Ridden & Rated: 13 of the Best Dropper Posts

Jul 15, 2020
by Daniel Sapp  


A Host of Posts

Dropper post have become standard equipment on most mid-level and higher mountain bikes, and there are now posts that will work for just about anyone and a wide range of budgets. Sorting through all of the options can be confusing, though, especially given the wide range of travel amounts and post dimensions. To make things easier, we gathered 13 of the best options currently on the market, gathered all of the important statistics, and then listed the pros and cons of each.

Not all of the posts we tested are the same length, so when you're looking at the table, keep that in mind. We based the numbers and weights off of the size and length of the posts in bold so if you're curious about the fit of a longer or shorter option, you may have to check the manufacturer's website. Most of them have any measurement you could imagine, but we stuck to a few popular and simple ones here, for the sake of simplicity and readability.


What About the Levers?

Right, you do need a lever in order to actuate a post. For our purposes here, we're talking just about the posts, except in a few situations where the lever is worth mentioning. Most levers, barring hydraulic or electronic options, are interchangeable, and many people prefer one over another. Most of it boils down to personal preference, so o keep things equal we kept them out, but noted where they are included when they come with the post.





Contents






PNW Components Rainier IR



• Weight: 626 grams (170mm)
• Lengths: 125, 150, 170, 200
• Max Insertion: 269mm (170mm)
• Internals: Cartridge
• MSRP: $179
pnwcomponents.com

PNW's Rainier dropper post is now in its third iteration. The new model now includes a tool-less adjustable travel system and a shorter post size to help it fit a wider variety of bikes than previous iterations. The post comes in a host of lengths, all the way up to 200mm ,making it one of the longer posts that we have checked out.

Travel is able to be adjusted by hand with a simple unthreading of the collar and sliding a shim out and over to the desired amount of travel, All-in-all, it's no more than a minute long process. PNW doesn't include a lever with their post, but the brand's "Loam Lever" has become popular among many riders, and they also selling a matching shift lever for SRAM's higher end XO1 and XX1 shifters.

PNW also run their own dropper post refurb and recycling program where riders can trade up for a new post, recycle their old post, or purchase a refurbished post if they so desire. The Rainier is also the least expensive post we have in this group, selling for $179 USD.


Pros
+ Long length option
+ Least expensive
+ Great lever feel

Cons
- Not the lightest



XFusion Manic



• Weight: 630 grams (170mm)
• Lengths: 100, 125, 150, 170
• Max Insertion: 295mm (170mm)
• Internals: Cartridge
• MSRP: $199.99
xfusionshox.com

XFusion's Manic dropper post is not only one of the cheapest posts on test, it's also easily user-serviceable, with a replacement cartridge costing only $25. The post made its debut a few years ago, with XFusion steadily adding in more size options to the lineup. The post is reliable, smooth, and affordable.

The post comes with a lever and the action required to actuate the Manic is extremely light. While the post's weight isn't all that light, it's proven to stand up to some serious abuse. With a variety of sizes and all the functionality one could ask for, it's difficult not to recommend it to anyone on a budget as dropper posts do in fact make riding more fun.


Pros
+ Most affordable complete post/lever package
+ Light action on lever
+ Easy and cheap to service

Cons
- Heavy
- Max length is 170



e*thirteen Vario Infinite



• Weight: 600 grams (150-180mm)
• Lengths: 120-150, 150-180
• Max Insertion: 287mm (150-180mm)
• Internals: Cartridge
• MSRP: $209
ethirteen.com

The all-black Vario is available in two travel options: One with 120mm to 150mm of drop, and another with 150mm to 180mm of drop, both adjustable by 30mm in just 5mm increments, without tools, via a clever rotating upper bushing. It's controlled by a redesigned remote, and e*thirteen says that it weighs between 550 and 618-grams, depending on the model.

The remote on the Vario has been refined and feels extra robust with plenty of traction on the thumb paddle. The $49.95 USD remote is sold separately, as are a bunch of the Vario's small parts. Assuming it's not a warranty issue, a new cartridge costs $49.95 as well, a rebuild kit (bushings, seals, keys, etc.) $24.99, replacement seat clamp hardware is $20.99, and the actuator assembly sells for $15.99 USD.

The Vario presents a solution to a lot of riders looking to get the most out of their seat tube real estate with adjustability in just 5mm increments.


Pros
+ Variable adjustability allows compatibility for many different riders / bikes
+ Lever is solid and feels great
+ A lot of bang for your buck

Cons
- 180mm is the max available length



OneUp V2



• Weight: 590 grams (210mm)
• Lengths: 120, 150, 180, 210
• Max Insertion: 297mm
• Internals: Cartridge
• MSRP: $209
oneupcomponents.com

OneUp's Dropper Post is another post that has a variable height. It is available in 120mm, 150mm, 180mm, and 210mm lengths. All of those lengths can be shimmed down in travel by 10 or 20mm increments to fill all the gaps in the line. The $209 post has an extremely low stack height allowing the post to get lower on the collar than any other post in the test group.

The dropper is also very light when taking into consideration overall length and drop. Return speed can be adjusted under the saddle and the post operates very smoothly.


Pros
+ 210 mm length
+ Adjustable return speed and travel increments
+ Low stack height

Cons
- Can get sticky after lots of muddy, wet rides (easy to service though)



FSA Flowtron



• Weight: 616 grams (claimed, 150mm)
• Lengths: 125, 150, 175mm
• Max Insertion: 297mm
• Internals: Cartridge
• MSRP: $249.99
fullspeedahead.com

FSA's Flowtron dropper post uses a sealed alloy cartridge actuated by a shifter style remote. The post is available in 30.9 and 31.6 diameters and in 125mm, 150mm, and 175mm lengths. There's also a 27.2mm version that is compatible with a drop bar or MTB remote, useful for some XC bikes and those who run droppers on road or gravel bikes. The MTB remote is unique in that it is adjustable to have a soft, medium, or firm throw.

We haven't had our hands on this post yet but, we have one on the way so we will give more impressions once we've had plenty of time on it.


Pros
+ 27.2mm option
+ Adjustable lever feel

Cons
- Weight



SDG Tellis



• Weight: 600 grams (170mm)
• Lengths: 100, 125, 150, 170
• Max Insertion: 282mm (170mm)
• Internals: Cartridge
• MSRP: $269.99
sdgcomponents.com

SDG's Tellis post is available in four different lengths, the longest being 170mm. It has a two-year warranty and utilizes the same Wintek cartridge many other posts use in this test. If the post does happen to have an issue outside of warranty, the cartridge can be replaced for $44.99 USD.

The clamp is one of the more clean and neat two-bolt designs. It incorporates with a 3D forged head to keep the saddle in place. The Tellis is user-serviceable and SDG has a number of videos on their site instructing users how to do everything from a basic installation to a 400-hour service or cartridge replacement.

The cable is clamped into the remote lever which makes set-up simple and easy. The action on the lever is also light...very light. As far as reliability goes, we've had no issues in our experience and several of us have had the post on various bikes in recent times.


Pros
+ Ultra-light activation
+ User serviceability instructions
+ Reliable

Cons
- Included remote is slightly lackluster



Crankbrothers Highline 7



• Weight: 575 grams (150mm)
• Lengths: 100, 125, 150, 170
• Max Insertion: 265mm (150mm)
• Internals: Cartridge
• MSRP: $299
crankbrothers.com

Crankbrothers have been making seat posts longer than many, refining their product over the years with a few hiccups along the way. The Highline 7 utilizes the standard Wintek cartridge many other posts we've tested uses, but with a lower pressure. The post still functions due to the fancy seals and bushings, along with keys that make the post move smoothly with very little friction. This allows it to move up and down quickly with very little effort and a very light action.

The post is available in a number of diameters, including 27.2 and 34.9, plus the standard 30.9 and 31.6. The post has a nicely machined head on it that swings open easily to allow quick and effortless saddle changes. Although there are a couple sharp edges at the bolts, that can be excused for how much time is saved in swapping out saddles.

So far the Highline 7 has proven to be completely reliable, with flawless performance in less than optimal conditions.


Pros
+ Uber smooth operation
+ 4-year warranty
+ Easy saddle clamp

Cons
- Sharp edges on hardware



Fox Transfer



• Weight: 614 grams (175mm)
• Lengths: 100, 125, 150, 175
• Max Insertion: 289.9 (175mm)
• Internals: IFP
• MSRP: $349
ridefox.com

Fox have had the Transfer seatpost in their line for some time now, but the post recently received a significant revision. The head now features a more streamlined design that allows for the post to drop further before bottoming out, thus allowing Fox to make the overall length of the post shorter in the extended position than the old Transfer. The redesigned clamp allows for an easier saddle installation. The bolts loosen with a 4mm Allen key and pivot forward and back. This allows them to swing free from the top plate completely while staying attached to the post. The top plate can then be removed for the saddle to sit on the lower plate. Simply place the top plate back on the rails, flip the bolts up, and tighten it back down.

The new post has a 30-50mm shorter overall length than the old model depending on the amount of travel. This should allow riders to increase the amount of drop they can run by 25-50mm if they were already bottoming out the collar, depending on the frame. There are now more drop options, including a 175mm version and a new dropper lever too, although that's sold separately.


Pros
+ Easy to use clamp head
+ Clamp bolts don't interfere with saddle
+ Low stack height

Cons
- Only available up to a 175mm length currently



KS Lev Integra



• Weight: 542 grams (175mm)
• Lengths: 100, 125, 150, 175
• Max Insertion: 265mm (175mm)
• Internals: Air
• MSRP: $389
kssuspension.com

KindShock or KS have also been in the dropper post game for quite some time now. Their line of LEV posts have been refined over the years and the latest iteration of the LEV Integra is no exception. The post is available in numerous diameters and lengths, now topping out at 175mm.

The LEV Integra utilizes a lower pressure but high volume cartridge which users can add air pressure too, above the factory setting, to control the return speed of the post. The LEV Integra comes with KS' remote lever which has been updated to a more traditional clamp style, foregoing the old clamshell style that didn't work all that well.

Having ridden the post on numerous test bikes and personal bikes over the last few years, the LEV Integra has proven to be one of the most reliable and maintenance-free posts that we've had our hands on. It's easy to use, worry, and hassle-free. It also has a great feel, and is one of the lighter posts we have, making it easy to recommend.


Pros
+ Reliable and lightweight
+ Numerous size options





BikeYoke Revive



• Weight: 525 grams (160mm)
• Lengths: 125, 160, 185
• Max Insertion: 264.5 (160mm)
• Internals: Twin-tube
• MSRP: $399
bikeyoke.de

BikeYoke's Revive seatpost was developed by a couple of German engineer/mountain bike enthusiasts who were disappointed by a number of issues that still plague droppers today - the worst of which is the penchant for hydraulically actuated designs to suck air into their oil columns and develop the dreaded seat sag. Additionally, many posts require a bit of work to do a full service if air gets on the wrong side of the seals.

