Review: Yeti's New SB100

Oct 22, 2018
by Mike Levy  
The new SB100 has, you guessed it, 100mm of travel out back that Yeti has mated to a 120mm fork, it rolls on 29'' wheels, and is light enough to be a competitive cross-country rig in most settings. But it's not a pure cross-country bike, at least not in the traditional weight-is-everything, 90-degree head angle sense of the word. Instead, the carbon short-travel rig is the answer to Yeti President Chris Conroy's question of ''How capable can we make a 100mm travel bike?'' Can it be your cross-country race rig? Yeah, of course, but if that's all you want to do on it, you'd probably be selling the SB100 short.

With relatively slack angles, a suspension layout that's claimed not to force a rider to choose between pedaling efficiency and bottom-out control, comparatively meaty rubber, and a cockpit lifted from an enduro sled, the SB100 really is the archetypal down-country machine. My X01 Race model test bike weighed in at 25.2 pounds and retails for $8,799 USD, a price that includes the $900 upgrade fee for the DT Swiss' XRC 1200 carbon wheels that it showed up with.
Yeti SB100 X01 Race

• Intended use: cross-country / trail
• Wheel size: 29''
• Rear wheel travel: 100mm
• Fork travel: 120mm (all models)
• Revised Switch Infinity suspension
• Carbon front and rear triangles
• 2-bolt ISCG-05
• Uninterrupted seat tube
• Internal routing w/ molded-in guides
• Room for bottle inside front triangle
• Fits 2.4'' tires
• Weight: 25.2 lb / 11.4 kg
• MSRP: $7,999 USD (+ $900 wheel upgrade)
• Frame MSRP: $3,400 USD
www.yeticycles.com


Yeti
The low-slung frame and short seat tube make the SB100 look like it's ready to party when the seat is fully lowered.


Yeti ain't exactly known for their inexpensive bikes, and it's the same story with the SB100. You can get a Turq (lighter carbon) frame and shock for $3,400 USD, but the standard frame that's said to weigh about 300-grams more isn't available on its own. Complete bikes start with the SB100 GX that goes for $4,999 USD, and it tops out four models later at $8,999 USD with the SB100 XX1 that comes with carbon wheels. You can check out the whole range on Yeti's website if you're looking for all the spec details.

Yeti also has their similarly priced, four-bike Beti range that are all assembled around the same frame but get shorter, 170mm cranks and WTB Deva women’s specific saddles. More importantly, Yeti has worked with Fox to come up with a shock tune that better suits lighter weight riders.






Construction and Features

The SB100 sports similar lines to the rest of Yeti's SB range, but the new bike's top tube drops lower, and the forward shock mount is on the underside of the top tube instead of on the down tube. There's a ton of stand-over clearance, too, and the seat tube is quite short to let the little SB100 run a longer stoke dropper post than any of Yeti's other bikes, depending on rider inseam.

Low and playful is the theme, and it gives the SB100 a very untraditional, BMX-ish feel when you're coasting around with the seat down and the bike is in party-mode.


Yeti SB100 Review
The lines go inside where they snake along mold-in guides.


You're never going to be able to use a front derailleur on the SB100, which is just fine in my mind, but the 2-bolt ISCG-05 tabs around the BB92 shell lets riders mount a lightweight upper-only guide if they think they need the extra insurance.

Cable routing is all internal, and molded-in housing guides are out of sight inside the frame so you can just feed the new line through without it disappearing into the dark nether regions of the galaxy.


Yeti SB100 Review
Yeti SB100 Review
Cables exit on the underside of the downtube, where you'll also find a sturdy stick-on rock guard.


You've got Boost hub spacing, of course, enough clearance to fit a 2.4'' rear tire out back (notable for this type of bike), and room for a standard-sized bottle inside the front triangle. A normal bottle clears the shock no problem, while my massive CamelBak Podium bottle just brushes it.



Geometry & Sizing

In terms of cross-country bikes, the SB100's numbers are out there. There's the 67.8-degree head angle with a 120mm fork (the same as the new Blur with a 120mm fork), while the existing SB4.5 sports a close 67.4-degree head angle with a 140mm-travel fork. The new bike's reach is also longer than the SB4.5 (452mm versus 444mm), and the SB's seat tube angle is also a notch steeper at 74-degrees. So cross-country travel and trail bike angles, really.


Yeti SB100


Yeti is another company that's been tinkering with longer, slacker bikes combined with forks that have less offset, and the SB100 is their first production model that embraces this new-school approach. Why? It's said to allow for the stability of a slack bike, but the 44mm offset (it's usually 51mm on a 29er) helps to keep the wheelbase in check and the dreaded floppy front-end syndrome to a minimum.

Yeti says that they've done their own testing with CSU's of different offsets and angle-adjusting headsets, so it's no surprise to see that same tactic applied to the even newer SB150 and SB130.




Yeti SB100 Review
The bike's 100mm of travel is controlled by Yeti's clever Switch Infinity system.


Suspension Design

With its Switch Infinity unit tucked in out of sight behind the bottom bracket, you'd be excused if you mistook the back of the SB100 for a single pivot layout. For those unfamiliar with the system, Switch Infinity employs two short Kashima-coated tubes and a carrier to manipulate the bike's axle path. Initially, as the bike goes through its travel, the carrier moves upwards on the rails to provide a rearward axle path for pedaling efficiency. Then, as the rear wheel goes deeper into its travel, the carrier moves downwards to reduce the amount of chain tension so the design can better deal with hard impacts.

Yeti has been BFFs with Fox Racing Shox for a long time, and the two companies worked together to develop the system.

Yeti has used Switch Infinity for awhile now, but there's a big change to note here: it's been rotated 90-degrees and moved back slightly on the SB100. Okay, that doesn't sound all that noteworthy, but the fact that every cross-country or trail bike should be able to carry a bottle inside the front triangle was a driving factor.

Yeti has also designed a new carrier that's both smaller and lighter. Up until now, every SB platform, from the 114mm-travel SB4.5 to the 152mm SB6, has used the same Switch Infinity components, but that's not so with the 100mm-travel SB100. The diameter of the Kashima-coated tubes has dropped from the 15mm used on the other machines to 10mm on this bike, thereby making for a smaller and lighter forged carrier.
Yeti
Yeti uses the same Switch Infinity unit (left) on all of their existing bikes, but the new SB100 employs a smaller, lighter version (right) that's been rotated by 90-degrees in the front triangle.

They've also moved the sealed bearings from the carrier to the frame, and greasing the unit is now done via zerk fittings located under the main pivot's bearing cap.


Yeti SB100 Review
Usually hidden behind a bolt-on shield, you can see how the Switch Infinity unit is tucked into the frame.


The SB100's suspension sees an altered leverage ratio intended to make the bike more capable than a pure race rig, with it said to be more supple at the top of its 100mm and sporting a stable mid-platform. The goal, Yeti says, was not to be locked into having to tune for either just ''pedaling efficiency or bottom out, and it gives the bike an incredible flexibility.''

There's a relatively linear anti-squat figure that should allow for a wide range of sag settings, according to Yeti, and for more sag that most short-travel bikes can get away with. In fact, Yeti says to run an unprecedented-for-the-travel 32-percent sag.


Specifications

Specifications
Release Date 2018
Price $7999
Travel 100
Rear Shock FOX FACTORY DPS
Fork FORK FOX FACTORY 34/120MM SC
Headset CANE CREEK 40 INTEGRATED
Cassette SRAM 1295 EAGLE 10-50
Crankarms SRAM X01 CARBON EAGLE 30T
Bottom Bracket SRAM DUB BB92
Rear Derailleur SRAM X01 EAGLE
Chain SRAM X01 EAGLE
Shifter Pods SRAM X01 EAGLE
Handlebar YETI CARBON 35X760MM
Stem RACE FACE TURBINE 35X50MM
Grips ERGON GE1
Brakes SRAM LEVEL TLM
Wheelset DT SWISS XRC 1200 25MM (+ $900 USD)
Tires MAXXIS MINION DHF 2.3 / AGGRESSOR 2.3
Seat WTB CUSTOM VOLT
Seatpost FOX TRANSFER



Yeti SB100 Review









Test Bike Setup

Here's where it gets interesting. If this thing was one of any number of other cross-country bikes out there, I'd probably start somewhere between 20 and 25-percent sag because, well, there's not much cushion for the pushin' when it comes to suspension travel, and it's generally frowned upon to be smashing the end of shock's stroke every few minutes. But Yeti says that rider can tune the back of the SB100 to be both efficient and not bottom-out all the time, and you get all that at 32-percent (12mm of stroke) sag. Seems like a ton for this kind of bike, but alrighty then.

Up front, Yeti's spec'd a 120mm-travel Fox 34 Step-cast rather than a puny 100mm fork, a call that might irk some traditional racer-types who bow down to the scale. Yes, you can install a shorter fork on the bike, but you're probably going to be better served by looking at any number of off-road road bikes on the market if that sounds like your plan. Courses are getting much rougher and technical but, more interestingly, more and more people who ride cross-country are wanting a bike that's not only ultra-efficient but also fun to point down some real trails.

The trick, however, is to provide them with that capability without taking away too much of the sporty, race-ready vibe that makes a cross-country bike what it is. So, have Yeti managed to pull it off?

n a
Mike Levy
Location: Squamish, BC, Canada
Age: 37
Height: 5'10
Inseam: 33.5"
Weight: 168lbs
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @killed_by_death


Yeti SB100 Review
While it doesn't feel quite as snappy as a real race bike, the 100mm-travel SB100 has got some serious legs.

Climbing

If the SB100 had parents, its pops would have been a trail bike and its mom a cross-country machine, so it's no surprise that the little Yeti feels a lot like a combo of exactly that on the climbs. First, the handling, which leans more towards dad than the other side of the family. If you're expecting a nimble rig that doesn't waver when you're at stalling speed halfway up some silly wall that you should've walked anyway, you might be a bit let down.

In that type of setting, the SB100's front-end can feel a bit light compared to a pure cross-country rig, and you'll only notice that if you're coming off a more traditional cross-country whippet. That said, it's really only apparent in the most challenging of pitches, or during those moments when you feel like you're breathing underwater during a race and have to get through something ultra-technical. There's a reason that traditional cross-country bikes are as pointy feeling as they are, and it's because races aren't won on the descents.

Good thing the SB100 wasn't intended to do that, though, because there are enough sketchy short-travel bikes out there as it is.

The SB100 isn't a bad technical climber, though, it's just that its handling feels more trail bike-ish than I expected, which can be a plus or a minus depending on your intentions. All the usual chess matches were cleared dab-free, however, just with a touch more body English and steering input required than when I was on something like Rocky's Element or a Cannondale Scalpel.

I've always been a sensitive type when it comes to geo, and going to 25-percent sag really sharpened up the bike's handling due to the steeper angles, but that's also not letting the magic that Yeti injected into the SB100's rear-suspension do its thang; more on that later, though.
Yeti SB100 Review
Technical sections expose the SB100's relatively relaxed handling that has more in common with a long-legged trail bike than a cross-country weapon.

You know this bike is efficient, right? I mean, it's got 100mm of travel, and even though Yeti says to run 32-percent sag, it still pedals with nearly all of the enthusiasm of a race bike. As you'd expect. The Fox shock has a three-position compression switch that's completely not ever needed unless you're a basket case. No bobbing and no excuses, then, no matter how much sag you're running.

So, based on its climbing abilities, would I choose the SB100 if I was looking for a pure cross-country race rig? No, probably not; it's a bit too lazy for me when I'm breathing through my eyeballs, and races are won or lost on ascents, regardless of how much fun or emphasis you put on coming back down. But as a fast, efficient bike that can certainly be used for racing, among day to day hammering, the SB100 is a solid option that's so much more fun (and capable) that one of those purebred, sketchy ass race bikes.


