Magura Vyron Wireless Dropper Post - First Ride

Jun 21, 2016
by Richard Cunningham  



Magura officially released its wirelessly controlled Vyron eLECT dropper post at its annual tech camp in Sedona, Arizona, which furnished the opportunity to put it to task in terrain where a dropper post is a near necessity. Most readers should be familiar with the Vyron, as Magura provided the mountain bike paparazzi with a soft-release last year while the German component maker was dotting the I's and crossing the T's before committing it to mass production.

If you missed the first-look report, the Vyron is a conventional dropper post in the sense that it is air sprung, and hydraulically controlled in much the same manner as the RockShox Reverb or KS LEV operate. Like the Reverb, its air-spring can be charged with a shock pump, which allows the user to fine tune the post's extension speed - and its internals are serviceable. The Vyron has a 150-millimeter stroke and is offered in the two most popular diameters: 30.9 and 31.6 millimeters. That is where the similarities end.



Magura Vyron eLECT seatpost - 2016
A silicone cap hides the micro USB charging port and on/off switch.
Vyron Details:
• Adjustments: air spring, hydraulic positioning
• Push-button remote operation: ANT+ wireless transmission (with two additional suspension controls)
• Power: Remote - CR-2032 battery / seatpost - NiMH rechargeable battery, micro-USB charge socket
• Travel: 150mm (step-less)
• Overall length: 446mm
• Installation height (top of seat tube to saddle rails): 57-207mm
• Warranty: one year
• Clamp offset: 0mm
• Weight: 595g (claimed) including remote
• Diameters: 30.9 and 31.6mm
• MSRP: $499 USD
• Contact: Magura USA, Magura Germany


About the Vyron

Magura chose to actuate the Vyron post using ANT+ wireless transmission software for two reasons: it eliminated the need for cables, levers, hoses and housing; and a wireless remote could be easily adapted to control other functions like suspension lockout or damping, and (although they never mentioned this) possibly a POV camera.

Fringe benefits: An electronic-remote actuated dropper would be a boon to bike retailers because they could sell or install a dropper post without negotiating (or eating) the expense of threading hoses or housing through the frame tubes, or dealing with bleeding a hydraulic system. A customer can buy a Vyron, install it with a hex key, and be riding in three minutes. Imagine also, the time saved on the assembly lines in Asia if workers could skip the tasks of routing dropper controls.

Magura Vyron eLECT seatpost - 2016
The ANT+ receiver, valve motor, and battery are tucked into the tail of the post head.
Magura Vyron eLECT seatpost - 2016
Use a shock pump to adjust the Vyron's extension speed. No cable means easy access.


Low energy consumption: Great lengths were taken to reduce the size and energy consumption of the seatpost’s electronic hardware, and it is hard to imagine how Magura fit a hydraulic valve, a motor, a rechargeable battery, and a radio receiver into the small extension that protrudes from behind the seatpost’s head, but they did. The pencil-thin NiMH battery is good for 400 cycles and can be recharged via a micro USB cable.

Magura says 400 cycles works out to about two months of trail riding, so none of us ran out of battery power in Sedona. Key to the Vyron’s energy efficiency is the tiny motor, which operates a fine-threaded needle valve that opens and closes the post’s hydraulic circuit. The motor has to turn the needle one or two revolutions to fully open or close the valve and that creates a slight lag time between when the handlebar remote’s button is depressed, and the dropper is either released or fixed in position.

Magura Vyron eLECT seatpost - 2016
The remote control overhangs the brake lever clamp, and thus requires very little real estate on the handlebar.


Quick-change Remote: Anyone old enough to have owned a Game Boy will chuckle at the Vyron’s remote control panel. The plastic switch has a soft-touch panel with a round central button that controls the post, flanked by two smaller arrow-shaped buttons which are reserved for add-on functions in the future (presumably, an eLECT Magura fork and shock). The remote is powered by a small, non-rechargeable button battery, and is fixed to the handlebar by an elastic O-ring.

Bail-out options: German engineers tend to fixate on worst-case scenarios. Keeping with this tradition, the Vyron can be actuated using a button on the seatpost head to extend, retract, or set the post at a given height, should your remote battery expire (or be lost altogether). As a further safeguard, when the main battery reaches exhaustion, the software switches off its wireless function and saves a small amount of battery reserve to enable the rider to set the post manually to a desired “bail-out” height, where it will remain for the rest of the day’s ride.


Performance

Mounted to an Intense Tracer 275c, which is one of my favorite trail bikes, and headed out for a day of riding on the familiar trails around Sedona, the Vyron dropper was destined to get a fair assessment of its mechanical and operational aspects. Admittedly, reporting upon its longevity would require a number of months, so I’ll focus on the former for now.

Setup: On the bike, the remote control’s handlebar clamp nested between the grip and the brake lever, where the button was easily accessed by my left thumb. I imagined that I might be initially confused by the two arrow-shaped accessory buttons on either side of the console, but that fear never materialized. Magura wisely chose a zero-offset clamp head, so riders desperately seeking steep seat tube angles will not be robbed by any set-back. With no cables to thread or levers to fiddle with, setting up the Vyron is as simple as snapping on a rubber O-ring and setting your proper saddle height – Boom!

