Review: We Are One Convergence Carbon Wheelset

May 5, 2023
by Dario DiGiulio  
photo

With a no frills philosophy and consistent throughline of environmental consciousness, We Are One has built a strong reputation as one of the finest composites manufacturers in the bike industry. Like any hot brand there's a fair bit of hype at play, but the folks in Kamloops aren't ones to rest on their laurels, as they keep releasing new and exciting products to grow and improve their lineup. Newest on the wheel front is their uniquely shaped Convergence series of rims, with some strong claims about increased durability, build strength, and ride feel. It's not unusual for companies to tout their newest wheel tech as somehow revolutionary, but given their track record, the WAO Convergence series might just have the performance to match.
Convergence Details

• Carbon fiber rims
• 28-hole front, 32-hole rear
• Inner rim width: 28, 30, or 33
• Made in Canada
• Lifetime warranty
• Weight: 1887 gram wheelset, 495-505g rims
• Price:$1,799 USD
• More info: weareonecomposites.com

Like all of We Are One's carbon products, the Convergence rims are made in their Kamloops, BC, factory with material sourced as close to home as possible. The wheelsets are built around Industry Nine Hydra hubs, with their class-leading 690 points of engagement and whichever freehub standard you prefer. The wheels are laced with Sapim Race spokes, held by Sapim Polyax nipples, using a 2-cross pattern for 29" and 3-cross for 27.5". When speccing a wheelset on the WAO website, you have the choice of Boost or Superboost rear spacing, as well as three front axle specs: Boost, Boost w/ RockShox Torque Caps, and 110x20 DH spacing. The rims come in 29" and 27.5", and mixed wheelsets can be ordered with ease.

photo
Thanks Knippelberg, great work.

DESIGN
The Convergence series differs from We Are One's typical rim shape, instead opting for a unique wavy pattern that is meant to optimize the bracing angle of the spokes as they enter the rim. They say the shape of the rim was driven by both beauty and function, with a 32% increase in impact strength over their prior Union models. Part of the redesign was integrating a novel material called ZRT, created by Boston Materials. WAO doesn't provide a ton of info about where the material is being integrated, but after some reading I'd guess it's helping with spoke bed strength, and preventing pull-out under very high stress. ZRT also helps prevent damage from lightning strikes, but I'm guessing that wasn't their first thought with integrating it into the new rims.

photo
Not just a pretty face.
photo
There's more at play inside.

On the other wheelbuilding fronts, it's business as usual, with pretty sensible choices all around. One difference from their other rim designs is the overall depth of the rim, which has been reduced to 18.5mm from the previous 21mm. Pretty small difference, but this should provide more compliance as the rim can deflect to conform to cambered terrain and impacts.

SETUP
There's nothing too special or unusual to report here, despite setting them up with a wide variety of tires and inserts over a few months of use. Over that period I ran Maxxis, Continental, and Specialized tires, and all were able to seat with nothing more than a floor pump, no compressor or special tricks needed. After a little while I did swap in the Santa Cruz Fillmore valves, because I've come to prefer their clog-free operation over standard Presta valves.

Worth noting is the front and rear difference in rim width that we tested here. WAO sent us a set with a 28mm internal rear (named the Sector) and a 30mm internal front (named the Triad). The idea here was to bias a bit towards the common tire sizes at the two ends of the bike, as most folks are running bigger rubber up front compared to the rear. I personally don't mind having a more squared-off rear tire, but the slightly mismatched combo did give a nicely similar shape to a 2.5 front and 2.4 rear tire.

photo
One of only a few battle scars.

PERFORMANCE
It's become a common refrain here, but talking about high-quality mountain bike wheels has gotten harder and harder as the competition improves. As long as they're built well and carry decent value, any number of carbon wheelsets should impress and deliver a solid, reliable ride. That said, there are a few key areas where the We Are One Convergence wheels did stand out from the crowd.

The first is that wave pattern, and I don't mean from an aesthetic point of view. The Convergence wheels have held their tension better than just about any wheelset I've used, which may not seem like a huge accolade until you consider what that means for durability. As a wheel loses tension, the stress on the rim, spokes, and even the hubs can grow pretty significantly, leading to failure under load - as well as some weird ride characteristics. The Convergence wheels have been very consistent, with minor loss in tension and no real change in how true they spin, which simply makes them easier to rely on day in and day out.

photo
Braced for impact.
photo
Beefy flanges mean fewer problems.

