First Look: 2015 BoXXer - Riding RockShox's New Downhill Fork

Apr 1, 2014
by Mike Levy  
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The downhill fork landscape has changed drastically over the last few years, with major players cutting weight by going to air springs, debuting revised dampers that are said to offer more control and performance, and offering new models that are compatible with 650B wheels. There are also fresh contenders entering the marketplace with designs that have been very much the media darlings over the past six months, but also offering the performance to back those headlines up. And let's not discount the Italians, with them re-entering the game and looking to take back a big chunk of their former glory. All of this has left some people forgetting about RockShox and their BoXXer, a fork that, despite not grabbing the lion's share of the headlines recently, has to still be the most widely used downhill slider out there. It's been clear that RockShox has been working over the last while to update the BoXXer - we spotted BlackBox spec prototype Charger dampers, similar to those used in the Pike, fitted to World Cup racers' forks at the beginning of last season - but the question on everyone's minds was how RockShox would respond to the latest competition.

Some speculated that we'd see an entirely new fork chassis, maybe even an inverted design, and that it would look nothing like the current BoXXer. A new damper would be a given, and an offering for both 26'' and 650B wheels would likely be a safe bet as well. As it turns out, some of that conjecture was correct, and some of it was way off base, so we packed up and flew to Queenstown, New Zealand, to get the full story on RockShox's 2015 BoXXer fork and why it looks familiar on the outside but is an entirely new beast on the inside.



The new BoXXer has been conceived with an entirely different set of parameters in mind compared to the previous offering, with an eye on increasing both simplicity and performance. ''Reducing the amount of adjustments, simplifying the package, and providing people with something that is set really well out of the factory was the aim,'' RockShox Product Manager Jeremiah Boobar told Pinkbike. And while the final product may look exactly like what has been in their catalog since 2010, Boobar's stated goals mean that the new fork is anything but a simple re-working of an existing design. Yes, the chassis does still use 35mm stanchion tubes and very similar looking lowers, albeit now manufactured using new methods that improve tolerances and with a 650B compatible option, but both the fork's spring and damper layout are completely new. It's the latter that is arguably of the most importance, though, with the new BoXXer employing a longer version of the Charger damper, complete with a single compression and single rebound dial, that has seen so much acclaim in their highly praised Pike mid-travel fork. Overall fork weights have also been lowered by a fair bit, with the World Cup model shedding 130 grams to weigh in at 5.7lbs, and the coil sprung Team fork losing 120 grams to weigh 6.37lbs.


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  We spent most of our time testing the 2015 BoXXer with it bolted to the front of Intense's 650B wheeled 951 EVO, a potent package that handled Queenstown's varied terrain with ease.



The Pike was the next project for the team before the BoXXer, and the very next winter we were out testing three or four versions on the Charger damper, trying to narrow it down to the right one. The whole time we knew that what we were doing for the Pike project was going to be extended into a BoXXer version.
- Jeremiah Boobar, RockShox Product Manager
It isn't an exaggeration to say that it has been the Pike's performance that has put RockShox at the forefront of people's minds when the topic of suspension comes up, so it isn't a surprise to see that they've taken that technology and applied it to a longer travel platform. And although the Pike has beaten the new BoXXer to the marketplace by a good year or so, it was a discussion about how to build the best possible downhill fork that led to both becoming a reality. ''The idea came up in February, 2011, during a drive to a test session in Phoenix. As you can imagine, you put a bunch of engineers, test riders, and all of us in a van for that long, and we're going to sit there and start talking and scheming and thinking about product constantly,'' Boobar explains of the eleven hour journey to the notoriously rough proving grounds of Arizona's South Mountain.