Wiggling the bike joggles an accelerometer and automatically switches on the electronics, so the Vyron is ready to rock with the first pedal stroke. I was told that the seatpost shares some of the algorithms as Magura’s eLECT reactive suspension system, including the wiggle-to-awaken function, so like Shimano’s Di2 shifting, the Vyron goes to sleep when it senses a lag in use to extend its battery life. There is an official on/off switch hidden beneath the charging port’s moisture barrier, but if you typically leave all the lights on at home, or have been dumbed down by a vehicle with automated headlamp functions, you will thank Magura for the auto-sleep function.

Ergonomics: Magura gets top marks for the Vyron’s manufacturing and construction – it’s a fine thing to look at, its shaft doesn’t wiggle, and it operates in silence. The push-button control provides no tactile or audio feedback, so when I called for an extension, the actuation was so quiet that I had to butt-check the saddle to verify that it was topped until I learned to trust the system.

My note-to-self, was to increase the air spring pressure in between rides in order to achieve an audible top-out clunk, but somehow that never happened. There is a Schrader valve on the end of the seatpost, and Magura says that the post can be pressurized anywhere between 188 and 218 PSI (apx. 15 BAR) to optimize its extension speed and retraction effort to suit. Magura says that most riders prefer pressures above 210 PSI.
Magura Vyron eLECT seatpost - 2016
Not usually seen is the slight forward offset of the seat-rail clamp. I found that I needed to set the rails back about 10mm to compensate.

Learning Curve: Once underway, it took some time to anticipate the slightly delayed reaction created by the Vyron's motorized control valve. Magura officials warned me that it would take a little getting used to, and it did. Initially, the half-second reaction time seemed like a year, because I was used to snapping my dropper post down at the last possible instant before arriving at the precipice of a steep or chunky descent. Imagine my surprise when I depressed the eLECT button, gave the saddle a firm butt whack too early and the Vyron refused to budge - just as my front tire began to roll off a substantial ledge.

I was mentally prepared for the initial delay to lower the saddle - I just failed to get my timing right every once and a while. What I was not prepared for, was the need to hold the saddle down in order to ensure that the motorized valve had closed completely. Forget this tidbit, and the Vyron pops back up to full height, and then locks. The result is the same: a no-drop dropper post at the most inopportune moment. After four hours or so on the bike, however, my brain had compartmentalized all the necessary reactions and I was able to operate the post seamlessly up and down Sedona's slick-rock and rolling trail network.

Technical Issues: Mechanically, the Vyron scored high marks. As mentioned, it was whisper quiet, and it never missed a beat. Its action was smooth, the remote control console's actuation button was never a problem to find (whether I was gloved or not) and it always extended and retracted at the same rate - which no-doubt, played a positive role in getting used to the timing aspect of its operation. I did have to retrieve the remote control after it parted company in a crash, which made me question the O-ring mounting. So, if you bin your bike, remember to check for it before you get to the bottom of the hill.


First Impressions:

bigquotesI put enough time on Magura's Vyron eLECT dropper post to assess its mechanical performance and its potential attributes, but I won't speculate on its long-term reliability. The only aspect of its performance that I did not completely come to terms with was establishing a mid-stroke saddle position, which required hovering over the saddle at my preferred height, waiting for the eLECT valve to close while the bike was bouncing down the trail. More time on the bike may have mitigated that process, but that was the recurring Vyron moment that had me wishing for the instant locking action of a mechanically-actuated dropper post. Riders who never use an intermediate saddle position, however, will never experience that issue, which brings me back to the positive attributes of Magura's wireless dropper.

Magura's $500 asking price is offset by the fact that you only need one dropper post for all of your bikes, so long as they share the same seat tube diameter. The control console is fixed with an elastic O-ring, so it can be quickly transferred to another handlebar, and a hex key is all you need to switch out the seatpost. Divide $500 by how many bikes you own and that represents a substantial discount. Pedally DH race? Pop the Vyron on your downhill bike and be the boss. Taking your cross-country race bike out for a trail ride? Slide the Vyron dropper into that carbon hardtail and hit the hard lines on the downs. Travelling to another country? Bring your Vyron dropper and pop it into your rental.

Magura's wireless eLECT dropper post provides much more than a cleaner looking mountain bike, and while the Vyron would not be my first choice for my all-mountain style of riding, it offers useful options that a mechanical post simply cannot match - attributes which should earn a lot of fans for Magura. - RC







173 Comments

  • + 66
 Haters gunna hate.

I think this is slick. As someone who does not have internal cable routing, I see the value in having one less cable. I really like the looks of the remote, also.

I do think, however, I would need something more instant. If any product managers are listening, why wasn't a FC solenoid or something fast actuating considered in the design? Reliability? Power consumption?