Another impressive characteristic of the Convergence rims is how well they've handled some pretty serious tire bottom-outs, with and without inserts. I've been riding Vancouver's North Shore a lot this winter, and there are no shortage of abrupt square edges to really see what your wheels can take. Despite some bad line choices and timing, the WAO rims have suffered no damage, nor have they caused any snake-bite flats in tires. Part of that is my choice to run heavier casing tires (typically downhill or similarly durable options), but a big component is just how wide the rim flanges are. There are a few brands moving in this direction now, and I think it really helps abate a lot of the common causes for tubeless flats, at least up here in the Northwest. As a result, I've started moving away from using inserts when running heavy tires, though I still opt for them with less-supportive light casing options.

photo
Durable, but how do they feel?

When it comes to ride feel, the Convergence rims have been pleasantly neutral. I know, not the explosive change in handling you hoped for, but to me this is high praise. They do everything quite well, without biasing too heavily towards any one trait. I've ridden carbon wheels that feel super precise and snappy, but can't hold a line through rough terrain unless the stars align. On the other end of the spectrum you have the forgiving feel of some aluminum rims, as well as specifically-made carbon products meant to give a very damp and smooth ride - though they sacrifice some energy in corners and heavy compressions. The Convergence wheels feel like they're right in the middle of that spectrum, which suits the varied terrain modern bikes are meant to handle.

VALUE
Coming in at a dollar under $1,800 USD, the We Are One Convergence wheels are by no means a cheap upgrade to your bike, but they are quite competitive amongst other options of the same caliber. Compared to some ultra high-end wheelsets out there, you could even make the argument that the Convergence lineup presents a better value, with a solid warranty, North American manufacturing, and an excellent product to boot. If you've already stocked up on good tires, have brakes you really like, and have treated your suspension nicely, then a high-quality wheelset is a pretty excellent next step in upping the performance of your bike. Given how well these have worked for me, I think they're a solid choice.

photo
Only the finer things here.

The only area where I wish We Are One had a bit more flexibility and cost consideration is in the hub spec. I think the Industry Nine Hydras are a pretty great set of hubs, but I'd be just as happy with lower-engagement options from companies like DT Swiss or Hope. I've had some durability issues with Hydras in the past, mostly in the form of broken axles and bearing life, and though their customer service is excellent, it's just another thing to check when you're giving your bike some love. Small complaints about a truly high-end component, but when you're balling out on fancy wheels it's nice to have a choice on the details.



Pros

+ Precise yet comfortable ride feel
+ Excellent durability
+ Solid value


Cons

- Limited hub selection
- Not much else




Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesThe best thing I can say about the Convergence wheels is that I'm going to avoid taking them off my bike until I absolutely have to. Their top-notch performance and build quality makes for an excellent component choice on a high end bike. Like many carbon wheelsets, they cost a fair bit, but given We Are One's commitment to local manufacturing and supply chains, you can feel good knowing your money is going to a company that cares.Dario DiGiulio







Author Info:
dariodigiulio avatar

Member since Dec 25, 2016
175 articles

212 Comments
  • 119 3
 I’m an admitted fanboy, but WAO are good people that make good stuff. Theirs are the only wheelsets I’ve bought since their inception, and I’ve no intention of buying anything else going forward. Strongly recommend!
  • 29 0
 I have multiple sets, oldest going on 3 or 4 years old. Great feel from them and I like the North American made aspect.
  • 10 0
 Agree have unions right now that are great and convergence wheel set on order!
  • 6 0
 I was asking the LBS which carbon rims/wheels to buy and WAO is their top choice as long as I'm happy with the hub selection. They don't sell WAO (they do sell Reserve which they'd happily sell me or build up on my current hubs). The guys in the shop have ridden tons of different wheels and WAO is their goto. Of course it's BC shop supporting a BC company that manufacturers in BC, so definitely some bias. They did recommend them over another BC company if I was considering that route.