''And of course the topic of how we can make the best possible downhill suspension came up. The development team quickly got to the point where they wanted to use a sealed system, so that's either going to be something that's fully bled, de Carbon based, with either an IFP (internal floating piston) or some type of bladder. So then the conversation in the van went into the challenges of using an expanding bladder or an IFP.'' RockShox's top tier damper at the time was their Mission Control unit that was employed within their high-end downhill fork, the World Cup. That Mission Control damper offers four external adjustments - low and high-speed compression, as well as beginning and ending stroke rebound - that go along with most people's thoughts of more dials equalling more performance. Is that really the case, though? It certainly seems to be, with the price tag of your fork or shock increasing with the amount of dials it has. ''Those conversations in the van kept going, and then, naturally, as a development team does, they turned to me, the product manager, and asked how many adjustments it needed to have,'' he continues. ''Does it have to have all the adjustments that we currently have with the BoXXer? My answer was that we only need the adjustments required to make the fork feel great.''

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  World Cup and Team BoXXers will come with Charger dampers and feature one compression dial and one rebound dial.



What's Inside the New BoXXer?

The BoXXer's old Mission Control damper is technically called an emulsion-type damper - this refers to a layout where the damping oil is free to mix with air in the system. Because oil does doesn't compress, meaning that the fork would not be able to move if the leg or cartridge body were only full of oil, air is used to compensate for damper shaft displacement as the fork goes into its travel. Emulsion layouts are usually simpler and therefore more cost effective, but the open design means that the oil and air can mix enough to cause the resulting air bubbles to pass through the damping circuits, with the outcome sometimes being a loss of damping and control.

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The Charger (pictured above) is the opposite of an emulsion damper. It's completely full of oil, meaning that there is far less opportunity for it to foam during hard use, and it depends on an expanding bladder to compensate for damper shaft displacement. The extruded bladder within the new BoXXer is about 50% longer than what is used on the Pike's Charger damper in order to compensate for the fork's longer travel and heat build-up that can occur during a long, rough run, as well as to prevent bladder deformation over the two aluminum couplers at each end.

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  From left: the Charger's extruded bladder relaxed with the cartridge full extended, the bladder expanded with the damper rod pushed into the cartridge just as it would be if the fork was going into its travel, and a cutaway showing how the bladder sits over the damper's compression assembly.


The Charger damper itself is very close to what is used within the Pike, minus the pedal assist feature, of course, and RockShox has had to make only minor changes to the shim stack layout in order to get the longer stroke Charger unit used in the BoXXer running up to expectations. In fact, the rebound shim stack configuration is exactly the same as what's found within the Pike, and the only alterations are found on the compression side of the piston. There is one major difference between the dampers in the Pike and BoXXer forks, though, with RockShox including a few extra shims that can be added to either the rebound or the compression side of the piston if a rider ends up nearing the closed range of the external adjustments.

In stock configuration the extra shims are loaded into the cartridge behind the compression stack and spaced up far enough so as not to have any effect on the fork's damping, but a tear-down of the damper can give you access to them by simply undoing the piston bolt and sliding the entire assembly off of the rod, thereby allowing you to reposition them as needed to either increase or decrease the level of damping. Sure, it's not an overly simple task, but a good shop should be able to easily handle the job, and RockShox will provide all of the literature required to get it done and tell you what to expect from the changes. Even so, how many riders will really need to do such a thing? ''I think that probably the ninety something percentile of riders should run it stock, and it's going to be pretty rare that people get in there and change that around, but we had the ability to build that in by adding a few extra shims, so why not?'' said Boobar of the added tuning ability that is new to RockShox's approach to fork design. ''We went through the trouble of dyno'ing it for people so we know the three different shim stacks that you can apply to rebound and compression, and we've already tested it, already proven it, versus people just getting in there and chucking shims around. We'll provide shim stack lists and configurations in the manual so that if people want to flip the shims around they can go ahead and do it.''

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  The Charger's rebound rod and piston sits to the left, while the compression assembly is shown to the right. The bladder is held in place via two aluminum couplers, with the lower coupler threading onto the damper body. The black low-speed compression dial that is located at the top of the fork leg can be seen at the far right.