Also, does anyone have any experience with NiMH in colder weather?
  • + 62
 Lost me at "Warranty: one year".
Will have to wait a while and see where this goes.
  • + 5
 See, I like having the extra cable because it makes my handlebars symmetrical. A shifter and brake on the right, a dropper and brake on the left. Other than that I think this has potential. Love it.
  • - 3
 @richierocket: especially an issue as these hydraulic posts tend to allow air to slip past the top seal, causing the post to sag in to its travel. Some of the worst offenders? KS and rockshox. Of course, if you are careful you can avoid this but it's still certainly an issue. Not great to see another post come out that may potentially have similar issues.
  • + 13
 I was lucky enough to get the Vyron early this year and still not having one single issue with it. Simply working as its supposed to.
Sure the delay between pressing the button and beeing able to push the saddle down is quite weird at the beginning but you get used to it.
Another thing is that you cannot keep the valve open by holding the button. Reason behind is the ANT+ wireless Standard. Good thing about it...theoretically you will be able to use it with your Garmin or any other ANT+ device which gives you plenty of additional options. Just imagine you will be able to program your ant+ devices (fork, shock, seatpost) prior your race and do the setup of your suspension from home via garmin maps.
  • + 9
 I have an Evil Uprising that sadly does not have internal cable routing, which bugs the shit out of me. I won't be looking to buy a new trail bike for a while and my OCD really wants to get rid of that external cable... this is looking like my solution.
  • + 3
 $500 is not a small price to pay but worth it to get rid of all those extra duffis cables.
  • + 8
 want something instant? try a spec command dropper. haha. your nuts will looovve the supposed "lag" the magura dropper has
  • + 5
 They skimped on the design. It looks like the switch for a generic 1987 air mattress.
  • + 3
 @richierocket: Agree, one year warranty doesn't show much confidence...
  • + 1
 600 gram post seem like a lead anchor. They should have made it 500g at $500 then I might get a boner for this product.
  • + 1
 @ka-brap: My SB-66 doesn't have internal routing either, but I run the KS lev which as zero cable movement. Which is the next best thing. Also the new fox transfer externally routed post has the same feature, a 150mm version will be my next post I think. There is absolutely no way I want to post that has a delay in the action.
  • + 1
 Yes, power consumption is why you wouldn't use a solenoid.
  • + 34
 I will eLECT to stick with my normal non fancy post tyvm.
  • + 8
 You're better than this.
  • + 32
 $500 US MSRP for a seat post. That's like $650 CDN. This industry is becoming a worse farce than ever....
  • + 8
 Agreed, stupid expensive. So just don't buy it.
  • + 18
 $6500*
  • + 38
 Guess you haven't seen msrps for the new reverb then...
  • + 15
 Agreed, mountain biking has become one of the most lucrative businesses. The prices are enormous for everything that has to do with a bike. If it's expensive for you guys (USA, CAN) than imagine how it is for us in the "third world". We don't even get seasonal discounts, and when we do, they are ridiculous. And in the end the dropper post is just a glorified office chair system.
  • + 2
 In Poland it costs THE SAME as KS LEV Integra 150 for example (DX is a bit cheaper, but with LEV DX you have fixed cable entry position which is really poor).
  • + 2
 @lkubica: lkubica the DX features almost the same variety of cable positions as the regular LEV. The difference is that at the LEV the adjustment takes place at the clamp cradle below the seat while the DX has to be rotated internally. This means you take out the cartridge and adjust it with the guide bushings. If you need further help please check out 11motors.de

thanks!
  • + 16
 In my opinion ALL dropper posts are overpriced . Especially when you compare them with other bike components. Top end droppers cost roughly 2/3 the price of latest suspension forks! Reliability of droppers is an issue as well. Droppers have generally been called the greatest advance in trail riding over the last 5 or so years so realistically manufacturers have been able to run riot with quality control and charge $$ cause they can!!
  • + 2
 @meph: I know, but still there are less positions AND you need to disassemble the post. I would be worried about warranty in this case.

Anyway, dropper post are massively overpriced this is for sure.
  • + 3
 @mrbrownstone: You're calling Croatia third world? Look at your GDP per capita, 70 % of the world is poorer than you. Not trying to be some leftist SJW, but there are countries where many people can't afford any bike and this dropper post is worth more than their year's salary.
  • + 3
 Now you feel how we Europeans feel all the time about US pricing. The Veron here costs the same as a Rockshox dropper, 379 euro. Normally something that costs $400 in the USA, costs 430 euro over here. So now you guys get shafted Smile
  • + 2
 Reverbs are the same price essential but they have a cable...
  • + 1
 @PJD1: and no lag.
  • + 1
 @scottzg: Wouldnt know, havn't owned a dropper yet...would probably improve riding, but, I'm not really mad about a set seat hight or pottentially manually raising/dropping.
  • + 6
 You know the saying, that's a real mountain biker, his ( or her ) bike is worth more than the car that hauls it to the trail head.

Well now the seatpost , in my case would be worth more than the car.
  • + 2
 Cost more than my whole bike, no joke
  • + 1
 @PJD1: - yes, the cheap cable remote option is from Giant, mine was $300cdn.
  • + 1
 @slowrider73: make your own, sale it cheap, make less profit! great business!
  • + 2
 @blazekelly: cos your bike is a cheap bike.
  • + 3
 @lesz42:

...pretty sure the manufacturers of dropper posts could sell 10x the number they sell right now if the markup was something reasonable.... that would actually mean MORE profit....
  • + 1
 @brianl: any problems with it though??? Reviews are hard to judge, everyone says the reverbs great (at 500 it should be) butt there's always a handful that have problems..other posts have problems but always a solid few that say it's great...just having a hard time justifying the outlay on something that can be so problematic by the sound of things. I want to ride, not screw with my seatpost of all things. ..
  • + 1
 @lkubica: The new LEV DX(the one that is all black) cable entry is adjusted just like the regular LEV where you take the screws off the seat clamp and turn the head. No need to disassemble the post.
  • + 20
 Cable routing isn't that hard; if it's done right it only has to be done once. Furthermore, the lag is disadvantageous, so I figure most people would rather just go to the trouble of routing the cable. It seems to me that the main advantage of this dropper is the ability to easily swap it between bikes... in theory. Sure, there's a significant cost savings, but then why don't we also all own one pair of pedals? Philosophically, and also practically, I'd like all of my bikes to be complete and operational all of the time. You never know when you might want - or need - to lend one to someone.
  • + 9
 Or, you own 10 bikes, and when your seat post is overseas for warranty purpose, you can't ride any of them because you only have one seatpost.
  • - 13
flag h-beck83 (Jun 22, 2016 at 6:59) (Below Threshold)
 @faul: uh, why do you need to send the post with the bike. Unless the post is stock would you not take it off? Buy local and forget shipping overseas I'd never send my bike outside my country or continent.
  • + 1
 @h-beck83: I think he means that you would be without a post. and since you are counting on having only one post for your "ten bikes" you couldn't ride any of them....Though I cant imagine why someone wouldn't have a spare post of some kind given that bikes are often bought as completes.
  • + 0
 @DGWW: yeah, no offense to faul, I misread.
  • + 18
 It's not just drop and go between bikes if your bikes have different seat tube angles. You'd also have to adjust the seat fore-aft, and level it for each bike, which is more of a pain than just setting the height. It's doubtful the hypothetical DH bike and XC bike the author uses as an example would have the same seat tube angle/seat location.
  • + 12
 1st world issue....
  • - 2
 Tucsondon - adjusting saddle angle is not really a hard or time taking thing to do... Unlike changing tyres or cutting spikes.
  • + 2
 @ad15: Yeah, if I had a second bike I'd gladly adjust the seat each time...
  • + 15
 Sound like a pain in the @ss to have to hover over the saddle while the post finds its mid-stroke position. Pun not initially intended but once I connected the dots whilst typing, by all means; pun intended.
  • + 1
 ah yes. the pain in the a$$ mid stroke.
  • + 14
 Hmm. I've had one for three months and have the following comments.
1. The remote rotates around the bar end and sometimes falls off
2. The dropper button is very small and often difficult to locate when you're riding hard and looking ahead.
3. The delay is very frustrating even after 3 months and actually makes me ride more carefully and therefore slower as a result because I've been tipped off the bike a few times
4. After only two months, the actual seat post itself has significant stiction and after pressing the button, it won't come up, or perhaps will come up a little way. It has good pressure and I now have to spray it with fork lube to get it working in a trustworthy manner, something I have never had to do with any other posts.

Do I like it? I don't really know because it is a clean solution for bikes that have no internal routing but it takes some getting used to.

Version 2 change is to get a large single button for the remote and allow the remote to secure better to the bar
  • + 3
 Zip tied the control and now rock solid. No problem with stiction with pressure at around 205 to 215 psi. Make sure you use a no loss air pump like Topeak or Syncros to set the pressure otherwise it can drop below the minimum (185psi) when you might think it is set correctly. I've always used suspension fluid with any dropper, this always helps to ease stiction.
  • + 7
 I am using Magura Vyron dropper for a couple of months already and I can say that in reality it looks better than performs.. Two things. Actuation button on a remote is too small, it is somehow difficult to hit it when it is the most needed, hopefully this will be solved by new remote. But that delay.. for rolling terrain it is like eternity. If you like to go fast on an ever changing or unknown terrain, then I recommend you to stay with good old reverb or similar, Vyron will freak you out.
  • + 7
 Imagine all current droppers would have half a second hesitation, you'll just get along with it. Than somebody comes up with a dropper that reacts immediately, no question, you will by it and dump the slow one. But it has no cable...
  • + 6
 Why so many electronic components as of late? A bicycle is purely a mechanical machine and should be kept as such. I'll never put a single electronic component on my bike other than a cycling computer. I love the feeling knowing that my bike is powered entirely under my own muscle power. Feeling each mechanical shift at my fingertips, dropping my saddle under cable actuation, pedaling without assistance, etc.
  • + 2
 I get that electronic bike parts are more "efficient" (whatever that means), but I'm not riding my bike because it's efficient, I'm riding because it feels good. Grams and seconds don't matter to me, feeling connected to the bike does. I'll stick with mechanical everything and keep a direct link to my bike.
  • + 4
 @HamsterPants: While I agree with you, exactly those added up grams and seconds are what make todays bikes so much better than bikes 5-10 years ago, so the little evolutionary things all serve a purpose imho
  • + 9
 No matter what you do though, there is electricity controlling your locomotion in the system between your brain and your muscles. A bike is just a step backwards in what biology learnt a long time ago - controlling things mechanically is inefficient. To feel 'fully connected to your bike', you'd best get ready to plug the gears and brakes directly into your brain so electricity can do its thing!
I love bikes because of their mechanics, I can see it and understand it and repair it. Even design it. But I'd actually like to be able to code my bike as well because the bike then is a closer representation of what we are as people; bio-electro-mechanical.
  • + 2
 Different strokes for different folks. Pun sort of intended.
  • + 2
 "A bicycle is purely a mechanical machine and should be kept as such."