I'm super happy to support a company that manufacturers in Canada and yet still has a fair price.
  • 21 0
 Agreed. Unions on Onyx hubs make any bike your favorite bike.
  • 9 1
 @flattoflat: yeah that's what I've done had them custom built with onyx hubs. no way I'd pick i9 over that.
  • 7 0
 Agreed. I’m on my second set. Now running Strife on Onyx Vesper hubs. Couldn’t be happier.
  • 2 0
 @cyrways: had the Unions and they were faultless. Great feel.
  • 4 0
 Just wish they had European distribution. I was considering their rims for a build, but quickly changed my mind when I figured out postage would cost me almost $300.
  • 5 0
 @Trailsoup: check 77Designz. European Distributor, they collaborate with their cockpits (stem is from 77Designz which is the parent company of Kavenz)
77-store.com/Store/Laufraeder
  • 10 0
 I used to cringe and roll my eyes at the armies of loyal We Are One adherents like you guys. But I bought some and now I’m one of you. I’d say I hate myself for it, but they’re great wheels.
  • 6 0
 @TheR: That's the funny thing about the bike industry, company puts out a great product and it's kind of frowned upon to be happy with it but a company can put out a shit product and the bad comments are almost encouraged.
  • 4 0
 @Tmackstab: Nah. There was something weird about the We Are One stuff. More than just liking a product. It was like a cult. But now I’m in it, so I understand. Throw in i9 hubs and I’m doubly committed.
  • 2 0
 @Trailsoup: I got my Unions built up on Hope hubs through Creation Cycles in the UK. Sure, you have to pay mva when they come into Norway but it was still cheaper than Reserve at the time. I LOVE the wheels, theydo what they should and are completely off the radar when it comes to damage/maintenance.
  • 3 0
 @Trailsoup: If you prefer buying from your neighbor in the East, get in touch with these guys: www.boutiquemtb.se/pages/true-wheels-ab
  • 2 0
 @Trailsoup: If local production (next to great quality) is an argument for you, then check out Beast Components. Made in Germany, so they don‘t need to be shipped half around the globe. Put their wheels on my bike a few months ago (with DT hubs), they are excellent.
Having said that, WAO is also a company I really admire.
  • 4 0
 Looks like i got some options. Thanks guys Smile
  • 1 0
 Having over 2 solid problem free years on a set of unions, vs going through 4 sets of flows in a similar period, Totally stoked on wea. Convergence will be my next set, sooner or later.
  • 66 0
 With a name like Knippelberg, it's hard to get out of the spoke department
  • 12 0
 I heard you can get promoted to spokesman though
  • 55 1
 Custom Wheel Builder out of Colorado will build these with i9 1/1 or Hope 5 hubs for something like $1,345 USD. Doesn’t get much better than that!
  • 8 0
 I used Custom Wheel Builder as well, but used the WAO Strife rims on Hope Pro 4 hubs for a similar price. I would highly recommend Custom Wheel Builder.
  • 8 0
 also used custom wheel builder for both sets but went with onyx hubs.
  • 5 0
 That's what I did. Didn't want to pay extra for the less reliable Hydra. Excellent build quality and zero complaints.
  • 6 0
 Jack is great and will add any hubs you want. Last two sets he did for me were Unions and Factions with DT 350’s. Both were @ $1350.
  • 2 0
 @cyrways: I've been considering building my own wheels, but that sounds like a good deal and the really interesting onyx hubs. I may go that route!
  • 2 0
 @weziewoo: I built all my previous wheel sets, having put them through whistler paces with no issues, Custom wheel builders prices convinced me not to this time. Their building techniques have exceeded my expectations.
  • 2 0
 @cyrways: Cool, thanks! That sounds promising (and exciting!)
  • 48 0
 If they offered wheelsets with DT 350 hubs for ~$1400, I'd already own a pair. I'd be buying for durability/reliability, so I'd rather have bulletproof hubs than spend a ton extra for some bling and increased engagement.
  • 2 0
 My thoughts exactly.
  • 8 0
 WAO Unions are around that price and are available with 350's last time I looked. Same lifetime crash warranty.
  • 12 6
 Agreed. The i9s are not great.
  • 7 0
 @Aeyogi: The angled nipple bed is the major reason I'm interested in them, so the Unions aren't really a replacement. I break a lot of spokes at the nipple, so getting rid of that bending stress should help a lot. The shallower rim profile should mean a less harsh ride as well.
  • 1 4
 I got raceface turbines new for $1200 for sale. I havent had any issues with the set ive owned for 3 years and i dont run inserts and have had multiple rim strikes
  • 2 3
 @DaneL:

I've broken the odd nipple with my angled spoke.

