Review: Yoshimura's New Chilao SS Flat Pedals

Apr 1, 2024
by Matt Beer  
photo

Yoshimura dipped their toes into the mountain bike market a couple years ago with their unique two-in-one ENDH stem and the Chilao pedals. They’re back with a new CNC’d component, but instead of expanding the line they’ve refined their flat pedals with the Chilao SS.

On the outside, the pedal is nearly identical to the original Chilaos. Inside though, there’s much more at play - or better yet, no play. “SS” stands for “static spring,” which is the critical part of the new patent-pending internal bearing preload system. The spring eliminates any lateral play between the pedal body and the spindle, no matter how worn out the spinning parts become.
Yoshimura Chilao SS Details
• 6061-T6 aluminum machined in USA
• Patented static spring preloader
• Triple outboard bearings
• 10 removable, 4mm tall pins each side
• Colors: YoshiKote, pewter, black and Ice
• Sizes: 110mm L x 107.25 W - LG (tested), 100mm L x 95.5 W - SM
• Thickness: 14mm
• Weight: 364g (actual)
• Price: $229, ($219 SM) USD
yoshimuracycling.com

The Chilao SS will still be available in two platform sizes and four colors. Price-wise, and like most products these days, the cost has increased from $200 to $229 (size large), but Yoshimura believes that pedals shouldn’t be a disposable item. In fact, they’re backed by a limited lifetime warranty.

photo
The cutaways show the new Chilao SS on top with its patented static spring preload system, V-Ring dust seal and triple cartridge bearing system.


Details

Hopping back to the internals, the static spring is really the bread and butter of the pedal now. The majority of flat pedals feel great until they break in. Then it’s a constant battle to keep them spinning just enough so they don’t bind, but also don’t resonate when you give them a kick.

The SS aims to solve that issue permanently by keeping the bearings under a predefined load which is independent of the spindle lock nut torque. This design also minimizes side load on the triple cartridge bearings, single bushing, and seals if the pedal body is impacted.

Furthermore, the Chilao SS dons a new V-Ring seal that sits nicely in a machined seat, making it fool-proof to remove and reinstall without incident.

The body and end caps are machined from 6061-T6 while the pins are 7075-T6. A proprietary alloy steel is used for the spindle itself and then cerakoted for ultra-longevity. All of those parts are machined, laser etched, and anodized in Chino, California, USA.

Yoshimura Chilao SS
Yoshimura Chilao SS

Dimensions

Like the original Chilao, the SS comes in the same two platform sizes; (110mm L x 107.25 W) for the large and (100mm L x 95.5 W) for the small. They use 10 pins per side whereas the small only holds 7. All M4 pins are the same length at 8mm and machined with a 3mm allen key head which stand a much better chance of staying square, versus a tiny 2mm, dirt-caked grub screw.

Both pedals measure 14mm thick at the leading and trailing edges. Additionally, that new spindle lends to a 3mm wider pedal Q-factor.

Yoshimura Chilao SS
Yoshimura Chilao SS

Price and Weight

With all of the clever workings tucked away, the Chilao SS’s pedal body is the nearly same shape and size, however, Yoshimura whittled away an extra 18g over the original pedal. That brings the size large Chilao SS to an even 360g per set, making them second lightest against the rest in our flat pedal group test last spring, only outdone by 5DEV’s Trail/Enduro.

As for the price, it’s not easy on the wallet. All of those smart intervals may mean extra longevity, but it comes at a steep price of $229 USD ($219 USD - size small platform). Those numbers place them close to the top of the price range from that test, only to be outdone by the Canadian-made, North Shore Billet Daemons.

Included in that price are 5 replacement pins and the limited lifetime warranty that excludes wear items, such as bearings or pins. Replacement bearing kits go for $15 USD.

photo
Yoshimura Chilao SS

Performance

Another unique tidbit on the Chilao design is the angled front row of pedal pins for a claimed enhanced grip. To allow for a thin pedal body underfoot, Yoshimura has opted to cut down that middle bridge as much as possible, but leave the dreaded axle bulge on the inner and outer area over the spindle.

