Reynolds R27.5 AM Wheels - Review

Jan 30, 2015
by Richard Cunningham  




Reynolds Cycling has made a few headlines with its elite-level carbon fiber wheelsets and expectedly so, as it was one of the pioneer wheel-makers in that field. This review, however, celebrates Reynolds' commitment to the more affordable end of the spectrum, with its $625 R27.5 All-Mountain wheelset, based upon its 23-millimeter inside width tubeless aluminum rim that fits, as you may have guessed, 27.5-inch tires. R27.5 AM wheels are designed, tested and trail-proven in and around Reynolds' US factory near Salt Lake City, Utah, and then shifted to Asia, where they are manufactured in a factory which they own and operate there. Weight for the complete wheelset is 1755 grams.



Details:

• Purpose: Trail/all-mountain
• Rim construction:19mm deep, tubeless aluminum profile, pinned and pressed joint
• Width: External: 29mm, internal: 23mm
• Spokes: 1.8 x 2.0mm double-butted stainless, black
• Spoke Pattern: 28, three-cross, front and rear
• Nipples: External 2.0 alloy - black
• Hub: Reynolds, straight-pull flanges, six-bolt rotor interface
• Freehub capability: Shimano or SRAM ten-speed, SRAM 11-speed optional
• Axle options: QR or 142 x 12mm through-axle rear. QR and either 15mm or 20mm through-axle front.
• Included: All stated axle endcap options and quick release skewers. Pre-taped rims and tubeless valve stems.
• Weight: 1755g (set, depends upon axle configurations)
• MSRP: $625
• Contact: Reynolds Cycling


Reynolds R27.5 Wheelset 2014


Construction

Reynolds builds the R27.5 AM wheels conservatively, with 28 butted stainless steel spokes, laced three-cross on both ends, and with straight-pull-type hubs that, reportedly, allow for higher spoke tension and a measure of longevity. What makes R27.5 AM wheels most attractive, however, is that the axles can be easily configured for quick release, or any number of through-axle configurations - and all the bits are included with the wheelset purchase. The front hub employs large-diameter bearings and its press-in endcaps can be pulled out and reconfigured in seconds without tools. The rear hub requires a small amount of threading, but we switched from the stock SRAM/Shimano ten-speed freehub, to an eleven-speed SRAM XD driver in about seven minutes. (XD drivers are an option, not included in the comprehensive axle kit that is shipped with the wheels).

Reynolds R27.5 Wheelset 2014
Reynolds pre-tapes the wheels and includes tubeless valve stems in the accessory kit.
Reynolds R27.5 Wheelset 2014
Large-diameter stainless steel bearings in the front hub allow it to accept 20-millimeter axles.

Reynolds inverts the conventional freehub ratchet mechanism, preferring to put the engagement spline on the inside of the freehub body and the pawls on the outside of the circle, nested beneath the drive-side hub flange. There are 30 points of engagement and that divides out to 12 degrees between clicks, which is average for most wheels sold today. The freehub spline is aluminum and, as mentioned earlier, Reynolds sells an XD driver kit for those who may need to upgrade their wheels to eleven-speed SRAM cassettes down the road.

Measuring 23-millimeters inside and 28.5 millimeters outside the flanges, the R27.5 AM rims are sufficiently wide to provide support for tires in the 2.35-inch realm, but a bit dated in light of the present wider-is-better trend among all-mountain riders. There are no eyelets to reinforce the rims and the joints are pinned and pressed together instead of being welded and ground smooth. Experience, however, shows that aluminum wheels in the 1700-gram range can do fine without either feature as long as the rims are designed well. We noted that Reynolds designed the rim flanges to sit very low, which reportedly adds lateral stability to the tire.

Reynolds R27.5 Wheelset 2014
Reynolds reverses the classic freehub ratchet mech. The engagement spline is fixed to the cassette body.

Reynolds R27.5 Wheelset 2014
The Reynolds straight-pull rear hub uses a high/low flange design. Replacement spokes should be readily available.


Trail Report

Testing the Reynolds R27.5 AM wheels began as a necessity. We needed wheels to fit bike in our stable with a Fox 36 fork and the Reynolds' front hubs were the only hoops we had that could be switched out from 15 to 20-millimeter axles. So the aluminum hoops were pressed into service on a bike with over 180 millimeters of travel and an appetite for straight-lining rock gardens and other features that riders aboard lesser machines would seek to avoid. Once we learned how simple it was to pull the endcaps from the front hub, we also employed the wheels for tire testing, which provided additional opportunities for us to break or bend them.

