ve had them. They just feel... good.

Wheels arrived at my door about a week after ordering. Customer service on ordering side was terrific. I had a last minute panic about microspline hub compatibility in the week they were building them and received THREE immediate responses from Nobl (phone/email/dm) assuring that all was well (which it was).

The one thing I’d change? Going with an Onyx Vesper hub. No quality issues at all, but these things just feel so squishy/springy. Silence is golden, but you’d be hard pressed to call this “instant” engagement given that the pedals rotate trough a solid handful of degrees before building up enough locking force in the hub to get the wheel turning. Maybe a lighter human wouldn’t have an issue, but to me it feels like I’m running rubber crank arms.
  • 1 0
 @Blownoutrides: I own the 2018 version of the TR36s myself laced to DT240's. They have been perfect, no issues. I DO run them on my more XC-oriented bike so I don't beat the crap out of them too bad. But either way, very happy with them.
  • 2 0
 NOBL warranty (last Spring at least) is significantly worse than "if you break riding it we will give you a new one" and more like "we warrant against manufacturing defects and offer a crash replacement program if you damage it riding".
  • 2 0
 @yupstate: nobl are Chinese made. Contract manufactured
  • 4 0
 Lifetime is 5 years
  • 2 1
 Laughs in AtomLab
  • 3 0
 It'd be pretty cool if we had made-in-Canada alu rims too!
  • 2 0
 Manufacturing aluminum extrusion , I think is a much bigger investment up front. By comparison , building carbon parts (with aluminum tooling ) is more suitable for a cottage industry.
  • 1 0
 @DGWW: Velocity rims, which are made in the US, get their aluminum extrusions from a US company that's specialized in extrusions: youtu.be/22sFAFTmBuU?t=78
So we could have (at least partly) made in Canada ally rims with not much more upfront investment than for carbon rims, it seems.
  • 3 0
 @cedrico: I'd buy Canadian made alloy rims. Maybe Devinci should do it. They already sell Canadian made alloy frames (made from Canadian made aluminium!)
  • 1 0
 @DGWW: same here Smile
  • 2 1
 This "compliance" thing must be a skinny person problem. At 210 pounds naked, I've never ridden a wheel that was too stiff, but I've ridden plenty of wet noodles....
  • 5 0
 I have. The old Enve M70s felt like riding a plywood disc at our weight.
  • 2 0
 @DrPete: have the M70/30HV and can concur.
  • 1 0
 I'm around your weight and couldn't believe how badly my LB carbon rims pinged and deflected off rocks. And I run low tire pressure. Maybe terrain has a lot to do with the varying experiences people have with them.
  • 3 0
 @krka73 Put some clothes on,will you?
  • 1 0
 @krka73 probably best not to ride around naked. particularly near schools
  • 2 0
 @nozes: Clothes are too expensive... got carbon wheels to buy!
  • 1 0
 @mtb-scotland: ALL good, I hate kids. Avoid them as much as humanly possible...
  • 1 0
 @VelkePivo: Definitely. But I think you can pretty much say that about any component on a bike. It's surprising how often I read about products I have a lot experience with, and my impressions are exactly opposite of what I'm reading. GO FIGURE!
  • 2 0
 @DrPete: Couldn't agree more.
  • 1 0
 @ATXZJ: I haven’t ridden this new generation of WR1s but the Agent rides waaaaaay better than the M70 in terms of compliance/tracking on the chunky stuff.
  • 1 0
 It's actually the dumonde freehub grease that quiets them down. The oil makes them hella loud (just finished packing grease in mine).
  • 1 1
 I would love to purchase a set of these in 27.5. Then I can proudly support a Canadian company. Unfortunately this is way out of my price range for a wheel set. With tax these are about 2000 Canadian pesos.
  • 2 0
 What happened to their $999 wheels? Now the cheapest on their site are $1399.
  • 2 0
 I love my Agent rims. I will be ordering my next set of wheels from them in the future.
  • 2 0
 I want to order some Unions but I can’t kill my Agents. Haha.
  • 1 1
 Why is no one talking about Carbonfan rims? Less than $200 each and much lighter than this. Been riding them for years, but I put air in my tires so ymmv.
  • 1 0
 And what’s the warranty?
  • 1 0
 Carbon Fan rims are my preference as well, and are what I run.
  • 1 0
 @DrPete: Who cares? Just order another one.
  • 3 0
 @JohanG: Uh, I'd ride aluminium for 100 a pop if that's the answer. The only way carbon beats alloy for me is the combination of strength plus unlimited warranty.
  • 3 0
 Just looked up CarbonFans warranty. You're dealing directly with a Chinese company, so there's only a 1 year warranty on quality issues, AND they require you pay for shipping to return your rim to China before replacement is issued, which is not going to be cheap. They also do not mention crash replacements at all. This doesnt seem like a good deal at all.
  • 1 0
 @jayacheess: I run inserts front and rear (BTW kids THAT's how you get a well supported tire that works at lower psi), Carbon Fan rims are a well known quality brand, and frankly at $180 each I don't care that much. The real cost of a rim failure is downtime and re-lacing the things. That said, once I began running inserts, I quit breaking rims altogether.