Yeti SB100 Review
I might be a little biased, but isn't down-country the best country?


Descending

Have you ever pushed a real cross-country bike hard on the descents? I'm not talking about a light trail bike here, but an actual race rig with pinner rubber, steep angles, and probably no party post. It's a frightening feeling at best, but the thing to remember is that these guys are often trying to recover on the descent, not set a new PR or take a wild line that saves them a second or two during a three-minute run like in a downhill race. Instead, these are two and three-hour races were pacing can play a big part, so a full-on cross-country bike is far from being optimized, and far from being fun, on the downhills. In fact, the opposite is often the case.

But this thing is different. This thing is fun. And fast.

Of course, I didn't need a crystal ball to know that the SB100 is going to be more capable than many other bikes of similar travel, but it was still a surprise to feel how solid and stable the little SB100 is. It holds a line infinitely better than a lighter, quicker handling bike, no doubt due to the relatively meaty rubber that Yeti chose to spec, but I wouldn't be surprised to learn that the frame is also much more resilient to flex than something that weighs a pound or two less.

You want to stay on the inside even though it's littered with roots and loose rock? You'll be much more likely to do it on the SB100 than you will on a more run of the mill 100mm-travel bike, and that opens up lines for riders who might not usually choose them when on a normal cross-country machine.


Santa Cruz Blur CC X01 Reserve Photo by James Lissimore
Cannondale Scalpel-Si
The Blur (on the left) and the Scalpel (on the right) are both competitors to the SB100, but neither are quite as capable on the descents.


That same confidence can be applied to other parts of the trail, too, and I have no doubt that anyone is going to be quicker and more at ease on a scary descent on the SB100 than they would be if they were on a steeper bike with a longer stem. If you're not, you should work on your skills before considering a new bike.

But where are the SB100's limits? Well, Yeti has done something really special with their short-travel bike's suspension, but at a certain point, 100mm is always going to be 100mm no matter what you do with it. I've spent time on all sorts of 100mm bikes, and because I tend to ride a cross-country rig like I don't have much to live for besides my cat, I'm usually forced to run around 20-percent sag if I don't want to clang off the end of the stroke and then walk around with a cane after the ride. As you'd expect, that makes a bike less than amazing on the small stuff where traction comes into play, which is then aggravated by tires that probably belong on a cyclocross bike.


Yeti SB100 Review
Like going fast on a short-travel bike? Me too, and the SB100 feels the same.


The SB100, at the recommended 32-percent number, is more forgiving and no doubt delivers more grip, too, but that's not a surprise. I mean, look at the tires, and it has a load more sag. But the surprise is at the other end of the travel: The damn thing doesn't want to bottom-out. I'm sure all you guys on 150mm bikes are thinking "So what? Neither does my bike," but you need to understand how shitty a 100mm-travel bike usually feels when you're at ten-tenths because the whole thing is a compromise; pick traction or bottom-out control, Mr. Bib Shorts, because ya can't have both. Only, you can with the SB100.

Relatively speaking - after all, it's still just 100mm - the back of the SB100 is supremely supple and delivers traction while not bobbing, but it also has enough ramp-up to make 32-percent sag on a cross-country-ish bike a real option. Actually, not just an option, it's the best way to run the little Yeti.

This is quite the bike, but its limits are more obvious on long, rough descents that test your hands and feet as much as the suspension and traction. You'll tire quicker than on something more forgiving, and while the SB100 is far more merciful than other bikes of similar travel, your margin for error is still smaller than it would be on a slacker, squishier rig. I guess that's not exactly the bike's fault, however, as that's really just inherent in the type of bike that it is, and it'd be like me talking trash about a downhill rig for being a handful on technical climbs. Yeah, no shit, Sherlock.





n a
Cannondale Scalpel-Si
Both the Blur and the Scalpel could be considered down-country bikes as well.

How Does it Compare?

The SB100 is a bit of an outlier right now in that there aren't a ton of off-the-shelf bikes like it out there right now. Santa Cruz's new Blur is the most recent and closest example that I've spent time on, but even that is more than a degree steeper up front and comes with a 100mm fork as opposed to the 120mm job on the front of the Yeti. Good thing I put a 120mm fork on the Blur then, eh? The two are quite similar (after the fork swap), but the Blur has a bit more of a traditional feel to it than the SB100, and the Yeti comes across as more solid feeling, at least to me.

Rocky Mountain's Element is another cross-country bike that I over-forked (Rocky does it stock, too), but it screams intervals and shames you for eating a pre-ride breakfast donut while the Yeti couldn't give a damn. The Element feels every bit the race bike compared to the more trail-ified Yeti, but both can do, er, both jobs. And the same goes for Cannondale's Scalpel, too.

If I lived in Lycra, raced competitively, and trained hard, I'd probably choose the Element or Scalpel just because it has that race rig vibe with handling that's going to help you when you need it. The Blur was quite fun, too, but I can't get past the SB100's versatile and impressive rear-suspension is - it's really that good.



Technical Report

SRAM Level TLM Brakes: I've had good experiences with SRAM's stoppers over the last few years, and I've come to prefer the early braking control in low-traction situations, but the TLMs on the Yeti never matched my expectations. The factory bleed must have been off as they tended to pump up during extended use, and power was a bit down from usual, too.


Yeti SB100 Review
Yeti SB100 Review
Wisely, Yeti spec'd a wide handlebar and a short stem on the SB100. Anything else wouldn't be right.


Maxxis Tires: Rubber obviously has a massive say in how a bike performs, and I give Yeti props for spec'ing this short-travel toy with a Minion DHF 2.3 with EXO casing up front because they could have easily saved a ton of weight by going with a lighter duty set of tires. You can do that, too, and I'd recommend it if you're going to be lining up to a cross-country start line, but the SB100 is just too much fun with the stock tires mounted. Traction and reliability trump saving a few hundred grams.


For an Extra $900 USD: You get a set of DT Swiss' XRC 1200 carbon wheels that are obviously light as hell and, at least for me, trouble-free. Yes, $900 USD is a load of money, and I probably couldn't justify the added cost, but they go a long way to making the Yeti feel quick and sporty.



Pros

+ More capable than a 100mm bike should be
+ Short-travel and trail bike geo has its advantages
+ Incredibly versatile rear suspension
Cons

- If you're a pure racer, a pure race bike might be faster
- Short-travel and trail bike geo has its disadvantages
- Pricey



Is this the bike for you?

I suspect that the SB100 is actually ideal for a lot of people who are currently on bikes with 50mm more travel but let's not go down that road again. Instead, I'm going to say that the SB100 makes sense for the type of rider who enjoys getting the most out of a short-travel bike, even if all their buddies are on much bigger machines. And while it doesn't come across as an out-and-out race rig - because that's not what Yeti was aiming for - it would be ideal (after a tire swap) for things like the BC Bike Race or other long, rough, adventure-focused types of events.




Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesThere was a time, not that long ago, when you'd pick between either a cross-country bike or a downhill bike and that was mostly it. Nowadays, you could argue that there are at least four or five distinct categories, and then there are the bikes that blur the lines a bit. The SB100 is one of those niche bikes, but its capabilities are far from niche; it'll feel like an extremely capable cross-country bike to some, and an efficient, sharp-handling trail bike to others.

We're well past suspension travel defining intentions, but this little Yeti underlines that evolution. And if down-country were a real category, I'd say that the SB100 is the quintessential example.
Mike Levy








401 Comments

  • + 158
 Is this the bike that Randy is riding at rampage?
  • + 143
 No. Randy will be ridding a new CANNONDALE Scalpel Down Rampage prototype. Rumor has it that they will unveil a revolutionary new fork called the Righty. The DH version is called the Righty Randy.
  • + 41
 I'm so dissapointed on PB. WHY we never see Randy featured here? not even a mention. Who did the guy pissed off to deserve this embargo.
First Evil, now Randy, wtf guys!
  • + 53
 #ImWithRandy
  • + 31
 @oldfut dont know, but Randys GF wants to let us know that 60mm is noticeable....
  • - 9
flag aquanut (Oct 22, 2018 at 6:57) (Below Threshold)
 @dingus: New bike tech like this makes me Randy... Time for me to go to another website with pink in the name.
  • + 27
 Word has it randy is planning on putting a fox 40 on his sb100 for rampage. Apparently he's asking judges to time his climbs.
  • + 3
 Can’t afford this. not sponsored. C’dale or C’yalater
  • + 4
 Randy only rides XC bikes with 90 degree headtube angles.
  • + 6
 Randy can overtake Sam Hill. On the inside.
  • + 3
 @Boardlife69: I thought the duel crown fork was called the Lefty Randy Righty?
  • + 1
 @Lagr1980: don't you mean 60cm???
  • + 2
 Yeah, reach for a small is under 500mm, headtube angle is over 62 deg, seat tube angle less than 80 deg. This frame is sooooo yesterday ....
  • - 1
 I ll wait for the SB50 !!!!!
  • + 3
 @dingus: #randytoo
  • + 2
 Randy rides a rigid for Rampage.
  • + 3
 @P3N54: #rigidforrampage that's a hell of a hashtag... Randy showed up to rampage to compete in rigid category, messed up start gates and won the main event
  • + 1
 Are you silly?
  • + 64
 $8k and an addition $900 for carbon wheels ?
Chances of spotting that Yeti in the mountains are an order of magnitude lower than seeing the hairy one.
  • + 140
 Spend a day riding in Colorado and you’ll be sure to spot many Yeti fanboys decked in matching kits. They like Audi SUV’s and prefer One-Up racks.
  • + 33
 Comparably speced Santa Cruz is the vitually the same price.
  • + 12
 @ryan83: toooooo real
  • + 19
 @ryan83: Audi? You must have a slightly different species of Yeti in Colorado, here they can be found alternately waxing their Porsches and their bikes in parking lots.
  • - 2
 I’ve got one for sale for a lot less than that..
  • + 8
 psh. find me rolling in my 2013 ford explorer with my yeti sb5.5 hanging off the north shore rack, in WV
  • + 17
 @Golden-G: Santa Cruz Blur TR X01 Reserve $7899 is a pound lighter, lifetime free replacement on rims, and free bearings for life.
Yeti SB-100 X01 Turq with wheel upgrade $8899, but you get Kashima!
  • - 2
 @MikeAzBS: free bearings for life? Wow... a better comparisson would be a Tallboy XX1 Reserve which granted comes with XX1 drivetrain ( add $600 above X01) but features virtually identical suspension components at $9200. Levy should have used the Tallboy for comparisson instead of the Blur.
  • - 2
 I wonder how much of that is the licence/hardware for that silly fox hardware in the frame.
  • + 6
 @Golden-G: Comparably speced Santa Cruz is the vitually the same price.
Oh, you mean ridiculous and unattainable for mere mortals?
(grabs helmet and rides away on his YT)
  • + 16
 @simooo: I've owned two Switch Infinity Yetis. Not one single issue. It is by far, the best pedalling suspension platform on the market. Yeti owns the technology, Fox makes it. I just ordered my 3rd Yeti and no I'm not a dentist, investement banker or a lawyer..
  • + 7
 @Poulsbojohnny: YT They look like solid bikes but any time I've looked at their bikes on-line, availability is nil and they do not sell frames.
  • + 2
 @ryan83: I got a really good deal on my aluminum 26" Yeti a few years ago, and was all excited and bought some Yeti kit, which is good quality, but now I don't want to be too decked out in Yeti kit when I ride. It's a really good bike, I'm not just a fan boy.
  • + 9
 Quite a few of them around here, but Whistler/Squamish is a weird place.
  • + 1
 @Golden-G: Agreed. It is hit or miss depending on what you want and when you look. I got mine this year in January, a 2017 paint/spec model.Aluminum (preferred) is a bit easier to come by vs carbon I think.
  • + 30
 @Golden-G: All these people hating on Yeti for the money sure picked the wrong sport to be cheap about. I can get tires for my KTM Enduro fornot much more than they cost for one of my mtn bikes. And even the "cheap" bikes are a few grand. Try running if the price hurts, but don't judge people who choose to buy the high end stuff. We all ride, and that's what matters.
  • + 3
 @ryan83: I'm like a third of the way there! I rock a one-up but sadly only have a volkswagen station wagon...not even all wheel drive Frown
  • + 3
 @ryan83: Seriously the truth. I've only ridden there a couple times; each time I saw 15+ Yeti peeps with matching kits, just as you described.
  • - 2
 I wonder how much money they spend getting the inside of their Audi’s and land rovers detailed after riding
  • + 22
 @SprSonik: people are bitter because other people work hard and make sacrifices to achieve their goals. Strange logic
  • - 6
flag mkotowski1 (Oct 22, 2018 at 14:28) (Below Threshold)
 @Golden-G: not bitter just find it amusing someone would spend 80 grand on a car
  • + 5
 You must not live near one of the yuppy mtb strongholds. Here in LA I wouldn't bet on NOT seeing one in the wild on a weekend ride.
  • + 2
 @Dustfarter: so I gotta ask how much nicer is this gonna ride than my 2000 dollar hardtail
  • + 47
 @Golden-G: The logic isn't that strange. Here's how it works:

It's not fair that you've aquired more money working hard and saving than I did jerking off in my mom's basement and spending my bike shop salary on weed and 50to1 stickers.