The question in our minds, and possibly yours as well, is if the general public, those who are planning on shelling out some their savings for a new fork, will buy the 'less adjustments is more better' approach, especially when the company's previous top offering included separate low and high-speed compression and beginning and ending stroke rebound adjustments. That's four separate dials, by the way, with two at the top and two at the bottom, which is contrast to the new fork's single low-speed compression dial at the top of the leg and a single beginning stroke rebound dial at the bottom. ''We did a lot of internal testing and a lot of dyno work to figure out a base tune package for it,'' explained Boobar when we asked if they were certain the simplified approach was the right way to go. ''The whole time the team kept coming back to me to ask if I'm sure we could get away with only having one compression and one rebound adjustment. I told them that I felt good about it, and that we've tested different tunes with people and everyone narrowed down to the same high-speed compression and the same Rapid Recovery tune, so let's take it to the next level and get it out to the World Cup racers,'' which was the next step in the development process of the Charger damper. After a season of racing and testing, it turns out that only a single World Cup racer, Devinci's Stevie Smith, runs a stiffer damper setup with the extra shims added into the compression stack. And his setup is far from being a one-off, with those extra shims being the very ones that come stock within the cartridge of an off the shelf BoXXer.

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  The damper's compression piston and shims laid out. The last shim on the far right, sitting between the piston and the piston bolt, is the check valve, while the last few shims at the far left are the extras that can be used to reconfigure the damper. The four smaller discs next to them act as spacers that separate those extra shims from the working compression stack, ensuring that they have no effect on its performance unless they are repositioned.



We did a test session with Stevie, which was the basis, and then we went out to the broader BlackBox racing guys with that base tune, although we were still a bit nervous about the lack of adjustments. Steve's mechanic, Nigel, came to us and said that they typically adjust high-speed compression throughout the week at a World Cup, and that they'll start with it a little lighter and then add a couple of clicks as the week goes on. He was nervous about not having that capability anymore. It turned out that they never ended up needing that adjustment. Every one of our other racers came back with the exact same feedback on the tunes, so we were really able to narrow down the tune package and just pre-set it.
- Jeremiah Boobar, RockShox Product Manager



Spring Updates

Both the air and coil sprung models see changes that are also aimed at simplifying the fork, with RockShox removing the old volume adjustment dial of the former and the DropStop ramp-up system of the latter. Anyone who's owned an air sprung BoXXer is well aware that the air volume adjustment dial is near impossible to turn when the fork is pressurized, requiring you to let the air out to adjust the volume and then pump the fork back up. Yes, the system worked as intended, but it was hardly a streamlined process that allowed you to make hassle-free changes. That setup has been abandoned in favour or volume reducing spacers, called Bottomless Tokens, that thread into the underside of the top cap and can be stacked up until you find the right amount of progression through the stroke. It's actually the very same setup that's employed within the Pike, and although it isn't any more convenient than letting the air out to turn the volume dial like in the previous design, it is far simpler. "If you're an aggressive rider, you still don't just throw the Bottomless Tokens in,'' Boobar warned us. ''You might be aggressive but you also might ride off the back of the bike, so you'll never really take advantage of it and you'll just come up short on travel. It really depends on your riding style and weight bias." This mirrors our findings when testing the Pike, with us being happy with a single Bottomless Token despite our sometimes steep terrain, something that points a finger at our off the back style on the bike when things get hairy. RockShox says that the fork will ship with a single Bottomless Token installed from the factory, and a few extras that can be added as required.

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  The old volume adjustment dial of the air sprung BoXXer is gone, with threaded Bottomless Tokens taking its place. Add more to decrease volume and add ramp-up in the last third of the fork's travel, or remove them to create a more linear stroke.


