Richie Rude's Yeti SB6 Bike Check - EWS Round 5, Aspen-Snowmass

Jul 28, 2016
by Paul Aston  
Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.


We normally start these bike checks with an introduction about the rider, their background, and their bike, all we need here is:

Richie Rude, #1, SB6.

Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.
A surprisingly narrow 740mm Renthal FatBar Lite Carbon with a 30mm rise for Richie.

Renthal takes care of Richie's cockpit, and his choice of parts seem to shun current fashion. At 5'11" he uses a medium sized frame with a 60mm stem, along with his mechanic Shaun Hughes, they have been testing out large frames but always settle on the medium. Bars are seemingly narrow but Shaun said: "If you look at Richie's hands you will see that he has massive scabs on his fingers, he seems to hit trees a lot, even with the 740mm. It's another safety thing, narrower bars will work with all different tracks around the world, he's used to them now and doesn't seem to be struggling with them."


Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.
60mm stem and a medium frame for a 5'11" rider, what is this, 2014?
Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.
Richie chooses an Ergon saddle for hundreds of hours of sitting over the year.


Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.
Fox 36, what else?


Richie is stacked and it's no surprise that he weighs in around 205lbs/93kg's. The fork has undergone a couple of internal mods, but nothing major. 98psi and full to the brim with four orange volume spacers still gives him around 25% sag, and Richie still manages to get through all of the travel regularly.


Damping wise Fox tuning wizard, Jordi Cortes, suggests that Richie, along with Aaron Gwin are both using a harder compression damping tune than anybody else in the world.


At the rear end of the bike, Richie uses a Fox Float X2 with the climb switch. Pressure fluctuates between 200 and 205psi depending on the venue with a few volume spacers in there, but not maxed out, "We have the SB6 really well balanced at the moment if you watch Richie riding the bike, it's looking pretty comfortable for him." Shaun says.

Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.
Fox Float X2 with the addition of the 2017 climb switch.

It's interesting to note that Richie doesn't use Shimano Di2 electronic shifting. Mechanic Shaun prefers them to use mechanical stuff that the riders can repair themselves, to some extent - both Richie and teammate, Cody Kelley, carry spare gear cables for example. Shaun says: "Ritchie is the ultimate bike tester, he can wreck anything if he wants to!"

Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.
Richie chooses the 11-40 tooth, 11-speed cassette from Shimano, a narrower range than most riders at the EWS.
Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.
A 36t chainring from OneUp combined with their chain guide and bash guard.


Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.
Skateboard grip take for extra precision on the Fox Transfer Post's actuation lever.
Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.
Tuned by Shaun Hughes.


Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.
Stages Power Meter says: "All of them."


Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.
Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.

Richie mixes Shimano's XTR levers with Saint 4-pot calipers for extra stopping power. People often mention that fast riders don't need brakes as much as regular guys, as they don't use them, Richie's sheer speed and size means that when he does occasionally pull them, they better be ready.


Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.
Minion DHF on the front paired with a Griffin on the rear.


Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.
The new DoubleDown casing from Maxxis isn't lightweight, but safety first when it comes to the race track.

The team has been relying on the 25mm internal width EX471 rim from DT Swiss for two years now. A 30mm EX511 has been added at the front with the 2.5" Maxxis Minion DHR. Shaun says, to be honest, they haven't spent enough time testing the wider rims and are worried that a 2.3" tire on a wider rim on the rear can leave the tire sidewall exposed to damage from rocks. More testing is needed before they take it to the race track.

Pressures are also pretty high compared to most other riders but so is Richie's weight and the force in which he smashes into the earth, 27psi in the front tire and at least 30psi in the rear Griffin - safety first.


Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.
The alloy EX471 rim from DT Swiss is an enduro and DH rider's favorite, it's same model rim that Gwin used without a tire at Leogang two years ago.
Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.
Will the same devoted riders make the switch to the new wider EX511 rim with its 30mm internal width?


Colorado USA. Photo by Matt Wragg.

248 Comments

  • + 337
 36 t up front and 11-40 t on the back... you don´t need Eagle when you've got POWER.
  • + 59
 He makes me feel like a baby biker with my 32-40 combo.
  • + 31
 Also, 740mm bars!
  • - 32
flag WAKIdesigns (Jul 28, 2016 at 7:45) (Below Threshold)
 @enrico650: according to granny ring moaners here, he's muscles must run on lactic acid only while his knees may explode anytime. I do hope his crank length is 170 or shorter because he will get rock strikes and misses the "obvious" benefits of cranking at higher cadence. I mean look at Froome on TDF, they crank fast on climbs, sooo relatable.
  • + 22
 Not to go full retard....but I wonder what his FTP must be to ride that kind of combo? And at his weight? Even if power:weight is in line with everyone else his peak and sustained power outputs must be just nutty!

Bad ass bike btw...form and function just killing it!
  • + 13
 @AaGro: the pure bike rider in me hates worrying about things like FTP but the Enginerd loves that shit. I know Graves said his "resting" watts are around 250 for a climb which means his FTP is probably close to double that. I'm sure Rude is similar.
  • + 7
 @AaGro: Check out the EWS site for the quarq power readings on Stage 3 in La Thuile for the Top 5 men on that stage. It's amazing how much power Rude was putting out
  • + 2
 @garcmol: You got a link to those results/readings? Can't seem to find them.
  • + 1
 @garcmol: yes, I want to know too, do you've a link?
  • + 2
 @soudonphilippe: posted it right above your post Smile
  • + 10
 But because we don't have the POWER of Rude-Dogg, we need massive range sissy-ass gearing, myself included. If the power hasn't come by my late 30's, I'll take the range!
  • + 70
 I run a 34-50 because my 200lbs of power is mostly comprised of beer and pizza.
  • + 5
 @enrico650: Again, you don't need the leverage when you've got arms like tree trunks.
  • + 5
 @WasatchEnduro: Ya, now I see a case where single ring makes sense. Ain't me though waddling along in my 22/36!
  • - 16
flag WAKIdesigns (Jul 28, 2016 at 10:54) (Below Threshold)
 I ride 36t chain ring to 11-42t back and I'm faaar from Richie's fitness level. In fact I am a weak-o. It's all about your muscle structure, formed by genetics and upbringing. Statistically speaking it is simply impossible that vast majority of humans are made for quick spinning, that untrained guys should run light gears. What keeps that mentality going is the legacy of road cycling which has as much to do with MTB as golf has with baseball. Yes you use a club to hit a ball in both cases. That's about the similarities...
  • + 2
 POWER!