I'm too much of a coward to say any of this to your face, but I feel empowered by the anonymity of the internet. Also, I really like getting "+" props from other unmotivated and bitter people.

See? That was simple.
  • + 7
 @SprSonik: I'm not hating but I'm seeing it from a different perspective. Me and Mrs Gonzo both work hard and get paid well. I have 2 kids who I pay for day care for, saving for my retirement on top of paying mortgage, insurance, and all the day to day stuff. I'm a Craigslist bargain bin shopper and still have a good old time when i get out riding my dual sport (1994 dr250) or my special ed enduro. A $9000 or whatever bike just doesn't register for me. Its like telling me I shouldn't hate on someone who wears socks on top of their shoes. I don't hate but it makes 0 sense to me.
  • + 5
 @Session603: LOL! True Story!
  • + 0
 @MikeAzBS: I love how SC owners are always plugging the "free bearings for life" line. Friend of mine is just putting his Tallboy in this week for its fourth set of FREE bearings in under 4 years (they are shot, rear triangle is rattling on the bumps). Meanwhile my Trance is a year older and the original bearings are still perfectly fine...
  • - 2
 There are several other bikes with more travel, equal weight, and same or better pedaling/climbing ability that will beat it descending and can be built frame up for less $$. Doesn’t really make sense to me.

Seems like reviewers sometimes forget what they rode/wrote in the past.
  • + 4
 @TheUnknownMTBR: there is simply not another bike that pedals as well as a Switch Infinity equipped Yeti. Levy made a mistake in his comparisson IMO. Yeti's are expensive, no doubt about it. So are SC, Pivot, etc... If you don't want to buy a fancy carbon bike fine, don't buy one. But dont come on here telling people that there are cheaper & better performing bikes that are of the same genre. That is utterly false.
  • + 1
 Can I buy the bike and wheels, return the bike but keep the wheels? Good deal.
  • + 1
 @ryan83: Ha. Great visual. Extra hot and foamy lattes in hand as well.
  • + 21
 @SprSonik: What's funny is the cost of mountain biking compared to actual rich guy sports - polo, skiing, car racing, yacht racing, heck even golf can be $10k/yr in greens fees. An $8k state of the art bicycle ridden on free trails is not expensive.
  • - 6
flag mkotowski1 (Oct 22, 2018 at 19:00) (Below Threshold)
 @Session603: It’s just a joke I don’t give a fck what you spend your money on
  • - 2
 @Session603: glad you put logic in your pinkbike posts, doing the lords work
  • + 2
 @JohanG: Trails aren't free. Donate to Evergreen!
  • + 1
 @JohanG: Free my @$$, shovels and digging don't pay for themselves and time ain't free, its got its own cost (even if not a $ amount)
  • + 5
 @ryan83: I carry my Yeti on the back of my 04 Chevy Cavalier
  • - 2
 @Golden-G: My comment has nothing to do with either the magnitude of cost or frame material. If anything, I’m not as inclined to believe that the latest version of XYZ means that every other manufacturer should just admit defeat and close their doors. Well, time will tell if your opinion is anything more than just that.

I’ll rephrase it just for you though: I’m such a hack rider that it likely wouldn’t make any difference if I was on this frame anymore than several others.

Feel better now?
  • + 1
 @Golden-G: Tantrum is the best pedaller.
  • - 2
 @Golden-G: well numbers on paper alone don’t define a bike, but just for some comparison sake:

linkagedesign.blogspot.com/2018/04/yeti-cycles-sb100-2019.html

and immediately jumping to the level 10 rage descriptors and posting orders like you’re somebody’s internet daddy isn’t likely to add any validity in your attempt to make a credible point. I doubt you’re a fanboi just lashing out, but it kind of comes across that way by responding as such. Or maybe a Democrat.
  • + 1
 @TheUnknownMTBR: rage? Nope. Fanboy? Whats that? I'm actually a carpenter. If you check my buy & sell you might see things differently.
  • + 4
 @Golden-G: while not working hard is an almost guarantee for not achieving your goals, the mostly American view that people that aren't rich simply don't work hard enough surprises me. Working hard and making sacrifices is no guarantee for becoming wealthy. I see plenty of people working their asses of while not having $9000 to blow on a bike. I also see a small number of people with the right connections that don't work hard and make no sacrifices while being wealthy.
There is a connection between work ethos and wealth, but it is no golden rule that always applies and making assumptions on individuals based on this rule seems simplistic, unwise, and frankly kind of arrogant.
  • + 1
 @Mac1987: yes you are correct. It's not all black and white.
  • + 1
 It’s a great bike, and I’m all for people spending their money however they want. Yeti seems like a cool company, and I know we hate weight weenies here.

But unless I win Powerball next week, it’d be awfully hard for me to justify spending $8,000 on a SB100 when the 120mm Intense Sniper Trail exists, and comes in at under 24lbs on their $6,500 build.
  • + 3
 @Golden-G: There are many other bikes that have very similar anti squat and pedal kickback curves. Yetis pedal very well, but many of the top bikes pedal just as well these days. There are plenty that do not such as YT and the big S as they seem to never design enough anti squat into there designs. Saying they are the best pedaling is a big statement these days!
  • + 1
 @atourgates: or XC 100mm version of the Sniper, see my link above directly comparing it to the SB100.

One thing I don’t care for on these new Yetis is the integrated headset. I much prefer choosing the headset angle I may prefer rather than the take it or leave it approach typically only seen on cheaper bikes than at the top tier level.
  • + 3
 @Golden-G: didn’t call you one, only said it came across that way by the way you responded.

“ ... there is simply not another bike that pedals as well as a Switch Infinity equipped Yeti ...”
“ ... Levy made a mistake ...”
“ ... dont come on here telling people ...”
“ ... That is utterly false ...”

Having your own opinion is fine, but acting like it’s the only one that matters, can’t be wrong, and is the end of all discussion doesn’t do yourself any favor on the credibility scale. Maybe try opening your mind and seeing things differently from other perspectives?

Otherwise having gone to votech school in my teens to become a welder/metal fabricator before going back to school to instead become a Mech Eng in that industry at age 30 (now just a mid-age old fart) I have only the greatest respect for anyone who works and contributes positively to society regardless of their job, but for craftspeople in particular. The discussion doesn’t have anything to do with how we make our living though.

Peace out.
  • + 4
 @TheUnknownMTBR: in my mind my opinion is the only one that matters! LOL!
Yetis are sick bikes! I like em! Are they outrageously priced? Hard to say. Do I wish they were less expensive? Absolutely!
Am I going to ride an SB 150 next season? Yes
Does my wife know about it? Not yet.
Is she going to kill me when she finds out? Likely..
Its just moutain biking. No need to take it too seriously.
  • + 1
 The SB130 I just ordered can be had cheaper and with a better spec if you just grab the frame and are intelligent with sourcing components. SB100 is the same, I’m sure. There were just a couple wonky things in the Yeti spec that I didn’t love so it was a home build for me.
  • + 1
 @DrPete: frame only is the way to go IMO!
  • - 3
 @TheUnknownMTBR: I’m a Democrat and I couldn’t give a fck about yeti or high end carbon bikes
  • + 1
 @DrPete: Are you ordering new parts without any kind of pro/insider deals? Sourcing used stuff?

Every time I try and build up from a frame for anything close to a manufacturer's build kit price, I come up way over.
  • + 2
 @mkotowski1: that explains alot.
  • + 3
 @DrPete: 100% Agree with you! I’m in a process of building my SB100 from the frame. I didn’t go too crazy by shopping for parts on Craigslist, eBay or PinkBike. Got all of my custom built with a very nice discount thru my LBS and soon I should have my Top Of The Line Ultralight (Under 24 lbs WITH Pedals) Yeti SB100 ready for under $8k. And I’m really far being a dentist. I’ll be even financing the purchase of my bike. I just really enjoy the sport, I do love Yeti bikes and after demoing the SB100 for 4 days (100 miles) I was absolutely sold. Currently riding a 2017 SB6c.
I don’t understand why people keep on complaining about how expensive Yeti bike. Their frames MSRP are $400 to $500 more expensive than an average carbon bike out there. But you should easily get 10% - 20% off even on a just released frame thru your LBS. Most of the people that ride Yeti bikes, they just build them from the frame cause they all know that it’s cheaper that way. And BTW Specialized currently selling their S-Work Epic Ultralight frame for $3,900, if we’re talking about pricey frames.

Cheers
  • + 1
 @atourgates: mostly using 15 and 20% coupons online when available, but also some special deals I have access to. Saved on the dropper by picking up a 30.9 to 31.6 shim so I could use one I had lying around. The only thing I ordered with no discount are the We Are One Agents, because I’ll never ride anything else ever again. Smile
  • + 1
 @atourgates: Another big area is the wheels. The XM1501s on the XO1 Race build, for instance, sell around $1000-1200, with an extra $1100 for carbon. For $1600 you can source your own We Are Ones or Santa Cruz Reserves with a lifetime warranty, or just go for some Stan’s Flow laced to some nice hubs and save a bunch.
  • + 1
 @iErnest85: Seems rather heavy compared to an Intense Sniper in both weight and cost
  • + 1
 @MikeAzBS: Good point !
  • + 48
 Anyone else think 'Down Country' sounds like a music genre we could do without?
  • + 15
 haha you're right! like Emo-Country or Countrycore Big Grin
  • + 17
 Bootgaze.
  • + 6
 EDMountain
  • + 3
 Isn't that what country already is? It's like blend of rap and country....
  • + 2
 I'm looking forward to the next road bike sub category of Up Town bikes. Especially the female specific models.
  • + 2
 Ill take down country any day if it means i dont have to deal with degens from up country.
  • + 30
 What's the first thing that comes to riders' heads when they hear "100mm travel"? It's sure as hell not "trail bike". Meanwhile, looking at its 25 lb weight, one isn't inclined to think of it as a cross-country bike either. Products that have this kind of identity crisis typically are hard to market and hard to sell.