Few decades ago people were saying the same things about cars...
  • + 3
 What about saddle dropping with hydraulic actuation? Do you prefer cable actuated brakes over hydraulic as well?
  • + 0
 @p-dub-4: That would be a Reverb
  • + 0
 @the-one1: yes, I've had a few reverbs over the years....
  • + 1
 @Extremmist:

...maybe we just need "self-riding" bikes...?
  • + 1
 @texasflood: Segways are not far from that...
  • + 1
 @Extremmist: and they were right, I've got a 1999 toyota tacoma and when you press the gas pedal it actually pulls a wire giving the engine more gas and air. It's simple and it will work forever. I love the fact my car has nothing more than cruise control and a clock
  • + 7
 Think its a good idea, but will probably wait until the 3rd or 4th generation to come out. No kinks then and cheaper price
  • + 6
 I really like the concept, but this all seems very "Mk1"
By the time we get to Mk3 or 4 it'll probably be quite good, so I'll wait until then,
Thanks
  • + 4
 Had one for a month. Looks very slick but the Remote is awful and moves around the bar as it doesn't clamp hard enough. The one-off switch broke as it is a wimpy plastic thing. Did not hold air pressure and the internals did not stay located inside the post, when I attached the pump the whole thing would rotate. Sent mine back for a refund. Other than that great! Good idea but wouldn't recommend yet until a mk2 comes out.
  • + 3
 $500??? I paid $368 for mine brad new...I couldn't see paying more $ for something I couldn't easily transfer to multiple bikes. The need for charging seems like a small trade off for how easily it can be changed from bike to bike. I do think the button should be bigger but that's my only complaint. For $368 I have I'm quite satisfied with it so far.
  • + 3
 To me this seems like a very good idea that has been executed very poorly. First off, there is simply no excuse for the delay. You may get "used to it", but input lag in any kind of control device is bad and annoying, always. There are plenty of electronically actuated valves even in cycling industry that provide near instant actuation (e.g. E:I shock). I don't take the battery life excuse, anything more than couple of days of intensive riding would be plenty. The ergonomics and design of the remote also seems rather poor.

Also, why NiMH? You buying out old stock at an discount from consumer electronics manufacturers or something Magura? Li Pol would most likely be lighter and would have better service life if charged "randomly" (totally worth it even at the cost of shorter battery life).
  • + 2
 Mixed emotions here. Also for me. But I find it strange that no one has got problem with air pressure. The first Vyron that I owned leaked air so I needed to fill it up every two day... This resulted in the post dropped during rides and wouldn't go up again. Got a new one but the new one was even worse. Having 218 psi in it, it wouldn't rise to the top and tried to lube it but nothing helped. Now I am inte my 3rd Vyron and this one seems to work fine. The one that I got have also Vyron marked on the top of the shaft where it is one e-lect logo as well. I find the remote to be too big and the button too small. Nice here is that I can switch the post between my rides.
  • + 1
 @Plexeter73 Only had patience for two Veyron shipments from Germany to the US. I finally asked for a refund after the second Veyron i received continually displayed the drop and stay feature you've described.

I also noticed that if I added pressure to the post and didn't use it for several days (tested up to full week) it would still go up and down without problems in the garage. As soon as I hit the trail and hit a few bumps or rocks the air pressure was gone and the drop and stay feature was back. I'm so glad i carry a multi-tool so that I could raise the post to the min-insert position to make the bike semi-ridable.

Love the concept, but still probably a version or two away from being ready for prime time.
  • + 2
 Why NiMH? Lithium has higher power density, less self-discharge, more shape/size options for packaging, less voltage sag in discharge cycle, etc...And arguably longer useful life.

And the dead NiMH battery must be sent back to Magura for replacement. So what is the time and cost for such service?
  • + 1
 Exactly. I was wondering about the same thing as well. There are good reasons why all consumer electronics moved away from NiMH. Hell, even the handheld vacuum cleaners come now with Lithium based batteries instead of NiMH.
  • + 2
 I like the idea of having one dropper post between multiple bikes - I HATE the idea of having to constantly re-adjust the seat angle and position between those bikes. It's not as "pop it off, pop it on" as it's made to sound in the First Impression section. But comes with the territory I guess.
  • - 1
 Blah to one dropper for my 6 bikes. Then when my.one dropper shits the bed all 6 bikes are unrideable.
  • + 2
 So far i have had 2 of these dropper posts and both of them have had the bonding for the motor and saddle clamp come loose and both of them was on there second rides. apart from that the seat post is amazing but after 2 braking on me i will not run them anymore. would be use full if any one else has had this problem could let me know.
  • + 4
 So the next step is the dropper post that is going to read my mind but in order to use it you will have to log in with facebook.
  • + 7
 About time this dropped.
  • + 2
 $500 is the norm nowadays for any high-end name brand dropper post. Yes you can get droppers for much less but let's get real MSRP for most droppers are around $460-$500

This one just happens to be wireless and blu-tooth enabled. I'm pretty sure the cost of the dropper is to make up for all the R&D and advertising. So to be honest the price is the same as most other high-end droppers.No big surprise here at all.

My opinion on this dropper is this:

There's a reason why they show the remote on a handle bar with no left hand shifter or brakes...That damn remote is HUGE and for a lot of riders it will be kind of a nightmare to get everything set up comfortable. Different bar lengths and different size hands will make this wireless set up a pain in the ass.