....Just sayin'
  • 11 0
 Don’t forget they sell the rims separately. I just built up a set with 350s.
  • 9 0
 Try the I9 1/1. Have proven to be very reliable for me! I used to run 350’s exclusively. Prefer the 1/1.
  • 9 0
 @DaneL: fwiw the unions, and all other Wao rims, have the nipple holes drilled at their respective angles to decrease load on the nipple. Obvious the convergence takes it a step further, but even that small detail on the old rims really improves the wheel. I have spent my entire life breaking spokes, nipples, pulling nipples through rim beds, constantly truing and re-lacing rims, but since I bought unions 4 years ago I haven’t touched my wheels. Tried to adjust tension a few times only to find that they were still perfect. It’s pretty mind boggling how good they are.
  • 3 0
 They do. Custom Wheel Builder in Co. will build you a set with 350’s for under. $1350
  • 2 0
 Try Custom Wheel Builder. Should be close to that price.
  • 3 0
 Step 1: Buy 2 rims
Step 2: Buy DT 350 hubs
Step 3: Drop off at LBS to be built
Step 4: PROFIT
  • 1 0
 @DaneL: Maybe a double butted spoke could help you right there. The bending will be at the thinner part either way, but with double butted spoke it'll be on a larger area, spreading the forces.
  • 3 0
 @Notmeatall: I only use double butted spokes. I still (almost) always break at the nipple, though. The threads are a huge stress riser, so that's where they tend to fatigue. The only time I see spokes break in the middle is if they first get a big gouge from a rock which then acts as a stress riser just like the threads.

That's not to say that having double butted spokes doesn't help, though; they're less stiff than straight gauge spokes, so they share load more evenly (a single spoke loses less tension when the wheel is loaded). That drastically improves fatigue life.
  • 26 1
 Knippelberg is my safe word
  • 15 2
 I got them for the lifetime warranty figuring they are a good investment, and was expecting only subtle differences in ride feel over my OEM aluminum wheels. I was shocked at how much they improved the handling of the bike. Riding a trail I know by heart, I can corner faster, charge through rock gardens faster, and carry more speed in general. I don't understand the mechanics of why, but the wheels made a big difference. I also got great support from the people at WAO. It is a wonderful company to do business with.
  • 9 1
 You notice how good they are the most when you put your old wheelset back on. Scary how big of a difference it was for me!
  • 13 5
 IMO best wheelset on the market from a performance and value standpoint. Been running a set of their Revolution Union rims with Hydra hubs for a few seasons and they are absolutely flawless.
  • 6 16
flag bigmeatpete420 (May 5, 2023 at 11:42) (Below Threshold)
 This is most definitely not the best. You can still buy a wheelset Lake, DT swiss 1950 for very nearly $800 less. And you get 240 hubs and 560 FR rims.
  • 6 12
flag pivotpedi (May 5, 2023 at 13:13) (Below Threshold)
 @freeridejerk888:

I call you when I need you, my heart's on fire
You come to me, come to me wild and wild
When you come to me
Give me everything I need
Give me a lifetime of promises and a world of dreams
Speak a language of love like you know what it means
MMm, and it can't be wrong
Take my heart and make it strong, baby
You're simply the best
Better than all the rest
Better than anyone
Anyone I've ever met
I'm stuck on your heart
I hang on every word you say
Tear us apart
Baby, I would rather be dead
In your heart, I see the star of every night and every day
In your eyes, I get lost, I get washed away
Just as long as I'm here in your arms
I could be in no better place
You're simply the best
Better than all the rest
Better than anyone
Anyone I've ever met
Ooh, I'm stuck on your heart
I hang on every word you say
Don't tear us apart, no, no, no
Baby, I would rather be dead
Each time you leave me, I start losing control
You're walking away with my heart and my soul
I can feel you even when I'm alone
Oh baby, don't let go
Ooh, you're the best, ooh
Better than all the rest
Better than anyone
Anyone I've ever met
Ooh, I'm stuck on your heart
I hang on every word you say
Don't tear us apart, no, no
Baby, I would rather be dead
You're the best
Ooh, you're simply the best
Better than all the rest
Better than anyone
Anyone I've ever met
I'm stuck on your heart, baby
I hang on every word you say
Don't tear us apart, no, no, no
Baby, I would rather be dead
Oh, you're the best
You're better than all the rest
Better than anyone
Anyone I've ever met
Ooh, you're the best