Yoshimura says that this cradles your foot, but I often found that to be a deterrent to my foot staying in place if my foot needed to be repositioned on the trail, particularly in wet conditions. I tend to ride slightly duck footed and with my feet towards the outer edge of the pedal.

When your foot is centered perfectly, there's an admirable grip with a thin, controlled feel. After heaps of time on various flat pedals, I’ll take a taller platform overall provided there is still decent concavity.

It’s worth mentioning that the grip did seem to be a smidge more than the original Chilao. That could be down to the extended Q-factor on the SS, the reworked pins, or a combination of the two.

Yoshimura Chilao SS
Yoshimura Chilao SS

Durability

The Chilaos showed up two months ago which isn’t enough time to judge their seemingly bulletproof design, but so far, they still feel the same as day one. Those slick internal workings have lept the grease looking fresh and the bearings spinning smoothly.

I did give one corner a good blow that resulted in a snapped pedal pin, but thankfully, as designed, that sheared off cleanly. The broken piece wound out cleanly and the new one installed without a hitch.

Yoshimura Chilao SS
photo

Comparison

To decipher what pedals are truly grippy, I’ll often reach for less-tacky shoes. The two main factors that bring together a solid pedal are threaded pins and true concavity.

Along with the Yoshimura Chilao SSs, I’ve spent a solid amount of time on the Wolf Tooth Waveform pedal bodies. Each one offers a decent amount of concavity in the X and Y axis. Similarities could be drawn between the shapes of each, but I don’t believe there’s any copied homework going on here. There’s only so many ways to cut out a block of aluminum.

Hands down, the Chilao SS offers more grip with their threaded pins, but only when your foot is perfectly centered. It comes down to that raised area around the inner and outer axle port on the platform and that’s marginally taller on the Chilaos in respect to the overall concavity.




Pros

+ The ideal pins; threaded for max grip, snap cleanly, and are removable by a sizeable allen key from the protected side
+ Static spring retained low-friction, but not overly free spinning pedals, throughout test period

Cons

- Raised outer edge on end cap requires perfect foot placement to achieve maximum traction
- Quality comes at a higher price




Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesAlthough it's still early to confidently evaluate the long-term durability of Yoshimura's novel Static Spring system on the new Chilao SS, they've evolved an already sound pedal. The grip and control is spot on when your foot is in that ideal groove, but that darn axle bump means there are other pedals out there with a uniform concavity that outshine the Chilao SS by a hair.Matt Beer


Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
361 articles

147 Comments
  • 99 0
 I don't get the April Fools joke on this one
  • 12 0
 Same for me. Every single thing I read today, I am trying to figure out the joke.
  • 59 0
 $230 for pedals. Woof
  • 5 0
 They spelled the name wrong a couple times?
  • 14 0
 @notthatfast: that's every Monday though.
  • 1 10
flag suspended-flesh FL (Apr 1, 2024 at 14:03) (Below Threshold)
 #WHOOSH!
  • 1 0
 @vapidoscar: took me a while, but every article, except this, was literally about a pink bike
  • 16 1
 $230 pedals is the joke.
  • 1 0
 Neither did I....
  • 2 0
 @ridedigrepeat: there it is!!^^^
  • 3 0
 @vapidoscar: It's the price for these flat pedals that's the joke!
  • 1 1
 Guys, there's a spring in a pedal. Ba-dum-tiss.
  • 4 2
 Subtle, but definitely an April Fools joke. The spring pushes on the outer race ... this won't compensate any play. A spring pushing on the axle would not compensate play anyway because the forces from riding are way too high - and if the spring force was high enough, it would cause wear in the radial bearing which is not designed for that.
  • 1 0
 @PhoS: Just wait till pedals are $500… the day will come and sooner than you’d think.
  • 2 1
 @Motivated: I'm stunned PB missed this. Unless there is some extra part that isn't shown clearly, the spring in this pedal does absolutely bugger all...
  • 1 1
 @Motivated: Wow I was slow on the uptake here. This one was for sure too subtle, haha
  • 4 0
 @notthatfast: You just might be overthinkng this, LOL. Yoshimura's real April Fools gag was a bolt-on motoGP style exhaust system that held a hydration fluid bladder and a drinking hose.
  • 3 0
 @suspended-flesh:
Well now I don’t know what to think… halp
  • 3 0
 The spring doesn't touch the axle. Happy April 2th!
  • 1 1
 @YoshimuraCycling: Thats what it looks like in the images, which would mean it can't have any effect on any play that might develop in the bearings. So....what does it do?
  • 1 1
 Other than allow the bearings to drift out of their seats under pressure.
  • 3 2
 @gabiusmaximus: Dudes - I am FAR from an engineer but even I can see that the spring is captured by the outer pedal cap and the outer of the 3 bearings. It keeps any parts wear-slop under control as the pedal ages like fine wine.