Which leads me to believe that someone within Yeti itself really wanted this bike, regardless of what the marketing department says. Kudos to Yeti for having this kind of thinking within their organization.
  • + 10
 I disagree. My transition patrol is a bit under 15kg/33 lbs. For me any FS 29er under 12kg is xc weight, and if I wanted an xc bike (which is the case), I would not buy some racish xc bike with a road like geometry and some shit tyres. The only problem of this bike is $$$$.

I'm not sure but I think this kind of bike could help all the roadies and xc guys that constantly lock their rear wheel, skip tech sections, drops, and ride like kooks on their expensive light bikes with their 1.95 slick stupid tyres. Did I describe accurately your friends from lake guarda @WAKIdesigns ?
  • + 7
 @zede: no. You missed bar ends, saddle bags, garmin holders, and more importantly being "dressed up in "factory clothing" they either virtually stole from a racer after competition or bought in Chinese online store, since Amazon or Ebay were too expensive. Suck balls of an average athlete or club owner to get sweaty clothing, all in order to appear better than others. That's Garda elite. They may look insecure but deep inside, they ARE better than you.

Now for reals, I do see place for 100mm bike. It makes sense to me as long as it has a fork no bigger than 120 and proper Xc tyres like XR2 or Ikon, maybe something slightly knobbier in the front. That's a loose shredder. Fine. I only whine on grey zone between that and SB150, the Down Country. My buddy just bought Trek Fuel EX and mounted Lyrik to it. I'll be poking him until he hates me.
  • + 18
 I have a 120mm Fox 36 on my trail bike. One of the best decisions I've ever made.
  • - 3
 @panzer103: I can understand that... I wish I had a 100mm 36 on my DJ...
  • + 20
 People underestimate XC bike weights. In the real world, 25 lb is very competitive for a Large XC bike with legit tires, a dropper, and pedals. Those stupid light specs you see are almost always small frame, paper thin tires, no dropper, and no pedals.
  • + 11
 Geoff Kabush wanted it...
  • + 2
 @dthomp325: It is the tyres more than most things that define the XC bike and separate it from a trail bike in the first place. If you mounted tyres from SB130 to SB100 you would work much harder on XC race or distance oriented XC ride than if you rode SB130 with tyres from XC race build. It is that simple. Hence I look at people with 100-120mm bikes and Minions like I look at the dude in the gym doing goblet squats on bosu ball. It's cool that you can do it and I respect it. I am just afraid that the question you are not asking yourself is "hhhwhyyyy..."
  • + 3
 except for the market has literally reoriented itself towards the down country. the xco worlds courses are looking less and less like xc and more like early enduro courses. a lot more tech, chops, droppers are almost the standard amongst them and to be honest its lighter than an sworks epic with a fox 34 SC
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: personally I can't help myself from going quick on the downhills, so I'll rip XC tires to shreds, but I still want something with more moderate angles and less sag for tamer XC rides. DHF might be heavy compared to an XC tire, but it's a fairly fast roller, especially in EXO and when paired with a Minion SS or Agressor in the back.
  • - 3
 @dthomp325: my point is, if you can utilize minions it seems that you could utilize more travel and slacker angles. But well... some like eggs with bacon and some like bacon with eggs. Like soy beans with chickpeas. Just make sure you are not eating chickpea eggs with humus filling. soy bacon...
  • + 0
 @sylvainvanier: still wouldn't beat lopes in a brawl with that
  • + 1
 @dthomp325: tomahawk > aggressor/minion ss
  • + 7
 @WAKIdesigns: I have a 160mm enduro bike. It's amazing on the steep and gnarly terrain it was designed for, but it feels like driving a monster truck on XC trails, it's just not as fun or fast as a shorter travel bike on tamer trails. EXO tires aren't all that aggressive, they are mid-weight trail tires.
  • + 2
 The SB100 is a KOM slayer.
  • + 1
 This bike has the geo number ALMOST dialed- everything except the reach. They all need to be shifted up one size- the large should be what the xtra large is, the medium should be what the large is, etc.

I custom built a ti hardtail that has geo numbers VERY close to this with a 120mm fork, and its as perfect as you can get I feel. I'm 5'9", and with a reach of 480 and a 40mm stem its the most balanced I've ever felt on a bike.
  • + 1
 @SnowshoeRider4Life: Both 2.3 Tomahawk and Aggressor wear out too fast, cost too much to run. 2.5 Aggressor DD is where it's at imo, I'm getting over 2x the life out of the 2.5 vs 2.3.
  • + 1
 I don't know, bikes like this have been selling like hotcakes where I'm at.
  • + 2
 This seems more like an epic ride bike for the euro bros than a bike for the XC crowd.
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: You've answered your own question. Tyres make the most difference, and yet are comparatively cheap to change out for different occasions. Not everyone can afford a bike for every possible discipline.
  • - 5
flag WAKIdesigns (Oct 22, 2018 at 10:27) (Below Threshold)
 @dthomp325: oh so you have it aside of your 160 bike? I bet you didn't read the comparison of sub 3k bikes Big Grin
@kiksy I know. That's why I just put 2 Rock razors on my 160 bike for local XC Big Grin .
  • + 0
 @panzer103: dude you could get 40 on 120mm it even more STiFF !
  • + 1
 @b-wicked: Hahaha that would be kinda cool, maybe even trend setting!
  • + 4
 @hamncheez: Surely 2 sizes up then?

You are shorter than average but want the geo on an L/XL? Surely a medium should be dialled for the average size person?
  • + 1
 @davec113: I have close to 1,000 miles on a 2.3 Aggressor EXO on the rear and it still has a good amount of life in it. What is too short for you?
  • + 1
 @davec113: i can't run the 2.5 and out east i found the aggressor to just be way to slick when things are moist which is quite often here. Plus it packs with mud so easily.

The tomahawk can wear i suppose but it sheds mud really well, hooks up on off chamber better, and can be run in more conditions i've found here.

ill take a tire a season and be stable vs 2 years on an aggressor.
  • + 7
 For what most people ride, this bike is actually pretty killer. Of course the true big terrain folks need more, and the racers need lighter (depending on the course) but this will do just about everything, with just a minor tweak to your riding style.
  • + 0
 @SprSonik: wait wait wait waaaait... so first 120 bikes were enough for what most people ride and now 100mm is? Come on... this starts to be bike paleo boys. Suspension ketosis. Down Country has to die as a trend sooner or later. If only for the fact that it has no racing format to support it. And never will. Is that it then? All fueled by increasing level,of difficulty of XC tracks, the other two bikes there being the last dinosaurs to live?
  • + 1
 @SnowshoeRider4Life: Yeah, I can see that... in CO it's mostly dry. Aggressor is not good in mud and not ideal on slick roots. Tomahawk rolls really fast and 3C compound will be better on roots.
  • + 2
 @MTBSPEC: I'll kill a 2.3 Aggressor in 150 miles or so, the sideknobs get undecut really quickly. Could just be the local rock, IDK... I'm in CO and there's a lot of rock! The 2.5 version has better grip and lasts a lot longer for me.
  • + 1
 @dthomp325: I guess my large 2x10 niner with a dropper isn't too bad at 28 pounds then lol.
  • + 2
 @hamncheez: I demoed the bike this weekend and it felt longer than the numbers suggest.
  • + 2
 @pikebait2013: I'm demoing a $6500 Pivot 429 this weekend. XL carbon 120mm frame with X01 build including pedals is 30lbs even.
  • + 30
 Kona - please bring back the Process 111.
  • + 5
 Did you own one @fartymarty ? I was very fond of mine but have to admit it pedaled really badly. There are many better short-travel 29ers out there now.
  • + 5
 @chakaping: never did but always wanted one. I am sure Kona could make a better one now. They do have the Satori but it doesnt look the same.
  • + 5
 @fartymarty: My friend's been reviewing the Satori, he was not sorry to see the back of it. The Cotic FlareMAX is probably the best short-travel 29er I've ridden for fun stuff. My Smuggler's way better than the P111 was but I have slacked it out. I think companies struggle to sell these kind-of bikes even though they're possibly the most fun to just go riding in the woods on.
  • + 6
 @chakaping: NSMB also struggled with the Satori. The FlareMAX looks great. Also the new Norco looks good as well. I'm still very keen on the factory Starling Murmur so will probably end up with that (im a cromo fanboy).
  • + 5
 @chakaping: That was my experience too. Loved it, but my next bike had another 30mm of travel, but pedaled way better. If you're going short travel, it needs to pedal really well and be poppy to maximize the fun.
  • + 6
 @Adamrideshisbike: I kinda see them as hardtails with a little bit of travel to take the edge off. As you say it needs to pedal well otherwise why bother.
  • + 2
 @fartymarty: My pal has a Starling, it's very fast and comfy. Maybe has more "steel feel" than the Cotics but it's definitely worth demo-ing both brands.
  • + 5
 @Adamrideshisbike: I thought I was just losing fitness until I realised what a dog the Process was on pedally rides. Now riding an Orange Stage 6 (150/160mm) and it is MUCH better climbing and on the flat. Night and day. Still got some of my fastest Strava times on the P111 on flowy descents though.
  • + 1
 @chakaping: Top of the list are Starling, Swarf, Geometron, Cotic.
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: get the starling, i got a rocket max and really struggled with it, did a lot and could not get it right. my swoop is really easy to get along with, it has the typical starling inacuracies -the taiwan version should be great.
  • + 1
 @chakaping: and frame only as I have all the other stuff....
  • + 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: The Starling is my fav of the lot. I've like them since I first saw them.
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: then get a swarf, ab it more "downcountry" than the starling but adriens attention to detail is just awesome -good price for that too
  • + 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: I will prob get the Murmur as it will be a bit more versatile in the long run. I already have a HT and want something I can ride on bigger terrain. The Swarf is nice tho and he is doing a new one with a little more progressive geo and longer travel.
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: if he does a longer travel one i would get that, should be in the same travelrange with the murmur then. the swarfs progression is also better -i bottom my starling quite often and do not run it soft by any means (still great and fun bike)
  • + 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: I think he was talking about 130mm which with the progressing is getting similar to a Starling. I is tempting.

Have you tried air on your Swoop? I would think a good air can stuffed with tokens would do the trick.
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: it depends heavily on the shock, I tried a (stuffed) inline and it was not great -very mushy in the midstroke. a friend tried a manitou mcleod with and without kingcan -same. the x 2 is said to work great -you basically need a big negativchamber. oldschool airshocks are degressive in midstroke which does not play well with the linear starling. the new generation should be fine, maybe even better than a coil as you get some progression
  • + 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: I will probably go air (more fettleable). I'm sure Joe has worked out what works with the frames.
  • + 1
 I had P111 and now I have kona hei hei DL (carbon 100/120). The P111 was the best bike I ever had for 1 hour of single tracks but, its a bit heavy for longer rides. The hei hei gives less confidence, but they enable me to ride long distance with great efficiency, but it also very capable bike on technical trails. And you can sqeeze 2 bottles into the frame.

The hei Hei are very similar to the SB100 in numbers and philosophy. It would be interesting to see a comparison.
  • + 4
 The Guerrilla Gravity Trail Pistol is a bike with similar intention, 120mm 29er built to get rowdy.
www.ridegg.com/trailpistol
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: My friend's tried a few shocks on his Murmur, think he likes the Fox DPX2 best so far. Gives it a bit more pep apparently.
  • + 5
 +1 for v2 Process 111
  • + 6
 All the new aluminum Konas are ungodly ugly
  • + 10
 @panzer103: That's not very fair. The carbon ones look pretty awful too.
  • + 7
 YES. I need to find one and re-review it to see how it compares to all these new ones. Kona had a prototype carbon 111 rolling around, too, but that was awhile ago and I think they pulled the plug on it. But a new 111 is due.
  • + 6
 @mikelevy: Mike, since you singlehandedly invented the "Downcountry" category you owe it to use to review them all for us.
  • + 8
 @fartymarty: I'm on it
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: I look forward to it.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: I would love a review of the Intense Sniper, Geometry looks really promising
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Kona hei hei 100/120 is available and is the direct competition to the SB100. The P111 is more like mini enduro bike. I had both.

www.pinkbike.com/news/kona-hei-hei-dl-29-review-2016.html
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Can you add the new Norco Fluid FS to the list.
  • + 1
 @ZKBT: Kona needs to do a refresh on the Hei Hei 29. Its a great bike( I own a 2017 model), but the reach and headtube angle could be much more aggressive!
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: I remember seeing a an extra large carbon 111 in the Winthrop area a few years back. Too bad it ended there.