Fitted with tires from three brands and in sizes from 2.25 to 2.35 inches, the Reynolds rims only gave us trouble with tubeless installations if the tire beads were severely bent or folded. In such cases (two times), we managed to air the tires up with a high-volume floor pump by fussing with the beads to coax them to seal while pumping furiously. Once seated, however, the tires all locked onto the rim flanges and we did not experience a single burp or tubeless malfunction throughout testing.

Reporting on the handling and performance aspects of the wheels is normally where we would complain that 1700-gram aluminum wheels are slow to accelerate and easy to ding in the boulders, but when mounted to a mini DH machine, they actually felt lightweight when compared to the heavier wheels and two-ply tires they replaced. On a more conventional all-mountain bike, the Reynolds wheels accelerated briskly enough to forget they were there and the two primary riders both remarked that their feel in the corners was on par with some of the wider all-mountain wheelsets we have been riding this winter which cost over three times more. That said, they are not going to trick anyone who has been riding lightweight carbon wheels. Reynolds wisely chose durability over "brisk acceleration" and put enough aluminum into the R27.5's to keep them alive for a while.

Reynolds R27.5 Wheel 2014


Issues

Each time we review a Reynolds wheel we receive a handful of negative comments about the reliability of the hubs, so in this test, we kept an eye on them for any hints of weakness. Nothing to report, The bearings look and run as new, and while the freehub ratchet did not have the whizzing sounds and instant engagement of a premium wheelset like an Industry Nine, it zips along as well today as it did months ago when we pulled the rear wheel out of the box. Same goes for the alignment. While I was writing this review I checked for even tension and runout. Tension was higher than I expected and while the rear wheel had a tiny bit of side play (run-out) it wasn't enough to warrant fussing with a spoke wrench. I'd say that our only beefs with the R27.5 AM wheels were that we had to wrestle with two tires to mount them tubeless, and that the rims are the old-school, 23-millimeter width.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesReynolds produced a good looking, rugged wheelset that could be a great upgrade for a rider who needs a do-it-all pair of hoops with an affordable price tag. While there are a number of choices in the $625 range, Reynolds offers convincing warranty and crash protection options that extend the value of its R27.5 AM wheel well beyond the sticker price. Pinkbike test riders are admittedly spoiled by riding wheels that cost more than many pay for their bikes, so when a value-priced wheelset catches our attention - especially one that looks as sharp as the R27.5 AM - we are happy to report on it. I thought that they would be toast in a couple of months, but it appears that our R27.5 AM wheels will be happily assisting us to test tires through 2015. - RC


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94 Comments

  • + 39
 The industry moves so fast when 23mm wide rims are no considered old-school.
  • + 3
 If 23mm is so old school, then why continue to test with them in 2015? Why not use the multitude of wide rims that I'm sure you have?
  • + 1
 They test them because the manufacturers still have aluminum stock of that width left or they haven't changed their tooling.
For example;
Many companies have stop producing 26" bikes exept for their low end bikes, where do you think all of that overstock goes?
  • + 22
 23MM is not terribly narrow even today. This is getting a bit ridiculous now. 25mm is great for 2.35-25 rubber sure but what about an actual trail or xc bike? These wide rims pull 2.25 tires too wide and squares them excessively. I dunno I think there is a place for 23mm, maybe not 19, 21 like mavic continues to use but 23 isn't bad imo.
  • + 10
 Darkstar63 is correct: 23mm width rims are proven performers and still the OEM spec on most production trail bikes. It may make sense for riders with more than one bike in their stable to keep things consistent so they can exchange wheels and enjoy similar performance. Also, most tires are designed around similar width rims. Wide rim users will also have to shop for compatible tires until the rubber folks catch up with the trend.
  • + 12
 I have some niggle with this review Richard...

Review stated these wheels roll slow, but I wonder how much of that is down to 180mm fork and bike?
Also PB reviews is pretty inconsistent. I seen reviews on pb calling 1800g light vs this one calling 1700 heavy.
Lastly the reviews doesn't seem retaliative to their market. Comparing carbon wheels 3-5x the price is hardly relevant, what of similar wheels on the market?