“SS” stands for “static spring,” which is the critical part of the new patent-pending internal bearing preload system. The spring eliminates any lateral play between the pedal body and the spindle, no matter how worn out the spinning parts become."
  • 3 1
 @suspended-flesh: You get that the bearings are a press fit in the pedal body right? The same pedal body that the end cap screws into... The distance between the bearing outer races and the pedal body end cap doesnt change no matter how much the bearings or bushings wear. Thats why most pedal designs have the pedal end cap butt up hard against the bearing outer races. If the spring pushed against the pedal body and the inner race of the bearing, then slop would indeed be eliminated, but thats not the case for these pedals. So once again, what does the spring actually achieve other than allowing the bearings to drift out of their seats over time?
  • 18 1
 Something Something deftraps.
  • 1 0
 I love deftraps. But I've destroyed like 10 pins over a couple years on them. Got Dagga's a year ago and the pins are all still perfect.
  • 2 0
 @vzhick: I've got both but prefer deftraps any day
  • 1 0
 Hell yeah deathtraps are by far my all time favorite pedal and they are a quarter the price of these!
  • 1 0
 @vzhick: +1 on the Dagga approval, mine are 3 years old and I just pull them apart once a season to regrease. Haven't had to replace anything and 0 play
  • 16 3
 Nice to see an actual innovation in pedals, even if it's not exactly earth shattering. The constant stream of new, premium priced machined goodies like pedals and stems and seat clamps in the MTB world tells you how much fat is still left out there, and I think Yoshi is the perfect example of a company seeing that and milking it... at least these have a cool bearing preload mechanism.
  • 6 2
 Is creating a problem to solve really ‘innovation’

A quality pedal has no such issue with adjusting ‘preload’ - stuff like wolf tooth, Pembree, etc