They are the best, IMO
  • 8 0
 It might be worth reaching out directly to see if WAO will build up Convergence wheels with different hubs? Just because it's not an option on the website, doesn't mean it's off the table.
  • 8 0
 Find a wheelbuilder and just buy the Triad and Sector rims.
  • 6 0
 @los36: I ended up going that route. Wanted Profile Elite hubs, but WAO wasn't able to get them. Local shop build them up for me. A little bit pricier, but I got exactly what I wanted and couldn't be happier.
  • 4 0
 I've heard mostly meh things about I9 Hydras. I'd probably want DT350s or Shimano XT hubs, They sell just the rim, so there's that route.
  • 5 0
 Ordered an Arrival with the Convergence wheels and they were able to throw Onyx hubs on them.
  • 1 0
 @jsnfschr: Nice, only way to do it
  • 3 1
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: I built mine with an XT hub, since it seems like such a good value prospect. They're a little creaky, and you have to clean/grease the freehub's clutch mechanism more than I'd prefer (Shimano can't seem to make up their minds on best practices), but with that caveat I'm pretty happy with them. Obviously you'd be limiting yourself to Shimano cassettes forever. Personally, I'm perfectly happy with that, since I can't seem to even beat SLX shifting performance with products from any other manufacturer.
  • 2 0
 Their customer service is awesome, I was able to send them my hubs and they replaced the bearings and laced them up to some triads for just over $1200 back to my door.
Been super stoked on the wheels and will probably try to get the arrival when it’s time for a new bike
  • 1 0
 @Grizzly134: I’m still using HG so I’d probably grab an old pair of hubs I have laying around.
  • 1 0
 @jsnfschr: I've been wanting to build these up with Profile Elite's. i had them on my BMX and had reliability issues. How are yours holding up?
  • 1 0
 They absolutely do. I’ve had them build multiple sets around DT 240s. Just buy the hubs (from Germany) and ship them up to WAO
  • 2 0
 @DANKimball: Well, I picked them up on Wednesday and had my first ride today. They look amazing, sound unbelievable and rolling smooth. Thus far, no reliability issues. Lol

Later this season, I might make a thread about them, just because there is so little info on them out in the wild and I'm sure it would be helpful for others looking.
  • 1 1
 @Grizzly134: How are you admitting to running cup and cone bearings and Shimano freehub’s and getting upvoted for it? This comments section is getting more and more ridiculous by the day.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: pinkbike commenters are growing wise to Shimano's cheap stuff? I don't know. I expect my opinions to be ill-received here, so I'm as surprised and you are.

Also, I found the Superboost rear hubs for sale CHEAP, which also helped me take the risk when I bought my hub.
  • 7 0
 WAO is the default upgrade in Sea to Sky. Everyone rides them as they stay true, the feel is dialled, and WAO has your back when you make a bad line choice or go way too deep.

There are of course other choices, and one can build a lighter rim, but it’s hard to justify spending more.
  • 6 0
 We Are One has brought a solid thermoset game to the table for years now. This new rim shape seals the deal for me - they are easily one of the best options on the market. Great rims that build into really strong and reliable wheels - check. We Are One back their warranty, and are so good to deal with - check .The price is very competitive among top-tier offerings - check. I have a set of these on the bench to be built over the weekend, and I'm looking forward to it.
  • 5 0
 My WAO Union rims have held up to some nasty rock strikes. I've had some really solid and loud impacts, but never that crackling pop... good stuff. Not sure I'd spring for the complete build at the price, but will definitely try these hoops next time around.
  • 5 0
 " ZRT also helps prevent damage from lightning strikes, but I'm guessing that wasn't their first thought with integrating it into the new rims. "