Also agree on the point of tire makers needs to catch up. Any rim profile with 30mm+ inner width causes a square profile to the tire. Of note is this actually reduces grip on hard bank/leans as the side nobs are no longer on the side, causing wash out vs something like a 23mm rim. (Of course there is other benefits such as higher volume lower pressure, more grip etc and depending on the rider, might out weight the square tire profile problem)
  • + 2
 He explains the relativity of 1700 gram wheels in the review. I concur, I have a of wheels that weighs similarly and have run them both on my trail and gravity bikes. On my trail bike they feel sluggish when swapped in for my lighter set and on the DH bike they feel featherweight. It's all relative.... depends on what bikes you are talking and what wheels.
  • + 2
 I run a bike shop and have the chance to ride a lot of different wheel sets lately and I can easily say mavic enduro maxx with a charge 2.4 front and minion dhr 2 2.3 rear is by far my favorite wheel set, I'd say enve is a distant second and considering price Id stick with mavic for sure
  • + 1
 Not to mention spoke strength is far superior
  • + 1
 @twocircles I have had excellent luck with Mavic rims and wheel sets. I still run Crossmax ST's (19mm inner width) on my trail bike from time to time. With a 2.4 Highroller II in front, Ardent 2.25 in back tire profiles are good and its stiff light reliable wheel set. I have tried to run 2.5's and they roll off in the back and are too round. I have to admit wider than that is ideal. I have some Stan's on Hope's I like better for aggressive riding but I'm not ready to stop riding the ST's.
  • + 11
 I like how you don't really seem to care that the hub had play in it after only a few months of riding. That usually means an out of spec hub manufacturing situation. You also don't mind that once someone bangs up the rim they're not gonna find very many 28 hole options at a shop to replace it with. No big deal. Just covering up the sham that is system wheels.
  • + 14
 I'll also mention that you failed to mention tbe alloy nipples with no eyelets situation. Which means you aren't really paying any attention to anything that matters with wheels at all. The after purchase serviceability.
The manufacturer uses alloy nipples to save weight.
If you've ever trued a wheel with alloy nipples and no rim eyelets you'll know its a f*cking nightmare and needs to be a ruled out practice of the system wheel world.
All to save 20 grams or whatever the hell useless amount of weight.
You don't have to be a hack to ruin alloy nipples in a wheel without eyelets. You just have to try trueing your wheel. Have you ever had to replace a whole wheels worth of alloy nipples because they're all rounded off?
Maybe you haven't.
Maybe you don't ride hard enough to be reviewing bike parts for people?
Or maybe you think 80 percent of the world doesn't ride hard enough or look closely enough at what they've bougnt to know any better?
And the bike companies are never going to change unless people like you Richard, stand up for the bike buying public that just want their bike to last longer.
Help us make the bike parts we buy better Richard.
Help us by speaking up about things that the industry just wants you to glaze over like it's not a problem.
  • + 1
 Had these wheels since last fall (replacing warped/dented wtb st's) and find them much as RC described. Did lose some spoke tension in rear over time - as I''m in the "non-wheel building" crowd of (apparent) ignoramuses, took em to Gravy and they came back perfect, trued and ready. Someday I'll learn more better...
  • + 4
 I'm not saying that you can't have good luck with these wheels. I'm glad you did. But it likely means you've been comparably nice to them. What I'm saying is that the journalists need to be more detail oriented. They think they're just low end wheels and shouldn't be scrutinized that hard. They're still close to a grand. See how much fun your mechanic has trueing them in a year or two when the nipples have nearly seized to the rim and deform as soon as you put a spoke key on them. All to save 30 grams and make their wheel look better by spec.
  • + 1
 Another one of those "speaking out of both sides of his mouth" reviews.
  • + 3
 No play XCri, and still running smooth. I PM'ed you with direct answers to your other questions.
  • + 1
 Alloy nipple are only an issue on badly build wheels. The only real long term issue you can have is nipple/spoke fretting, which has nothing to do with eyelet.
It can be avoided by using good lubricant at build time, and not using threadlock like some do.
Given that, I never rounded a nipple when truing full alloy wheel, even when nipple were badly stuck (just need to unwind nipple completely, re-lube thread/hole with linseed oil and voila). Using good spoke wrench helps a lot.
  • + 1
 Oh My mistake. The article does say the rear wheel had a bit of side play. But reading again that would appear to be your way of explaining that it was slightly out of true.
  • + 1
 XCri^^^ Good point. I figured that the spoke wrench mention would eliminate confusion, but... Fixed
  • + 16
 Man the trolls...! Unless you are spending closer or over a grand there is nothing substantially wider than 23mm on the market right now. To the Easton Haven carbon example.. they are 21mm weights 100g less for 3x the price. Spank's wheelset are all heavier and or narrower. Industry Nine is only wheel set that is slightly wider at the same weight BUT with 2x the msrp of $1200! Race Face for slightly less but much heavier... these are just some examples. Not only that Reynolds throws in all the axle configurations(5x sets of adapters) along with your wheel set. They are doing the MTB world a service by providing these wheel set.