Most issues with pedals having a loose fee are bush wear, not ‘preload’.
  • 15 1
 *sees price for flat pedals, skips article*
  • 4 0
 And here I am running some Xpedo spry that came on a bike in 2014. Missing ONE PIN, never messed with anything on them, just ride.
  • 1 0
 @superfrodaddy: I have know a couple people with those and they have all had issues. But yeah the whole pedal thing is getting a bit silly.
  • 2 1
 @superfrodaddy: I can't believe you've been running the softest magnesium pedals on earth for ten years without bashing pins out of them. I only use those for gravel.
  • 1 0
 @superfrodaddy: Spry user here to. Did damage 2 pins on some rocks,easily removed and bolt on new ones that I had laying around.
Three bearings each side,no bushings,270 grams.
  • 3 0
 @superfrodaddy: yeah, but you have to keep explaining that your pedal doesn't mean what it looks like it means......ex - pedo
  • 10 0
 Chilao owner here, yet it took 2 Sedona MTB festivals and riding the sales guys Yeti with them on to convince me to buy em. Here’s my experience with both sizes.
- The best unmentioned feature is that they do not roll under your feet when climbing tech. Seriously , those who know what I’m talking about know how bad that can be. The Chilao for some reason will not roll underfoot during climbs no matter how hard you push even if you have your foot in the wrong spot. Doesn’t make sense but it is absolutely repeatable.
-if you want the “most grippy pedal ” look elsewhere. For me I need to easily reposition my feet while riding gnarly stuff. Comparison, Kona wah was II is way too grippy where I can feel like I’m stuck with my foot crooked and can’t reposition. Chilao has just enough grip to feel confident but will allow me to float or reposition at will.
- pins shear off on impact. The pins hold up well, I’ve only had to replace a few over 2 years but they shear vs bend. Easy to replace and the pedal threads are not damaged.
- expensive, yes but cheaper than replacing plastic pedals (Chester’s, one ups) every few months because they start missing pieces after a few rides….. I went through 5 set of damaged pedals in a year before ponying up for chilaos. Do the math.
So far the Canfield crampon is my second favorite to the Chilao. The Crampon has the odd bump you can feel if you don’t have thick soled riding shoes, but is crazy thin, you don’t think about the bump once you’re really riding. Both have held up to extreme abuse and refuse to roll while climbing , give grip while allowing me to reposition without fear but the Chilao feels the best underfoot and goes pretty far between service intervals.
But em , you won’t regret it if you want a thin, medium grippy pedal that won’t roll under your foot.
And yes, I would love another set of chilaos for the endorsement and testing on my enduro race bike this fall!
  • 14 0
 Thanks for the rad testimony! The positive experience riding a mountain bike, or any bike for that matter, is what we are after. We know our pedal isn't for everyone. Lots of different ideas out there to be sure. The Chilao is for riders like you that can discern the difference. You've had a great experience on them and that stokes us! Hit us up, we would love to get you on the new SS.
  • 3 0
 @YoshimuraCycling: Love my Chilao pedals! I've used them for 2 seasons and have roughly 700-800 miles on them riding rocky New England Singletrack and they still spin freely, have no play, etc. I've snapped 2 pins off of my pedals and my wife has snapped one off of her set of Chilaos; all 3 were easy replacements, threaded right out. I know these pedals aren't cheap but, like Oldschool, i'd gone through 4 sets of lesser expensive pedals over a 6 year period and spent less than the combined totals of those on my Chilaos and I see no sign of them giving up on me and they just keep taking the hits. Some people like to spend a ton of money on cosmetic changes to their bikes (which is great for them) but I prefer to spend more money (relative to the average) on functional things, like points of contact and for my feet/riding style/terrain, these work very well. Also, Collin @ Yoshimura was great to work with as well!
  • 1 0
 @VTMB: Thanks for the real life story! We will still support the original Chilao for the foreseeable future if you need anything. When it's time to jump on some SS models drop us a line, we will take care of ya!
  • 2 0
 I, too, saw the light while at the Sedona MTB festival 2022! These Yoshi pedals changed my riding style and inspire confidence in the gnar! I have them on all my bikes!
  • 1 0
 @sickboy13: Love it! Glad we could help!
  • 2 0
 How are you possibly destroying OneUp plastic pedals that fast? I have sets that a over 3 years old and they have no problems at all.
  • 6 0
 I always loved machined, flat pedals but the prices have gotten out of control and I've been really happy with a bunch (almost all?) of the composites at a sizeable price discount. Even for DH I'm not convinced the metal ones are more durable where it seems the most likely thing is to bend or shear off a pin.
  • 1 0
 Coming from someone that grinds their Oneup composites against rocks to keep my balance in some slick rock features, I couldn't fathom trashing fancy AL pedals in those situations.
  • 2 0
 All pedals break, which is why I don't see the point in spending more than 60 bucks on a pair. Like in past 3 years I went through 3 pairs of one up plastics (2x broken body, 1x bent axle, always left side), and one pair of union pedals (bent axle). And it still ended up being cheaper than this pair of pedals (which would probably also break).
  • 5 0
 The triple bearing thing is nice. Even two would be nice. Speaking as someone who has had a pedal get ejected off the spindle because the little bearing failed - once it goes, there's nothing holding the pedal on. Trying to ride on the bare spindle sucks....
  • 15 0
 Ah, a fellow Race Face Atlas enthusiast I see!
  • 4 0
 Funny you say that, we played around with the idea of 2 larger ,even 3-4 smaller bearings in a row. Then the spring idea came to mind and totally sealed the deal. 3 quality bearings in a side-load free configuration can do the job better than slamming a pedal full of bearings, ha!. Plus lock it torque is 8nm, they're there to stay!
  • 4 0
 I really like the increasingly larger selection of pedals with M4 pins that allow more bike Lego of different pins to different pedal bodies. I have original chilaos with chromag Dagga pins in the front and rear 3 pin positions. Durability is excellent and grip is insane.
  • 6 0
 Dialed! Hey I don't know how long you've had the pedals but as the article says too, we updated the pins, they're seriously way better. Custom made fastener instead of "off the shelf" . Shoot me and email "contact" on the site. I'd be stoked to get you some of the new pins.
Even if they don't work you'll have some spares.
Cheers!
  • 2 0
 @collintimmermans: When were the pins updated?