DropStop was how RockShox controlled ramp-up on their coil sprung BoXXer forks, with a skinny elastomer bumper positioned down the middle of the coil and a finger on the underside of the spring side top cap that made contact with the top of it at a pre-determined point in its travel, causing the fork to firm up. A dial on the top cap allowed riders to adjust the position of said finger, which would then change where in the fork's travel it would make contact with the bumper. It worked, but, much like the air fork's volume adjustment, it added a fair number of pieces to the fork, and the dial wasn't always easy to turn either, so RockShox has deep-sixed that setup. Where does the ramp-up come from now? A simple seal head that is held in place with a C-clip at the bottom of the damper side stanchion effectively seals off the lower casting, turning it into a smaller volume air spring that causes the fork to firm up later in its travel. There is also a new bumper that the seal head makes contact with prior to bottom out that provides a little extra cushion before you reach the end of the fork's travel. That means that there are just three pieces in total - the seal head, the C-clip, and the bumper - which also helps to remove some grams. Boobar told us that both Danny Hart and Andrew Neethling, longtime proponents of coil sprung BoXXers that used the older DropStop system, found that the new seal head design provided more than enough ramp-up in force for them, meaning that it's likely enough for you and I as well.

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  The black coloured seal head is held in place at the bottom of the stanchion tube with a C-clip, thereby sealing off the lower portion of the damper leg to add more ramp-up to the fork's stroke.

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  The new Solo Air assembly sees an increase in negative air volume combined with the appropriate changes to the positive side of the chamber that is said to increase suppleness.




Chassis Details

There's no doubting that an inverted design would have turned a lot of heads, and while there were rumors floating around that was the direction the RockShox was taking with the new BoXXer, those whispers ended up being about their new RS-1 cross-country fork and its upside down layout. As it turns out, the BoXXer retains its right side up design and 35mm stanchion tubes, although a new 650B compatible set of lowers (that weigh 52 grams more than the 26'' lowers) has been added to the mix. That means that there will be both options for a complete 650B BoXXer, as well as the opportunity to purchase 650B lowers for those who want to transition to the slightly larger wheel size but don't want to break the bank for an entirely new fork, with them using the required 48mm of offset and correct axe-to-crown length compared to the 42mm of offset for the 26" version.

Were you hoping for an entirely new fork both inside and out? RockShox feels that they have good reason to stick with what they know rather than release a new chassis that might not show any benefits: "We're really happy with the way it performs, and we've spent an enormous amount of time developing this 35mm chassis,'' Boobar told us when pressed on the matter. But wouldn't a new look for the BoXXer get people even more excited? ''We went through roughly twenty-seven configurations before settling on this one, and we feel like it's the right balance of having enough stiffness and having the right amount of flex. If a fork is too stiff it will have a tendency, especially when you air into things, to deflect you a bit, and this fork has enough stiffness to corner effectively but at the same time it also has the ability to 'walk' through sections so you don't have to fight to keep it from deflecting." So there you have it, don't be expecting anything completely earth shattering from RockShox as far as chassis design and downhill forks go, at least in the near future.

Saying that RockShox hasn't made some improvements to the BoXXer's lowers would be selling Boobar's team short, though, because they have been toiling away at smaller, less obvious details that he says can make a big difference to the fork's suppleness. ''A lot of people say that you need a new surface finish or new seals to make things smoother, but those things are all easy to point at. There are so many pieces to the puzzle that have a dramatic effect on how smooth a fork can run,'' said Boobar while on the topic of chassis updates and improving sensitivity. "You've got your bushings, your tolerances, your sizing and machining, the seal material and seal squeeze, and all that stuff has to work in combination. We feel, especially with the Pike, that we've been able to come up with a secret sauce that allows us to achieve really low friction without having to go to a risky or super expensive surface finish. We can stay with stuff that is solid, robust, and easy to manufacture consistently." He's talking about the same manufacturing process used for the Pike's lowers being applied to the new 650B BoXXer lowers, and very soon to be used on the standard 26" lowers as well. That trick looking Fast Black hard anodized treatment will be employed across the board on all 2015 BoXXers, although it's more for appearance's sake than to add any slipperiness to the fork's action. Something that took less engineering knowhow is the new sticker kits that will come with the forks, allowing riders to add a bit of a custom touch to their ride.