5'11", 205#. Monster HP, sticking another 5 seconds on everyone on the climb? If his bars were any wider he'd rip 'em off the bike!

Fired up for Aspen!

The Quarq graph of the women is remarkable as well, demonstrating the time to be had going all out in one of the slowest sections of track.
  • + 2
 I run a 11-40 32 on my 25lb XC hardtail and I still think that's a tight range. Bumping the front up to a 36 on a 30 pound Enduro sled seems... Painful.
  • + 0
 I'm 6'1 210 and I run narrower bars also (740mm). I wonder if it is a bigger guy phenomenon that we like slightly narrower bars or if it's just a coincidence. Would be interested to hear somebody with some knowledge of biomechanics weigh in on this
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: it will depend a lot on the climbs that you do, % of graidiant, tipe of soil etc, if it is muddy you will need a easier gear beacause the sticky mud will slow your bike

i run a 34 with a 11-42 but on normal rides i try not to go to the last 2-3 easier gears, on races i basicly climb as easy as i can to not frie my legs

but about road riding, you spin your legs more than on the mtb, i ride mostly 50/50 of my time betwen road and enduro and is a total diferentstyle of
  • + 2
 @tom666: I suspect as much. I run a 710mm (!) Kore Torsion on my Balance. I tried running a 740mm bar and it was just plain twitchy. Not as tall as you or Richie, but a little north of 200lbs.

My "GUESS" is that it's probably not solely a big guy thing, but also technique. I come from motorcycles and I'm used to strong inputs at the bars (counter steering) while at speed. The moment I got more leverage everything felt twitchy.
  • + 1
 On the chainring thing another point is that some suspension designs might respond differently to different size rings? I dont know much about it but you do read " optimized for a 32 tooth ring" etc etc in some bike suspension descriptions. Anyone with more knowledge? ?
  • + 2
 @slowrider73: I can't say I know anymore about it than you. I prefer 36 tooth rings, but as you've noticed a lot of newer bikes seemed to be designed around 32's. I'm on a 32 now for the same reason, but I'd prefer a 36 front 11-42 rear combo.

Anyway, here is a pretty good read on the subject.
www.ridingfeelsgood.com/suspension-linkage-kinematics-basics-anti-squat-pedal-kickback
  • + 6
 I am not surprised at all! I'm on 34t 11-36 and find it no struggle to climb up hills, and I don't train or anything just ride for fun. So for a pro enduro racer to be running a bigger front cog with a wider range cassette is no surprise whatsoever. Eagle can suck it
  • + 3
 @BDKR: nice one mate thanks!
  • + 4
 @piersgritten: No argument, you rock. Some people just have what it takes, and others are old 'n fat 'n tired.

Here is the segment I have in mind when choosing gears:

www.strava.com/segments/701622

I can usually ride it without dipping below 22/32. I try to stay in 22/28 but so far that is just been too brutal for me.

I've seen single speeders ride it with a 32/20 but that was a long way to go without sitting.
  • + 6
 @briceps: If Graves FTP was 500 watts Froome would be the second pony and we'd be hearing about Graves winning his 5th tour. I'd believe 360 to maybe 390 but I doubt higher. To say 250 is his resting power that means it's just low tempo power, of course depending on the climb. Very impressive don't get me wrong but now way Graves or Rude has a FTP of 500 watts.
  • + 2
 @briceps: If Graves FTP was 500 watts Froome would be the second pony and we'd be hearing about Graves winning his 5th tour. I'd believe 360 to maybe 390 but I doubt higher. To say 250 is his resting power that means it's just low tempo power, of course depending on the climb. Very impressive don't get me wrong but now way Graves or Rude has a FTP of 500 watts.
  • + 1
 Wawaweewass the same bike eith skateboard grip. Pure genious, never before seen such radical thought process.
  • + 2
 @captaingrumpy: I am right there too. I ride a 34 front 11 to 36 rear and have no trouble climbing 1500 to 2000 feet in 45 minutes. I even am thinking about going to a 36 front. But it has nothing to do with fitness and everything to do with riding style. I previously owned a single speed MTB so now my style more closely emulates that which means I prefer taller gears. It's all down to how you ride.
  • + 2
 @heatproofgenie: Based on 250W whats being easy to climb at, using a FTP calculator and doing the sums in reverse his FTP would be 340W.

Still very impressive. FTP isn't as important for MTB as it is for the road.
  • + 1
 38t up front and 10 speed 11-36 on the back, beat that Razz
(Squatting 235 kg in the gym)
  • - 2
 There isn't many climbs in EWS races.U will definitely need the Eagle in UCI XCO.
  • + 5
 In my experience, bigger riders dig the bigger ratios.
Richie 36/40=0.9, 93kg
me 34/36=0.944, 92kg
a friend 36/36=1, 96kg
my girlfriend (2by) 22/32=0.69, 58kg
I know trails are different, but as reference I can say that I was with my friend in Andorra, we were ok with no lifts.

As Waki points out it's not just about fitness though, depends on how your body works. Maybe one day pinkbike will grow up and stop the "man up" comments. maybe on day...
  • + 2
 @lifeskyline: you obviously don't know what enduro is mate
  • + 3
 @Uuno: So working out and "manning up" don't play a factor? Man up and ride your bike faster and harder
  • + 5
 @ipedalhard: Yes it does play a big role, but your muscle structure plays a major role here. If your genetically predisposed for high cadences due to predominance of slow twitch muscles, had no training guidance through all your life and just trained how it feels right to you, that is spin fast, then weeeell, you are never going to push a hard gear, your muscles will lactate like a mother of twins. I am, and as it seems many people here, the example of the opposite. I didn't train hard to ride at low cadences at hard gear, I just trained, pedaled how I like it. I have no bigger probs to push 34 to 36 on 650B bike with 1,5 ply tyres, for 1000 feet on reasonable gradients, in reasonable air temperatures, but I've always been this way. Riding a road bike on flat kills me though, I just fkng can't sustain a steady pace at low intensity. I did this pacing training one year, it was HELL, it was freaking HELL, hated every single minute of it, I felt how I am dying inside, how my legs are turning into stones. Now give me a few sets of 90% sprints and yea, they kill me to, but not inside. I feel awesome afterwards. We have tons of steep climbs here, I never ever remember the moments when my heart is going at a max rate, while it is obviously a torment for the body, but I remember every single ride with that pulse pacing sht, I remember how awful I felt the day after. Most importantly that volume training never did much to my overall fitness on the trail, I just don't respond to such exercise very well. It is a known scientific fact that certain people don't respond to certain types of exercise and their bodies go back to untrained state quickly after finishing exercising in a particular way.