I have a pair I got at the Sea Otter two years ago and they ended up being relegated to the DJ bike because I felt like the pins didn’t offer enough grip for DH or Enduro use.
  • 1 0
 @Nobble: swing by, we'll get you set up!!!!
  • 1 0
 @Nobble: about june last year, the length is about .5mm longer but the difference is insane. we did a soft launch because it was one color at a time. all orders and pedals have these pins as of Feb this year, sick!!!
  • 6 1
 Why try to create a product and sell 1,000 units a month when you can price it so that you only need to sell 12 a month to pay the bills.
  • 16 0
 The exhaust systems pay the bills, we're just having fun!!
(I'm literally building pedals as type this)
  • 3 0
 Aluminum pins are not the way. They shear off at the mere sight of east coast tech gnar. Replaced all of the pins with steel units within a month. Otherwise not bad. Needed a rebuild after one year which seems early, but also easy to rebuild. Tenet Omens seem like the way. Grippiest I’ve ridden. Loctite those pins before use. Interested to see how the Omens hold up.
  • 2 0
 @n8shearer: I run the original Tenet Occult as my winter pedals since they were released. Still haven’t bothered with a rebuild. In that same time frame I killed a set of DMR Vault and Deity Deftrap. The Tenet has been legit for me.
  • 4 1
 I genuinely don't know how people ride flats. I know my personal technique is not the best, but between losing a foot up tech climbs, or having a foot blown off going mach jesus on a DH trail I finally decided enough was enough. Clips are by far the only way to go, for me.
  • 10 0
 If you learn to ride flat pedals, you’ll be a better rider for it.
  • 6 0
 Or I could buy 4 sets of deftraps
  • 2 0
 Yeah. I definitely view flat pedals as wear items.
  • 3 0
 Get me a set too!!
  • 3 0
 just like ol times "is this april fools joke?" haha love it, happy trails yo!

couple notes if anyone sees this.
pins have deep 3mm head, not 2.5
price clarity, 229lg/219sm
lifetime warranty Smile
  • 3 0
 oh one more thing, is a i-glide Igus bushing, not a DU bushing Smile
  • 4 0
 @collintimmermans: I'm not sure you can expect details like this to be picked up when things like the spelling of the manufacturer get overlooked.
  • 3 0
 @farkinoath: that's why I left this comment ha! Too much ham and chocolate on Easter you never know.
  • 3 0
 I like what Yoshimura is bringing to the party. I'm always down to support USA made parts and these look worthy. With a lifetime warranty, look like they are standing behind the product. Send me a set Yoshi
  • 2 0
 Interesting. Yoshimura could make an 'upgrade' for the old design pedals, either with a new spindle, or a thinner 'inside' roller brg to make it a floating brg. Might need a different spring. Would be interesting to see if they do this to maintain some loyal fans... I would expect this if I was a Gen1 customer.
  • 2 0
 thankfully the gen 1 pedal was never inferior, and we'll continue to rebuild and maintain them, its hard sometimes launching something "new" without stepping on your past products (if that makes sense)
always staying in touch with people (some dont even have the pedals) at events and online, its so rad meeting people and getting feedback, keeping people stoked is the goal!
  • 1 0
 @collintimmermans: To be honest that's a nothing answer. So I assume you wouldn't consider this.
  • 4 1
 Im curious, what part of your foot are putting on your pedal to notice a bearing bulge at the crank? Im not sure I understand why thats a concern, or even a "dreaded" issue?
  • 2 1
 For me, that is automatic no go. I won't buy pedals with a bearing bulge. I would rather have a thicker pedal to avoid that.
  • 3 2
 @93EXCivic: Why is that?
you get a thinner pedal, and larger bearing.
I'm not sure I understand, help me out here
  • 3 0
 With the shape of my foot and a stiff shoe the bulge is right at the back of the ball of my foot, if I get too far back with my weight I lose 90% of my traction instantly. If I'm wearing a softer soled shoe it isnt an issue, but the shoes usually have less protection and support.