The Revive is designed to be able to be rebuilt by anyone with a bit of mechanical knowledge. It also has a release valve near the clamp head to allow air to escape, as it's only a matter of time with most any dropper before that happens. Open the valve, depress the post, close the valve, and things are back to normal.

With that, the post isn't the least expensive by any means...$400 is more than twice what some of the other posts in our basket cost but, for many riders, the ability to easily bleed the air out will be worth that.


Pros
+ Release valve bleeds air
+ Smooth action

Cons
- Pricey




RockShox Reverb Stealth C1



• Weight: 654 grams (150mm, incl. lever)
• Lengths: 100, 125, 150, 175, 200
• Max Insertion: 225 (150mm)
• Internals: IFP
• MSRP: $399
sram.com

RockShox have had a number of years with the hydraulically activated Reverb post in their line up. The latest iteration of the Reverb is the C1, and it addresses some of the reliability issues that were at times found in the previous versions.

The hyraulically actuate C1 Reverb has a lighter action and drops with far less force than any of RockShox's previous posts. The C1 also has a longer service interval of 600 hours, aided by a new IFP design and the addition of a vent valve that allows users to bleed air out and eliminate the sagging that IFP posts can develop after extended use.

The post is available in a range of lengths, from 100 to 200mm, and sells for right at $400, making it one of the more expensive posts on the market, even as it is hydraulic and includes a lever.


Pros
+ Light action
+ Bleed valve
+ Variety of lengths

Cons
- Hydraulic is difficult to fix trailside



Vecnum Nevo



• Weight: 511 grams (212mm)
• Lengths: 122, 152, 182, 212
• Max Insertion: 317 (212mm)
• Internals: Air
• MSRP: 439 €
vecnum.com

Vecnum's Nevo post is one of the fancier mechanical posts we have on test and it's completely assembled in Europe. The post comes with all of the bells and whistles to justify its 439 € price. The post has a long drop - at 212mm, it's more than any other post we have gotten our hands on and with a 511 gram weight for that length, it's also the lightest.

The Nevo has clean looks and a slotted head that makes the saddle super easy to install. It also has a low stack height.

A different approach than some other posts, the Nevo only is available in a 30.9 diameter, using shims to fit 31.6 and 34.9 seat tubes and we've had some issues with ours slipping, even with friction paste and the appropriate torque when mounted up to our RAAW test bike, although there have only been a handful of rides on it as of yet, it's worth noting as it's the only issue thus far.

The post's travel can be reduced, up to 32mm, to get the exact height desired. Therefore, riders are able to utilize the low stack height and long post length to its maximum advantage.


Pros
+ Longest post on test, light for length
+ Slotted head makes saddle install easy
+ Mechanical - easy to service

Cons
- Shims=slipping
- Feels a little clunky and harsh compared to some other posts



RockShox Reverb AXS



• Weight: 650 grams (150mm)
• Lengths: 100, 125, 150, 170
• Max Insertion: 225 (150mm)
• Internals: IFP
• MSRP: $800
sram.com

The wireless Reverb AXS goes for $800 USD, or exactly twice the price of a standard Reverb Stealth with their 1X remote. It's also a smidge heavier than a standard Reverb, at 650 grams for my 150mm-travel model, but you're paying extra for the missing hose, not missing grams. Paired with the post, is a wireless shifter that is very similar to the AXS gear shifter SRAM uses for their wireless MTB drivetrains.

The head of the post contains a tiny motor, gearbox, and electronics that make the post work. On the bottom is a vent valve to bleed off air. The head is adjustable via a tilt screw in the front which also locks it in place and a clamping bolt on the side. All of that aside, the post offers the easiest installation of any dropper we have, just put it in, pair it, and go.

We've had the Reverb AXS on numerous bikes over the last year with zero issues, and the battery has only needed to be charged every three weeks or so with regular usage.


Pros
+ No hose, easy set up
+ Easy to set post to exact height desired by feathering remote
+ Flawless performance

Cons
- Remembering to charge batteries
- 2x cost of standard reverb, 4x some other posts




In conclusion, all of these posts are solid choices for the right rider and each has its benefits. If money was no option and I wasn't worried about having the lowest possible stack height, I'd choose to have the RockShox Reverb AXS on every bike I had...especially if I was the one building the bikes and routing cables. If I was concerned with the lowest stack height possible, I'd look at the OneUp or Fox Transfer. For the easiest to install a saddle on, the Transfer or Crankbrothers Highline 7 both fit that bill. Longest length? OneUp or Vecnum. Looking for the best overall value? The PNW Rainier IR is really hard to beat.

At the end of the day, all of the posts here are so much advanced over their predecessors that it's hard to go wrong with one over the other. Depending on what you personally need, one may indeed be better for you and your budget than the other, so check out the chart to easily compare the lengths, stack heights, and costs to decide what's right for you.


396 Comments

  • 257 0
 No conclusion? Pinkbike, which one is the best value for money, and best overall seatpost?
  • 28 1
 Seems like it is an upload error, based on the index.
  • 225 9
 The best value for money seatpost is not here - it is the Brand-X Ascend.
  • 54 0
 Check out the vital version if you want some actual conclusions. I can save you the time, the bike yoke wins. Also despite being ‘pricey’ its the same price as a lot of the other posts here that aren’t ‘price’. Not saying its cheap, far from it. Just consistency would be nice.
  • 19 0
 @drfunsocks: Bit like the KS only comes in up to 175 and this isnt picked out as a flaw!
Lack of consistency for sure.
  • 30 0
 @drfunsocks: That's what I was thinking! The reverb is the same price and the Vecnum is more expensive, and price isn't even mentioned as a con for either. Not to mention that the bikeyoke seems like a better value based on their quality. The KS post is only $10 cheaper and doesn't even have any cons listed.

Similarly, the comments on weight in the pros/cons are so inconsistent that they're completely worthless.
  • 10 26
flag landscapeben (Jul 15, 2020 at 1:55) (Below Threshold)
 @chillescarpe: Nope, the best value is a decent post bought second hand from Pinkbike Buysell and given a service to freshen up. I just got a oneup 170mm for £120 and two 150mm droppers (1x RaceFace Aeffect, 1 x Whyte drop it II) brand new, just removed from their shop-bought parent bikes and sold for £90 a pop to go on my mates rides as the owners wanted to upgrade to a more expensive dropper in both instances.
  • 11 0
 @chillescarpe: totally agree best value and a great performer .. had couple of Rock shox models that were rubbish and wobbled about Ike a toilet door in the wind .. the brand X was excellent in comparison and a third of the price
  • 12 1
 @thegoodflow: the whole articles pros/cons section should be taken out really. On the axs reverb ‘easy to set post to exact height be feathering remote’ its a dropper post, the whole point is to be able to set it to a height easily! Put your arse where you want the post, press the button, bingo! Neglects the the $800 post only having 170mm drop is a weakness on a $180 post but not mentioned on the axs...
  • 30 3
 @landscapeben: Or just buy a new Brand-X Ascend for £129.99 with full warranty.
  • 9 24
flag landscapeben (Jul 15, 2020 at 3:06) (Below Threshold)
 @chillescarpe: No thanks, you can keep it, i'd rather be riding my oneup. I'm not saying it's a bad post, I'd just ride something better for the same money.
  • 24 3
 @chillescarpe: Brand-X is fire for the price
  • 2 0
 @drfunsocks: your spot on and come on, who really cares if your post is 2mm out of position?
  • 7 1
 Currently waiting for a 210mm Oneup to arrive to replace a broken reverb. With no conclusion I’ll have to wait a few days to ensure I made the right decision.
  • 4 0
 @chillescarpe: yep totally agree.
  • 19 0
 @chillescarpe: After I became a Reverb bleeding specialist, I bought a Brand-x (or Tranz-x, I don't remember) a year ago and it still goes strong. It's rock solid compared to an Reverb.
Ok, the lever feels cheap but it works. Every single time!
  • 5 0
 I’ve had loads including a transfer but my 2 favourites have been one up and xfusion manic and both fantastic but the one up pips it I think. Light cheap very adjustable and cheap to service
  • 1 0
 @chillescarpe: it’s slow but it functions forever with no problems at all ever! Pair it with a wolf tooth lever and it’d be great however for not a lot more you can get the one up
  • 31 7
 It’s 2020... nobody wins, everyone gets a medal.
  • 4 1
 @chillescarpe: so true, think it’s the same or very similar to the Trans X species OEM too. And also if I remember rightly Race Face have the exact same badged up and sold more expensively (obviously!!)
  • 6 0
 PB never gives conclusions to "shootouts." Ever. Drives me nuts. At least Enduro Mag likes to pick a winner.
  • 1 0
 Counting the cons i get KS as a winner (zero cons). Sad.
  • 12 0
 I've owned a surprising amount of these and the biggest surprise has been the SDG Tellis. Zero issues, easy install, good speed and super-smooth operation, inexpensive and the right length. They're now my default. Clearly built in the same factory as the Bontrager Dropline, but way more reliable and better movement. We all know the problems with Reverbs, even has a Transfer develop a lot of play, and the Highline was so slow that with the longer length you'd never get it all the way back up while riding. OneUp was solid too, but also developed some early issues and for some reason I've had the cable disconnect itself more than once when moving the bike around.

TLDR: SDG Tellis checks all the boxes for least amount of money and weighs little. Just get one.
  • 2 0
 @chillescarpe: Found one way better on price!
  • 1 1
 @chillescarpe: No, I've was cheap and bought one of those and it worked for a year. My previous Specialized Dropper was 6 years old before I had issues with it. A little bit more money and you can have a dropper that works well for several years.
  • 1 0
 @WolfpackFBNS: Was not the same as these have just come on market in last 6 months
  • 1 0
 Many people says Brand x ok, but just think it's a Shimano cartridge inside !
Test the pro koryak next time : shimano quality !
  • 5 0
 @chillescarpe: Exactly! The cheapest and only dropper you'll ever need. Not sure why people dole out so much cash on droppers... They all do the same thing besides the reverb. All the reverb does is give me headaches..
  • 2 1
 @chillescarpe: Maybe, if you like slow returning posts...
  • 2 0
 @WoodstockMTB: tough to get someone to buy sidebar ads after you pan their product....*cough*REVERB*cough*

did anyone think PB would talk about the 800lb sram in the room?
  • 22 0
 best value: oneup
best overall: bikeyoke
  • 2 0
 @tobiusmaximum: This comment is so 2010
  • 11 0
 Reverb Stealth is twice the price, and the same weight as the X-Fusion yet the latter is the only one that’s heavy? Good to see Pinkbike impartiality as usual. Gotta keep those SRAM $ coming in I guess.