My Carbon Fan wheels (F: 33mm ID AM 28H & R: 29mm ID DH 32H) combined with P321 hubs and Berd spokes weigh 1439 grams for the set, cost about $1500 to put together and have a noticeable compliance to them that my other 3 other sets of carbon fiber wheels (ENVE, NOX, & Nobl) just didn't. What Carbon Fan really offers that other brands don't is the ability to pick every aspect of your wheels, so that you can spec them differently front to rear. I happen to believe that a front wheel and a rear rim have different requirements and therefore should have different specs. So I would not even consider a set of wheels where the front and rear rims are identical. Nor a set of 1900 g wheels unless they were bargain priced.
  • 4 0
 @SunsPSD: You can buy rims separately from WeAreOne, you realize. Their weights are competitive to CarbonFans, plus you get their lifetime crash replacements, etc. And they're not laid up in China.
  • 1 0
 @jayacheess: depends on how you ride. But if you’re moving to carbon because you’re denting too many alloy rims... not the move
  • 2 0
 @jayacheess: I don't even like bringing this up because I dig what WeAreOne is doing and wish them the best, HOWEVER I can buy TWO Carbon Fan Rims and keep a spare on the shelf for backup and still save $90 over what 1 WAO cost. $90 is enough for a re-lace that second wheel too and have not but a day of downtime. To top it off I can choose my width and layup specific to my needs/ desires on Carbon Fan wheels, options which WAO simply don't have.
I never mind paying for the best, that's why if I cared much about warranty I'd buy a set of Crankbrothers Synthesis wheels, the only ready made wheel company that got it all correct imo and also provides the warranty you covet.
Take care.
  • 2 0
 @SunsPSD: Your comparisons are really confounding.

Crank Brothers rims are laid up in Asia, and cost 700 usd each.

Nothing you're saying here is making a terribly good argument for buying CarbonFan rims for most riders. I gather they work for you, since you're not worried about dealing with China for rim failures abs warranty replacements, and are perfectly happy having a stock of rims at home to build up on short notice.

For the rest of us, dealing with a North American company with a great warranty, mid range price (for carbon) and local construction, easily trumps everything else.
  • 3 0
 @jayacheess: Exactly. “I don’t understand why anyone would buy that Patagonia sweater when you can get 4 sweaters made by slave labor from a company whose employees live in poverty for the same price.”
  • 3 1
 @DrPete: 1) You have no idea of the working conditions of the people building wheels in Asia. For all you know those are highly coveted jobs that pay well and are well higher up the average pay scale than the same jobs are in Canada.
2) You are the rare mountain biker if you somehow avoid all Asian made bicycle parts. Frankly isn't much to choose from without Asia. I assume you don't ride any major brand CF frame and countless other components?
3) Lastly, lifting a people up occurs naturally when their economic activity becomes valuable. If you want to see Asians slip in to poverty and be unimportant to employers, than never buy an Asian made product again. This is how you punish and destroy an economy. My purchasing of Asian products is a huge NET positive for China and frankly is the single solitary reason (all consumers I mean) that 1.5 billion people are currently rising out of destitute poverty and firmly in to the middle class.
4) You virtue signaling is misplaced, makes a lot of assumptions, and frankly is asinine. The only legitimate reason to overpay for N. American made manufacturing is to support domestic manufacturing, which is a good reason. But don't think for one second you are 'helping' the poor Chinese when you refuse to do business with them.
  • 4 3
 @SunsPSD: 1) I have to laugh. What a self serving bunch of assumptions and wishes about Chinese manufacturing.
The only thing we know for sure is that the people at the Kamloops factory seem to be treated well.