My 510 freerider pros have zero traction on one up and crankbrothers composite. On deftraps im basically glued to the pedals.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: Are we talking about an underfoot bulge, or the bearing bulge at the crank?
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: im talking more about the axle bulge. My foot does ride right up against the cranks though so I cant imagine I wouldn't feel that. I did misunderstand and answer a question that wasn't asked.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: All good,
just curious. I've had several people tell me that pedals such as the OneUp with the inside bearing bulge is a no go. I've always wondered, how that affects anyone, it might be that more people misunderstand.
So you prefer a flat or concave shape to a convex shape,

How does the shape of your foot, while wearing a stiff soled shoe have an effect?
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: i have wide feet so I cant really get away with throwing my foot just anywhere on a pedal and being comfortable. The shape of your foot combined with shoe selection are really the 2 biggest factors in selecting a pedal.
If I'm doing a more commuter ride I wear normal freeriders and am not super picky about my pedal. If I'm riding mtb somewhere I might have to do some bailing or am just on and off the bike a ton I go with freerider pros and deftraps. Usually I ride clipped in for mtb though due to being so picky about pedal/shoe comfort.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: but the wide foot, when stuffed into the shoe doesnt really play a factor does it, like its the shoe at that point, regardless of how wide or narrow your foot is?
not trolling, just trying to learn. I find fit issues interesting, especially when it comes to pedals. There always seems to be very adamant opinions about it, and Im always a bit curious from where they come from.

If I thought about it critically, most feet arent dead flat, not even close, most have a fairly pronounced arch, which is supported in our shoes to some degree. youd think, that unless you had the "ball" of your foot on the pedal, a slightly convex shape should provide more traction, not less.

I have "flatter" feet than most, and tend to ride with my foot more forward on my pedals (protecting weak ankles, using bone structure for support, rather than muscles and ligaments) so I seem to get along with most pedals. the concave shape would suggest a foot position thats further back on the pedals for other people....

I always assumed youd hit your ankle bone on the cranks before the inboard bearing would cause any issues.
  • 3 0
 @onawalk: i ride with the ball of my foot right up against cranks, if I look down i see no pedal, only axle. If I widen my stance ill have the edge of the pedal push between my 2nd and 3rd metatarsal. My ankle bone is nowhere near the cranks unless I get my food twisted awkwardly.