Upgrade Kits for Older BoXXers

New downhill forks are exciting and all, but the bottom line is that there are already loads of riders out there who have 2014 model year and older BoXXers and they aren't going to be running out to their local shop to plunk down a hockey sock full of money for a brand new fork. And as much as they'd like to sell a zillion 2015 BoXXers, RockShox is well aware of that as well. It's that fact that convinced them to offer both the Charger damper and the revised Solo Air spring as an aftermarket upgrade kit that can be installed into older 35mm BoXXers, allowing riders to modernize their current fork with the latest technology.

It's still not an inexpensive proposition - the Charger damper retails for $379 USD, and the Solo Air assembly for $188 USD - but it's a hell of a lot less expensive than a completely new fork. The damper can be installed into any BoXXer that uses 35mm stanchion tubes, so 2010 and newer, while the Solo Air kit requires that the fork not be manufactured any earlier then April of 2011 due to changes in the inner profile of the spring leg. That means that as long as you are smart about what used BoXXer you purchase off of the Pinkbike Buy and Sell, you can likely assemble yourself a great performing fork for a very reasonable price.


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FIRST RIDE - Queenstown, New Zealand
RIDING THE 2015 BOXXER





That's a whole lot of tech information to swallow, but the fact that should have been strained out from all of the damper and spring talk is that although the BoXXer is still the BoXXer by name, and the chassis is visually the same, it is essentially a new downhill fork from RockShox. And the fact that previous versions of the fork, including the current run that is spec'd with Mission Control dampers, have to be some of the most widely used downhill forks on the planet, means that the 2015 models have some big shoes to fill. No, those 2014 and older forks aren't perfect - BoXXers aren't known for being the most active forks on the market, after all - but the fact that many of our downhill test bikes come equipped with RockShox's long travel fork means that we've spent countless hours on them over the past years. And we continued to do exactly that during our first day of riding on Queenstown's Skyline Bike Park's tracks, putting in a solid day on the 2014 offering to learn the lines and get a feel for the current production model before swapping out that fork's internals for 2015 guts. This strategy gave us a chance to see how RockShox's plan of letting consumers upgrade their current fork to the Charger damper will play out, with the second day of of riding being spent on a 2015, 650B model.

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  It might have only been three days of riding but it included pretty much every sort of terrain imaginable, from the smoothest jump lines to some of the steepest, rockiest roll-ins around.


On Trail with the BoXXer

Being able to ride both a standard 2014 fork, then the same fork that had been upgraded with a Charger damper, and finally a 650B compatible, 2015 model gave us a clear understanding of the differences between the three, and we came away a bit surprised at the leap in performance when talking about the complete 2015 fork relative to the upgraded 2014 version. More on that a bit later on, though, as being able to spend $379 USD on the Charger damper to upgrade your current fork will likely be of major interest to many riders. How does it feel compared to a standard 2014 BoXXer? Well, one way to describe the difference might be to say that it makes the older Mission Control system feel over-damped in all situations, even though we wouldn't have said that prior to this experiment, and that the Charger setup manages to feel both more forgiving and more supportive at the same time. How does it do it, especially given that it has no external high-speed damper adjustments that would let us dial in a balance with low-speed control? ''The way the cartridge functions and the way we balance the forces gives it a completely different feel than the Mission Control product,'' Boobar told us. ''And all but one World Cup athlete is on what is now the stock tune, as well as all of our test crew who are more regular riders. All of them are completely satisfied. And we're really happy because the Charger cartridge has less adjustments, performs better, gives you less hand feedback and less fatigue, as well as being 88 grams lighter than the Mission Control product.''

We'd have to agree with those statements, even if we only managed to put a few days worth of testing in on the fork, and would we'd also stress the fact that we didn't find ourselves missing that high-speed compression and extra rebound adjustment from the Mission Control damper one bit, despite suspecting that we might.