Either buy a cheap cartridge post or a Bike Yoke.
  • 2 0
 Why isn’t the “Rated” section showing up on my screen?
  • 14 0
 @jclnv: The "heavy" 170mm x-fusion is also lighter than the 150mm reverb axs that costs 4x as much, but the weight of the axs isn't mentioned in the pros/cons. The x-fusion was also criticised for "max length is 170"... the $800 axs is also only available up to 170mm, but that wasn't mentioned as a con for the axs.
  • 13 0
 I think they were trying to avoid having to say that one of their major advertiser's product (i.e., RockShox) is a complete turd compared to the competition.

First thing I did when I got my bike was swap out the Reverb for a PNW. Simple, kind of heavy, but exceptionally reliable, the PNW is the AK-47 of dropper posts.
  • 1 2
 Odd, they all have pros and cons!
  • 2 0
 The KS rage is short for its travel, is less than like $200, and goes to 190mm of travel. I’ve been on one since October and it has been completely trouble free
  • 2 1
 @dinislee88: you did it!
  • 4 0
 “No conclusion? Pinkbike, which one is the best value for money, and best overall seatpost?“

@notphaedrus They wouldn’t dare upset their major buyers of ad space and paid content.
  • 1 0
 @LuvAZ: fixed

best value: pnw
best overall: bikeyoke

oneup = durability better than ks lev, but still not quite there.
  • 4 0
 FWIW, I've had several KS Lev posts and will echo their total reliability (and functionality) comments, they have all been bullet proof and easy to service/clean. I've also had a couple of Brand-X on Fat Bike's and they just simply work, hot or cold albeit a bit slow in the winter, you can't beat the value.

KS for reliability, track record and weight, Brand-X for value that can't be beat...also the remote is really quite good on the Brand-X, not as nice the Wolf Tooth I have with my current KS but very close and included for well under $200.
  • 4 0
 I currently have the PNW, XFusion and BikeYoke mounted on my bikes. Winner by far is the XFusion for me. Has the best lever action and is dead reliable. BikeYoke is second, the lever is just a little more notchy. Distant third is the PNW. The lever action is horrible requiring a lot of pressure to actuate and lacks the smoothness of the others.
  • 11 0
 hahaha the rare 13-way tie!
  • 2 1
 @chillescarpe: 100% agree 100 bucks and three seasons later still going strong.
  • 1 0
 @dinislee88: third times the charm
  • 2 0
 @chillescarpe: wish I can upvote this more. Still using mine after 2 years and ZERO service
  • 1 1
 I mean, I'd never in hayalll install, ride, and review, how many posts? So Kudos to the authors for doing this. I refuse to even pretend I see anything wrong with their methods, or anything else. Epic effort, youse guys.
You coulda made it 14 by trying out the 27.2 Thomsen dropper, but 'for criminy......
  • 1 1
 damn dude... read and see which one is best for you! Jesus...
  • 1 0
 @salespunk: Wait till they need servicing. Then you’ll see the beauty of the BikeYoke.
  • 1 0
 @kleinblake: I tried a KS in Spain on holiday a couple of years back and loved it, came home, ditched my Reverb, bought a KS, have not touched it to this day and it still works like new. No need to consider anything else for now.
  • 1 0
 @chillescarpe: It seems it used to be.
I've been having one 27.2x100 for two years or so. It works great and has very little of play in just rotating saddle, no wobbling or anything like that.
And I've got another one less than half a year ago. It already has a sort of noticeable 'lateral' play.
  • 2 0
 @NaturalSponge: you have the 210 one up is amazing.
  • 1 0
 I've ridden 4 posts over the past few seasons: The Reverb 125mm, Crank Brothers Highline 150mm, the X-Fusion 170mm, and currently the Oneup V2 180mm. By far my favorite post has been the Highline. The only con I experienced with that post after 3 years of use and ZERO service was that it always has a slower extension speed than the others and didn't make any noise when fully extended (its nice to know its at the top). You get used to it, but it never once needed a service, never stuck, and was always reliable. Also its lever rotates 360 degrees so you can get it in a really great position.
The One Up sticks a lot, even after greasing the collar and bushing once a week. it also makes a squeaking noise when I extend it, and takes more force to begin to push down that the other posts I've owned. The stack height is amazing though and I can get it way lower in my frame that the X-Fusion that came with the bike. The X-Fusion was otherwise a well performing post, but I couldn't get it low enough in my frame. The Reverb worked great, until it didn't like everyone else.
If I were buying a new post tomorrow it would be the Highline, no question.
  • 2 0
 @NaturalSponge: the one up droppers are amazing
  • 1 1
 @NMK187: The OneUp needs a full disassemble once in a while - which is actually only an ~8 min job. Jamming more grease in is good, but you need to get inside the collar to really get it back to its original, slippery self. In fact, I heavily recommend doing this brand new, as it seems often it's underlubed from the factory.

Once that's done, I think it's one of the simplest / easiest to service posts around. I just bought my 4th (various bikes, GF's bike) and I'm very happy with them. Reverb/9Point8's can rot in hell.
  • 1 0
 @drfunsocks: Yep Bike Yoke hands down for me. Just did my second service (post 2 years old). Easily available reasonably priced parts kit, easy even for someone with average home mechanic skills and continues to run as smooth as when new. Have NEVER even had to top up the air pressure. When I compare it to the rockshox, LEV, specialized and fox I have experience with and all my friends posts there is no comparison. Long term cost by far the cheapest. There are two Revive posts in the group of 15 or so I ride with (a 3rd one just bought but not had long enough to comment) and I think ours are the only posts which have never had an issue requiring the post going to the agent.
  • 2 0
 It's the One Up. $209, shortest overall length, most travel, lightweight, adjustable, smooth.
  • 2 0
 @Klainmeister: I've also been on the Tellis for well over a year and both my 150mm and 170mm have worked flawlessly. Easy to install and the stock lever works great (not the sexiest but totally functional). I've ran a few different models now (Reverb, KS Lev, Transfer) and the Tellis has been the most set-and-forget of them all.
  • 1 0
 @Klainmeister: ditto on the SDG Tellis. I've had Reverbs and KS droppers since they first came on the market.
The Tellis came stock on my bike and I wasn't expecting much from it tbh but I've been blown away by how smooth and reliable it has been.
  • 1 0
 @avalanx: index shmindex.
  • 86 3
 Brand-x for me, cheap and it just keeps working. The lever is not the best but you can always replace that.
  • 7 0
 This
  • 6 0
 Same for me, cheap as chips and has been working flawlessly for years
  • 9 3
 Last time i checked on crc, it was almost the same price as the one up
  • 3 0
 The also now do a 200mm version, which is great!
  • 1 0
 I had a Syncros that looked identical to that Brand-X and for as long as I owned it, it had trouble returning to full extension on the first press of the lever, regardless of the piston's air pressure.
  • 1 0
 @Stokedonthis: Stocks are low but the Brand-X is about €30 cheaper at least. Not much, still something.
  • 2 1
 I'm with you on this.... customer service is great from CRC too, when I had an issue with one they just replaced it.
  • 1 0
 yep - best post, but pretty awful lever. Switched to a cheap bontrager and it's an awesome setup!
  • 9 1
 ZTTO levers, 15eur on all my bikes, except the Reverb where it's an oil circuit:

www.aliexpress.com/i/32986127932.html

It's so good I even thought about making a european stock.
  • 4 1
 @zoobab2: +1 on the ZTTO lever. Super smooth,all aluminum,great grip and easy to install.
  • 3 0
 my brand-x has been completely reliable, but am I the only one whose saddle has so much play when the post is extended that it rattles like crazy if you pedal standing up?
  • 3 0
 @zoobab2: Looks like a Wolftooth rip-off.
  • 1 0
 @zoobab2: Does anyone know if the woothtooth integrated mounts SRAM/ shimano will work on this lever?
  • 1 0
 @Stokedonthis: Yep, last year I got my Brand X post for ~$130CAD on sale, with a $20 discount code, now they're at $212CAD on "sale".
  • 7 0
 Too bad CRC's delivery options to Canada are basically broken at this point.

If I order a Brand X dropper the delivery options I now have are as follows:

- Duty Paid - C$66.93
- Standard Tracked Postal - Free (May *will* incur extra duty charge, which used to be reasonaable, but can now be half the price of your order due to CRC's new shipping service.)
- Priority Tracked Express - Free (May *will* incur extra duty charge, which used to be reasonaable, but can now be half the price of your order due to CRC's new shipping service.)

I used to order from CRC almost exclusively and basically had to stop completely once they f*cked up their shipping process. It's completely uneconomical for Canadians.
  • 1 0
 @jayacheess: I feel you... I use to order from CRC all the time in the last 3 years. I only paid duties maybe 2 of the 10+ orders I had. But my last two orders, both were charged duties.

And if you don't choose the duty paid option and you get caught paying at the border, the delivery company will charge you way more than what CRC would have charged you. I found out the hard way.
  • 2 0
 @Ryan2949: Yeah, same here. Refused to pay and sent the order back. It's not worth it at all, now. Jenson has basically become the only reasonable option.
  • 1 0
 @jayacheess: merlincycles has been great for deals. Not everything is in stock, but when I use to work in a bike shop, I was able to get parts cheaper from them, then at my cost LOL. Blew my mind.
  • 2 0
 @Ryan2949: It's interesting that it's even worth it (or it was worth it) for you guys to order from Europe. I live in Europe, and I never ever order stuff from the US or Canada, because basically no one posts to the EU for cheap, and you can't escape import duties. Smile
  • 2 0
 @HollyBoni: I always order from European websites - CRC, MerlinCycles, Bike24, CiclioMattio to name a few - because their prices have always been better, even after shipping.

I can buy 4 high end tires on Bike24 for the price of 2 from North America. ~36 euro's($55CAD) gets you a Magic Mary SupreGravity/Ultra Soft. Or you can get any DHR or DHF with any casing and compound you want for ~35 euro's.

JensonUSA has crazy fast shipping, but they rarely have any discounts on parts. They also charge shipping to Canada on anything unless it's more than $150USD, plus you are paying taxes (13% in Ontario). Whereas most of my orders from Europe has gone through the border without being charged taxes. But I gotta wait longer.

EDIT: I went on Jenson and ONE Magic Mary SuperGravity Soft (not even the ultra soft) is $122CAD + taxes.
  • 3 0
 @Ryan2949: yeah, same here. CRC isn't what it once was. No Shimano and higher prices. Oh well, it was good for a while.
  • 1 0
 @jayacheess:
I've never been charged duty on their standard free shipping, have you? It says "may" incur duty and taxes. As far as I know, most bike parts don't have any tariffs or duties, and tax is 5% in BC, so not that much.
  • 2 0
 I got a free Wolftooth lever for my dropper, and boy does that ever make it feel just fine!
  • 2 0
 @woofer2609: I didn't a couple years ago, and then I started getting tagged with everything. The main problem now is that the new CRC courier will ding you with the fee, regardless of what border services actually says. And their fee is like 5 times the Canadian government's fee because of 'processing charges'.
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: My last order from CRC was a Nukeproof carbon bar and an Xtools tool box. Total was $99CAD (good price, I know) shipped. I think when I got hit with duties, I was charged over $40 just for taxes and duties, which is 40% of the price I paid for the items.