I can see wireless everything in the future and this is just the beginning before we start to see it evolve into something we all will desire.
  • + 2
 Anyone who pays $500 for a seat post should ride without a seat, so they can recall how it felt to buy the thing...
  • + 2
 @texasflood: That made absolutely no sense.
  • + 1
 @LiquidSpin:

...it was a joke...but I guess it doesn't make too much sense if you believe that $500 for a seat post is "fair value".

The reality is that the manufacturers are gouging people because they can - people will pay pretty much what ever they ask because it's the latest and greatest thing. I bet this thing rolls out of the manufacturing plant at well under $50.
  • + 1
 @texasflood: Define "fair value" it's completely subjective.

"Another mans trash is another mans treasure"

Again, they may seem outrageous in price but you have to realize there's more to making a product than you think. It has to go through R&D and then has to be marketed and packaged. Not every company is making dropper posts the same way or with the same exact formula. These droppers may seem unfair to you but eventually they will lower in price. In fact there are cheaper dropper posts available to you now.

Businesses are in it to make money. Profit is what keeps companies and their employees happy. Profit is also used to further improve upon existing products. No company goes into business in the mindset not to make some amount of profit. Unless they're a non-profit organization.

The iPhone sells for $700 retail yet it only costs Apple close to $150 I believe to make. Why? to cover overhead costs, adverts etc etc etc. Oh and also to make money.

So yeah, that dropper does costs less to manufacture in bulk. Try starting your own business and see if you can understand where they are coming from.
  • + 1
 @LiquidSpin:

Again, you are missing the point - $500 (or $650 CDN) is a massive amount to pay for a seat post that moves up and down without having to use a quick release. In this case, they've added some different technology to get the same result. The industry has recognized that more than a few people involved in this hobby (sorry "lifestyle") will pay what ever it takes to have the newest thing, so they price it accordingly. This isn't a critique of them but of us - the would be consumers of massively overpriced products.

As for the rest of your comments, I will let it slide and assume you didn't intend to make it sound as condescending as it appears. FWIW I know a thing or two about business and profitability.
  • + 1
 @texasflood: I wasn't trying to be condescending in the least. I also agree that they do price it according to the market value because they are in it to make a profit. These profits can sometimes help the company grow and do more future research and development.

Or most of it can go into their already fat wallets.

But this is business and how it works regardless of industry we're talking about. Eventually dropper posts will become more and more affordable but keep in mind if they continue to produce something better than the old they will always be priced more.

(This rule doesn't apply to things made in China by the way)

If my post came off harsh I do apologize I was just trying to make/explain my point.
  • + 1
 I've been running one of these posts for the past couple months and have a few comments about it. The remote buttons are too small and there is not enough feedback on them. The remote has three buttons, one for the dropper and two for your shock and forks. When you're hurting on a hard xc race you end up mashing the buttons and quite often miss the correct one. Since the feedback isn't instant, you try to sit down, only to find out you didn't hit the right one. You try again, but by this time you're in the middle of a techy downhill section. My second observation is that the lag is pretty annoying. It's not like a reverb where you hold the button down, sit, and then release the button to lock it in. Instead you press the button, try sitting, the post finally kicks into action and drops down. You now have to keep sitting at that exact height for about a second 1 until the post closes it's value again. You don't get to choose when it locks, it's on a timer. This can be quite annoying when you hit a hard downhill section of trail and go to quickly drop the post, only to loose balance during the 1 second wait time and have the post fly back up at you. If those two things are fixed, this post would be amazing! If as soon as you pressed the button you could sit down, and if as soon as you released the button the post locked. Until then, I'd use it for casual xc riding where you're not going to hit anything super crazy but want a dropper just in case. I'd leave it as a miss for enduro right now as you can't get those quick post height adjustments in.
  • + 1
 Does anyone remember when we used put the saddle out the way and leave it there?
I've been riding over 30 years now and I've adjusted my seat height less than 10 times whilst on a ride.
I set my height by the logo on the post, leave it there, then stand up to pedal.
Sitting down is lazy, stand up and hammer
  • + 14
 Does anyone remember having to get up to change the channel on the television?

Have you ridden with a dropper post?
I have adjusted my seat height 10 times in a section of a ride.
  • + 1
 Well yeah I only have my saddle high if I have to ride longer bits of road to and from the trail. It is low when I'm on the trail so indeed for me there is no point having a dropper post. I'd probably break it more often than I'd use it because it is rather exposed when you crash. The qr seatpost clamp works just fine for me.

Then you have people racing the Trans Provence or at least regularly ride similar terrain. Even the Megavalanche Alpe d'Huez has longer sections of non-technical climbing or traversing. It helps with recovery if you can give your legs a break and raise the saddle. And when you're racing it matters that those dropper posts are quicker to adjust than a qr seatpost clamp (despite the name).

But that's racing. Probably more people run a dropper than makes sense. But then again more people run XTR stuff than makes sense. It is their free choice and they support the companies putting money into the sport. Another great thing is that probably the only interface where the number of standards (or dimensions) are actually dropping is the seatpost diameter. So finally you can invest in a fancy Thomson (rigid) seatpost with a fair chance that you can eventually transfer it onto your next bike. No way you're going to do that with your forks, hubs, rims, cranks etc (unless you frequently "upgrade").