I talked to a dude who had a midlife crisis, started to run, do marathons, triathlons, yoga, and after 2 years got depressed because he was barely progressing while he buddies were doing great. Then through Yoga he got into some gymnastics, body weight training and he rips. just like that. 1 year, and he's the best in his peer group.

So there are people who are into high cadence, low cadence, but mostly people who are in between. I guess it can be trained, but I am sure the best thing you can do is to capitalize on your genetics and the way your upbringing shaped the rest of the way your body is built. The most stupid thing someone can do is to read some sht about how you're supposed to pedal, either by some loonie on a forum or in some stupid magazine for kooks, and just have a go at it. Fortunately all sorts of media are getting smarter about it, like GCN, who do some basic tests, showing what I just wrote about above. Doctrines are for idiots.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: I agree that people are naturally good at some physical activities whereas they're lacking in others. I have my positives and negatives as well. What I'm getting at when I say "man up" is two things. One, don't let the genetics excuse hold you back. It's easy to get down at the gym or biking because of the genetics excuse. "Man up" and push through it. It may not be incredible progress, but it's progress nonetheless. Secondly, "man up" and find the balls to let off the brakes while riding. Taking chances is what makes biking fun. Yes the genetics plays a role and everyone should train what works best for them. But it shouldn't be used as an excuse to slack in areas where you're lacking imo
  • + 1
 @ipedalhard: yes but you can man up and spin faster or man up and push a hard gear. This what I mean. My ability to push the hard gear has little to do with my manning up. As I descibed above I am pussying out for high cadence. Yes it did took a bit of manning up to change to 1x10 from 2x9 around 2010, when I started running 32t front and 36t rear. But all in all it came easy for me.
  • + 1
 Sploosh
  • + 152
 Everyone is running out to cut their 800mm bars down to 740mm and dumping out the parts bin for that 60mm stem before they head out to play pokemon go for the day.
  • + 6
 @T10irons .... and removing all the taped on gear all over the bike. Much cleaner is cool now...
  • - 6
flag rewob (Jul 28, 2016 at 9:20) (Below Threshold)
 Narrower bars make sense with a larger upper body. You don't need the leverage of 780s to keep that front tire pointed straight.
  • + 7
 @rewob: idk if that's how it works
  • + 2
 Already had mine at 749mm... Guess I can ride like Ruse now Wink
  • + 21
 DJ - 720
XC - 730
Trail - 740
Enduro - 750
Park - 760
DH - 770
Dickhead - 780+
  • + 11
 @ThomDawson: standard sizing for bars would be wonderful if people couldn't be 5'0", or 6'6".

What do you do if you want to race enduro on your trail bike, or ride park on your dh rig? Seems like a lot of cutting, or switching bars...
  • + 11
 @bderricks: bar size isn't relative to how tall you are its relative to how trendy you are. Everyone knows that Razz
  • + 6
 @ThomDawson: I'm just a hair over 6'0", but for me it's relative to how lazy I am. I put 760mm bars on my Commencal and loved them. My new Spartan has 780mm bars stock and I love them too. I'd rather adapt to the extra 1cm on either end than take off my grips and pull out a hacksaw. I think a lot of riders fall into this group.
  • + 17
 @ThomDawson: Whatever, I recently switched from 785 Atlas to 787 Blacklabel and that 2mm has been a game changer, I'm soooooo much sicker now.
  • - 1
 @rewob: I think you're right. That's been my experience. I'm a little over 200lbs and have the notion of aggressive counter-steering well burned into my mind from years of riding rice rockets. I tried a 740mm bar on my Canfield Balance and it felt downright twitchy and scary. I took that thing off and sold it.

OTOH, I also have a large '11 Kona Operator with an 800mm bar and a White Brothers / MRP Groove 200 up front. It's long as a train and heavy! Stable at speed, but to get the most out of it, you have to take it by the scruff using a little muscle! Not about to get rid of the 800 on there!

Anyway, I think you're right. A combination of a lighter shorter bike and rider weight/size/muscle could easily mean less leverage at the bars is a good thing. :-)
  • + 4
 You got a hearty laugh out of me for that one.. f*cking gold!
  • + 7
 It's pretty funny to read this thread and remember racing a dirt bike at 100 mph in the Nevada desert with 740 mm bars and a 35 mm fork. My personal rule of thumb for my trail bike is to run the bars commensurate with shoulder width. Proper arm angle is more important in determining bar width than Internet bosses.
  • + 6
 @ThomDawson: which category you fit into? I am firmly in dickhead...
  • + 2
 @bderricks: I'm only 5'6", and my Meta V4 comes with a 780mm bar stock. I thought I'd be cutting it for sure when I got the bike, but after a few rides I noticed that it felt very natural. I'm still tempted to cut about a cm (5mm each end), but I doubt I'd notice the difference.