Got charged 13% HST (Ontario), then 6.1% duty (Canada-wide), then a "processing fee" of $11 then a "transaction fee" of $5.

This was with DHL.
  • 2 0
 @jayacheess: I ordered my Brand X dropper from CanadaCycles. Free shipping. 2 years later still works without single issue too.
  • 1 1
 @Ryan2949: that’s a pretty reasonable processing fee as far as shippers go, ups/fedex charge like $50 For dealing with customs. Standard mail is better though, like $10 dollars. As far as the actual tax and duties though I have a hard time feeling sympathy for people needing to pay those, seems like everyone is thinking back to when online shopping was small and customs would just let it pass
  • 2 0
 @jj12jj: Nah dude, you could do paid duty shipping with CRC up until like summer 2019, and was super reasonable. Usually like 25-30 dollars (total, shipping and duties) on a 150 dollar order. Paying 50% of the cost of the item in duties and shipping is literally what we used to deal with back in the day when online ordering wasn't the norm. I'll go back to other companies that are offering reasonable shipping.

The crazy thing is, CRC will still do super cheap shipping to the US, Australia, etc, etc. I'm not sure what happened last summer, but it's non-functional for us in Canada.
  • 1 0
 @jayacheess: Exactly, Canada gets screwed when it comes to shipping.

Example: If you buy a $2000CAD Vitus bike from CRC, you'll pay $600CAD in taxes and fees.

Meanwhile you can buy the bike in the USA and pay $69.99USD for shipping and this is said below: "All duties and taxes for bikes are included in shipping cost."

So to buy the same bike in Canada, costs us $600, but to have the same bike shipped to the USA is $70. Makes sense.
  • 1 0
 @Ryan2949: If you live in a major city, refuse to pay DHL and clear customs yourself. It can be a PITA, but DHL will usually drop their fees.
Of course, YMMV.
I'm finding Jenson is the better bet now.
It was fun while lasted.
  • 76 12
 How would anyone buy anything but a OneUp post. Solid, Dependable, affordable, shimmable, best lengths, tiny stack and insertion depth. They get my money all day long.
  • 4 0
 That's what I thought, but after half a year of riding I must say I'm not disappointed.
  • 12 3
 There is a pretty long thread on here about how the one up post doesn't function properly if you have the post close to all the way inserted. That's why I went in a different direction
  • 7 5
 OneUp and PNW make the most reliable and reasonably priced droppers out there
  • 2 0
 @friendlyfoe: I found this thread when I was having the same issues with my post and my heart sank! Turns out that I just needed to top up the air pressure again and it was back to normal! Although I'm not sure if this applies to everyones woes
  • 6 0
 I just switched from a 150mm Fox Transfer to a 180mm OneUp and I've been really impressed. It's smoother, easier to setup and allows for a much greater drop at half the price!
  • 1 0
 Their stuff is always out of stock. Went to their site this week to buy a 2nd v2 post but the 31.6 posts are all sold out. That's the only reason I can think of to buy anything else.
  • 1 0
 Yes, price, action, length, user serviceable. I swapped from a factory transfer 150 in order to get the full 210 one up post and have been using it for a year with no issues. Maybe 5% less solid feeling but the remote is infinity better than the mk1 fix lever and its 30% cheaper.
  • 3 0
 Let's not forget the readily available spare parts for about any of the parts you migh need and full disclosure on how much they cost.Something most brands should aim for.
  • 13 0
 you should consider Bikeyoke. And don't bother to buy the revive. The Divine even bleeds itself each time you push it completely down, has the same supereasy serviceability and is cheaper than the revive. I'd only choose between the OneUp and the BY Divine
  • 4 0
 Let’s not forget to leave out amazing customer support. Had mine about a year and then after I serviced it I started having some popping. The same popping happened when I first got it but then it went away after applying the electrical tape to the hydraulic mechanism (something early post got left out), so I was surprised when it came back. Well one up sent a whole new post, no hassles, no are you sure you built it right (it’s the simplest post to service too), just wanted to get me up and going ASAP. Come to find out the popping is it just ever so slight twisting in the frame that I was actually able to eliminate by applying fiber paste to inside the frame and post rather than just the post (guess too much was getting scrapped off). So now I’ll send the new one back to them even though they say it can’t be sold as new, kind of sucks for them cause I never even mounted it. Now have their bar and pedals too, impressive new company so far.

And for the not as smooth complaints the post does take a bit of time to break in and gets a lot better with use but is maybe never as smooth as a reverb or fox but honestly don’t miss it since it’s a dropper and I’m more concerned about amount of drop and min insertion rather than its small bump sensitivity. That said they could use a lower friction seal.
  • 6 0
 Upgraded from a Fox Transfer 150 to the OneUp V2 210mm. No problems with the post sticking and way less movement in the saddle than the Fox, and 40% cheaper in AU.
  • 3 0
 Oneup ftw. V1 for 2 years, only basic maintenance and inflating needed, still goes like new. It was the best option for biggest drop then, and also one of the cheapest. Only V2 could replace it, because I could perhaps get away with 200 drop.
  • 1 0
 @friendlyfoe: I had mine about 1cm from full insertion and it was binding with hardly any torque. I found someone who makes 25mm deep double bolt clamp and now it's fine.
  • 2 0
 I have some generic brand that sounds like a transgender superhero spoof called Trans-X. I think it's the same as the PNW. I rebuilt it myself pretty easily using PNW (I think?) instructions for service. Stupidly and absurdly simple.

But....then it did the same thing and wouldn't hold air and they warrantied it via Kona. Putting the Wolf Tooth lever with it made a huge difference.

Honestly unless you show me a picture and describe the lever actuation, the lever's adjustability and feature set, you're telling me nothing about the post.
  • 1 0
 @friendlyfoe: V1 or V2?
  • 3 0
 Also, great customer service. I had a cartridge go out on my V2, and they sent me a new one, the V2.1 actuator (no silly o-ring keeping the cable in place), and a pair of socks!
  • 2 4
 They are all made in the same factory in china
  • 1 0
 Enduro-mtb did a pretty big series on droppers recently. One Up won indeed.

enduro-mtb.com/en/the-best-dropper-post

I can imagine people would choose something else but yeah, One Up should be good for most.
  • 3 1
 OneUp is an excellent post. Works well, quality build, and low price. However, I still like the action of the Reverb despite the cons of tougher bleed and maintenance. The Reverb lever and post is super smooth and just great action.
  • 2 0
 I have a 170mm V1 and a 210mm V2. The new actuator is much better, one weak point for the V1 was if there were any tight spots in the cable routing it could cause issues as it was the outer that moved on actuation, rather than the inner. Now that's been resolved and the drop is longer, the V2 is my post of choice.
  • 1 0
 Dependable? Maybe if you don't ride in wet conditions, but if you do, the seals aren't up to the task and it will quickly seize. I've had two and both seized very quickly and required constant (to the tune of every 3-4 weeks) rebuilds to keep moving.

So: "Can get sticky after lots of muddy, wet rides (easy to service though)" should read: "Ingests a ridiculous amount of debris and water, requiring constant service", at least in my experience with it.

My X-Fusion has been better in every way.
  • 2 0
 @shinook: the PNW Ranier is a good reliable post
  • 1 0
 Yep, mine is great. It replaced a 150 fox transfer. I’m 6’4” the 210 of drop is a game changer. Also, the $20 ZTTO levers found on eBay are great.
  • 1 0
 @scottlink: How's that lever feel/smoothness? Say compared to a Fox Transfer. Trying to decide on a new post and it's Ranier vs. Devine. Device is 2X the price but ppl say smooth as buttah.
  • 3 0
 @shinook: I don't know if it's you who's been unlucky, or me that's been lucky, but I've ridden through 2 UK winters on Oneup droppers with zero issues (apart from the cable routing I mentioned above). I've yet to service either of them.
  • 3 0
 @danimaniac: I replaced my 160 Revive with a 185 Divine when I got a new frame that could take the extra length, and I prefer the Divine. The action is not quite as silky feeling, but the release requires less thumb pressure when there is weight on the post. Otherwise, same fit and quality for a little less money. Best posts available. The Vecnum would be interesting if there weren't such reliable, well engineered hydraulic posts as the BikeYokes available.
  • 1 0
 @danimaniac: I bought the Bike Yoke Revive 3 years ago. I ride 2-3 times a week, about 15 miles each ride. The Revive still functions like new. I have only once tried the "air bleed" function, when it was new, just to try it out. So, zero maintenance in 3 years. I highly recommend. Is it pricey? Yes, but over time it will save you from buying replacement parts, as well as time / money servicing it.
  • 2 0
 I know I'm an outlier but I wasn't too impressed with the OneUp V1 post. Mine has a lot of side to side play(yes I do maintain it). Also, I couldn't find a clamp for my v1 lever when I bought new brakes that weren't compatible with my original clamp. This forced me to buy a whole new lever and doesn't seem like great customer service. I'm glad most people seem to be having better luck.
  • 1 0
 I too went from a 175mm Fox Transfer to a 210mm OneUp. So far so good, and can't imagine buying anything else going forward given the almost $100 price difference between the OneUp and Transfer.
  • 2 1
 I bought one and it didn't work very well. The cable connector at the bottom gave me a lot of problems and there was twisting play. Returned and bought a PNW, and I am loving it so far.