So some of you needs to stop trolling...
  • + 10
 Agreeing with you on the trolls but...Specialized Fatty's are 29mm internal and cost $500-$600 for a pair at your local shop.

www.specialized.com/us/en/ftb/wheels/roval-mtb-all-mountain/roval-traverse-650b
  • - 14
flag immacaroni (Jan 30, 2015 at 13:14) (Below Threshold)
 but specialized wheels are garbage just like the rest of the company.
  • + 1
 I'm just awaiting the delivery of a Stumpjumper with those wheels, albeit 29" ones. I'm actually a bit worried it'll be limiting the tires that I can use due to causing a square profile....
  • + 2
 It looks like a great wheelset. Velocity Blunt SS and Stans Flow are both wider than 23mm and significantly less than $1,000. They are available everywhere, and can be built up with whatever hub/setup you want.
  • + 4
 @immacaroni that was a shining example of a trolling remark. If you are going to hate on something at least be specific and factual. Simply saying a company is garbage without citing actual examples (like "remember that terrible foray into proprietary suspension they did years ago?") ads nothing to the discussion.
  • + 1
 There are plenty of competitors in this price range that make these wheels look silly. Check out Light-Bicycle and Derby for wide carbon rims at great prices. Velocity is a strong aluminum contender with the blunt SS and blunt 35 among others. And of course Roval fattie aluminum. Your best bet if money is a concern is to buy some SLX or XT hubs (or Hope hubs) and learn how to lace up your own wheelset. There's nothing like riding wheels you put together yourself after you've spent the time and know you've done it properly and well done.
There is no reason to buy skinny, heavy wheels when there are so many better options out on the market.
  • + 2
 Some good points ChampionP, that said you are comparing lacing up your own wheels vs ready to go factory wheel set. Yes companies like Light Bicycle do offer fully laced up wheels but their ability to keep cost down is due to online sales. For companies like Mavic, Reynolds.. etc you aren't actually paying for the wheel set as much as for the distribution and dealer net work. There is 2nd or 3rd middle man you are paying before it gets to you. With that you do get a showroom and staff to talk to (not necessarily better). With the exception is what you and ryan83 pointed out, the Roval Fattie. Personally not sure how good they are but competitively priced to these Reynolds.
  • + 1
 Spank Oozy 295. External 29.5mm 1700 grams in 27.5 and price tag at 699...
  • + 1
 American Classic All Mountain wheels - internal diameter 24mm, weight for pair 1673g...around 430 euro
  • + 1
 24 and 28 spokes...on all mountain wheels, let me know how those hold up. i had traverse in the same spoke configuration and lace. garbage wheels couldnt hold a true. so go ahead and save 15g for less spokes and be forced with higher spoke tension. and theyre built with a radial lace on the non disc side front wheel. lets see how that holds up if a rider makes a mistake on slightly over shooting a landing. wow spesh you sure know how to build a strong set of wheels....pfft pure shit imo. I have had two pairs of these wheels and theyre flexy garbage that wont hold a true. sure they save a nominal amount of weight for the spoke lacing, but id rather have a wheelset that would last over 6 months. btw im not trolling, just speaking from experience.
  • + 9
 $625 is " the more affordable end of the spectrum"?

You can get Outlaws for just over $300 if you shop carefully. Components are pricey enough without calling $600 a budget minded price....