Isabeau Courdurier from Sunn uses a 785mm bar and she's lke 5 feet nothing.
  • + 0
 @ThomDawson: I use 700mm handlebar and it's just fine for me, at least I fit between the trees, I don't know why are people so obsessed with wide bars.
  • + 2
 @headshot: lol, I was only kidding, hope nobody took offence Razz I have been a dickhead in the past but now I'm somewhere between Trail and Enduro. I wanted to add an Uber Enduro category but I couldn't decide whether that'd be wide or narrow...I can imagine a lot of enduroistas heading out to the garage with a hack saw after reading about Rudes setup!
  • + 1
 @headshot: Me too...
  • + 35
 Sticker on the back of the fork crown = genius. I once rolled through cow shit and it splatted up in there and could smell it the rest of the ride. Not only that, when i got home it was like the stuff was baked in there and wouldn't come out. I'm still not sure it's cleaned out...
I guess a fender would do the trick too...
  • + 1
 I have been running Tuck tape on the back of my fork for a while now. It works amazingly well. It even works to cover over some problematic spots on the frame as well.
  • + 1
 That was the main thing I noticed too - I know where to put my beer, etc., stickers now.
  • + 1
 Rude 5'11"/205lbs and me 170cm/62kgs how to gain that?
  • + 34
 The cursed 5'11" when it comes to bike sizes. Nice bike check
  • + 5
 I'm 5'10 and i spend a long time looking at geo to decide what bike to get
  • + 1
 6'0 with shorter arms... always struggling
  • + 19
 205 lbs?! Damn I did not take Richie to be such a heavy mate. And god damn what a sexy bike. Id do sone bad things to ride one of those...
  • + 10
 205lbs of muscle
  • + 4
 @blackrun: Exactly. But still I figured hed be like 180 or 185 tops.
  • + 1
 double post
  • + 1
 He uses that power well.
  • + 11
 5'11" & 205lbs?

Dude is a unit!

A lot of the enduro guys are super slim - be interesting to know how much power he puts out carrying around all the extra muscle.
  • + 15
 @blackrun: Richie Rude, what a name! Stan Lee would be proud
  • + 1
 @HobNob: Thats exactly what Im thinking! Im the same height and I dont know if I could ever get up to 200 lbs in muscle.
  • + 5
 205 lbs of freight train. An awe to behold.
  • + 2
 @blackrun: How many stone is that?
  • + 2
 @twozerosix: 14.6429 stone
  • + 4
 Hear that sound, the sound of a train a comin!


www.instagram.com/p/BH7w2QbDtPN/?taken-by=marcosborne92
  • + 0
 @GoldenH: What a monster!
  • + 6
 Im not saying he is (on sumtin) but 205lbs at 5'11 is crazy for a guy who is pedalling bikes all the damn time.
  • + 7
 @inverted180: I hate to even go there, but seems like all of our sports heroes eventually are connected to some questionable or downright illegal extracurricular activity. I hope and pray that Richie is clean. Love that kid.
  • + 3
 @chillrider199: ya that's crazy I'm 190 at 6,2 and have decent muscle mass.. He must be a beast..
  • + 2
 @bohns1: 5'11 and 200lbs, its not that outrageous. I'm 5'11 and 200lbs, carrying most of it in my legs. I've got a little more upper body than Ritchie, and he looks like he has tree-trunk legs, which is where I'd bet he's carrying most of his weight.
  • + 2
 @chillrider199: you can definitely get up to and past 200 lbs of lean mass mate youve just got to commit to the training AND DIET. Its achievable with doing all you can to be in an anabolic state and tgat comes from heavy arsed weight training and , most importantly eating lots of good muscle building food. Nutrient timing is the key. Give your body what it needs when it needs it. Plenty of rest and recovery to actually grow and put on muscle is also key. It aint easy but it is achievable for anyone.
  • + 6
 Beast coasters are made from hearty stock!
  • + 2
 205 in full gear maybe?
  • + 16
 @inverted180: People have different natural bodyweights. Richie has a pretty stocky physique and thick legs and no doubt 205lbs is a pretty trim weight to him - he's bloody fit at this weight. If he was to let himself go he'd probably go up to 220, not down to 190. 205 seems crazy to a 160lb guy with a slim ectomorph physique, but to a guy with a thicker build and a ferocious appetite it's not that crazy at all. I see no reason to accuse him of foul play over anybody else.
  • + 1
 @tom666: Well spoke!
  • + 2
 @tom666: I've seen him at Mountain Creek, he's a big-boned dude, look at the size of his wrists. If anyone were to let themselves go, they'd likely go up. I think for the type of racing that he does, with such long sustained descents, that kind of build is beneficial. I've always trained heavy with the weights, and while I can't keep up with my 150-160lb riding buddies like I'd like too (that would require really scaling back on the weights), arm pump and leg burn on long descents has never been an issue for me.
  • + 3
 @WasatchEnduro: there this photo of him from 2015 EWS where he wore the fully blacked out hit (can't find it or i'd have posted it) with him absolutely smashing a rooty off camber right hander. wasn't so much roost as the roots disintegrating underneath him. That photo solidified the freight train imagery for me.
  • + 5
 people have to bear in mind, the importance of muscle mass inproducing explosive energy. i guy i ride with is 40 kg lighter than me and on a 20 min climb he will beat me hands down every time, but on a 2 min climb ranging from 1% up to max possible say 35% i will destroy him. for three reason. 1. i have way more muscle than him to generate the explosive torque needed for such a short period of time, 2: i'm training for explosive sprinting not 5 hour high tempo road rides and 3: i enjoy burying that kind of v02 max pain, going at 110% for 2 mins is a vastly different pain to going at 80% for and hour - granted i wont be able to talk or walk for a min after the 2 min max test.... looking at richie there are so many things coming into play here. 1: high muscle mass, 2:supremely skilled = less energy spent on the techy stuff to other riders, and more speed coming into sections needing fullpower. If you take into consideration that he may be genetically predisposed to producing less lactic acid, genetically wired to perfection in slow and fast twitch muscle ratio for his sport. and probably has an extremely high pain threshold - then all the training side of things, training to recover fast, training to 200bpm all the time, training specifically for all out power on the pedals, eating all the best stuff for maximim o2 uptake and so on then until someone else can match richie rude , drug taking will not enter his mind whatsoever. basically he's f*cking shit hot and i hope to god there will be no "lance armstong" scandal with him in the future.
  • + 3
 @inverted180: i climbed 300k ft last year and regularly do 60-100mi road rides and am 6'0" and hover between 195-205. No matter how much i ride and how well i eat i cant seem to get below 195. Disadvantage racing XC for sure. Different genetics i guess.
  • + 2
 @SlodownU: Not outrageous at all. I just mean at my height in comparison Its a bit daunting.. I smash 6 squares a day and two protein shakes and all the time in the world lifting weights working for fire dept and still can't hit 2hundy..Small boned and well toned is how I have to accept it I guess.. I got that Michael Phelps lankiness gene going on but cmon!
  • + 3
 @inverted180: not crazy in the slightest, i'm, 5'8 and at the moment weigh 175lb, but last year i weighed 198lb and was podiuming in national enduro races, took the desicion to drop weight drastically and try and maintain power, which is working as i'm now winning national enduro races. my current ratio is 2.5lbs to the inch and richie rudes is 2.8lbs to the inch. what people forget is the importance of your genetics ectomorph, endomorph or mesomorph. mesomorphs will tend to do well at every sport and put on and lose weight/muscle easily responding to training inputs well, but there are only a few sports that they will absolutely excel at using athletics as the easy example.... they perform amazing at multi events like the decathlon, and do well at sprinting (usain bolt is a bizarre exception). ectomorphs really struggle to put on weight, but can lose it easily and in terms of athletics.... will do very well at the high jump, long jump, long distance running etc, and your mesomorph really struggles to lose weight but can put it on no problem more often as muscle than fat. and they do awful at sprint events despite having the power and obviously poor at long distance events, but for weighlifting, they will destroy most folk due to low centre of gravity, stocky legs and a good bit of "mong" power. sounds to me your body type errs towards ectomorph, and richie is mainly meso morph with a touch of endomorph in him. nothing crazy just simple genetic make up
  • + 1
 @tom666: yeah, I completely understand where Richie is. I've got very little upper body muscle and weight 180 at the same height. It's very easy for me to believe that that is trim for him
  • + 11
 I love those YETI bikes, they are in top 3 of my favorite bikes. Those two yellow-turquoise ones from last year were hands down the best looking MTBs I have ever seen.
  • + 3
 They release that turq/yellow two tone every 5 years for their anniversary. I remember in 2010 they did the same on the 575s and 303s. They sell them with custom turquoise chris king bearings. So pretty.
  • + 8
 I saw Richie this spring at the top of a climb doing a photo shoot on a small feature and before I recognized him, I asked if he was "doing okay". I feel like an ass every time I think about it. He was much shorter than I thought, but jacked. Seemed like a really nice kid. They were hitting a tiny feature and going huge.
  • + 8
 Richie using the medium with a 60mm stem is the same as using a large with a 40mm stem but with more weight over the front wheel, a reduced wheelbase and ability for him to run a 150mm dropper rather than 125 because of the larger seat-tube.