I own the following:

1] PNW Rainier 200mm: Would buy again and do recommend
2] KS Lev 175mm: Would buy again and would recommend, but not available in 200mm+ length
3] Bike Yoke Revive 185mm: Would buy again, neutral on recommendation
4] One Up 210mm: Neutral recommendation
5] 9Point8 200mm: Would not buy, do not recommend (leaks air)
6] RS Reverb 170mm: Would not buy, do not recommend (problems in the cold, and a pain in the ass)
  • 1 0
 Mine has developed some vertical play after about 60 hours of riding (not when putting pressure on the saddle, but rather pulling up on saddle), but apart from that has been smooth and reliable. I'm using the 2.1 actuator.
  • 1 0
 I had a B1 reverb for all of a week. I took my bike in and purchased the V2 OneUp post and couldn’t be happier. That also led me to a bash guard, edc tool and pump, and a front axel. OneUp makes stuff that just works.
  • 1 0
 @CarlMega: the lever is the most positive feeling lever I've used... Barely touch it, it goes.. feels good, and doesn't flop or rattle
  • 1 0
 I have 2x 210mm for my bikes and so far they are the best ever, replacing one brand-x and one Fox transfer. Totally agree, why would you buy anything else?
  • 1 0
 Mine sticks and takes a lot of force to push down. Also makes a squeaking sound when compressed. I service it once a week at least. The stack height is incredible though.
  • 2 0
 @NMK187: Your experience seems to differ greatly from most other owners. Have you actually tried contacting OneUp about it? They're always super responsive.
  • 1 0
 @thegoodflow: I've bought a lot of their stuff but it can require some patience. If they have something on their site that is sold out, I always ask for an email to "notify me when available". I have now done this with their pedals, bar, and dropper post. All were available within 1-2 weeks. However, we're definitely living under different rules during Covid.
  • 1 0
 I tried to buy one last week - not in stock in the size I need anywhere in the UK. So had to get the BrandX post instead.
  • 47 0
 Bike Yoke is the Honeybadger of Seatposts ... 4 years, all year/weather use, 0 Service, bikeyoke dont care
  • 4 0
 Same here! Not the cheapest, but easily the best there is. Now i own two, on my both mountain bikes.
  • 1 0
 Same hire two revives in use. fox transfer fucktory, fills like piece of chinese crap compared to them.
  • 3 0
 yeah, I might service mine end of this season not because I must, but because I can.
  • 4 0
 I've had 5 different IFP style posts. All developed the air pocket and saggy post syndrome. Got a used Revive for cheap and it has been flawless and smooth. I won't go with anything other than BikeYoke now.
  • 2 0
 Weird, I’ve had the opposite experience, mine has been a bit of a basket case since day 1, and now creaks like crazy. Good to hear other other people have reliable posts, maybe worth sending it out for a rebuild rather than the parts bin.
  • 2 0
 Dude for real. I've had my Bike Yoke for 3-4 years. Not a single rebuild or air bleed yet (knock on wood). Will never get another dropper as long as that company is around.
  • 1 0
 @maxyedor: Nice thing about the Revive, you can rebuild it yourself. No need to spend $150-200 if the dropper needs a rebuild.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, I have a Bike Yoke Revive on the short travel bike, it is by far the best seat post I have ever owned. Buttery smooth action, solid feel, totally foolproof design, reliable and lightweight.

Somehow the KS Lev on my "big bike" is still going strong after 5 years. When it dies it will be replaced by a Bike Yoke.
  • 34 2
 Pity the Brand-X Ascend is missing from this test!
  • 2 0
 Yep, brilliant for the money!
  • 3 0
 Surprised it wasn't included indeed. It is probably the "good for little money" option for many of those shopping online.
  • 2 0
 See the pnw - travel adjust.
  • 19 3
 Brand-X aka CRC must have not been willing to pay to have their product displayed in PB's "reviews"
  • 6 1
 @Torrrx: Brand-X is Trans-X. I got mine on rebate price for 100eur, bargain. PNW also rebrands those Trans-X dropper seat posts.
  • 2 1
 @zoobab2: Ah yes all the trans-X dropper posts with the adjustable travel
  • 16 0
 @zoobab2: so I googled up trans X... you wouldn't believe the search results
  • 1 1
 @Torrrx: Brands/companies pay PB for advertisement, not for having their stuff tested. Nukeproof and Vitus stuff is often being tested here so your statement doesn't hold any water.

@Duderz7 : Yeah good one. In Europe they may not be as cheap (or even available) as Brand X but I can imagine in Canada it may very well be the other way around.
  • 1 0
 @The-Catalan-Rider: try tranzx. Definitely less exciting (unless you have an object fetish for dropper posts and handlebars).
  • 35 6
 No love for a Canadian made dropper on a Canadian site? Cmon Pinkbike! #wheresthe9point8

Just so happens to be my favorite post and by far the best head design...travesty I tell ya.
  • 5 1
 Agreed!
  • 8 6
 I hated that post, never was reliable for me
  • 5 0
 I have had luck with mine and enjoyed 200mm of drop for the past 2 years. Pays to get rid of their grease tho as it dries out, had better luck with a teflon based lube
  • 9 7
 Mine failed to stay down on the first ride and I crashed as a result. It was a faulty part on a new post and they would not offer a complete refund because the post was installed. No apologies, no worry about causing a crash, horrible customer service.
  • 9 2
 Best head design for sure, but as unreliable as a Reverb. On my third post now (warrantied twice) and they have a habit of losing air and becoming sticky. Not worth the premium price.
  • 9 4
 9point8 spanks all these posts. I was a first adopter of the 9point8. That post is still working on my bike with only needing a rebuild. I've added 2 more to my stable.

Raceface/Easton did the 9point8 mechanism dirty by not abiding by the tolerances set forth by the Canadian engineers. The Fall Line is a masterpiece of a dropper post.
  • 4 0
 @drpheta: This is my fifth season on my 9:point:8. It only worked well for the first two. Now, it's had a couple rebuilds and is still sticky and constantly loses air. There's a reason why places like Fanatik are blowing out their 9.8 inventory at cost.

I'll be replacing mine with either a Bike Yoke or OneUp.
  • 3 0
 I have 2 of those, both leak like crazy. Bought them because of the 25mm offset but I would not recommend this seat post.
  • 2 0
 @rarerider: Yea the head design the Fall Line is awesome. They are the only company offering different offsets on their dropper. I wish OneUp would develop some sort of offset head plate or adapter, but 9.8 is the only one in the game for now. Not worth the headaches of the dropper just to get that offset head, though.
  • 4 0
 @drpheta: It's OK until you try a BikeYoke. Both versions of the BY posts feel and work better and are more consistent and reliably sealed, and are much cleaner designs. The only thing I prefer about the 9point8 is the saddle mount and being able to easily swap out the layback option. So it's on my loaner/backup bike that gets frequent saddle swaps and adjustments.
  • 5 1
 Failed a third time after the second warranty rebuild. Will not purchase again. Post stanchion scored itself on the first two warranties, then after both replacements the post started leaking and just stopped working. The first "warranty" 9point8 charged me for parts too, which I thought was BS.

That said, the head design is super nice. The post is garbage though.
  • 2 0
 I'ts funny because when I was researching posts 2-3 years ago the 9point8 was by far the most reliable....sure the others have come a long way, but still think it's a super reliable well sorted platform. It's light years better than the KS one I had around the same time.

I rode/raced 2 full seasons here in the PNW along with the BC Bike Race - 0 issues. Started getting sticky, bought parts to rebuild which were cheap.
  • 2 0
 @RadBartTaylor: yeah
I can see it's not an isolated incident with some users, but my 3 have been rock solid.

1 is about 5 years old, the other 2 about 3 years old.
  • 5 0
 9point8 has a bad bath of seals from a single supplier some time ago. It affected 6 months of production. That is a LOT of posts. As far as I hear, a change was made to the seals they was not known to them. My first one needed several warranties, but after the second or third one it was good for multiple seasons. I have bought two more for myself since then, the old version and the new. Both have been fantastic. Zero issues. Best post out there in my opinion.
  • 4 0
 same - best post ive used - also extremely light
  • 5 0
 I am going through 4th season on a 175mm 9point8. Ï have done service myself this winter after 3 years of use, just to be sure I put something in.

Reliable, zero issues, just inflate time to time.

I have a Revive for 3,5 years (first batch of revives from preorder) w/o any issue. And OneUp V1 170, 2 years no issue.

All these have been great.

My next choice would be a Bikeyoke though.
  • 3 0
 Worst post I've owned in a decade of riding. The did warranty is several times but I eventually gave up and threw it out. As an aside Raceface licensed 9point8 tech for their posts and dropped them not long after when the returns piled up.
  • 2 0
 9Point8 has been a problem for me leaking air.
I would not buy again. Customer service wasn't very good either.
@privateer-wheels tried helping me out by connecting me to 9piont8 rep, and that didn't get anywhere either.
Privateer-wheels was more informative and helpful than 9point8.
  • 3 1
 Mine was sticky and unreliable. After warranty it’s still sticky and unreliable. Can’t handle cold either. Leaks air and you gotta love that collar with no way to open besides a pipe wrench which destroys the finish. Terrible design.
  • 2 0
 @abzillah: sorry to hear that buddy Frown

@gafoto: you should be using a strap wrench on the collar. Same as any dropper post collar. Not a pipe wrench!
  • 1 0
 9.8 would go a long way in just utilizing a replaceable cartridge but keeping their head design.
  • 2 0
 @PHeller: the head is definitely the best there is. Isolating the leveling of the seat from the installation of the seat is pretty genius imho.

But I think when they work, which seems to be not the case for everyone while I have had great experience, they work really damn well - better than a replaceable cart has been my experience.
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels: Yeah the seat head is very good. But compared to the smoooth action of something like either of my BikeYokes, it isn't an impressive post at all. And they are clunky looking in comparison to a BikeYoke and many of the other newer posts with lower stack and shorter bodies. I haven't had the issue and I have been aware to try and avoid it, but the main seal seems to be their weak point. It was a unique design with some interesting features when it came out, but it's getting stale.
  • 2 0
 @velodonata: The New Fall Line R has a lower overall stack and tidier head, which I believe is more competitive. And they introduced new seals a while back. This is what fixed my original post - it suffered from both slipping brake and air leaks - three warranty jobs later and it's been on trail every since without issue, three seasons I believe. Was a pain in the butt, but it's good now. My two others have been mint, one being two seasons old now.

I have one of the new R's and it's as "smooth" as anything else out there. Mind you, I don't really place a lot of weight on a dropper being smooth - it's not suspension. Your BikeYokes I'm sure is great and I'm not going to knock it. People seem to love them. They gave you a button to fix that whole air/oil issue and all. I would rather just not have the oil at all. And I would prefer to be able to rebuild my post at home when it comes maintenance time, not toss a cart in the garbage and buy a new one. For me, 9point8 ticks that box. I definitely favor the mechanical brake and oil free assembly. Just my opinion of course.
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels: The 9point8 R version is $400 and doesn't come in anything longer than 150. My second BikeYoke is a Divine model that doesn't even have or need the external reset feature, it is internally self bleeding. My Revive model with the external bleed never needed it's use. Both versions are easy to fully rebuild at home, there is no disposable cartridge which was a factor for me too.

I found the occasional need to do the full press and hold to reset the brake in my 9point8 to maintain lever feel and stroke action much more of an actual issue than using the BikeYoke Revive feature ever turned out to be, and a definite contrast to the smooth consistency of the BikeYokes.
  • 21 0
 You'd think OneUp v2 is great until you try BikeYoke Revive.

Two of my friends have OneUp v2 and they're not nearly as smooth and one feels notchy despite been new and freshly lubed.

Revive is sublime.

OneUp remote is average at best and what's funny is that there is GREAT ZTTO remote available at AliExpress for quarter of the price that's far better quality and operation plus you can 3D print matchmaker/ispec adapter for free.
  • 3 0
 All the ZTTO stuff looks pretty nice considering, good tip.
  • 1 5
flag jeremy3220 (Jul 15, 2020 at 3:06) (Below Threshold)
 I thought about the Revive but user reviews made the Revive purge system more of a curse than anything. Users mentioned if you store the bike sideways or flip it upside down then you have to revive it, and eventually they mentioned having to revive their droppers multiple times a ride. I'm sure it's smoother but other than that it sounds worse. Also, max travel is 185mm, my OneUp is 210mm.
  • 1 0
 Revive is nearly double the price online, so it better be great...
  • 5 0
 @jeremy3220: newer Bike Yokes have a membrane which stops most of the air contamination and I know two 1.0 Revives without that and I've only seen them bleed the post once after they bought it.
  • 4 0
 @GVArider: One thing to note on the price for the Revive is that it comes with a lever (and a very good one at that).