It’s shame these new breed carbon 29er frame are so freaking heavy. I have a hei hei dl 29. It’s so light. Would love a similar version with a little more travel.
  • + 21
 Unpopular Opinion:
Yeti's switch Infinity is an incredible demonstration of unnecessary weight and complexity for marginal shifts to the leverage ratio curve which could (should) be simplified to a single pivot design.
Stop.
Pass on the weight saving and simplicity gains by replacing switch infinity for single pivot from a near-race-rig.
  • + 6
 Yeah I have been thinking this for a while too. Switch infinity is just an excuse for MOAR KASHIMA!
  • + 5
 They already did that, it was called the ASRC and I have owned both, the SB100 is WAY faster and WAY better in every way than the single pivot ASRC even being 2 pounds heavier and I'm in WAY worse shape than I was when I owned my ASRC
  • + 2
 There's plenty of single pivot XC bikes out there. If Yeti is targeting the person what wants a bike that can handle XC and trail duties, but not excel at either, this makes sense.
  • + 2
 @Shralpophiliac: Geoff Kabush has won many xc marathon races aboard the sb100 all year long
  • + 3
 @projectnortheast: that may be so but henrybsick said that Yeti needs to switch to single pivot and what does Geoff Kabush know anyways, dude doesn’t even know how to spell ‘Jeff’.
  • + 20
 "XC races aren't won on the descents"

Jolanda Neff laughed her ass off at that one.
  • + 6
 yep totally agree,today you can´t recover from an uphill sprint to left the rest of the rider in the dust,then a good downhill rider catch you in 10 seconds...Downhill is equal or even more important now in XC races. Yolanda,Nino,Kate Courtney are really fast downhill riders.
  • + 19
 Of course the downs count, but I think you know what I meant.
  • + 13
 Jolandas desending skills would be useless if she couldn't climb too. No matter what in XC you spend more time going uphill, and that's where races are won and lost.
  • - 1
 @clink83: Simply false. Langvad would win the majority of races if the climbs were the deciding factor. Neff forces her into mistakes and simply wears her down by going faster than her on descents. Not to mention the amount of times they've been together at the top of the final descent and Neff's descending ability puts enough gap into second that they don't even get to sprint against her.
  • + 6
 @jclnv: "not to mention the amount of times they've been together at the top of the final descent"=Yolanda can climb. Its a mathematical fact that you spend more time climbing than descending in an XC race, if you can't hang on the climbs you will never be in a position to attack on the descents. There must isn't enough time on descents to make up for being a slow climber.

If Jolanda wouldn't go to the front of every damn race at the start she would probably be riding off the front at the end of every race too.
  • + 4
 downhill in XC races is complex,it is not just the amount of time,it put a lot of pressure for the slower rider downhill or just for those with not enough mental skills to deal with it. One fail going uphill is a little mistake,a fail while going downhill it is a crash an a big mistake if you are racing XC,One rider can get very fit but if that guy/girl is not good at downhill it is to me a 0% chance to win a race today. You need fit and the best ridding skills you can learn. Many teams have a guy to coach on the trail those riders only for those crazy downhill sections. Absalon brothers worked together to improve ridding skills and line choice. Only a few can win making a difference in the downhill section,but many can lose the race there very quick. So downhill to me is a game changer compared to 10 years ago and is key to new XC races.
  • + 1
 @homerjm: Exactly. I think Clink83 is looking at XCO from a dated perspective.

Going off the start hard is a tactic of hers as she knows it wastes the older riders who don't have have the zero to 100% that she has. Sometimes it doesn't work out but she's an all-out feeling based racer. Same as VdP. One of the reasons she's my favourite in any discipline.
  • + 2
 @jclnv: he's agreeing that you have to win races on the uphill, but you can loose them on the down.
XCO, Marathon, normal XC races w/e if you can't hang on the climbs, which is most of the race, you won't be in a position to attack. Its really that simple.
  • + 2
 I'm sure that Batty, Langvad and the other top racers also know that Jolanda likes to go out hard and ride her wheel trying to make her blow up, which she does do.
  • + 0
 @clink83: She's the 2018 World Cup champ. She's the most talented all-round female bike racer on the planet. I think she knows what tactics work for her!

This is cut and pasted directly from Redbull.com.

"Breaking away from the chain Jolanda Neff, Annika Langvad and Kate Courtney accelerated ahead. With Neff dictating the pace, her noticeably faster descending saw her quickly make time on Specialized team-mates Langvad and Courtney."

All she has to do is match them on the climbs and she wins races on DESCENTS. And she does, often. Fact. Holy f*ck do we watch the same races?
  • + 2
 @jclnv: and again, you still spend more time climbing so you still have to keep up. You can go round and round and round, but in XC the races are won on climbs. It doesn't matter how fast you are on descents if you get dropped on the next climb or blow up on the descent. She had good results this season, but she had several races last year where she was out of the top 10...because she blew up and couldn't keep up on the climbs.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: You could look at it this way too, how was she the XCM world champ and how does she win on nontechnical tracks when her descending skills aren't a real advantage?
  • + 1
 @clink83: Yes, she's the best all-round rider on the planet. And She's the World Cup XCO champ because Langvad can't descend for shit.
  • + 15
 the problem with these bikes is, that you can ride them brutally fast and there is lots of security to work with -until suddenly there isnt. in 2014 i rode a salsa horsethief with pike and big tires -a dangerous machine
  • + 18
 I kinda like that though. Don't you? The feeling of hammering down a trail on a bike that has no business being so burly is great.
You're right that after a certain point it gets maybe a bit out of its depth, but I guess you just have to know your own limits, and learn the bike's.
  • + 12
 @speedfreek: It's like riding a HT with a decent burly build. Risk = thrills = fun.
  • + 7
 @speedfreek: i also liked it, but i had some nasty offs with it as well. on most other bikes i always knew afterwards what went wrong, with that bike i often could not tell the actual reason for the crash other than: "I probably should not try the same lines as on a 170 mm bike".
  • + 4
 @fartymarty: i find it much different. after riding my "enduro hardtail" ( as the kids in the dirtpark named it) for 4 months, i switched again to my fs last wednesday - the biggest difference is actually the speed you carry. even in sections where i do not brake i was so much faster on the fs.

with short travel 29ers its different. at least on easy and medium level trails they carry momentum better than anything else and make you feel like some sort of demigod until suddenly the rockgarden you tried to double catches you out. with a hardtail i am always slower and aware that the margin of error is very small.
  • + 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: I have been on a HT for the last 4 years so don't have much to compare it to. I am looking to build up a FS bike next year which should be fun (or scary fast).
  • + 2
 @fartymarty: before june i havent ridden a hardtail for a longer period of time since 96. i like it and my pumping -/jumpingskills are at an alltime high but having fun with it on real trails is sometimes a struggle. with a good fs you just try to be centered on the bike and look ahead -done. i may be exegerating a bit but offroad i find it much more fun and only scary if you start thinking about your speed -which obviously you shouldnt
  • + 2
 @optimumnotmaximum: very true, i think 150mm is a sweet spot. my banshee prime is super responsive but it gets crazy trying to follow friends on bigger rigs. But youre oh so right about a short travel 29 fs making you feel like a god haha
  • + 8
 Nice review and nice bike. But yeah, pricey. Hopefully, commencal, yt and canyon get on the downcountry train soon to offer a nicely priced alternative

"I tend to ride a cross-country rig like I don't have much to live for besides my cat, I'm usually forced to run around 20-percent sag if I don't want to clang off the end of the stroke and then walk around with a cane after the ride."
Good one
  • + 6
 I think many XC race bikes can be changed so they aren't so 'race'. I have a dropper and bigger meat on a Scott Spark RC and it is surpisingly fun and capable.
  • + 2
 @iamamodel: I wish scott was making a spark RC with a 110mm fork, good tyres, a dropper and a 67.5 HA. But instead they chose to make the spark that has 120mm F/R. downcountrail ?
  • + 3
 @iamamodel: like, I don't know, putting a Minion DHF on a short travel bike... Razz
  • + 1
 @zede: I had a 27.5 Spark before I got the 29 RC. Love the latter more.
  • + 1
 Whilst it is not as light and racey, the Canyon Nerve is good option too. I have ridden mine in bikeparks but also on marathon races and it has never let me down so far. The geometry is a bit dated tho and it has a relatively long stem and not so large bars with the stock spec.
  • + 1
 @iamamodel: What width tires are you able to fit on your RC? Which model are you riding? Thanks.
  • + 1
 @zede: You could always put a bigger fork on the Spark WC? 100mm rear and 120mm fork might be cool on that bike, just like Levy put the 120mm fork on the blur even though it's spec'd with a 100mm. Scott might void a warranty though...
  • + 2
 @projectnortheast: yeah well, if i'm gonna buy an expensive bike, I would rather be fine with the bike the way it's sold. Changing the fork, tyres, brakes rotors is a bit too much
  • + 1
 @zede: Angleset,bigger tires, dropper. Do it yourself.
  • + 2
 @zede: True, but I haven't bought a stock complete bike in 5+ years... mostly just build my own bikes from frame up
  • + 1
 @projectnortheast: frame alone is always super expensive if you don't have already the needed parts, otherwise I would be tempted...
  • + 1
 @SpeedyChix: I have 2.35 Ardent Race. I still race xc on it. Truly big tyres would turn it into a slug. Plenty of room for them though. It is a great bike. Message me if you want to ask heaps of questions. I'll answer them because I love that bike.
  • + 8
 I ride a yeti sb6c with a coil, big rotors, big tires. 31 pounds or so. I race enduro but have always been very fitness oriented as well as focusing on DH over the years as opposed to climbing. I'm a bigger rider, 200 geared up, but in shape. I love pedaling and challenging myself to go fast. My yeti is too much bike for my local trails and I've been looking for a year or so for something that will fit the bill for pedal efficiency, a few xc races here and there, some light enduros, and something a little poppier and snappier than my bruiser sb6c. Enter the Sb100. I feel like I am the exact rider this bike was made for and there are alot of us out there. Too big for something light and flexy like the sniper, and I don't mind working a few more overtime shifts to cover the $800 or so difference in price from comparable bikes. Thanks Yeti.
  • + 1
 Agree-I have the same rides and 100 is sweet. Taken it to areas where I ride my 6 but it's done well-do need to be careful in certain spots but man this thing just moves and flows well.
  • + 8
 @mikelevy - "the 44mm offset (it's usually 51mm on a 29er) helps to keep the wheelbase in check and the dreaded floppy front-end syndrome to a minimum"



*increasing the trail and/or decreasing the head angle will increase the wheel flop factor on a bicycle or motorcycle*

lowering offset increases trail.