Not sure I would like to go back to anything longer than 50mm but I am a turd compared to Riche on a bike.

He is running some pressure / volume spacers in that fork too but at 205lbs and charging that hard I suppose thats what you need!
  • + 4
 Agreed. All these bike checks except Minnar are mediums, seems like a lot of pros seem to prefer the smaller size down. I see a lot of people riding what looks like 2 sizes too small with a huge stem, or a smaller frame barely clearing knees in the cockpit. Im 6-3 182lbs ride XL SJ. 50 stem and 1000 bars... OK 760
  • + 7
 @paulaston and @pinkbike and @yeticycles thank you all for articles like this (and the race coverage)! It's extremely fascinating to see what some of the pro racers, mechanics, other support teams, etc are doing and hear about their preferences.
  • + 5
 Here is a pretty interesting comparison of Rude's vs Kelly's set-ups: enduro-mtb.com/en/pro-bike-check-comparing-richie-rudes-cody-kelleys-yeti-sb6c (Sorry PB: cross-contaminating websites).

Interesting to see both running "narrow" bars. And Rude has obviously gone back to XTR levers - anyone know what the difference is feel is between the Saint and the XTR levers??
  • + 8
 You kinda wonder which one of these two is actually the yeti.
  • + 8
 For the rest of us, he's basically riding a fully rigid bike.
  • + 1
 Haha that was funny!
  • + 4
 i'm assuming the snowmass stop is a more pedally course of all the ews stops. and to think he'll be a top contender, if not winner, hammerin 205lbs of himself down the trail like a fookin' freight train. it's pretty wild considering most of the top racers are pretty light/small dudes from what i've seen.

"i can get up to 70 miles per gallon on this hog"
  • - 7
flag driftmonster (Jul 28, 2016 at 7:26) (Below Threshold)
 that was funny when someone posted it 2 days ago
  • + 1
 I'd think he'd consider the 5.5 on this course due to it having a hair less travel and wagon wheelz. Curious to see how many are riding 29 v 27.5 assuming this is more fast singletrack and less double fall line gnar like the last round.
  • + 4
 A lot of people are getting hung up on Rude choosing a medium bike, but there's much more to it than just reach. The reach is even less than stock (426mm) as you lengthen the fork. Also, the head angle gets slacker and the wheelbase grows. Pretty soon the wheelbase gets ridonkulous, so a large frame would be worse. With a 64/65 degree head angle it's harder to weight the front end necessitating a longer stem. I bet if he was riding a stock sb6c he'd be on a large, but he wants a slacker head angle paired with a reasonable wheelbase, so 60mm stem it is.
  • + 7
 So the fastest Enduro Racer at the moment gives nothing on the longer reach trend. Soothing.
  • + 3
 unride-able! at 5´11 on a medium? you kidding? other guys his height are on xl frames
  • + 1
 hes riding a medium, but those SB6Cs are stretched out. The medium's top tube length and reach are comparable to many competitors' large frames.
  • + 1
 @MetalMessiah: 426mm (medium frame) is pretty short these days, for whatever (sales) reason.
  • + 1
 @Pauloquincer: medium sb6 top tube is the same length as pivot Mach 6 large
  • + 2
 Looks like he likes a low front end with the stem slammed as low as possible - the lower the bars the larger the reach so its likely the large was just too long for him without running an ultra short stem.

Its also worth noting that the normal riders amongst us use larger frames to increase stability, when you are #1 in the world I imagine you are a little more confident / less crap than the rest of us!
  • + 2
 keep in mind that this is a race bike not just a regular everyday all around fun bike. same with Gwinns bike set up, its for racing, you make it to what you need it to do best, of course always sacrificing something, to gain something else. this boy is an animal regardless
  • + 3
 Really awesome to see RR against the 'trend' riding like it was 2014! I think we should all take a step back from the hype of 'innovation'
  • + 6
 I don't think he's bucking innovation as much as just using what works for him. His size and muscle development puts him outside of the norm so what he prefers is likely to be outside of the norm as well.
  • + 1
 that's really not all that heavy. I'm 5'7" 200 pounds and I don't "look" particularly beefy.