I own a C1 Reverb, OneUp V2, and a couple Revives. The Revives are the best of the bunch, hands down. The Reverb was bought as a new take-off for less than the OneUp V2, and at that point, it was the better buy. Actuation on the OneUp is the least smooth of the bunch, and the post feels cheaper overall IMO. I would buy it again, but only if I already have a lever that I want to use and am looking to save some money. I honestly feel like the Revive is just as good of a value (possibly better), assuming you want to use the included lever. The only thing I don't like about the Reverb is that the parts to service it are super pricey compared to the Revive.
  • 2 1
 @jeremy3220: not my experience at all
  • 2 0
 @jeremy3220: none of what you stated has ever happened to me.

I’ve had the oneup and the revive. The oneup feels about 1/2 as good as the revive.
  • 1 0
 Haven't tried the Bike Yoke yet. My only issue with the Bike Yoke Revive is that they only make a 160mm and I am pretty much maxed out on 150mm posts, so not sure if I can fit it. Currently using a OneUp and Reverb. The OneUp is an excellent post. Good action, quality build, and low price. However, I still like the action of the Reverb better. Smoother, adjustable speed, and the light smooth action of the lever is like butter. The Reverb does have cons though, with the tougher bleed and more maintenance.
  • 2 0
 @tacklingdummy: no, they have a 185mm.
  • 1 1
 @jzPV: You are right. They do make a 125mm, 160mm, and 185mm. I should rephrase my statement. The only size they have that may fit me is 160mm, but it likely would be too big.
  • 2 1
 @tacklingdummy: you can travel it with little spacers. So you can make it a 155/150 and have full insertion.
  • 3 1
 @tacklingdummy: Keep in mind that the Revive has a low stack height. Compare to the brand(s) you've been using on the chart at the bottom of the article. The 160 from BikeYoke may actually increase your wiggle room vs. some other brand's 150 size. Also, Bike Yoke has another model (the Divine) which is both less expensive and has adjustable extension, so you can configure it to optimize the travel.
  • 1 0
 @Inertiaman: OneUp has one of the lowest stack height and I'm pretty much maxed out on that post. It would depend on the frame as well, but it is extremely tight on the bikes I have right now.
  • 2 0
 @tacklingdummy: that's one benefit to the OneUp. My 5'0" tall girlfriend fit a 150mm OneUp V2 in her lower VPP Roubion. That's impressive IMO. Bike Yoke posts are a bit longer.

I, on the other hand, actually can't run a lot of posts that are under 170mm because I don't get enough insertion. I have a 185mm Revive in my Rallon with >100mm of post exposed. Seat tubes are getting too short IMO.
  • 16 0
 I really like these shoot-outs! But I have to say, the Pros and Cons seem quite randomly assigned. For instance, the comparatively high price is not mentioned as a Con for the Crankbrothers, Fox, KS etc. The weight is mentioned as "not the lightest" for the PNW but this one has quite similar weight as Fox etc, where this is not mentioned as an issue.

I think the summary table in the end gives a very good comparison. You might even work with green/red color codes for category leaders and laggards.

But the Pro/Con summary per product is .. a bit flawed this time Smile
  • 19 0
 the conclusion dropped below my expectations
  • 7 0
 I too would like a extended review.
  • 3 0
 @nozes: An extended review may be posted soon.
  • 2 1
 Well I can imagine that must have been a bit of a setback. But don't worry, it will drop eventually. If it doesn't, clamp your keyboards tight until it bleeds. If that doesn't help, grab your torch and AXS and let's travel to the PB headquarters.
  • 17 1
 Brand-X dropper is missing on the list. They make the best bang for the buck droppers on the market, and they basically don't need service.
  • 3 4
 They dont sponsor PB so theybarent reviewed. I agree, have mine for two years and still didnt need any service appart from pumping air into it.
  • 2 0
 Aren't the Brand-X seatposts actually made by TranzX? Either way, I have one of each on 2 different bikes, both going strong after a year and were inexpensive ~$150. I've never ridden a higher end one, so I'm not sure what spending more actually gets you.

RaceFace Aeffect and many other posts seem to be the same.
  • 1 0
 @aciddrop: Yes,they are.
I think even at some point Giant used the Tranz-X with their name on it.
A few weeks ago I was searching for a 27.2 post for my XC bike and found another brand using their posts. Procraft,house brand for Bike24 has their 27,2 x 110mm travel model for 134€. It's great!
  • 14 0
 "RIDDEN AND RATED: 13 OF THE BEST DROPPER POSTS" **

(**Apart from that one we haven't actually ridden yet. Or touched.)
  • 14 0
 Yeah, what's your point, Pinkbike?
  • 4 0
 pb apparently doesn't stand for pointbike
  • 1 0
 @Mooka: So... no point, no pink either on here. Lots of puns to be found though, so...
  • 10 0
 How can the FSA post even be in a "Ridden and Rated" article, when this is part of their description:

"We haven't had our hands on this post yet but, we have one on the way so we will give more impressions once we've had plenty of time on it."
  • 10 0
 Because this is an advertisement
  • 1 0
 @the-joe: I know, but they could atleast TRY to make an effort.
  • 8 0
 This "ridden and rated" article looks like it was written by someone who forgot they had a deadline, then 20 minutes before it was due, their editor said, "How's that extensive 13 dropper post review coming?" The rest is history.
  • 2 0
 Agreed. I like most of the Pinkbike content, but occasionally they publish something that makes me think WTF?
And 9/10 of those times, its written by Daniel Sapp.
  • 7 1
 First off: It's called Vecnum NIVO, not NEVO Smile

Secondly: Don't let the mechanics fool you. There is no oil in the seatpost and you don't have the possibility to adjust the position of the saddle seamlessly, instead, the post is indexed and you only have so much positions you can use for saddle height. And yes, the seatpost is a little bit more noisy when adjusting the position of the saddle, BUT: It works flawlessly, is lightweight and I don't have to worry about bleeding the internals.
  • 5 0
 You can choose between an indexed or a non indexed (or very fine incremnets) version when you order the Nivo.
I´m using their Moveloc droppers on veveral bikes since they came out a few years ago and had bsolutely zero issues so far.
On my latest build I´m using the Nivo and opted for the indexed version. I got so used to having those pre-set positions that I didn´t want to go for a non indexed version again. No problems with the Nivo so far and great customer service by Vecnum.
  • 3 0
 @spoegel: same story here. 6 intense years on the Moveloc with zero issues. Now the Nivo indexed, because the predefined positions feel great for me.
  • 1 0
 @spoegel: do you like the movloc? I thought about getting one for a while but couldn't find any real world feedback at the time. The concept looks great to me
  • 1 0
 @dicky1080:
I have build 6 bikes with them so far and all have zero issues and require no maintenance except for adding some grease underneath the top dust seal and retightening this seal cap every now and then.
The Nivo I have running is only a few month old but working like a Charme so far.
  • 1 0
 @spoegel: thanks for the feedback mate ????
  • 9 0
 Pinkbike dropped it with this post
  • 5 0
 Clearly I was the only one who bought a Manitou Jack. To replace my Reverb, which worked fine until it didn't, two rebuilds later and shat itself a third time, not to mention I hated the pokey button knob remote thing. Wolf Tooth and Manitou Jack.
  • 9 0
 I'm disappointed that the Canadian company 9Point8 post wasn't on here...
  • 5 0
 Best post so far, while it cost more upfront then one up(etc) you do not need cartridges , and serviceability super cheap and easy
  • 5 1
 How is it that everyone has a strong opinion on STA but there are almost no options on the market for different offset dropper posts?

It’s not like offset seatposts are a new idea...
  • 2 0
 You say almost no options, do you another with an offset head beside the 9point8 Fall line R? Very interested to know it there are others.
  • 1 0
 I meant “do you know”
  • 1 0
 @pipomax: Nope. If there are any others I'd love to know, as my Fall Line R isn't the most reliable.
  • 1 0
 @JCO: what problems are you having? I just purchased one and waiting for it to arrive. Do you ride in freezing temps?
  • 1 0
 they would wear out even quicker with that additional leverage
  • 1 0
 @pipomax: Mine leaks air so it needs re-pressurizing every other ride. Apparently poor seals are a recurring problem with 9point8 seatposts. No experience in freezing temps.
  • 7 4
 All dropper posts I used so far over the past years:

Bike Yoke 9/10
Race Face 7.5/10
OneUp* 6/10
KS 6/10
Rock Shox 3/10

*Bought it on a used bike with ca. 450 miles.
(I clean and lube my dropper posts usually after each ride and never clamp the upper stanchion into the bike stand)
  • 3 0
 I had a reverb, which I never had a single issue with, worked perfectly. But it was only 120 drop. After some careful measuring I now have a 180 One Up, reduced to 160. I get 40mm more drop than a reverb for the same seat height. Post now drops all the way to seat collar. Early days but seems reliable. Though like all enteral routed posts was a pain to get installed and set up.
  • 8 3
 Why would anyone purchase a Reverb? Unless it comes on your bike it makes zero sense, can't believe they refuse to ditch the pointless hydraulic remote.
  • 1 0
 I loved the advert for the cable lever conversion. To read it you'd think it was them who'd come up with the idea of using a cable.
  • 2 0
 I've had my reverb B1 that came on my Tallboy running perfectly for the past 2 years with regular 50 hour maintenance (riding dry CO Front Range). The hydraulic line hasn't been an issue at all. I agree, having to bleed another line on the bike seems unnecessary, but if you're comfortable bleeding lines, it's fine.

All that to say, after 2 years, it's now got the sag issue I've been hearing about. Super lame. The 400 hour service should fix it, but that process looks ridiculous (and I love rebuilding suspension).

Not trolling, but every cable actuated post I've tried feels like absolute garbage compared to the hydraulic line. Maybe it's my weak hands, but I would happily deal with the hydraulic bleeds if it means a superior lever feel and ease of actuating the post.

Honest question, do any of the cable actuated posts/levers come close to the performance of a hydraulic line? If there are any out there, I would purchase that new vs the 400 hour rebuild of my reverb.
  • 2 0
 @ahamby: On all of my cable operated droppers, I push the lever and the post moves up or down. So yes, in my opinion they do come close. When I had a reverb I travelled in a friend's van to go ride. Unfortunately my bike came untethered on the journey and the hose got ripped out of the remote. Game over. I'm pretty confident that wouldn't have happened with a cable. I also like the ease with which I can remove the post from my bike with all my cable operated droppers. Bleeding Reverbs was a ball ache for me. Maybe all the years I've spent doing manual work has left me with hands strong enough that I don't notice any difference whether using hydraulic or cable operated levers.
  • 5 0
 Strange, why was the weight a con for some posts when they were within 10-20 grams of some other posts (which had no mention of weight).
  • 2 0
 Seems like it's the cheaper posts have weight as a con. Trying to convince people that there's some kind of downside to a cheap post when in reality they're just as good if not better these days
  • 3 0
 Why have dropper levers been left out exactly?