So nothing to moan, rigid seatposts and qr seatpost clamps are here to stay Smile .
  • + 0
 I know all the theory about correct seat height but it doesn't work for me. I've got an xc race tomorrow, it's only for an hour so I'll be standing and hammering as always. My posts are bolted and never move.
  • + 1
 @ReformedRoadie: The tv has been wrapped in a blanket for 18 months or so (before we moved) and I still haven't made time to put it in place. But indeed before that I never bothered to search for the remote, just use the bottons on the tv Smile .

@turbohippy Yeah one hour should be very doable. I did a two hour ride this evening, had the saddle down all the time. But this is XC. Remember the top section of the Megavalanche is pretty rough, especially when you're just below the snow and the rocks are big and loose. By the time you reach Alpe d'Huez you'll be pretty knackered and saving some energy sitting down on these smoother sections is definitely going to give you an advantage for when you'll be standing again on those steeper switchbacks with the roots and all. I have no experience riding the Trans Provence but surely they'll also want to preserve energy wherever they can during such a long multi-day race.
  • + 1
 Sweet, more batteries for the land-fill! For a bunch or people who proclaim to love riding outside and enjoying our natural environment, we sure suck at sustainability. I know these ones are re-chargeable but that isn't really getting the issue, it just reduces it slightly.

When someone comes up with a Solar or Kinetically charged bicycle power system I will interested.

Let's recover braking power to supply the juice to our electronic shifters/lights/suspension/seat posts.
  • + 1
 Says the Australian! Hear, hear!
  • + 3
 Hopefully it holds up better than their brakes. Our shop sees a 50% problem rate with Maguras of all models on brand new bikes, some of which crap out before even being sold.
  • + 1
 Hahaha see the same crap but more for road with rt8 at my shop
  • + 5
 That remote looks like something you'd use to open your garage door.
  • + 1
 Good concept, and I'd love a cableless dropper but that remote....what were they thinking. I would have expected something like the Di2 or Etap shifters, where it's just a tiny, low profile button. You only need one button--push to open valve and push again to close valve.
  • + 4
 Oh wait,Cant ride need to charge my:
fork
seat post
shifters
glasses
garmin
gopro
  • + 1
 F'ing bluetooph and F'ing batteries in my F'ing sheatposs?

I kinda sorta remember magura made some awesome hydraulic cantis back in the 90s? I kinda sorta had some respect for them though wasn't keen about the kustom brake pads. Pshhh... that's gone now.

I just don't see why this travesty is for sale. Don't you need to start a project with a belief you're not done until its awesome? You're not going to upset your customers? I could see this project being chalked up to experience: "well, no one expected V1 to be any good but we develop engineering experience from the project." This is just such a stupid POS! Look at the little cheap membrane control buttons!
  • + 2
 The wireless feature looks like a solution for a problem that doesn't exist. Sounds like there are reliability issues as well. I'll stick with my (flawless) 9.8 dropper thank you very much.
  • + 1
 My decision came down between the elect and the 9Point8. Since all my bikes are old enough not have internal cable routing holes the 9Point8 was essentially ruled out unless I drilled holes in my frame which I wasn't too excited about doing. I can see how the 9Point8 makes more sense for a lot of riders and I probably would have went with it except internal cable routing was in the begining stages. For me it was between drilling holes in my frame and spending $399 on seat post that was back ordered or spending $368 and not having to drill holes in my frame. Easy decision...for now at least, until I get a a newer frame then the 9point8 will be back on my list if the eLect has problems. none so far though.
  • + 1
 30.9 mm & 31.6 mm are the two most popular sizes. A whole 0.7 mm separating the two. Well I'm sure the industry responsible for things like derailleurs (& now electric ones :s), Boost, 650B & going from a 20 mm standard front axle to a 15 mm front axle has a real good reason for never tackling the ridiculous & arbitrary myriad of pointless seat tube/post sizes that accomplish seemingly nothing except being a pain in the ass. Probably helps sell more posts though. :/
  • + 1
 My local "bike park" has uplift via a t-bar drag lift. Most people put the t-bar behind the seatpost/under the saddle, not a good place for an expensive and flimsy dropper post. Personally, I have a beater, non-dropper, seatpost for when I go there - it'd be WAY easier with a wireless setup, and 30 second exchange of seat posts. I'm seriously considering this.

The remote is hella ugly though...
  • + 1
 You're making the assumption there, @richardcunningham , that all my bikes have the same seat-tube angle; otherwise moving the post from bike-to-bike will also require saddle angle adjustment and, depending on how frequently it gets moved, that's probably more hassle than I can be bothered with .
  • + 2
 Jesus... But if you do want to put a dropper on a DH bike for some reason then it's easiest with this one. Droppers do hell of a difference on pedally courses. Also DH bikes allow you to run the seat quite high, even without a dropper, so you'd be using max 100mm of range. I'm actually removing my dropper everytime I go to a bike park because I already trashed two remotes when riding park on my AM bike.
  • + 3
 *Presses button and watches the loading icon searching for signal on the remote screen...then seat drops * Cool idea, easy transfer, not mechanical enough
  • + 2
 You just know someone is currently working on an Ant+ hack so they can actuate their buddys dropper on the next ride from their phone....
  • + 3
 Now I only need to buy a second bike, to justify the purchase of this dropper to my wife.
  • + 4
 Just to have a cable less? This is getting too much.
  • + 3
 Get this, get electronic shifting, get a hydraulic gyro.........enduro barspins for days LOL
  • + 3
 Hate on it all you want but your looking at the future.
  • + 12
 "you're"
  • + 6
 @sngltrkmnd: no he's right, my looking at the future
  • + 2
 Weak battery, weak warranty, unnecessary addition of electronics... and a $500 msrp?