The 60mm stem is not surprising. I found 35s to be a little silly, and moved to 50mm and found I had more control.

36-40 is insane. I wish I was that strong. 34-42 was bad enough on silly steep things, but was ok on extended alpine climbs.
  • + 3
 No kidding I'm 6'2" and 265 and not particularly too tubby. Muscle is heavy. And beer bellies
  • + 2
 I feel Richie's pain at 5'11". Bike sizing sucks at this height, I'm always between a medium and large. Can usually get the reach but the seat tube is too damn high to put a 150mm dropper on most bikes.
  • + 2
 What's the rear tyre on the first photo? Not mentioned in the article but I can't recognize it from the current maxxis range. I know he often uses an Aggressor as a rear but that's not it.

Edit: Nevermind, it's a Griffin.
  • + 5
 Correct on the Griffin. Most of the racers have a full quiver of DoubleDown tires at their disposal that we'll be releasing to the public shortly, including the Griffin, Minion SS, Minion DHR II, along with all the readily available DD tires. The Griffin was already a popular EWS rear tire in a DH casing so we were able to drop a lot of weight with the DD option for the longer transfer stages.
  • + 2
 @Maxxis:
That appears to be a DH casing Griffin.

Perhaps he wants a full DH casing for this event and this is the lightest and only 2.3 Maxxis offers in DH casing?
  • + 2
 @Maxxis very happy to have DD options finally! DHF are awesome, but I can not wait to race on another rear!
  • + 1
 @Krispy-at-Go-Ride: Also correct on the DH casing. I cant speak for him about why he would choose one over the other but it might be a matter of volume as well. The DH-spec Griffin tire is 27.5x2.40 as opposed to the DD Griffin at a smaller and lighter 27.5x2.30.
  • + 2
 Hold on a minute.......XTR levers with Saint calipers? I've been reading over and over and over that that setup won't work due to the modulation and oil flow differences between XTR and Saint.......
  • + 1
 i've heard the same. Shimano dude said running a 4 piston caliper with a lever designed for 2 piston caliper will work for a run or two maybe. Can someone clarify?
  • + 1
 @Jimmy0: can't offer much clarification but I've seen many people running similar combos for the last few years. I wasn't aware there was an 'issue'.
  • + 1
 @ThomDawson: Yeah I've been reading quite a few threads about it over on MTBR and Vital. I ask because I already have M988 trails, and have really been contemplating about some Saints. But the forums out there say differently, can't really cross the Servo-Wave lever with M820 Saint caliper. This was what I wanted to do, but seemed like I couldn't based on what people were saying.

But Richie is running this exact setup I wanted to make.....which makes me wonder now.....
  • + 1
 @chrisingrassia: hmm I'd be interested to know if you figure it out dude.
  • + 3
 @chrisingrassia: Coming soon, Q&A w/ Rude's mechanic? That would be sweet PB.
  • + 1
 iirc the xtr race levers are not servo wave, but they look like trail...
  • + 1
 @ThomDawson:
Also, this one:
www.chainreactioncycles.com/us/en/shimano-saint-m820-disc-brake-caliper/rp-prod82469

Look at the Q&A direct from CRC. There's just so much conflicting info out there. Stupid internet.
  • + 1
 Graves was running it at Yeti a couple of years back. ........maybe Yeti know something the rest of us dont :-)
  • + 1
 i run xtr race levers with saint 4pots. they work fantastic. been running this for about two years now.
  • + 1
 @cuban-b: is your understanding though that the race levers work just fine with Saints, but could pose issues with the trail version?
  • + 1
 The lever in the picture look like a M9020(Trail) lever, but that does not really make sense, as the XTR-trail levers and Saint levers are more or less the same, at least for M988 and M820. I am guessing those levers are M9000 with M9020 lever blades, for easier reach adjust. The whole point of running XTR levers with Saint calipers is to eliminate the Servo Wave, for a more consistant and direct brake action/feel. Only the XTR race levers can help you do this.

I am running XTR Race(M985) levers with Saint M820 calipers, it works great, a lot of power, great lever feel. It is a bit more fiddly, as the reservoir is a bit smaller, you have to bleed it/refill mineral oil as the brake pads get worn. I don't consider this a problem, as I normally have to bleed my brakes more often than I change pads.
  • + 5
 @oyvin10: the levers on Richie's bike are 100% stock 9020 trail levers. The Calipers are stock saint calipers. the system works fine, and has for several years now.
  • + 1
 The piston is slightly different between the XTR trail lever and saint even though visually they look the same. The leverage is different which changes the feel, probably less grabby for the lighter tires/wheels/bikes EWS racers use. Shimano says it won't work probably due to pad wear compensation and shimano being shimano.
  • + 1
 @shaun7005: My mistake, I just assumed he ran 9000 levers to eliminate SW. So he runs 9020 mainly for weight savings then?

Great that you follow up on our curiosities Smile
  • + 1
 @shaun7005: you sure those are 9020 and not 988?
  • + 5
 @chrisingrassia: pretty sure, i bolted them on there myself...
  • + 5
 @oyvin10: actually the weight savings don't matter much, its all about the feel. The carbon levers seem to have a bit of "extra modulation" type feel. I set these brakes up to be very powerful, so if he needs more brake, its always there, but the carbon lever blade seems to be favoured over the saint. Some races i will simply change to saint levers if there is more risk of him crashing and wrecking a lever blade. We work pretty closely on Brakes, as i did when Jared was on the team.
  • + 1
 @shaun7005: this is the internet, so naturally I distrust you and will say I'm right. =)

What are your thoughts on running those same Saint calipers with the M988 levers?
  • + 2
 @chrisingrassia: the 988's work fine. I've had good results running all combinations of XTR Levers with the saint calipers...
  • + 1
 @chrisingrassia: the calipers for m810 and m820 both use servo wave levers from the factory, so i would imagine other shimano servo wave levers would be compatible. 'optimal' performance from these combinations is another debate... dunno why people would say it's completely incompatible.
  • + 4
 DT 741 on the caption and 2 inches above it it clearly says DT 471 so many typos in this..... And Cody uses DI2
  • + 0
 Someone also needs to proof the section on tires. It says DHF front and rear, but then talks about DHR and Griffin.
  • + 0
 @DMal: I know mate he's probably on DHF front and aggressor rear
  • + 2
 Rude ? beast ! Stage smashing machine.... 'The bike does not maketh the man' I have a feeling that whatever you put Richie on he would perform..... #akaGwinn
  • + 1
 "Damping wise Fox tuning wizard, Jordi Cortes, suggests that Richie, along with Aaron Gwin are both using a harder compression damping tune than anybody else in the world."