That whole width thing too... standards do not exist anymore, please call them something else.
  • + 16
 Outlaws are in a different weight class so they aren't a good comparison
  • + 4
 Sure, but this is being sold as a 'budget mided' wheelset, not a weight saver. So they are a pretty decent comparison. That's my point, if it's not relatively cheaper than the rest, don't start the sales pitch off with suggesting it is.
  • + 6
 If these wheels are expensive then build em. With wheels being one of the best upgrades you can do to your bike I can't believe that more riders aren't building their own. I build 2 sets a year on average for me. Not because they fail but like everyone I get the bug to try something different. I have a collection of good hoop sets. $200-300 builds a new set on old hubs at retail.
  • + 8
 Specialized Roval traverse Fattie 650B wheels are wider, lighter and cheaper!
  • + 2
 Hmmm, interesting.
  • + 8
 What about Roval Fatties @ $600, lighter with DT Hubs...
  • + 5
 One day an awesome company will come along an say no we are going to make 26ers again ..... I'll let you know then if I wanna buy one.
  • + 3
 I don't get all the people whining about how 23mm is narrow. It is not. Mavic (French, I know, but still very reputable) still sells the Crossmax at 19mm. Only new companies that need some attention are going over the 23mm width, trying to be innovative enough to call for some reflectors. Has anyone wondered why there are no 28mm from say, Easton, Mavic? two very big reputable wheel manufacturers?
  • + 3
 I am not saying that the 25-28, or even the extreme 41 (Ibis) are bad, I just believe they are trying to call attention by selling something a bit outrageous in the "wider is better" race.
  • + 5
 Having ridden wider rims (Blunt35), I have to say there is a serious advantage to them. Its worth trying them for a ride, I was really impressed at how much they improved the ride.
  • + 2
 Lots and lots of large companies suffer from design stagnation. Often, they won't change until some smaller competitor starts cutting into their profit margins. Why would Mavic or Easton change until they need to if they're making plenty of money of their regular wheels. Not to mention that both Mavic and Easton hubs are DRAMATICALLY outclassed by almost every premium hub manufacturer on the market (I9, CK, DT Swiss, Hadley, Hope, etc. etc.). Should we think Chris King hubs are not a performance upgrade since Easton is still making a crappy low durability low engagement hub?
  • + 2
 Mavic uses a solid rim bed, which penalizes their rim designs WRT weight inordinately compared with other designs, when widened. That's why they don't make wider rims, they wouldn't be weight competitive, even with zircal spokes. Go tell a moto rider that their rim is twice as wide as it needs to be. or a road bike rider. They'll laugh at you.
  • + 0
 Undrilled rim bed doesn't change anything for weight. When you drill holes for spokes you remove the same amount of material regardless of rim width...
  • + 3
 some thoughts on wheels-i have an old pair of mavic crossmax sl's. love the straight pull spokes, and the way mavic engineered the spoke nipple/rim interface. all of which makes it possible to replace a broken spoken without removing the tire, the rotor, or the cassette (if you have very nimble fingers). not a huge fan of the proprietary spoke themselves-they're not terrible, in fact they're very durable, but they're hard to come by in an emergency. also love that i don't have to f*ck with rim tape.

love the instant engagement on my I9's. not so much the proprietary spokes, or having to remove the tire and tape to replace a spoke.

ideal set of wheels would have mavic style rims/eyelets/nipples mated to "normal" straight pull steel spokes and I9 hubs, with a "wide" rim profile.

doubt if any of this will ever happen.
  • + 4
 Crank Brothers wheels have an unusual, but brilliant alternative design that ticks all of your boxes, but they also need special spokes like your Mavics.
  • + 0
 RC commenting on my comment-that's awesome. i grew up in san diego, still miss some things about it. you ever find yourself in WNC, gimme a shout!
  • + 2
 I was happy with my Reynolds 27.5 carbon wheelset until the rear hub failed after only a handful of rides. I contacted Reynolds and they want me to ship the wheel to them for inspection. Sadly I won't be purchasing anymore Reynolds products in the future because of this issue. Having a wheel fail on me for the first time after dropping 1.5k in +10 yrs biking is a total disappointment.
  • + 1
 Same issue with my 29s. Rear hub failed after 6 months. Just got it back from Reynolds. First ride out, hub slipped a few times, but has held since. Going to wait a few weeks till it grenades again and send it right back. Ridiculous for a $1600 wheelset.
  • + 4
 I want these. They are high on the list for upgrades.
  • + 2
 Great wheel for the money. I've blitzed some pretty hairy trails with these on my Mach 6. Still true even with only 20 psi in my tires. Only 40 grams heavier than the carbon version. No problems with my Conti Trail King 2.4's.
  • + 1
 aluminum mtb wheelset has this weight is normal,but the rim is too narrow,here carbon mtb rims for AM,internal width is 29mm,no matter clincher or hookless,make it can support wider tire.
  • + 3
 Viable option to a Swiss/FlowEX combo with similar price/weight - sounds like no strength issues with the lower spoke count?
  • + 3
 I had a pair of 28h wtb i23s and bent them within a month... Never anything less than 32h for me from now on.
  • + 1
 i23s are an XC rim... I wouldn't place all of the blame on the spoke count.
  • + 1
 so santa cruz specced an xc rim on their nomad? WTBs site says xc, all mountain, gravity...
  • + 1
 That's for the entire frequency line, not just the i23. which includes the i25, which is the one that you'd actually expect to use for heavy stuff. & bike manufacturers still have the nasty habit of underspeccing rims to come in at a lighter weight for the full build for advertising purposes... especially on their lowest end builds, which is where you see the i23s on the nomad. I certainly wouldn't expect a 455g rim to take a huge amount of impacts, especially with 28 spokes. build up something burly like an i25 with 28 spokes, though, & I'd be less worried.
  • + 1
 @groghunter Why do you think just because the i25 is wider that it will be that much stronger? Sure there's a bit more metal there but wall thickness doesn't change. I'm looking at having a set of wheels built in the spring and am kind of bouncing back and forth between DT ex471 and WTB i25 for the rim. Use is anything from trail to light DH. The more i read the more confused i get!
  • + 2
 You're assuming the only thing they changed when they went from i23 to i25 is width. I'd be disinclined to believe that. You're going to build a wider rim burlier, because it's more likely people will go bigger on a wider rim.
  • + 2
 27.5? Sounds unreasonable review since I'm still on 26.
But still are looks like great affordable rims.
  • + 9
 who cares what you still ride....would you want PB to do a review on XTR Vbrakes?
  • + 7
 I'd read the shit out of that... and think of the comments!
  • + 1
 supertrar make good wheels you can get a custom set built up for much less than these and there just as light as stans flow ex
  • + 3
 Lol @ arguing about rim width.
  • + 1
 that freehub looks eerily like the one superstar and nukeproof wheels use. it WILL loose a few teeth and end up eating its self and destroying the hub.
  • + 2
 I used aluminum Reynolds Canyon 26" rims for 4 years on my Fuel EX. Great rims, great weight.
  • + 1
 "Reynolds definately put more metal to make them last rather than having the goal of quick acceleration"