but this is blogvertising soo
  • + 1
 Spot on. Given equal head angles, wheel diameters, and fork lengths:
More fork offset equals sharper/quicker steering by decreasing trail, even as it increases wheelbase.
Less fork offset slows steering and increases wheel flop by increasing trail, even as it decreases wheelbase.
My impression with the current move to shorter offset is that it might result in bumps affecting the front wheel less.
It’s easy to think we’ve found the range of workable trail numbers in 43-51mm, and now the market is working out the optimum number. Also easy to think it makes little difference either way and it’s just marketing detail.
  • + 2
 I picked up on this as well! I have a played around with low offset forks on all 3 of my bikes(Hei Hei 29, Following V1, and Wreckoning). Only the 160mm Wreckoning seems to benefit from this lower offset due to increased cornering traction. However the climbing off all these bikes suffered when I swapped for the low offset fork. Climbing, slow tech riding, really anything under 10mph the bike just feels like it is not as persistence at these speeds with the low offset.
  • + 2
 Nailed it. Came to the comments to see if anyone else noticed this screw-up.
  • + 7
 A few years back i had a Banshee Phantom, that bike opened my eyes to how much fun short travel and big wheels can deliver, this Yeti would surely be awesome , i need a go on one asap.
  • + 6
 I’m still on this bike with a 140 mm MRP Ribbon Coil. Every time I start to shop for a new bike, I end up saying “Nope”......
  • + 4
 @RBWebb: Just got a Banshee Prime, 135mm 29er. Put a 160mm 36 upfront. Thing is too much fun. Banshee is awesome.
  • + 1
 @scottay2hottay: same here, theyre awesome. I just wish their customer service was better. I have a 140mm yari and it does everything
  • + 3
 @RBWebb: Same here buddy. I'm on a Phantom with a Fox 34 at 140mm. I just can't see anything that I would trade it for!
  • + 3
 Can't agree more! Rode Banshee Phantom for this season in Whistler Bike Park. I was totally blown away by its capability!
  • + 9
 How is the new I ntense sniper not mentioned? Slacker and longerand similar travel.
  • + 4
 I haven't ridden it, so it'd be a bit unfair of me to compare it to the SB100. I've heard good things, though.
  • + 2
 @mikelevy I just got one. Haven’t spent a ton of time on mine. But got the xc version and put a 120 Stepcast on it. Feeling pretty good so far. Definetely slack and trail geo esque
  • + 5
 This bike never ceases to amaze me on how plush it is. 100mm that's plush? Yeah I'd call BS too unless I experienced it! Also, it's a playful booger that likes to get sideways whenever possible and to pop off every rock and root in the trail. Thing is a riot. But so is the price tag. They say YOLO, but sometimes you only YOLO once when your wife finds out how much it's costed...
  • + 2
 I've been shopping for a short travel trail bike and $5k for a GX build seems to be the standard for carbon bikes now. Most brands are right around the same price point. The Yeti is actually a cheaper MSRP than the Giant Trance 29 GX and Specialized Stumpjumper ST GX builds.
  • + 1
 @dthomp325: yeah the GX build is a good deal IMO. I went with the TURQ series X01 build with the carbon hoops.
  • + 5
 I rented this bike for High Cascade 100 and was really blown away at how smooth and fast it is. In a lot of ways it is the perfect bike for Bend trails and someone who likes to ride fast! I think Levy's statement about how this bike is perfect for BCBR and other longer adventure xc races is spot on!
  • + 9
 This sounds more like a Tallboy than a Blur
  • + 3
 Yup. Not sure how this was overlooked.
  • + 3
 Yup, 100% agree. I brought up the Blur because it's new and comparable.
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: yo mike, was there ever a final review of the Blur with 120SC fork on it?
  • + 1
 All the way.
  • + 6
 I've been reading about a TON of issues on all the new yeti bikes. Did you experience any of the play that others are noticing on the bigger bikes?
  • + 1
 Nope, zero play. We have an SB150 and an SB130 in rotation for testing, too, and neither have any play.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: that is really good to hear.
  • + 1
 @redmr2man: i've been owning a sb5.5 for a year now and last June, pretty much all the bearings died ! Rear hub, bottom bracket and most importantly the main bearing of the infinity system...
My mechanic told me he knew 4 people owning the same bike including 3 who had the same problem with the main pivot.
Over here in France I can see few used sb 5.5 being sold with brand new Switch Infinity systems, the system being under guarantee.
Despite the known issue I had it fixed and I keep enjoying the hell out of this machine. The bike seems to fit great to epic rides in the Alps ☺
  • + 4
 "Yeti is another company that's been tinkering with longer, slacker bikes .... and the SB100 is their first production model that embraces this new-school approach." - not according to their reach figures it isn't @mikelevy
  • + 3
 You left out the part about the short offset fork, which was the key to Levy’s statement.
  • + 2
 'tinkering' does not mean 'executing' or 'understanding'. They are aware of the new school geometry and flopped around trying understand the numbers....
  • + 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: Less is more. I'm not slamming Levy specifically but I'm tired of seeing bike journalists suggesting that bikes have cutting edge geometry, then I go to the geo table and the reach figures are circa 2013.
  • + 3
 Mike just a quick comment - "XC races aren't won on the descents" Being a middle aged man that grew up on twitchy XC bikes - I would also like to make the point that the new modern XC epics like the Nimby 50 sure can be lost on the descents. That's when you are in the fetal position after crashing on the rocky, steep and/or loose downhill section.

I truly believe that for some of us that are going for a decent time and 12th place in our age class (that's after a meaningless sprint to the line with a 20 year old on a Cromag hardtail with freeride wheels) - these new bikes are a great idea. You have done a great job of explaining this in your article. It shows how cross country is having a bit of an identity crisis right now. There are so many options.

There is a very small number of us that actually complete at UCI type XC lap events compared to those of us that do epic point to point XC races/rides that its great to see manufacturers adjusting their bike spec's.

thanks for the great review and comparison.
  • + 3
 I can confirm XC races not won on the descents, but it’s fun rolling up to the start on 160mm full bouncer rig and finishing mid table
  • + 6
 xc races aren't won on the descents, but they can be lost on the descents
  • + 1
 @zede: Exactly. See the women's world champs with Courtney and Langvad. Kate railed that descent and gapped for the win.
  • - 3
 @OriginalDonk: kate capitalized on Langvaad poor descending skills and gapped the win*** Kate didn't win because of her DH skills, but Langvaad lost because of her lacking DH skills. I think your logic needs some rethinking.

Cheers
  • + 4
 @LOLWTF: I'm responding to @zede's comment that races can be lost on the descents and said exactly. Langvad couldn't stay with Kate on the descent and got gapped on the last lap. She also walked tech descents at La Bresse.

Your reading comprehension appears to be stellar.
  • - 5
flag LOLWTF (Oct 22, 2018 at 11:31) (Below Threshold)
 @OriginalDonk: I see you ain't exactly the sharpest knife in the kitchen...
  • + 6
 @LOLWTF: Keyboard warrior with no flag who joined Pinkbike a month a go. Troll on.
  • - 7
flag LOLWTF (Oct 22, 2018 at 11:36) (Below Threshold)
 @OriginalDonk: sure, anyone that points out your obvious lack of intelligence is a troll...
  • + 2
 @LOLWTF: Right buddy. I mentioned that Kate railed a descent. Maybe it would've been easier for you if I had been more explicit and said that Langvad didn't and lost the race. Apparently you've got enough in this back and forth to question my intelligence. I call you a troll because you've clearly got nothing more to do than come at me when we're saying the same damn thing. Good stuff buddy, good stuff.
  • - 6
flag LOLWTF (Oct 22, 2018 at 11:52) (Below Threshold)
 @OriginalDonk: it's cause you're actually saying the opposite of his statement but at this point I don't expect you to realize anything.

Have a good day, "buddy". Good stuff
  • + 2
 @LOLWTF: You are a special one aren't you. Annika struggling on the descent and Kate railing it aren't mutually exclusive are they? In my view both were at play on the last descent at World Champs for Kate and Annika.
  • - 4
flag LOLWTF (Oct 22, 2018 at 12:16) (Below Threshold)
 @OriginalDonk: like I said I've given up on you. Would it make you feel better if I say you're right? You're right, buddy. Good stuff
  • + 1
 @LOLWTF: Only took 5 messages for you to give up on me. Looks like 6 of your 8 posts on this article are below threshold why stop now? You're doing so well.

Bottom line, buddy, is that you came after me, my logic, and my intelligence in response to a simple post about Kate descending well. Maybe it would have pleased you more if I followed that up by saying Annika didn't but it appears you were out to call people out.

Take your ball and go home champ.
  • + 4
 don't stop now, this is entertaining
  • + 5
 @twozerosix: I know. I've only used buddy and champ. I still have chief, captain, big guy, pal, and sport to use.
  • + 1
 You guys are both wrong. Katie dropped Langvaad on a tech climb because Langvaad was gassed and stalled out twice. Without that gap on the climb there is a very good chance Katie would of been caught on the flats and lost the finish line sprint to Langvaad
  • + 3
 @mikelevy "ideal for a lot of people who are currently on bikes with 50mm more travel but let's not go down that road again" .. Please do go down that road again, just to remind us. I'm considering a SB130, but starting to wonder if the SB100 might be a whole lot more fun
  • + 2
 @nzmichael it's easy. If you have a 150-170mm bike, getting a 130mm bike is useless. so get a 100mm or nothing.
If you have a DH or FR bike, getting a 130mm bike kinda makes sense. overlap is waste of money
  • + 5
 Someone make a burly 100mm 650B frame please. Something like a BFe or Switchback with a bit of squish at the back and space for a bottle would be lovely. Thanks.
  • + 4
 @Adamrideshisbike: If Giant is going to keep borrowing their front triangles from Salsa bikepacking rigs, then they should really push the humongous-framebag-clearance angle a bit more. At least somebody is still making bikes for people with long legs and short torsos I guess.
  • + 2
 @Adamrideshisbike: are you seriously suggesting that an Anthem frame is "burly". Lol, good luck with that.
  • + 3
 The new Norco fluid is 120mm but it feels like less when going up. Available in either wheel size
  • + 2
 @Adamrideshisbike: looks like a bike from 2013
  • + 5
 Walked right past it the other Day when I saw the 100 bit. Figured xc bike. Sounds like a modern light weight process 111. Which sounds frigging awsome to me.
  • + 3
 Seeing as you rock(ed?) an Element and loved it, can you discuss the difference a bit more in depth than you did in the article? How's the Element compare when it's in the slackest mode? Are you still keen on the Element or does the Yeti make you consider a trade-in?
  • + 2
 yeah, also considering the sizing differs between these two bikes @mikelevy can you tell us which frame size you were on for both yeti SB100 and RM element ?
  • + 3
 I just came here to see people making comments about how you have to be a dentist to afford a bike that is only a few hundred dollars more than most other big name carbon bikes.
  • + 3
 A couple things:

* Seems like this is a short-travel bike that climbs like it has 150mm of travel... It's usually the other way around.

* How are you going to test a 100mm bike and not wear a lick of spandex? Smile
  • + 11
 I've always got the bibs on underneath the baggies.
  • + 5
 Brands have begun to use the term down country in their marketing. I reckon that makes it legit now @mikelevy
  • + 9
 I have to send a cease and desist to Race Face.
  • + 2
 where the f*ck is all the rampage stuff? Feels like last year cam mccaul was interviewing every human or human shaped rock on the mountain and the only thing we have this year is a teaser of the new venue filmed by a drunk drone pilot
  • + 2
 Love the review and this bike is on my "must demo" list. I have been on a decked out 2015 pivot mach 4 for 3 years (115/120mm). I have been eyeing the yetis 4.5 for awhile. Need to try riding some modern geo 29ers (older ones were not nimble at all). Its a shame that there are few bikes like the SB100, mach 4, spider etc that cater towards the people that have to pedal to the top before descending and do not intend on riding bike parks. Bikes that sit inbetween pure XC and trail/all mountain.
  • + 6
 Down-Country will be the buzz word for 2019. It's happening.
  • + 1
 I for one welcome our new down country overlords. A trend that will make bikes more fun.
  • + 2
 Nah, I think it is bad news. Once something is being categorized at a deeper level than just mountainbiking, next step is it will become competition. And Strava will cash into this, I tell you. People will beat you at the car park test, at the picknick, doing selvies at the faster shutter times and even rushing their post ride beers. 2019 may still be fun but from 2020 onwards, the UCI will sanction down country riding and it may take another few years to develop another buzz word for the very same thing. So please just ride your bikes you like to, just please don't call it down country. Every time you do, somewhere on this beautiful earth, a tire will burp.
  • + 2
 This thing is so beautifu sculpted; I am from 1988 and I have never seen such a beautiful bike in my life.
I don't know how it rides but I read a lot of reviews telling about a bottomless feel. Makes me curious.
As a engineer I really like the tech stuff hidden inside the frame. It is just a beauty.