This is one of those things where if it doesn't matter to you, good for you. Enjoy not being able to tell the difference, but some people it is night and day.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: Interesting,
so you ride with the ball of your foot over the axle, similar to how a clipped in pedal would be set up for instance. That would make sense as to why youd want a concave pedal, and the bearing bulge might interfere. Have you tried a pedal similar to OneUp, that has the bearing bulge at the crank?
  • 3 0
 I hope yoshimura gets into the MTB parts game. they got some seriously bling cool stuff. Would love to run some Yoshimura cranks and cockpit
  • 5 0
 We are working on it!
  • 1 0
 I’m gonna assume Yoshimura is fooling many today
The “SS” = static spring, static means “does not move”
An upgrade and upcharge for a spring that doesn’t move?
I did see in the demo vid the pedal body seemed to move when smashed into the ground ??
  • 5 0
 The spring is 'static' not 'dynamic' just meaning it doesn't create any spinning friction. Kind of like your cranks; how they have the threaded bearing pre loader on one side... Or a Chris king or onyx (my favorite) hub. It doesn't drag on anything-just spinds along with the crank, (or fixed to the axle like the hubs) Except this is a spring, so you don't need to adjust it... Ever... Any wear is taken up as the pedal is used for its life. Just need to do your 'oil changes'.. But the spring also maintains a 'neutral' point so there's no play in the pedal ever.. Kind of a two-in-one deal!
Hope that brings some clarity... Cheers,
  • 1 0
 @collintimmermans: so the problem they are attempting to solve is not ever having to tighten your pedal's main axle nut? Is that correct?

If that is correct why would a spring be best for countering the outboard directional forces that the bearings put on the nut?
I'm guessing if the force on the nut is great enough that is begins to loosen, that force will great enough to compress the spring, right? or is there something I'm missing?
  • 4 0
 I've got yoshi exhausts on my RC51, it's held together with little springs too
  • 3 0
 You owe me dinner, that was so hilarious my food was ejected.
  • 2 0
 Love that bike
  • 1 0
 For those who are looking for lightweight and proved to be reliable flat pedals:
I recently updated and modified DMR V12 [Mg]. Using a dremel removed remaining paint and casting imperfections.
Replaced with 8mm stainless pins. And got titanium axles with TiN coat on sale.
I bought these pedals almost 6 years ago (on sale). So 54eur for the Mg pedals and 26eur for the Ti axles - 80eur total!
Now I call them V13 !Big Grin
Any guesses how much they weight now?
  • 1 0
 Or you could get a pair of Race Face Chesters and several months' supply of beer.

Who are these riders who are so one with the trail that they can divert precious concentration away from inadvertently starring in "Friday Fails" to worry about pedal slop? Not I.
  • 1 0
 I could never afford a Yoshimura pipe on my old motorcycle but I do like their designs and especially these pedals. My only comment is I wish they would have kept both the older style and new style as an upgrade. I feel once we hit $200 pedals, it's very hard to sell anything beyond this range as all of the other pedals fall under $200. I stalled buying these as the orange pins where out of stock and now the price increase, might as wait for the limited edition colorways.
  • 4 0
 The number 1 google result for "Yoshimua" is this article.
  • 4 1
 Dakota Norton is running these for the 2024 World Cup DH - the stack attack is going flat!
  • 2 0
 That bulge in the middle of the pedal is a massive NO from me. Deity makes pedals that don't have this, and it feels incredible on your feet.
  • 2 0
 If I want quality US made parts I would buy these no doubt.
For those not wanting to spend much get the TrailOne composite pedals for $50, great people and great product.
  • 1 0
 So are the three cartridge bearings are an interference or clearance fit? How much force does it take to move the pedal laterally? Do those bearing bores wallow out over time as the pedals moves laterally over and over?
  • 3 0
 Is it Yoshimua or Yoshimura? Asking for a friend...
  • 3 0
 Flat pedals rule. All jokes aside.
  • 1 0
 I like the four mid-support pins. I am missing that in my DMR Vault Lacon. Feels scooped out on the thin soled Leatt flat pedal shoes.
  • 3 0
 Love me a good cutaway.
  • 2 0
 I had the hacksaw for an hour on that one, nice and slow nice and careful...
  • 3 1
 BRING BACK THE PINK. ITS STILL THE FIRST
  • 2 0
 CrankBrothers could learn a thing or two here!
  • 5 0
 My crankbrothers cut themselves away.
  • 2 0
 If grippy isn't in the pros then I'm not paying for those
  • 3 1
 The Pro's say they're grippy... Does that count?
  • 2 2
 While I'm sure they're great, I can almost get 2 pairs of One Up alloys in different colors for the same price. Thanks, but no thanks.
  • 5 0
 Well, one is Made in Taiwan, one is Made in Chin....o.