Tell me more.
  • + 1
 For a pro MTB'er, that's called intellectual property.
  • + 2
 More mass moving faster needs more compression damping. It's really that simple. Lighter guys won't like it. Slower guys won't like it either.
  • + 3
 Some pro once said "set it up as stiff as possible, then ride faster and faster until the suspension feels good".
  • + 2
 @twozerosix: that was Brendon Faircloth.
  • + 2
 EX511's? What the sh*t, I just bought XM481's that are the same internal width. I didn't know about those. I wonder what the difference is?
  • + 4
 @shawnca7 The EX 511 rims are more stout and heavier (538g) than the XM 481s. The XM 481s are good rims. The EWS competitiors were running them before the EX 511s were available.
  • + 2
 @kwapik: Cool, thanks man! Nice to hear I made a good purchase.
  • + 1
 So forcing the riders to squat, frames the bikes better. "F your knees, we need that bike filling 90% of the shot"! #SlavSquat
  • + 13
 Rude can squat ass to grass with the weight of 8 pinkbike trolls on his back, so the SlavSquat is a walk in the park.
  • + 1
 Wow, 36T chain with an 11-40 cassette. I've always said I would up my front chain ring to a 36 if I ever got an 11-44 rear cassette.

This guy is an animal~
  • + 2
 What's up with the non vented brake pads? I thought that would be a no brainer on any Shimano equipped bike.
  • + 11
 We've been playing with all of the Shimano pad/rotor configurations we could think of at the shop I ride for. We surmised that the vented pads don't really make as big of a difference as the RT99 Freeza rotor does.
  • + 1
 @jmusuperman: I second that finding⬆
  • + 1
 @jmusuperman: Agree. The I've found absolutely no fade w/ RT99 and the Aluminum backed, 2 piston pads (G01A). I would go so far as to say the vented pads didn't fair as well as the G01As when it comes to heat. (In my experience anyway).
  • + 3
 Damn Richie, back at it again!
  • + 8
 with the white stanssssssss
  • + 1
 I ride the exact same bar and stem combo as Richie! Same bar rise, width, stem length and everything. Now if i could just ride like Richie
  • + 1
 Where was he faster? Almost everywhere. Beast.
  • + 2
 How do riders become so fit? ! Seriously. It must not be in my genes.
  • + 7
 Constant training. And when I say training, I mean training. Not going out for 7 bike rides a week. But doing the horrible no fun shit like interval training, hill repeats and gym routines. To compete at the top of any discipline now, you have to do the hard stuff.
  • + 2
 By putting in the weightroom time. I've got the fitness, just not the riding talent or balls, haha
  • + 1
 Important to note that he is running the 36 RC2, and not the 36 FIT4 BOOST QR15 fork.
  • + 1
 Why do they swap out the saint leavers? Thought they were nice when I used them.
  • + 2
 Did anyone edit this article?
  • + 1
 Whats wrong? Let me know and I can fix it.
  • - 1
 @paulaston: Since you asked:

Run-on sentences:

"We normally start these bike checks with an introduction about the rider, their background, and their bike, all we need here is:"

"At 5'11" he uses a medium sized frame with a 60mm stem, along with his mechanic Shaun Hughes, they have been testing out large frames but always settle on the medium. "

"If you look at Richie's hands you will see that he has massive scabs on his fingers, he seems to hit trees a lot, even with the 740mm."

"It's another safety thing, narrower bars will work with all different tracks around the world, he's used to them now and doesn't seem to be struggling with them."

"60mm stem and a medium frame for a 5'11" rider, what is this, 2014?"

"We have the SB6 really well balanced at the moment if you watch Richie riding the bike, it's looking pretty comfortable for him."

"Ritchie is the ultimate bike tester, he can wreck anything if he wants to!"

"People often mention that fast riders don't need brakes as much as regular guys, as they don't use them, Richie's sheer speed and size means that when he does occasionally pull them, they better be ready."

"Pressures are also pretty high compared to most other riders but so is Richie's weight and the force in which he smashes into the earth, 27psi in the front tire and at least 30psi in the rear Griffin - safety first."

(Also, it's "with which", not "in which".)

"The alloy EX471 rim from DT Swiss is an enduro and DH rider's favorite, it's same model rim that Gwin used without a tire at Leogang two years ago."

Corrected punctuation:

"Damping wise, Fox tuning wizard Jordi Cortes suggests that Richie, along with Aaron Gwin, are both using a harder compression damping tune than anybody else in the world."
  • + 4
 @MtbSince84: Are they not just quotes taken from interview though?

And seriously, go mark the kids homework and get some sleep!
  • + 2
 @Racer951: People don't speak in punctuation. It's up to the writer/journalist to transcribe them into actual English sentences.