All the stock ones I have used have been shite, and even though my aftermarket Wolftooth Remote lever is incredible, it is still a considerable extra cost on top of an already expensive piece of kit. Surely this must affect the review of a dropper as a whole product?
  • 1 0
 See the explanation in the introduction...
  • 1 0
 @GVArider: Yeah, I dunno man I think the explanation is pretty spotty. Surely to review a post that must include the lever, even if sold separately. Do a separate review article comparing aftermarket lever options if need be. But to review one company's post + lever then compare it with another without a lever is a bit unfair. Especially as there is extra cost and performance concerns at play.
  • 2 0
 @iainmac-1: I'd rather they all just sell the posts without the levers anyway and have the price reflect that. More and more companies are making the levers optional and I view that as a selling point
  • 1 0
 @thegoodflow: agree! Forcing the lever on me like selling rims and tires together.
  • 2 0
 @thegoodflow: I agree with you totally, my experience with stock levers are poor so would rather just buy a post on it's own. I guess what I am trying to say is from a kit review perspective it is a bit scattered.
  • 2 0
 @iainmac-1: I think that's why they were just focusing on the posts though. Because a lot of people already have a lever, or have a lever preference just due to ergonomics or whatever. I really like the one-up lever, mainly because of the ergonomics. The lever shape mimics the downshift trigger on a shifter, rather than an upshift lever, so your thumb doesn't have to reach as far, it's right there. But, I also appreciate that they sell the post w/o the lever so you don't have to pay for it if you don't want it.
  • 1 0
 They should at least distinguish those posts with/without levers, and for those w/ levers, which ones suck. The Bike Yoke lever is excellent, and even preferred to Wolf Tooth by some folks who've used both w/ the Revive. And its included in the price of the Revive. But I wouldn't expect Daniel Sapp to notice that.
  • 4 0
 Vecnum NIVO will outlast all of its competitors, it's lighter and cheaper in the long run. That would by my only go-to shall I equipe a new bike. Now, KS Rage 170mm for only 130eur will do the job.
  • 1 0
 I have the same experience with my Vecnum moveloc XC. Super reliable, easily serviceable and pretty light (~430 grams including remote+cables)
  • 7 0
 Brand X plus ZTTO remote, no can defend
  • 5 0
 Missed the 9.8 Fall Line R. Bought one earlier this year. Comes with offset options and only weighs 376g for 125mm. Really enjoy it
  • 5 0
 Almost every dropper works OK for at least a few months. This, like most other dropper post reveiws, cannot tell you about what matters most: reliability.
  • 3 0
 Bike Yolk Revive: $400 Con's: Price, RockShox Reverb: $400 Con's: ???

A little bit of consistency would be nice when comparing so many different posts. Also I vote anything over $300 better be a whole lot better with so many good options around $200

Personally, I used to buy Fox Transfers, but when I could sell my used Transfer and buy a brand new OneUp in the 210 length compared to 175, for the same price, I'll be buying OneUp from now on.
  • 2 0
 The "user serviceable" field in the bottom chart is kinda wonky? Because AFAIK OneUp doesn't have a user serviceable cartridge and is labeled as yes, while Reverb, for which you can find a service manual for a whole rebuild on RS website, is labeled as no. Or is the AXS different?
  • 2 0
 My first bike came with a Brand X Ascend dropper (often on sale on Chain Reaction for around £90-ish).

Current bike has the Reverb. The Reverb seems fine and haven't had any of the issues i've heard a lot about (yet).

But if the Reverb does end up needing replacement, i actually preferred the Brand X.
  • 3 1
 The X-Fusion Manic (170mm) come stock in my new bike. It is very refined compared to the OneUp,very smooth to operate,feels more accurate to the lever inputs and have almost no side to side play .
It is even cheaper so,to me the X-Fusion Manic could be the winner if you don´t need shims or have really tight clearances issues.
  • 2 0
 I replaced my Reverb with an X-Fusion Manic and it is leaps and bounds better than the Reverb ever was. It is more reliable and needs no maintenance compared to the Reverb. Money well spent and stoked with the seat post.
  • 4 0
 I thought the xfusion manic on my Evo would be one of the first components to swap but it's been awesome for over 1.5 yrs now
  • 2 0
 So - which posts can you safely hang the bike by? That was always a concern with my old Reverb. If you picked up the bike by the seat it would f*** up the dropper. It was a royal PITA and added fragility to my mountain bike which is something I am not looking to do.

/BrandX + ZTTO remote 4 lyfe
  • 3 0
 Surprised to not see the Specialized Command Post. People joke about its fast return and it does have slight play, but they work really well and are inexpensive and easy to service.
  • 2 0
 For what it's worth, my experience of droppers so far:
Gravity Dropper - 2009 to 2013 - game changing bit of kit that transformed trail riding experience. Heavy, looked horrible but generally reliable and could service / repair with a hammer.
KS Lev - 2013 to 2018 - Quite expensive to buy at the time but has been a great post. Very reliable and smooth. But difficult to service (specialist tools needed). Has only had one shop service in its life, and still going strong.
X Fusion Manic - 2018 to now - as many have commented already, I have had zero issues with this in two years of heavy use. No servicing, just keep it clean after each ride (and use a bit of lube to pull dirt out of seal). Superb value to performance ratio. Supplied lever was OK, but added a PNW loamlever and that has made action even smoother.
  • 3 1
 I own 3 X-Fusions and they are 125 and 150. All 3 work flawlessly for 2 years now.

Working droppers that have been on working bikes for over 4 years now are one Thomson and a Lev. Both are 125 and solid after all these years. Time for new cables maybe but gone are 3 RockShox that do not Echo and 1 CrankBrothers Kroncrap. I wasted money on 4 droppers that lasted a month each I would never buy a RS dropper ever again and now with a bleed port=whoopty doo.

For the price of one Sram $800 heavy dropper at 650 grams I can buy 5 X-Fusions and be happy as a pig in shit.
  • 2 0
 I'd like to know:

How many people change the droppers that come on their bikes?
How do some of the cheaper droppers that come on bikes compare to these 13?

I've got two 2019 bikes, a Kona that came with a Trans-X dropper and a Giant that came with a Switch SL dropper. Neither of those are bad enough to justify spending another $300 dollars changing yet.

Droppers are way down the list of things that get switched out and certainly not day 1 items to change.
  • 5 0
 what about Yep´s Uptimizer?

yepcomponents.com/?v=bb60bf7683fc
  • 1 0
 Nothing to say bout the seatpost, but I have the same type of multi-directional joystick-remote on my BMC Speedfox with integrated dropper and can't say I like it, it feels a bit strange, not 100% clear when it's pressed enough... So I ordered a 3rd party traditional lever instead (but maybe the dropper is the problem Smile )
  • 1 0
 @ice29: The opposite here. Loved my YEP, especially the joystick. Unhappy with my wolftooth and OneUp remote.
  • 1 0
 I am running 3x different posts between bikes...
Xfusion on a Fuse: Dependable & simple. Not as smooth as the other two.
Lyne Components on a FatBob: Basically an older version of PNW. Smooth & simple. No issues.
BikeYoke on a Pyga: Smoothest & lightest action of all. Only grip... when the post is down and you lift the bike by the seat the dropper tends to extend... kinda awkward when hoisting the bike...
  • 1 0
 Some thoughts on the posts I've used. I hate my RockShox Reverb and it's idiotic hydraulic actuation. I don't understand why RockShox thought it was a good idea to further complicate the post. Fox Transfer was a solid post but lacked length. I hated the lever on the Fox Transfer. My KS Lev Integra worked flawlessly for four years of abuse without servicing it a single time. XFusion Manic was a great dropper that worked well for me but I didn't own it very long to see if it was reliable. The newest post I have is a OneUp V2. I love the low stack of the OneUp allowing me to run a 210mm dropper fully inserted in my frame. The OneUp does start to get a bit slow after a lot of muddy and nasty rides. However, servicing is incredibly easy and in about 15 minutes the post is running fast and smooth again. The OneUp lever is also cheap and feels nice. If I had to buy another dropper I'd probably buy a OneUp again because of the long length, low stack, ease of maintenance, and cheap price.
  • 3 0
 Can't believe they just through all those posts in the toolbox like that. Making me cringe that they are all scratching each other. Lol.
  • 2 0
 I really wanted a BikeYoke after my KS Lev started sagging an inch, but I'm cheap. Bought a PNW. Excellent customer service and a 3-year warranty at half the cost. Has been a great choice so far.
  • 2 0
 Why are the flaws not consistent? Very selective about only listing "170 or 180 maximum length" as a flaw on only a few post. Yet only OneUp and Rock Shox are available in longer lengths.....
  • 1 0
 I have tried several Reverbs and had a 9.8 for quite a while, but have since gone with PNW droppers and couldn't be happier with them. They are reasonably priced, very reliable, and easy to service (which I haven't needed to do yet). There Loam Lever can't be beat either. I think the new crop of inexpensive cartridge-based posts make so much more sense than the more expensive, complicated, and less reliable posts.
  • 1 0
 ReTerd: Never lift bike with the seat in the down position. Not good in cold weather. Wobble side to side 1 year later. Bleed is ridiculous.

PNW: PrettymuchNoWorries. Great customer service. Got a new plastic adjust bushing cuz I’m stupid and snapped it. Rainier Gen 3 & Loam Lever nice set-up. Keep the cable actuator at the cartridge pin and alignment pins greased.
  • 2 0
 So glad that you can get a solid dropper at equal to or less than $200, instead of the $350-400 that all the droppers used to cost a few years ago. Oneup for the win, by the way.
  • 1 0
 Bike Yoke Revive is certainly a hassle free post to run- provided it stays in one piece - mine failed spectacularly (seat clamp boss head sheared off the telescopic post) just out of warranty. No brainer to replace it with Brand X, every mechanic in Blighty seems to recommend em
  • 1 0
 Ridden and rated? First, where is the rating? Second, were they really ridden, or just checked out at a bike shop. Check weight posted online (otherwise why would they weigh most without levers except a few?), push seat down, actuate lever, check price; review done.
  • 1 0
 We've got people who have been using *product* for years, and it's bullet proof. And then we've got the same number of people claiming it's junk. I sometimes wonder how many company marketing shills are running rampant over the comments section.
  • 1 0
 Hey, love my two Fox Transfers, very reliable, solid, and the "thud" is a nice reminder. No complaints. Had the one up v2, nice but felt kinda cheap, and the feel off the remote tended to bite a bit, all or nothing. The Fox seems to have a nice feel which I could not duplicate on the OneUP. Oh well.
  • 1 0
 Also, I dont quite get who is spending so much on a dropper. For me, I need a dropper to drop down, and return. That's literally all it has to do. Obviously reliability is something worth paying for but posts like the brand x have that covered. I mean, why would you spend more, am I missing something??
  • 1 0
 reverbs get a ton of hate, but I love th c1 on my megatower at the moment, and the old school reverb i had on my top fuel was also great. I never had any reliability issues, they're super easy to bleed and in my opinion make a great "standard issue" dropper post.
  • 1 0
 Come a long way from crappy droppers:

Old Spec Command Post IR (leaky air spring esp if left in dropped position)
Old RaceFace (9.8 tech, same leaky air spring issue, wouldn't lock properly in cold despite doing the reset procedure)
Old Reverb (becomes a shitty susp post if you pick up bike by saddle while it is in down position, wouldn't actuate in cold)
Wouldn't touch any of the old CrankBros droppers before the Highline even though they did have a rep for honoring the warranty

Only old dropper I still have is a KS Lev, with its only real fault is that it gets stuck in its position if left unused. Had some issues with some other issues that gone away on their own, like not fully locking and raising/sinking very slowly.