Also, Pops Yoshimura was a true Superbike tuning legend. One the other hand I ride plastic pedals. Unless they are on special at the Sea Otter....

www.yoshimura-rd.com/blogs/yoshimura-history/yoshimura-history-11-1976-1977-the-dawn-of-yoshimura-suzuki
  • 2 0
 @suspended-flesh: And Chino is Spanish for Chinese. Maybe I need to go verify this factory actually exists (I live near Chino).
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: Yeah fun coincidence. It's been Yoshimura's moto engineering shop for decades at the same address. The MTB division is his grandson yo
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: come say hi we'll give you a tour dude! Haha
  • 1 0
 Well if you change your mind, 1 set for a lifetime. Gotcha covered!
  • 1 0
 @collintimmermans: Are y'all going to the Sea Otter later this month?
  • 2 0
 @suspended-flesh: heck yes we are! So excited! Wyn will be there, so if you can't find us, just listen for us laughing.
  • 1 0
 @collintimmermans: Rad - see you there! WynTV on deck.....
  • 1 1
 OneUp Alloys suck because they have no concavity.
  • 2 0
 @suspended-flesh: yeah dude!! Maybe we'll get you that "special at sea otter" you mentioned.. Ha ha
  • 1 2
 @xciscool: suck this
  • 2 0
 am I wrong asuming April fools' move was Henry's idea?
  • 3 1
 Nothing beats Deity T-Macs.
  • 1 0
 Yes sir!
  • 2 0
 They look awesome. I just wish they were flat.
  • 4 0
 We tried making it 'flat like a pancake' thing. It didn't work for us unfortunately. Settled on French toast
  • 3 0
 @collintimmermans: i may still give them a go at some point because they look amazing and i love French toast, and the fact they can be rebuilt and easily serviced. I don’t get along well with the outside concave on pedals that have it but i won’t know till i try. Maybe the increased Q factor will help.
  • 2 0
 @Klimbnbike: it wouldn't be right of me to say "worlds best French toast" but its definitely delicious, homemade, and with 100% real maple syrup, and we dont cook it in grease to make it more appealing. and you don't have to pay extra for an orange juice or a side of sausage links (lifetime warranty).
hahaha
  • 1 1
 I really tried to love my Yoshimuras, but they just weren’t grippy enough. 5dev pedals blew them out of the water. In terms of grip and price…
  • 1 1
 PNWs are really good, wanna try the 5devs too
  • 1 0
 "but also don’t resonate when you give them a kick"

What? Kick how? Resonate?
  • 1 0
 basically pedals can "overspin" or make that chattery noise when riding/ loading your bike/ stomping the mud out of your pedal etc etc. just doesn't feel solid. thats eliminated now Smile
  • 1 0
 @collintimmermans: When riding? How are they "overspinning" when you're standing on them? Loading your bike? Like on the car or truck? Why are you kicking them then? And what does it matter what noise a pedal makes in that situation?
  • 2 0
 So... This wasn't an April Fools' joke?
  • 1 4
 I think I’m just weird. Because I find a non symmetrical pedal off putting. Maybe that’s why I like the Tenet and Sensus pedal so much more. Well outside of performance. It really shouldn’t matter since 80% of the time the pedal is covered by your foot.
  • 2 0
 Offset of parallelogram pedals allow for some deflection in the case of a pedal strike softening the blow. My one gripe about the Tenets.
  • 1 0
 @n8shearer: thats also my gripe with alloy pedals, when they hit a rock they grab HARD. I'd rather break a pedal than go otb.
  • 2 1
 No industry discount, no thanks.
  • 3 3
 "Quality comes at a higher price"

No it don't. Quality comes in at about half that. Too much tech toos manies pennies
  • 2 2
 Made In Chino, sounds like april's fool.
  • 2 0
 Chino is a city in the western end of San Bernardino County, California, United States, with Los Angeles County to its west and Orange County to its south in the Southern California region.







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