@Yeti, props to the engineering and webdesigners!

For those webdesigners here around. Have you seen there website? Speechless. The bike sells, their story and website sells.

One word WOWW!!
  • + 3
 The movement on that infinity link looks super short, makes me wonder how different this implementation really is from a single pivot, if it can only move like 10-15mm.
  • + 4
 Yup, agreed. From a butt-on-seat perspective, the SB100's rear suspension is best in the short-travel biz right now, so I'm inclined to believe that there's something to it... even though the Infinity unit only moves up and down a few millimeters. Whatever's happening, it sure works.
  • + 4
 A lot of supensions layouts trust on a linkage drive movement. By using two linkages, you create a virtual pivot point.

upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9b/IHsunday.jpg

What Yeti did (is instead of using two linkages) they put one rotation point on a vertical rail. You could compare this to an extreeeeemm long lower linkage (infitity long, I think there is the name coming from).

This tiny change has big effects.
  • - 2
 @Bahlman: Thanks for answering a question that neither myself or Mike asked...but I believe that the infinity name comes from the 'infinite' variation in positions that the pivot can be located in along those rails (sliding along it) I'm very clear on what yeti did, this is why I've commented initially. What I was actually asking above, is how different this would feel to a single pivot bike with the pivot positioned , say , right in the middle of the rail travel, given that (in this particular iteration of the infinity link layout) the links have so little travel.
  • + 2
 @DGWW: Hi I can understand your question, however I don't know how different this would FEEL to a single pivot. I did a very short study in 3D Cad and did a copy CAD of the layout. What I see(if i am right) is a small vertical amount of travel leads to a virtual pivot point which moves in cm's. In theory it's completely something different than a single pivot.I think that's where the bottomless feel comes from. I becoming more and more curious by writing this...
  • + 1
 Honestly, I loved this review. and I would probably love this bike. And a lot of people would honestly probably love this bike, too if they were more honest with themselves about how many milimeters of travel are necessary to have a good time riding their bikes. I look forward to @mikelevy reviews. Dude can write.
  • + 1
 Sounds like an awesome bike! Pricey but it would be perfect for the trails in Ontario. My 155 Warden is a bit much on tamer terrain. I wonder if this bike is comparable to the Evil Following? I know the Evil has an extra 20mm travel but they sound like both bikes fall into the same down-country category!
  • + 1
 that is such a beautiful bike and if I had the money i'd want that over any other bike.

its just that I cant commit anymore... with the rate standards are changing/have changed, I have absolutely no confidence that i'll still be able to get parts in 5 years time.. and considering how long it would take to afford this bike (or even a bike worth 3k) it needs to last me 10 years+

so Im forced to stick with my 26" hardtail and 26" dh bike and I can live with that
  • + 4
 Old enough to remember when 100mm was “long travel” on Yeti’s Kamikaze DH bikes...
  • + 1
 Cross country races aren't won on the downhill? Ever see Nino or Jolanda in a World Cup? Crush on the DH sections in order to "take it easy" on the climbs. Both incredible climbers no doubt, but this strategy has taken them both to a lot of wins.
  • + 1
 We have a guy with one in our Ride group, I've seen him go down really steep gnarly stuff (Cdn Rockies) on that bike, amazing, you would never ever go down on a race XC rig if you value your life, crazy price but seems pretty capable. XC race bike with a DHF on the front, not bad.
  • + 3
 I'm riding a shortshocked Devinci Hendrix with 29er Wheels on my hometrails. 110mm rear, 120mm front, 330mm BB 65.5 ha and really light wheels. Most fun bike ever.
  • + 1
 "... it would be ideal (after a tire swap) for things like the BC Bike Race or other long, rough, adventure-focused types of events"

For rough, rocky, technical backcountry climbing I'd want a bash. I get that XC bikes don'e come with one, but bikes built to go into the mountains and climb trails not made for bikes are going to be dragging the chainring (and frame) over rocks - which I realize is unheard of in the era of smooth flow trails. Any bike with aspirations to act like a trail bike needs one IMO.
  • - 4
flag LOLWTF (Oct 22, 2018 at 11:04) (Below Threshold)
 I will never understand that. How the f*ck are people slamming their chainrings so often? To be fair I'm pretty sure the BCBR or any related event warrant a bash guard. Hell I don't even rock one on my downhill bike nowadays
  • - 1
 Sorry, meant to say DONT warrant a bashguard
  • + 3
 @LOLWTF: it seems your trails suck.
  • + 3
 @LOLWTF: ride more tech
  • - 4
flag LOLWTF (Oct 22, 2018 at 11:28) (Below Threshold)
 @Axxe: yet people fly from all over the world to ride them...

Maybe I should "ride more tech" or you guys should learn to ride the tech... Pretty sure it's the latter Smile
  • + 2
 @LOLWTF: i don't understand that logic...does that automatically make your trails tech? how does that relate to you or your ability to ride those trails? if you're a pro trolling then sure take it, otherwise yeah, ride more tech. ride it better. faster. take gnarlier lines.

there are several ski resorts right by me. people fly from all over the world to ski and ride them. they are not the best skiing, not even in the area.
  • + 1
 @LOLWTF: P.S. you'd love the epic pass.
  • - 4
flag LOLWTF (Oct 22, 2018 at 12:01) (Below Threshold)
 @underhawk: you guys are funny. As soon as someone disagrees he's trolling. Goold old americans. Not sure who needs to work on his skills between the guy needing a bash guard on his xc bike or me lol
  • + 1
 @LOLWTF: Dismissing a need for a bash guard on an XC bike is either trolling or ignorance.

Of course we all can ride without one. I rode triple for years everywhere. Bent many rings. So what. Bash is better.
  • + 6
 @LOLWTF: I don't know about all the other stuff, but to answer your first question, I don't hit my chainring all time, but I'm not a trials rider and I can't hop and pedal kick my way up everything. When I have to "pedal up" or use some other rear wheel lift technique, it's even odds that if the edge is high enough and sharp enough I'll catch my ring. Even trial riders use a bash though, or maybe especially? Hooking your bash is good technique to get up and over when you don't have a good run up or the right leverage/balance.

To answer your other question/implication, could I work on my skills? Yes, I do all the time. Yet another reason I need a bash.

At the end of the day, if you don't want to run a bash, you prefer to walk the tough sections, or are good enough to never need one, then you don't have to run one. It sure would be nice to have the option for those of us who do want or need one. Since I know my abilities and current limitations, I wouldn't get a bike for technical climbing that didn't have one.
  • + 1
 Fork offset: 44 was what being used originally, bike handled like shit, so what changes? Slacker angles? Longer reach? I think the industry is getting this one wrong. I’ve had the chance to ride back to back bikes with varying rakes. It’s easy I tell the 51 from the rest. I’ll go so far to say that 44 feels more “floppy” and unpredictable as the front wheel tends to tuck v. Track in tight corners. I can understand the lower offset on enduro rigs maybe...
  • + 0
 i dont think Levy understands trail.... lower offset = more trail = more flop
  • + 1
 @mm732: nope, you are the one who doesn't understand mechanical trail, any given ha with any given fork offset that produces the same amount of trail, the one with more offset will have more wheelflop, offset determines wheel flop, a zero offset fork, will have zero wheelflop either at 59 deg or 70
  • + 1
 @adespotoskyli: It's just funny that the industry is selling 44 like it's new or better. Neither is true. Wheel flop, interchange that with wheel "tucking" I guess it's personal preference?
  • + 1
 @plume: well the chopper boys tried it to the extremes, as far as some deg negative offset to make those long forks work so there is some base to work with, the slacker you go the less offset you need to counteract the wheelflop, or the tendency of the wheel to steer on it's own from the torque created by the offset and the weight imposed on the front wheel, it gives more mech trail that way but off course there is a point and beyond it won't affect handling in a good way, it resists steering at speed,
  • + 2
 @adespotoskyli: @mm732 is correct. I think you're making a sign convention mistake. Offset is positive when the axle sits forward of the projection of the head tube center axis. For trail, the convention is positive when the tire patch is behind the projection of the head tube axis. Ergo, decrease in offset -> increase in trail.

Wheel flop f = sin ∂ cos ∂ t

Therefore, decrease in offset -> increase in trail -> increase in wheel flop.

Or to give an example:

A Pinarello Dogma 65.2 has a head tube angle of 70.5° and offset of 43 mm has flop of 23 mm
A Cervelo R5 has the same head tube angle of 70.5° and offset of 53 mm and had less wheel flop 20 mm.

Source (article refers to offset as "rake"): rolobikes.com/pdf/rolo-wheel-flop.pdf
  • + 1
 @nattyd: ahh yeap, thanks for the correction, my bad!

Hate to be wrong!
  • + 4
 Would love to hear a comparison between this and the Intense Sniper.
  • + 2
 I have a sniper trail with 130 up front and 120 rear. I like the bike however there is A LOT of flex in the rear end. Also there is some movement in the rear pivot right out of the box where the shock linkage hits the upper triangle. It is torqued to spec but still motion. Intense knows about it but you have to register bike file a claim and go through a bunch of bs to get it. I would like to try the sb100 and maybe unload my sniper.
  • + 3
 I actually owned both this summer, I had a Sniper for a brief period before I got rear ended on the freeway with it on my T2. The Sniper is lighter by quite a bit, mine was pretty close to 23lbs with pedals with only minor part swaps (XC Pro build), I think my SB100 was more like low to mid 25s with a 34SC and a pretty bling custom build. Sniper frame is probably at least a pound lighter. The Sniper was crazy flexy in the rear, and I felt like the geometry was gonna write checks that the frame couldn't cash (especially with a 34SC which I had planned on). I'm pretty certain I would have broken it had it not been in a car accident. The SB100 was way more solid feeling, much more trail bike than the Sniper. It did have issues with creaking though, which I was surprised weren't mentioned here - they did eventually send out revised Switch hardware that seemed to fix the issue, but I sold the bike shortly after due to some other circumstances, mainly lack of time to train and race XC due to having a baby - I couldn't really justify having a second bike that cost that much. The SB100 is a fun bike - really fast for most of the terrain I ride around Park City and an all around weapon for a skilled rider. Probably a perfect Downieville Classic or BC Bike Race bike.
  • + 1
 @pills1975 @Zak-B Thanks for the feedback, fellas. I'm hugely disappointed to hear about the flex, but its much better than discovering it on my own!
  • + 1
 @Zak-B: did you feel the reach was the same on the sb100 as the sniper?
  • + 1
 @pills1975: It's a little shorter size for size, I rode a medium in both at 5'8" tall. Close enough to feel pretty similar.
  • + 0
 The main discontinuity for me is that trail bike position with xc travel. So much weight on the butt with only 100mm in the back isn't a good combo for high speed pedaling. I'd have to put a Syntace Flatforce stem on there and ditch the riser bars.
  • + 4
 The swallow is the bird of true love
  • + 1
 True
  • + 4
 I've got to ask, what the eff is down-country?
  • + 4
 Ask Randy, he will tell you.
  • + 7
 @KxPop It's mostly just a silly, made-up term for an over-forked cross-country bike with a dropper post that's being ridden in a completely irresponsible manner. It's for XC types who aren't in shape and only use the rear brake, like me Smile
  • + 7
 @mikelevy: Or it's for Enduro types looking to do some XC racing but not willing to give up their geometry. I have seriously been in the market for this type of bike for a while. It should also work great on my local not so technical Enduro races. The label you have given it had just provided more fuel for my search. I have actually walked into a LBS and asked to see their down-country bikes.
  • + 2
 @toddmania98: Yes! Exactly.
  • + 1
 Or riding hardtail XC on eduro-feel trail.
  • + 1
 would love to see a review of the specialized epic evo. basically, does throwing a 120mm fork and bigger tires on the same frame as the world cup make it a trail worthy bike, or are you better off buying a camber?
  • + 2
 We actually have one of those in for testing right now. Stay tuned.
  • + 0
 Mike. Ive been looking for a bike that can cover trail duties and allow me to do some racing on it - fun stuff not too serious. Currently have an Evil Following which is great but a heavy frame and a bit too much bike sometimes. Sounds like the Yeti might by perfect? - thoughts
  • + 0
 @mikelevy: what do you think?
  • + 1
 Can someone explain why the reach is shorter and the seat tube angle is slacker compared to modern trail bike geo? For reference, the reach on the SB100 is 28mm shorter and STA is 2.9 degrees slacker compared to the SB130.
  • + 1
 Probably kuz Big Banks Hate Little Banks!!
  • + 2
 Devinci Django is the definition of "Down Country." Fast and nimble, but has serious downhill chops.
  • + 0
 "You ride down here with that?"