Or to paraphrase Sam Jackson: "English, motherf&$ker! Do you even write it?" :-)
  • + 1
 1 hella of an enduro rider...its like seeing gwin riding enduro....dat skateboard grip on the dropper post lever...genius...
  • + 1
 @shaun7005: What length cranks does Richie use and does he ever change lengths? Thanks!
  • + 1
 my guess would be 165mm....
  • + 3
 170mm cranks for everything except DH. then 165.
  • + 1
 I wonder what are those shims on the caliper mounting screws for? Anybody knows?
  • + 1
 The ones that sram uses? I would imagine, but pure speculation, that it could potentially be used to fine tune caliper angles perhaps.
  • - 1
 I can't tell if this is sarcasm or not....
  • + 1
 @ridehard84: Not on my part.
  • + 2
 @panzer103: Yeah, most Sram/Avids use them as well as some Shimano calipers. They allow for loating of the caliper for better centering of the caliper on the disc.
  • + 3
 I'm guessing the question is aimed at the washer and locknut not the black one piece shim.
  • + 1
 @teschenbrenner: yep, not the black one Smile the washers like those that come with v-brake pads. Shouldn't there be another pair between the caliper and an adapter to make it work (to adjust the angle of the caliper)?
  • + 1
 Maybe the screw holes in the frame are screwed up Smile and the angles don't match with adapter or caliper holes.
  • + 1
 @GawiQ: Nope, they function perfectly just how they are. They are not lock washers, they are concave and convex washers allowing a floating caliper when the screws are loosened. For centering, you lossing the caliper mount screws, spin the wheel then pull and hold the brake lever, then tighten the mount screws while holding the brake lever.
  • + 1
 @ridehard84: I know they are concave and convex, not lock washers. For centering you can do exactly the same you described even without any washers at all. When the screws are loosened the caliper will float anyway... Your answer still doesn't add anything. Just play with the v-brake pads mounting and you gonna see why this setup here won't work like them. Smile Still have no idea what those washers here are for...
  • + 2
 @GawiQ: The washers are used to allow the mounting bolts to mis-align with the caliper when using certain caliper brackets. If you look at the caliper bracket in the picture, you will see that both sides of the bracket are not parallel. This angle is needed to tilt the caliper so that it aligns with the brake rotor correctly. Due to this angle, the caliper mounting surface and the mounting bolts are no longer perpendicular. The washers allow the bolts to press against the caliper evenly.
  • + 1
 @gigamike: I think I need those.
  • + 1
 @gigamike: Thank you Smile I supposed it but still needed someone with clear answer.
  • + 0
 @GawiQ: re-read gigamike's reply from the second sentence on while you look at the pic. Hard to say it much clearer than that. But does it come from the factory with the spacer? I don't know, maybe he upsized his rotor and to correct the alignment for the larger diameter rotor the angled spacer is necessary, so they added the specialty washers. Exaggerate the issue... lets say the bolts are going through the hole on a 45 degree angle because the spacer is that extreme... it would be next to impossible to tighten a nut down without shifting the caliper out of place and even then only one edge of the nut would be holding the caliper down. Not a great connection given the stress the caliper goes under during braking.
  • + 1
 @teschenbrenner: re-read my reply and you will find out that i wrote "needed", so it does mean that gigamike's reply was what I "needed" and it was the clear answer.
  • + 1
 Am I mistaken, but in the pit walk article, ruses teammate has di2 on his bike, yet this article says neither use it?
  • + 1
 Actually just reread it and it says the mechanic prefers them to run mechanical, and they both carry spare gear cables, which implies they don't use di2.
  • + 2
 Both racers run mechanical XTR, the Di2 setup is on my own personal bike.
  • + 2
 The "Rude Beast"!
  • + 1
 Ritchie Rude - The lost Gecko Brother
  • + 1
 Richie Rude Boy! I wish I could shred with him :'(
  • + 1
 36T? who need a sram eagle? Big Grin
  • + 1
 Renthal takes care of Richie's cockpit !!
  • + 1
 SB66, far more superior!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • + 1
 is it just me or does richie always look stoned as hell?
  • + 1
 36T and 11-40?! They better test Richie's legs for 'motorized doping' !
  • + 2
 170mm fork?
  • + 2
 Yep (at least that's what he was using at La Thuile)
  • + 1
 @adal9087: thanks
  • + 2
 @Sponger: I think it's actually 180mm up front. Which is sweet.
  • + 1
 Is that a 170mm dropper post I spy?
  • + 2
 I wondered the same thing as it looks longer than the fork on the picture. I tried measuring with my thumb as I don't have ruler to hand – didn't work.
  • + 1
 @paulaston: Any idea why enduro riders want to use 150 and 170mm droppers which puts the saddle pretty much as low in the frame as possible when the DH guys all run comparatively higher and fixed saddles?
  • + 3
 The Dropper is a 150mm Fox Transfer. No 170mm option yet.
  • - 2
 @shaun7005: Cause It's not possible the best enduro rider in the world could be testing a 170mm version?
  • + 1
 @big-G-84: I'm pretty sure shaun7005 is Shaun Hughes, the Yeti mechanic ;-)
  • + 2
 @gigamike: Ha, fair enough, I did not know that. I apologise @shaun7005 but you know what most pinkbike members are like lol
  • + 3
 @big-G-84: all good. I'm just trying to answer the questions... But yeah, i know a thing or two about the Yeti Race team bikes for the last 7 years. Always happy to answer questions about these bikes.
  • + 1
 471 in the back and 511 in the front,I like that idea
  • + 1
 Where Can i get those 511 rims, can't find them anywhere
  • + 1
 @freerabbit: not out yet
  • + 1
 That's a lot of kashima coat on one bike.
  • + 0
 Even on RRs bike, rear Kashima is a different color than front Kashima lol
  • + 3
 It takes a different color depending on parent (base) material. If the aluminum is different from shock to fork (it probably is), then the color will be different. Will be the same for everyone.
  • + 2
 @atrokz: I just upgraded from a '14 CTD for to a '16 34 and noticed the Kashima is a different color as well. Someone needs to send a memo to raceface because my kash money bars don't match and had to go back to black.
  • + 1
 @xjohnx77: I believe there was a change to the process during that time span. Here's where Kashima notes the color may be affected by base material: www.kashima-coat.com/en/experience/characteristics2.php

Here's a good chart to show how grinding off the coating (required for the process) will show different ranges of color as well, so the parent material, and the ultimate thickness of the coating with affect color.
www.kashima-coat.com/en/img/color_pc.jpg
  • + 1
 so to get the gold, the coating is between 5um and 10um, which is between .005mm and .01mm, which is .0002 to .0004.
  • + 0
 @xjohnx77: I've heard each batch is unique
  • + 1
 @TheRiddleofSteel: see links above
  • + 1
 FWIW, ya'll are taking this far more serious than I meant it. If anything, I'm poking fun at the fact FOX makes a Kash dropper for more money... who's only purpose is to match other Kash on the bike, which it will almost never do.
  • + 1
 @groghunter: I'm just explaining why! haha. Don't shoot the messenger.
  • + 1
 DT 741 is the heaviest rim DT has ever made....;-)
  • + 2
 Troll bait I sense...
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: just a bit
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