I just pedaled my Convergence rims to the top of Olympus, and Zeus was pissed, throwing lightning bolts at me right and left. He missed every time.
  • 9 0
 Didn't we all agree that WR1 is a better acronym than WAO?
  • 31 4
 If we had any input, can we please keep it to WAO. We like this one best and vote for it. Cheers
  • 2 0
 I use weareone, alloneword
  • 6 9
 @WeAreOne: sounds good, WR1
  • 9 0
 @WeAreOne: Boom, boom, boom, now let me hear you say WAO
  • 3 0
 Wao wao wao wao wao wao, unbelievable!
  • 6 0
 Super solid warranty, my buddy cracked his & got a new hoop before he could blink.
  • 7 0
 Looks like I'm not the only one breaking Industry 9 hub axles all the time
  • 3 0
 If you're still running the Hydra Pinner make a steel rear axle.

pinnermachineshop.com/en-us/products/forever-axle-for-industry-nine-hydra-rear-hub
  • 1 0
 i broke 2. PITA. amazing hubs, but what's up with the axle deal??
  • 1 0
 @jamesbrant: they pretty much all break, even DT though I'll say it seems the Hydra are especially prone to it.

www.mtbr.com/threads/breaking-hub-axles.1214627

Something about the 15mm alloy axles on most popular hubs (ie 1.5mm wall thickness on a 12mm thru axle).

Steel will fix it. Or a bigger axle. I believe Hadley still use 20mm.
  • 6 0
 I really hope they add a build option with the new Project 321 hubs for a nearly 100% made in Canada option.
  • 3 0
 There's an option I'm looking forward to building and riding myself!
  • 1 0
 Tairin Shogun hubs come to mind as well...
  • 3 0
 ZRT mainly helps with inter Laminar strength.

Aka it prevents delaminations caused by impacts. So it’s main purpose is to make the rim tougher not to improve spokehole strength.


It’s basically short vertical carbon fibers which help to transfer loads between the carbon fiber layers (which is usually done only by the resin).
  • 3 0
 Very brave to criticise I9 for bearing issues. I have done it before and would suggest that is a major not minor issue as it seems to afflict more than just my Hydra hubs which have chewed through multiple sets of bearings. The "but they provide awesome customer service" fanbois might get upset again as they don't seem to want to see their local manufacturers be critiqued. It's a fact and needs to be addressed. It makes their value seem low end as DT Swiss bearing sets last at least 5X as long. I hope I9 look to improve this in future or current range(s)
  • 4 0
 With the ZRT does the warranty only cover damage from lightning strikes while riding or damage from lightning strikes at any time?
  • 8 0
 Not to speak for WAO, but if lightning strikes your wheel while riding and you survive, it seems like they should offer you an Arrival as a warranty replacement
  • 4 2
 Genuine question if I break a wheel Do you send me an entire new wheel and hub taped ready to go? Or do you just send me a bare rim and then I have to go pay another hundred dollars to get it re built whenever my local bike shop can get to it?
  • 1 0
 WR1 charges $40+ replacement spokes/nipples for a rebuild if you send the hub in. Just asked the sales guys. Said it's about $84 to get it fully rebuilt if you send the hub. You can also just request a new rim only, and get it built and dialed at your LBS.

Hope that helps!
  • 5 3
 If you break a frame, do you get sent a complete new bike, or a frame that all the parts need to be changed over on?

It would have been a “genuine question” if you hadn’t added the “ and then I have to go pay another hundred dollars to get it re built whenever my local bike shop can get to it?” at the end
  • 8 2
 @onawalk: it's unfortunately something WAO will have to confront in the current landscape. Santa Cruz will send out a whole new Chinese wheel with a return label. It's easy with communist mass production and for better or for worse (likely the latter) Western consumers now expect the "Amazon" shopping experience with everything. Makes it hard for local businesses trying to operate in a better way to succeed.