-Oh hell yeah! Why not?

"Well it looks like an xc bike?"

-Only while climbing

(1 hour later)

"Hey how the hell are you done already you did the long lap and I did the short? !"

-Less is more...

""Huh what?"

-Nevermind. I'll see you next time!
  • + 1
 Looks almost as good as a Scott Spark RC. A couple pounds heavier, a little steeper HA, and no on-the-fly geometry adjustment but still a similar shock rate.
  • + 3
 !00mm can be ripped hard with a dropper and slack headtube.
  • + 8
 If a hardtail can be ridden hard, a bike with 100mm more travel in the rear surely shouldn't be for more delicate riding, should it?
  • + 3
 Exactly! Smile
  • + 2
 @vinay: If knees can be replaced...Jackson promo video for Trance Advanced 29 does a better job of showing the capability of shorter travel 29", but at half the price for base model it just wouldn't look right on a Porsche. I'd like to see Dennis Enarson test the SB100 to destruction. Tacklingdummy wasn't suggesting 100mm can't be ripped, unless he meant 00!mm We all know you ride a BTR--congratulations. Hardtails are for young people with socialized insurance.
  • + 0
 @ceecee: A hardtail hard on your knees? Never heard that one. I've heard of people who do a lot of seated pedaling and always find themselves in the wrong position at least for part of the ride. And people who do a lot of running on hard soil/tarmac. Those could lead to overuse injuries. But I've never heard of anyone who could attribute a knee injury to a lack of rear suspension travel. Apparently you have. Give me a reference to your sources in your next post and we'll discuss that.

You congrats on your bike too.
  • + 1
 @vinay: 'Hitting' the same jumps I dug nearby on a 130mm fork hardtail vs a 5010 for six months prior, and today my knees and feet ache. Go case a few under similar parameters and aching will be believing.
  • + 1
 @vinay: Lots of hardtails have are built more for trail riding because they are built stout. I doubt you are gonna hammer hard on a 900 gram carbon hardtail frame like a beefy chromoly or aluminum trail hardtail frame. However this rig, is still setup as more of XC-ish rig and the 100mm travel will help protect it.
  • + 1
 @ceecee: I meant 100mm. Typo !00mm. Haha.
  • + 3
 @vinay: You serious or joking? If suspension doesn't take the compression, what does? That's right, your body does (feet, ankles, hips, back and neck).
  • + 1
 @ceecee: social insurance not socialized insurance. socialized insurance isn't a thing.
  • + 1
 @underhawk: yeah, that.
  • + 1
 @ceecee: medince...that's a funny way to spell insurance. yes, it matters.
  • - 1
 @dualsuspensiondave: Did you interpret my first comment differently? I said 100mm of travel allows for more than a hardtail.

@tacklingdummy: This isn't a 900 gram full susser in the article, is it? A hardtail frame the same weight as this full suspension frame can be built just as strong. But I didn't mean to bring strength to the discussion as this wasn't what your initial comment was about. Actually I didn't argue with your comment at all. I just merely meant to say that the steering geometry and low top tube (either with dropper or just with the saddle set low) is going to allow for more technically demanding riding. Geometry determines most, suspension travel comes after that. I just think it is odd that even though we've come to accept a hardtail can be ridden hard, there is this perception that 100mm travel full suspension bikes are very delicate machines. Marathon racers and WC XC racers aren't particularly easy on their gear. And no bike manufacturer wants to see their bike fail when ridden on top level. So no I wouldn't say these XC full suspension bikes are supposed to accept more than a 2.5kg steel hardtail frame, I do think you can do more on then than on a generic 2kg aluminium XC frame.

@ceecee: Yeah, we could argue about that one 'till the cows come home. There are two ways to look at that. If you think casing that much is part of it then yes you're going to need the rear suspension. The other approach would be to step back and practice easier jumps until you're not casing that much anymore. Now in the context of this article, I doubt this bike is built to endure consistent casing that, when ridden on a hardtail, would lead to sore knees and feet.
  • + 2
 Sounds like that longer travel Spez Epic thing. Surprised they didn't use that as a comparison.
  • + 1
 also the Canondale Scalpel SE version and not the normal one
  • + 1
 Cool bike, not sure why slowing it down with those heavy tires. Sometimes I see weird tire choice on yeti, i.e. ardent on 140 travel bikes.
  • + 1
 Love it or otherwise Yeti's rear suspension is some of the best in the game. They may want to look at the mud "guard's" design though lol
  • + 1
 Yeah, seems like the 90-degree turn makes more of a mud “scoop” than a guard. The SB130/150 seem to have the better design.
  • + 2
 Kona Hei Hei CR/DL for $4699 has very similar dimensions and has been rowdy since 2017
  • + 2
 it's true, that was the one bike I was considering VS the SB100... but I'm a glutton for turquoise
  • + 2
 Based on the specs and geo, it seems quite similar to the Tallboy. Would be an interesting comparison.
  • + 2
 Lets not forget what the fine folks at KONA did with the HeiHei DL (120F, 100R) mint bike, the rest came after
  • + 2
 so its about 2 lbs lighter than my sworks epic with a fox 34SC on it which is amazing really.
  • + 2
 So we’re making a new XC bike what kind of tire should we use. Minions!!! Why use anything else?
  • + 2
 I love this bike except I don't ever want to ride anything with higher than a 66 head angle ever again.
  • + 2
 Where’s the 5010 review?
  • + 1
 The new 5010 is such a blast to ride.
  • + 1
 @harryhood: Can confirm! Super fun, easy to double up on stuff. Did you find the rear suspension a little "wooden" sometimes? I couldn't tell if it was me fighting chain growth or just 130mm ramping up.
  • + 2
 Does this mean my 2014 Giant Anthem X 29er is destined to be cool again?
  • + 0
 Who cares what's "cool" ?
  • + 1
 @LOLWTF: Many people...but honestly not me.
  • - 2
 I didn't know ML was an XC racer or indeed that any of the PB readers are likely to be at the font of an XC race where that race winning climbing performance is actually relevant? Quite frankly I think longer travel trail bikes have better traction than a short travel or hardtail bike.
  • + 3
 Mike had a very respectable result in the 2017 BCBR. I would think that climbing performance would be important to everyone invested in XC racing, not just the leader.
  • + 2
 @PNdubRider: Beat me to it! Saw him at BCBR twice -- Mike's no slouch at all.
  • + 3
 Not to mention his "staff rides" was an XC bike...
  • + 1
 @PNdubRider: that's a marathon not an XC event to be precise and one where a trail bike style marathon bike like this one would be perfect I imagine. I was in no way implying ML was a slouch btw.
  • + 1
 @headshot: Beg to differ on the marathon description. BCBR is a multi-day demanding XC race in true SWBC/PNW style.
  • + 2
 Intense Sniper not mentioned as a competitor?
  • + 1
 It is a competitor, but I haven't ridden it so I didn't want to compare the two.
  • + 2
 Wonder how it compares to the intense sniper...
  • + 1
 Flat bar, 60-70mm stem, XC tyres, bike yoke dropper, xtr brakes easily under 11 kg Wink
  • + 1
 Seems like a good bike overall, but I think it will be a hard sell.
  • + 1
 Their sales are way more than they originally thought...
  • + 3
 It looks like a niche bike now, but I don't think it will in a year or two.
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: I walked into a local LBS and Yeti dealer - they had a SB150 on the wall and several of the 5's and 4.5s...asked the owner if he was planning on getting a SB100 in for a demo, he replied "nobody around here wants that kind of bike - they want 160mm big bikes". So I guess I have to travel to CO to attempt to test ride one. I wanted this bike before your review and want it twice as much now.

I'm pretty much done with gravity racing which includes enduros, ride more flattish stuff, and have a good time doing it. If BC natives say it performs going downhill in fkn Squamish, I would imagine it's going to be completely capable for most terrain near me.
  • + 2
 @twozerosix: I was up in your neck of the woods and rode a SB100 from Progression Cycles. Handled Tiger decent enough, I was pleasantly surprised with it!
  • + 2
 @connorjuliusjohnson: thanks for the reco - that's where I'm at riding wise - if the bike isn't a total handful coming down ETS/OTG its fine for my needs. Too old/sensible to be doing Predator any more.
  • + 2
 @twozerosix: Rode ETS to OTG to NOTG I think. Not from the area so not totally positive. I got the sense it would be way too outgunned on Predator though. Rock gardens/real rooty sections were the only "oh shit" moments but still held its own!
  • + 0
 just wonder, why the position of the crank on all "commercial";-) pics is the same?;-)
  • + 1
 Sell it as slope/slalom bike.
  • + 1
 The bro-tude in this review is really irritating.
  • + 7
 Sorry, bro. I'm not like that in person. I don't think.
  • + 0
 Major Dental wholesale supply companies now includes a Yeti bicycle brochure with their shipped orders to dentist.
  • + 1
 Randy for Privateer 2k19.
  • + 1
 Loving these shorter fork offset bikes!
  • + 1
 What’s the maintenance schedule like for the SI system?
  • + 1
 Manual says to shoot up the zerks with grease every 40 hours.
  • - 1
 100 mm of travel does not need this heavy and expensive suspension. Good shock and a Horst link would do. Waste of weight and money.
  • + 1
 Downcountry isn’t that like Enduro?
  • + 5
 Totally, but slower and sketchier.
  • + 1
 Never mind!
  • + 0
 Just like those guys at YETI CYCLES to be thinking outside the box!
  • + 1
 Is it 29+ compatible?
  • + 0
 264 comments for that overpriced piece of plastic...wtf ??
  • - 1
 A 29 totem looks good
  • - 2
 take note of the dirty scratch on the cash-ima Switch Infinity unit
  • - 2
 Yeti Bikes: Making the 100mm suspension that no consumer ever asked for.
  • - 2
 Waiting for new scalpel 2020. Even more down-country
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.289196
Mobile Version of Website