Pretty impressed with budget droppers like the Manic and SDG Tellis. That super light action on the Tellis is dreamy and the Manic convinced me that I had zero need to spend more.
  • 1 0
 After using the SDG Tellis for two years, on a trail bike most of the year and fat bike during cold winters, they've both been trouble free and worked perfectly. Honestly that's about the main things I look for. Reliability all year round. However, the bonus with the SDG Tellis is the ultra light lever action. Its especially beneficial during cold rides with thicker gloves on too. I would definitely recommend it to others.
  • 5 1
 OneUp V2 is brilliant. I’ve had 3 reverbs and they were all rubbish!
  • 2 0
 I found out that the cartridges used in many seatposts (OneUp, BrandX etc) do not like when pulled at the saddle when the seat is down.
  • 1 0
 Oh no, one up has that problem, too? To bad, thats a no for me ...
  • 2 0
 @Stokedonthis: every wintek cartridge dropper is not recommended to be regularly pulled by the post
  • 1 0
 @Stokedonthis: They replaced my 210 on warranty after the cartridge blew on a bike park day.
  • 1 0
 Which one of you no good pinkbike warrioring sombiches can tell me what the saddle is in the One-Up dropper images. Packet of Monster Munch and a Mountain Dew to the first right answer
  • 1 0
 Looks to me like the Ergon SM
  • 1 0
 Ergon sm Enduro
  • 1 0
 @zeronine3: PC gamer snack pack coming your way
  • 2 0
 Bike yoke revive is great, very smooth. Would be improved by cable clamping at the lever though to make installation less of a pain!
  • 2 1
 Both mine have cable clamps at the lever
  • 1 0
 Had a KS Lev (older one) that came with my commençal, can't service the hidraulics and it started dropping when i seat. Replaced with a Pro Koryak , so far good price for value , and can be serviced as all should be...
  • 1 0
 the guys @ SDG must have a special type of articulated allen key
that front seat mount bolt is at hte perfect angle to make sure you scratch the shit out of the stanchion

thank you SDG
  • 1 0
 should have done the brand-x ascend. The cheapest dropper you'll ever need. Not sure why people dole so much cash on droppers... They all do the same thing besides the reverb. All the reverb does is give me headaches..
  • 1 0
 I was going to read this and get upset about what I could I have bought instead of the BikeYoke I just installed, but I decided to not read it, and to ride and be happy instead.
  • 1 0
 Not a popular one but the current bontrager dropper has been great to me. Lever isn’t that smooth but the rest of the post has been relatively reliable. Last gen had play front and back in addition to the side to side.
  • 1 0
 Looks like ol Danny boy fell asleep at the wheel midway through... or had couple growlers. Apparently we should all buy a KS Lev Integra! The inconsistency is super helpful. Thanks PB!
  • 2 0
 Are all dropper posts internally triggered these days?
Mine is not, and my bike won't route an internal cable. So am I stuck with the one I have until I buy a new bike?
  • 1 0
 Thankfully there are still some good options for externally routed droppers!
PNW Cascade (30.9 or 31.6) and Pine (27.2)
Brand-X Ascend II
Fox Transfer and Marzocchi Transfer have (or had) external versions
I'm sure there are others I missed
  • 2 0
 What about 9Point8's offerings, or DVO's Garnet? Pffft, this post should be titled, "Thirteen dropper posts that all won a participation trophy."
  • 4 0
 and the winner is.....?
  • 5 0
 OneUp V2 no doubt !
  • 1 0
 PNW if you're on a budget. BikeYoke if you're not.
  • 3 0
 So many different droppers and this still didn’t tell me which one won
  • 3 0
 Bike Yoke or One Up hands down. Simple as that.
  • 3 0
 Only ride the SDG these days, nothing negative to say since a few 1000km.
  • 1 0
 Back here in SA, local co Lyne sells a range of their own posts including a 200mm drop post for the equivalent of $190. Full support so we fully support them :-)
  • 4 1
 What is the Reverb doing here, that thing is consistently garbage.
  • 2 1
 Mine stopped working during an enduro stage at -1deg, completely stuck. Apparently it is another known problem of the Reverb.
  • 2 0
 Yeah - buddy bought into the AXS reverb hype. Pfffft, during rainy bike park ride, the thing could not stay fully extended. Which sucked because our bike park still requires you to ride bit at the top to hit a few of the trails. I would never even think about that post.
  • 2 0
 The way, the droppers are thrown into the box on that picture is so painful to look at.
  • 3 0
 no PRO Koryak? seriously?
  • 2 1
 Just don't pick a Reverb! Buy the cheapest one that has your preferred amount of drop. My Oneup seat post and Brand X have been fine for years!
  • 1 0
 Hi @Daniel Sapp, there are some errors in the spreadsheet. Stack height, OneUp V2 is 33mm instead of 40, Bike yoke Revive is 42mm instead of 45.
  • 3 0
 The KS Lev Integra comes in 200mm...I know, have one.
  • 2 0
 Title - ridden-and-rated-13-of-the-best-dropper-posts


FSA Flowtron - "We haven't had our hands on this post yet but"
  • 1 0
 Gotta throw some love to the Wolf Tooth dropper lever. I have that lever on a One up, Fox and Specialized dropper. It’s amazing.
  • 3 0
 And the winner is Brand X.....oh wait a minute
  • 1 0
 The Revive is so solid that Bike Yoke had to make a saddle with lateral play so that the ride would feel like your old dropper post.
  • 1 0
 Raceface Aeffect = Syncros Dropper= PNW...etc they're all just a rebranded TranzX/BrandX dropper. Don't over pay for your next post.
  • 1 0
 This is just marketing of how a post feels and how long it is, nothing about durability, reliability, play, etc. This is not a rating or even really a review.
  • 1 0
 My KS Integra post from 2017 is still going strong. I have never needed to service it and the cable has only been replaced once.
  • 1 0
 Does anybody know where to get replacement cartridges for the X-Fusion Manic? I could only find a few of them out of China for like $50.
  • 1 0
 I would consider the lack of a 200mm option on the AXS Reverb to be a drawback. I currently run the 170mm and I could easily use an extra 30mm of travel.
  • 1 0
 I've had numerous cartridge issues on the Crankbrothers post and the KS Lev Integra has a super finicky saddle clamp that creaks.
  • 1 0
 Why does no one ever mention the Funn Updown? Twin tube design means it effectively bleeds itself all the time. Seems to be working for me so far.
  • 3 2
 What does Reverb C1 User Servicable - No mean? I just did a 400 hours service on my Reverb - am I not a user?
  • 3 0
 C'mon man. I service my reverbs too and save loads of cash in the process but it's hardly 'pop it apart and swap out some seals' serviceable is it? Takes time to learn the steps and a little skill and finesse to get right. Plus to do easily needs specialist tools
  • 3 0
 Show us ya Top Picks
  • 6 4
 The KS Lev Integra is the worst post I've ever owned.
  • 2 0
 @Daniel Sapp
The KS Integra is available in 200mm as well.
  • 2 0
 Vital MTB already did it! Razz
  • 2 0
 They really included a post that they didn’t even get to ride??
  • 1 0
 Satori Sorata Pro, 80eur shipped: fr.aliexpress.com/item/32956607988.html
  • 1 0
 Ive had a vecnum nivo since they came out. Its been very reliable and has a very light action. Highly recommend.
  • 1 0
 How long do you tested? Most Post I had like Reverb failed within of a few months
  • 1 0
 Found a dropper seatpost on ebay for £32 new will let you know how good it is when arrives from China?
But price is good!
  • 1 0
 Once again, the comments are more informative than the content. And far more entertaining.
  • 1 0
 I’d like to try one of these, but I think my Gravity Droppers are going to last forever.
  • 1 0
 PB Conveniently forgetting that the Transfer is not self serviceable as a negative.. Also, no love the Brand-X Ascend?
  • 3 0
 no RaceFace… no 9.8...
  • 1 0
 okay but you missed out on probably the most important factor, RELIABILITY!
  • 2 0
 does anyone know what saddle they have on the Vecnum Nevo? Cheers
  • 1 0
 It looks like a Specialized to me. Unfortunately they write their models on the other side of the saddle so that's all I've got.
  • 1 0
 please let me know if you find out for sure. I was about to ask the same question.
  • 1 0
 Given you included the reverb as -remotely- acceptable, I doubt the whole article
  • 2 0
 no 9point8 fall line? bummer
  • 2 0
 Nice biased comparison pb!
  • 2 0
 No brand x or 1up two of the best value posts?
  • 1 0
 No Thomson droppers - i have 2 of the covert and they work well - no issues
  • 4 2
 DVO Garnet!
  • 1 0
 That post straight up kicked ass when it came out. But it’s VERY pricey. I don’t think it’s better then what’s out now. My lasted 3 years no service before it got sticky.
  • 2 0
 Pnw bachelor is amazing!
  • 1 1
 AXS Reverb is the best post if you have the $. Bike Yoke is the best if you want to save $ and go non-wireless.
  • 2 0
 Love myPNW Rainier
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the love!
  • 2 0
 no Magura Vyron?
  • 2 0
 PNW-FTW
  • 1 0
 Thanks Ben! We're stoked to have your support!
  • 1 0
 Any durability testing performed?
  • 1 0
 Are we ever going to see the results of your XC bike test?
  • 1 0
 The SDG has been flawless for me on numerous bikes.
  • 1 0
 KS is junk. OneUp for the win!
  • 4 3
 Just give me kashima.
  • 9 0
 You called me?
  • 5 1
 @Kashima: Kashima coat my body
  • 3 2
 No Brand X
  • 2 2
 Kashima coat my body
  • 1 1
 No RaceFace? Strange...
  • 1 1
 It's the same as last year's Fox Transfer. I spoke with the company yesterday.
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