I'm a WAO fan (2 sets) and have no plans to buy rims elsewhere going forward but I see this complaint more on more on online forums.
  • 1 5
flag bigmeatpete420 (May 7, 2023 at 9:07) (Below Threshold)
 @jdejace: lmao okay
  • 5 3
 @onawalk: Santa Cruz Sent me a
Whole wheel. That’s why I ask. So
Did e-13. And both were FAST. That’s why it was a “genuine question”
  • 3 1
 I just broke my rear wheel on the first ride, bought them on the July 4th sale , got them on the 10th , broke them on the 25th. Let my brake it down. $ 40 spoke , $35 re-build service , $ 10 nipples , $50 dollars return shipping to your place (they charge it). The cool part is the shipping to BC Canada, it has to be free domicile shipping (not free) so they don’t receive custom taxes when they get the hub. From DC to BC that was $67 + tax. The total is about $200 plus 3-5 weeks down time depending on their working queue. At least from the US the warranty is not nice at all.
  • 2 0
 From reading that link about the ZRT material, I was pleased to see that this manufacturing process allows for making a premium material out of recycled carbon fiber. That's actually pretty good news and I'm surprised it's not brought forward as a selling point for the rims.
  • 2 0
 I once had an E13 wheelset that came with the bike. Dented it the first ride, ripped some spokes, hammered it back into "shape" a few times. I hated it. So much that I found joy in abusing and punishing it. I didn't care about scratches, dents, lost spokes. It was the best wheelset.
  • 3 0
 These look pretty damn good, heard nothing but good things about We Are One. I wouldn’t hesitate to buy these if my current wheels ever tapped out.
  • 6 3
 2 cross for 29er at 1800 grams is dumb.
I’m already not worried about wt if I’m getting these. Give me 3 cross and 50 extra grams.
  • 4 0
 what is it about a 3 cross pattern that you prefer?
  • 4 0
 @twonsarelli: Stronger /stiffer build. Depends on the need/rider's preferences
  • 23 0
 @twonsarelli: 3 is 1 more than 2, so it must be 1 better
  • 4 3
 @bman33: 2 cross is more laterally stiff than 3 cross, with no discernible difference in radial compliance. you'd probably be fine with 2 cross if you're in the market for new wheels
  • 4 1
 @twonsarelli: Radial compoiance, you are correct. You are incorrect for 2-cross being stiffer than 3-cross laterally. Been building wheels professionally for 25 years.... That said, with the stiffness of carbon rims and depening on riding styles, 2-cross can be fine for many riders...
  • 3 1
 @bman33: 3 cross uses longer spokes, resulting in lower lateral spoke strains than a 2 cross pattern (the data i found suggests about a 21.3% difference between the two). could be that this manifests in unique ways that lab data doesn't accurately measure
  • 2 0
 @twonsarelli: Yes, longer spokes, but those spokes cross over more real estate and further between the hub diameter and the rim diameter. 3 cross is stiffer. Two spokes on their own, the shorter one is stiffer. However, they 'stack' over each other with the crossing and which provides additional stiffness larterally while providing bit more compliance vertically.
  • 2 0
 @twonsarelli: on a 32 spoke wheel, 2x puts double the stress on the spokes during braking compared to 3x.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: is it a big problem? i've never heard of spokes breaking during braking
  • 2 0
 @twonsarelli: In his summary he mentions 'Strains' vs. 'Stiffness'. I see in Figure 6 where he notes the 4x, 3x, etc... for lateral stiffness. Its seems the test is somehow measure 'strain' vs 'stiffness'. One can feell the difference in two lace patterns (same rim/hub spoke type, count) when pushing/testing/building the wheels. Intersting read, but if one needs a 'stronger' wheel.... 3x is better than 2x on every occasion.
  • 1 0
 @bman33: when speaking to custom wheel builders, they told me they’d recommend 3 or 4 cross for heavier riders mostly based on improved braking forces in particular, less so for radial stiffness and lateral stiffness. Is this your philosophy as well or are you primarily concerned with lateral stiffness? (Seems that radial stiffness is so small, it shouldn’t really be a driving force for decision making, especially with tire displacement)
  • 3 0
 @twonsarelli: I've broken 2 nipples on my front wheel during hard braking, it was a 2-cross 24 spoke rim....I rebuilt a new one with 2 cross 28 hole with brass nipples and haven't had any issues yet, but it definitely happens
  • 1 0
 @twonsarelli: I've done it, only with butted spokes that were, coincidentally, double cross.
Wheel was tensioned properly.
  • 7 3
 "Honey I spent $1800 dollars on new rims" would not go over well in my house.....
  • 24 0
 That's why you say you spent $1,800 on the entire wheelset. I think most people would be upset about $1,800 for just the rims.
  • 2 2
 You live in Canada, so it would be "Honey I spent $1999 dollars on new rims"
  • 6 3
 Interesting how different homes/couples set up expenses. I would never question my wife's discretionary spending, and vice versa.
The biggest discussion about new purchases isn't "Can I/we afford it?" but "Will this bring me happiness for a long time, and do we have the space for it?"
  • 10 0
 More like "Honey I got robbed on my way to the bike store, but I still have the same black rims as always"
  • 1 0
 It never does. You’ve got to push through that resistance hahaha
  • 1 0
 I got my set of WAO Unions from SPOKEX when they were selling them with their 310's. They've been fantastic and bomb proof in heavy chunky enduro conditions. Life time warranty is a plus, but its even better when you never need that warranty. Great stuff WAO!
  • 2 1
 I bought a set of WAO unions and broke on the first ride , the warranty is a nightmare from the US , maybe going for a brand with direct US support is a good idea. I’m from Quebec and I live in DC, I was so happy when I set them up but now I’m kind of disappointed, well … such is life ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • 1 0
 What did they break on, and how is the warranty a nightmare? I always hear it's a hassle free fast process
  • 1 0
 I wish my experience had been as positive as the others here. I’ve broken four of these in 8 months. Every time the retailer has replaced no questions asked which has been great but it’s getting a bit frustrating. Especially because I have to pay for a rebuild every time one breaks.