Serve the masses and live with the classes
  • + 3
 i like my ex 823's
  • + 1
 Funny how no one likes to wheelbuild anymore, huh??

All of my DH wheelsets are Mavic rims. They're dependable, durable, and you can wrap them around any hub you get your hands on. No waiting for the proprietary part that only works on that particular wheelset that no one holds in inventory that you need to order from Timbuktu and pay duty and freight and all the other B.S. Just lace it and ride it. Replace it when ness and repeat.
Cheap and easy.
  • + 1
 My 23mm inner rim width Hope tech enduro rims are now classed as old-school...Frown
  • + 2
 Actually the oozy trail 295 are 599...
  • + 1
 $600+ for a Reynolds wheelset?

Will pick a Hope Hoops set over them anyday for $500
  • + 0
 dunno... sorta starting to feel like 27.5 is a bit of a joke. a cruel joke aimed at the wallets of your average mountain biker.
  • + 2
 loaded just came out with a 40mm wide.wtf
  • + 1
 For the price, I can do better both in hub and rim. 23mm is considered narrow today.
  • + 9
 just because its considered narrow doesn't mean its rendered useless. just as 26 is now "too small" of a wheel, it doesn't mean you can't tear up your trails with it.
  • + 5
 Agreed, if you have a narrow rim its not like you can't ride it. If you are upgrading however (these are aftermarket rims) you might as well go for the superior performance of a wider rim.
  • + 1
 The Specialized Roval Traverse Fattie for comparison are ~ 60 grams lighter, 29 mm internal width, and a little bit cheaper.
  • + 1
 Where in my comment did you read that a 23mm is rendered useless. I just stated it's considered narrow by todays wider is better movement. I still use Mavic XM819 on my 26er bike. Don't take these replies as a personal attack.
  • + 1
 All good - didn't take it like that at all.
  • + 1
 I own them, and I like them. Light, strong and affordable. Still saving up for some carbons but these get me by.
  • + 2
 Great wheels but the only sad part is that I still cant afford them.
  • + 1
 everyones anxiously awaiting WTB KOM 35's
  • + 1
 I wish somebody would test those spesh fatty aluminum rims, hint, hint.
  • + 2
 I'm a wheel destroyer and did 25 dh runs on a shop bike. The wheels were still true when I returned it which is remarkable. They felt stiff too. Recommended.
  • + 1
 are they better than Stans Flows?
  • - 1
 aluminium is for heathens isn't it?? Lol
  • - 1
 Easton / superstar mavic-cc
  • - 2
 what no 135x12! for my dartmore hornet build. looks like dt swiss then
  • - 1
 Carbon or GTFO
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