2) Who is suggesting we avoid asian manufacturing altogether? Sometimes that's the only alternative.

The point was that when there's a local alternative that guarantees well treated workers, local-ish shipping for acquiring the product, a quality product, etc, why not buy on this continent?

3) No one is suggesting never buying an Asian product again. More straw man arguments.

4) Oh! The 'virture signaling' key-phrase. No wondering you're so obtuse - you're a right-wing internet person.
  • 1 3
 @jayacheess: Please dial down the derangement. It doesn't take a right winger (whatever that means) to notice the "I'm a better anonymous internet poster than you" dripping from most of these posts.
  • 3 1
 @JohanG: Because people want to buy locally? What is wrong with you two?
  • 3 1
 @SunsPSD: that’s an impressive fantasy you’ve built up to justify paying less for rims.
  • 2 0
 "We are one"
"We are Borg"
"Resistance is futile"
  • 1 0
 www.youtube.com/watch?v=j3Js0fV2wm0

Fanatik review of a few We Are One Rims and builds
  • 1 0
 2020 and people still hate on carbon. and still ignoring the lifetime warranty.
  • 1 0
 I thought they used to have a $1000 wheelset?
  • 1 0
 Not sure why this review means they don't.
  • 1 0
 @hmstuna: Can't find one on their site.
  • 1 0
 @yupstate: yeah, your right they stopped making the movements
  • 3 0
 Looks like they very recently discontinued the Agents and the Insiders. Black Friday they had a coupon for 15% off that got you a complete wheelset with I9 101 hubs for $850. Probably cannibalized too many sales of their Revolution series wheels. I've loved my Agents, which I bought earlier when they were ~$1250 with DT 350s. $1400 for the newer rim with I9 101 hubs still is a good value for such a nice and well supported wheelset. I do wish I had bought a set of the Insiders on Black Friday for my hardtail.
  • 2 0
 @Timzjatl: Yea, too bad in my opinion. Would be nice to have a 30mm ID option in the "trail" category that's a little bit lighter than 1900g for a wheelset.
  • 2 0
 @hmstuna: I make movements every morning after a cup of coffee.
  • 2 0
 @yupstate: they’re literally all lighter than 1900g.
  • 2 0
 They have the old rims still listed if you select custom build. Not sure if the price is different than before.
  • 1 0
 Can someone recommend a good ALU wheel for XC racing?
  • 2 0
 Any DT nice enough to have a star ratchet rear hub (their pawl hubs are trash). They come up on eBay, Pinkbike and Craigslist all the time. Dentist bros buy nice bikes, but want carbon wheels and sell the stock DT's hella cheap.

Bontrager wheels are also pretty nice and reasonably priced if you have a local Trek Dealer you like.
  • 1 0
 @WasatchEnduro today is yesterday's tomorrow
  • 1 0
 So, it's made in Canada to rip off Canadians! Heard of Light Bicycle?
  • 2 3
 Not a wheel company. A rim company. They don’t make a in-house hub. Rims are a dime a dozen for choices now a days.
  • 4 0
 If that’s your standard then Industry Nine, Mavic, and Hope may be the only wheel companies on the planet.
  • 3 0
 Oh, forgot DT.
  • 1 0
 @DrPete: and light bicycle.
  • 3 3
 So really the review for this wheelset is just one word: "Meh."
  • 1 0
 LB Wheels for life.
  • 1 0
 26"?
  • 2 2
 Nope.
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