For reference I weigh under 150lbs, run Maxxis DD casings with 26-27psi in the back, I’ve tried with and with out inserts and broke the wheels regardless.
  • 4 0
 I came for Knippelberg , the hero we all deserve
  • 3 1
 FusionFiber thermoplastic rims in the details box? had me thinking they were doing something new....might wanna update that.
  • 2 1
 Fanboy here, I've ripped the revive (XC bike) and union for a while now. Stoked to try these out if my unions ever break! Which is unlikely, but that's fine too
  • 3 0
 Just the best in everything they do. Good job team at WA1
  • 1 0
 Quality in their work is top notch!! Im still running my Agent 29 on Hope pro 4 that I got in the winter of '17.Ive rebuilt the rear once
  • 3 1
 FusionFiber thermoplastic rims? that looks like carbon to me
  • 2 0
 its thermoset
  • 1 1
 These wheels look great! If you're in the market for a carbon wheelset, it looks like Ibis is giving away one for free: gearjunkie.com/biking/kuat-bike-gear-giveaway
  • 1 0
 that wave pattern looks super cool
  • 1 0
 Is the 29er locked into 2x or can it be built 3x?
  • 1 0
 "Hand laid by Knippelberg"
Heh.
  • 1 0
 Knippleberg... Bart Simpson made that rim.
  • 2 1
 The Con is they have no Cons?
  • 6 7
 I genuinely do not understand how limited hub selection is a downside, can't you just lace your own hub?
  • 1 0
 I'm not trying to comment on the rims, I genuinely don't understand. I'm not great with wheels so is there like a technical reason?
  • 2 0
 @joebiden: You can, but if you’re looking for an upgrade for your early 2000s Trek hybrid it’s not just the hub compatibility you have to worry about. Wink
  • 6 2
 It's more of a "might be a downside depending on your wants or needs" type note than a definite downside. For comparison, NOBL wheels has a lot of hub and spoke options available that allows you more customization and pricing options. It's nice to have options like that.
  • 3 0
 I build my own wheels, and you can buy these as rim only. So I don't see any issue.
  • 3 0
 @jhoward: I upgraded after that incident. Now I ride a Commenical with a star spangled paint job.
  • 3 3
 Dear We Are One.....26 AINT DEAD
  • 9 0
 Yes it is, That being said, they make Coups
  • 14 1
 We agree completely. Check out our Coup rim that is 3 year old. DH shredders and DJ riders all love this rim! Stoked to get you on some if you're game!
www.weareonecomposites.com/shop/dirt-jumping-wheelset-profile-elite-1473#attr
  • 4 0
 @WeAreOne: oh shit, the dog caught the car!
  • 1 1
 Yes please!!
  • 1 1
 Best in the Biz!!
  • 3 6
 the flat spoke area feels like.. less strong for more weight to me. the way forces distribution in the rim ... either im stupid, or WAO is doing weird stuff Smile
Below threshold threads are hidden







Copyright © 2000 - 2024. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv42 0.139316
Mobile Version of Website