Yeah, I'll pass.
  • + 3
 $500... why not a solar battery..???
  • + 9
 Zee Germans eLect to ride at nacht.
  • + 1
 I think you could charge it on the go with one of those portable solar panels and a usb cable.
  • + 6
 Because nobody in Britain would buy it Big Grin
  • + 2
 I'll keep it Canadian and go with one of the best releases to date...The 9.8 fall line! Thank s
  • + 1
 40% more expensive than a gravity dropper, untested durability, inferior function, two batteries, and massively more complex? Sign me up!
  • + 11
 ...It's heavier though, so more post for your money.
  • + 6
 Gravity Dropper: Function over form since before you were born!
  • + 4
 It doesn't look like a sex toy though.
  • + 4
 +1 for Gravity Dropper
  • + 3
 the remote looks like some rando chinese part they found on Ali Express
  • + 1
 im ok with having shocks that one day adapt to speed, terrain and slope someday. As far as the seat post, no more batteries plz! Not interested.
  • + 1
 How did everyone at Magura agree that a dropper with a half second delay would be acceptable? And how did they come up with that horrible remote? Gott Im Himmel!
  • + 2
 This is how Skynet starts.
  • + 2
 Delay is a deal breaker for me ... no thanks
  • + 0
 Just give me a lever right under my seat mounted to the post. No need to run the cable all the way to my bars. Clean and no electronics.
  • + 11
 2012 called and said it has a KS post ready for you. Let us know how that goes.
  • + 4
 Oh look, he's just performed best trail ride trick - A seatpost one-hander!
  • + 5
 I have an old CrankBrothers post with a lever right under my seat, want to buy it?

(Each time I use it, it looks like I'm wiping my ass or touching myself...)
  • + 4
 Just shorten any normal post hose and clamp it on the saddle.

Totally hate having 2 hands on the bars myself. Only had good things happen when hitting trails with only one hand Smile
  • + 2
 ... seriously dude, you will never be a Strava KOM if you use old technology - we all know that's what riding is all about!

Spend your hard earned cash on these kinds of "advancements" and you'll be a better rider for it! And next year you can buy the next big marketing thing - on the fly electronic bar width adjusting maybe - $2500!!!!
  • + 1
 We all know they're going to make those wireless. I'm not surprise. What's next? Voice commands dropper post.
  • + 14
 DROP DAMMIT!!
  • + 2
 @eicca: OH SH*T
  • + 5
 OW MY BALLS!
  • + 3
 I'd rather set it as something as random as it can be, so that no spectator can interfere with his shouting. Like MOIST! or TAXIDERMIST!
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: or ramrod!!
  • + 1
 Eliminating a minor annoyance, and adding a major one. Brilliant. Can't wait to charge my seatpost!
  • + 1
 I can raise and lower my quick release seatpost WHILE RIDING about as fast as this thing adjusts saddle height. I'll wait.
  • + 1
 400 cycles = 10-30 days of normal usage for me.
Not bad, but could last a bit longer.
  • + 0
 if you average that out that's 20 cycles a ride, you must go up and down like a yoyo
  • + 3
 @multialxndr: 1 at the car, 4 times on the emt/poganip climb, 4 in ucsc single track, 1 time for a decent, 2 times on the climb, 1 time for second decent, 1 time up poganip to emt, and 4 times down emt.

Sorry, 18 cycles in a regular 20 mile ride.
  • + 1
 @multialxndr: more like a carousel.
  • + 1
 How to add one and a half pounds to your bike. Dont forget the batteries.
  • + 1
 LOL can't wait to hack that
  • + 1
 No Lithium battery? Strange...
  • - 2
 Do you have any idea how easy these are to hack?! I can't wait to encounter these on the trail. It's gonna be like driving around the suburbs in the 80s with a cracked universal garage door opener. Heeeeheeeeheeehaaaaaaa
  • + 1
 I just rode mine today and loved it. Starbike purchase was $375.
  • + 1
 Magura Making products that will kinda work since 1893
  • + 0
 So dope 1 post for all my bikes ! I'd buy one for sure , save so much money on your stable
  • + 1
 watchout........battery has a 5% Big Grin
  • + 1
 Brilliant Magura, can I try one? Big Grin
  • + 1
 SO many things that could go wrong with this on the trail
  • + 1
 I'm just here for the comments Smile
  • + 0
 i like the post but WTF IS THAT SEAT ew ew ew kill it with fire
  • + 1
 It's an SQ LAB.
  • + 0
 I'm still running a 19 gram Chromag QR.
  • + 0
 I do not need another dropper. Particular at that price. Thanks anyway.
  • + 0
 Id be more excited for a cable actuated magura
  • + 1
 Ejection seat button?
  • + 0
 "Sorry guys, I can't go ride today- I forgot to charge my seat post"
  • + 0
 So many people having issues with external routing....get the drill out?
  • - 1
 Added benefit for those that carry the bike IN the car is that you can remove the post with minimum faff.
  • + 12
 I carry extra faff for this sort of problem.
  • - 1
 so can thieves
  • - 2
 I automatically "Dropped" straight to the comments....
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