While we were impressed with the upgraded setup of the 2014 BoXXer fitted with a Charger damper and new air spring, it was when we got on the 2015 fork that we took note of an unexpected jump in performance. Yes, the damper offers the same controlled movement through the travel, somehow being able to offer both support and forgiveness at the same time in a way that those who've spent time on a Pike will know all about. It can be a very difficult thing to combine those two without one taking away from the other, but the Charger does exactly that. In fact, we ended up backing out the compression dial and releasing air pressure during our last two days of riding on the 2015 BoXXer, and not because we felt that the fork was transferring too much through to our hands but because it simply doesn't need to be closed off to be able to preserve the bike's geometry by not diving. By the end of the second day we had gone down 15 PSI, out a few clicks on the compression setting, as well as one or two on the rebound, and found ourselves at the bottom of each run without any complaints. This is in contrast to the Mission Control equipped BoXXer that often saw us dialing in both more low and high-speed compression as the day went on and we felt faster as we came to grips with the track. We also installed a single Bottomless Token, which turned out to be a two minute job, with it making a noticeable difference in the last third of the fork's travel.

Although the new fork's performance was impressive, we're honestly not all that surprised given that the Pike uses a similar setup and we've put countless miles on many different Pikes. What did come as a surprise to us, though, is how supple and active the 2015 BoXXer is. RockShox has never had the most active of downhill forks on the market, but this new model is supremely slippery and eager to move when passing over the
smallest ripple. We were told that this is due to new manufacturing methods that improve tolerances all around, although the process is only being applied to the newer 650B lowers at this point in time - that will change to include the 26" fork soon, though. And it is the manufacturing of the fork as a whole that will decide how successful the 2015 BoXXer is in the eyes of the consumer, because, much like the Pike, it doesn't look like we'll have much to complain about when talking about out and out performance. So long as RockShox can absolutely nail the reliability factor, as they seem to have been able to do with the Pike, it will be a winner. And what about the fork having two of its external adjustments removed? We certainly didn't find ourselves missing them, and we're pretty damn sure that other riders won't either.


www.sram.com
Action photos by Adrian Marcoux

Must Read This Week

199 Comments

  • 193 3
 shedding 130 grams to weigh in at 5.7lbs, and the coil sprung Team fork losing 120 grams to weigh 6.37lbs because fuck using the same units!
  • 29 2
 'Merica!! In Kiwiland!
  • 40 6
 5.7lbs = 2585g
6.37lbs = 2889g
THANKS GOOGLE!
  • 5 0
 Grab me a charger damper and I'm set!
  • 57 1
 they need to smooth down those top knobs so my sash doesn't get snagged
  • 50 0
 "New downhill forks are exciting and all, but the bottom line is that there are already loads of riders out there who have 2014 model year and older BoXXers and they aren't going to be running out to their local shop to plunk down a hockey sock full of money for a brand new fork. And as much as they'd like to sell a zillion 2015 BoXXers, RockShox is well aware of that as well. It's that fact that convinced them to offer both the Charger damper and the revised Solo Air spring as an aftermarket upgrade kit that can be installed into older 35mm BoXXers, allowing riders to modernize their current fork with the latest technology."

BRILLIANT!!
  • 20 5
 Um, that sash is enduro-specific, and this is a dh fork...
  • 7 15
flag seraph (Apr 1, 2014 at 11:01) (Below Threshold)
 454g to a pound. It's not that hard to figure out.
  • 2 18
flag wuzupjosh (Apr 1, 2014 at 11:20) (Below Threshold)
 yes and becasue i think the new damper is probly not nearly as good as a fast suspension damper ill get an rc with that and a new air spring
  • 11 4
 I love how a few months back it was shocks for " the 3 % " now it's shocks with a standard tune that's perfect for every body ?!?!

C'mon rockshox cut the bullshit !
  • 7 5
 2585g.... only two adjustments.... wow! Finally a fork that doesn't require a hydrodynamics degree to tune and weighs less than any other dh fork on the market while still having Rockshox legendary 35mm chassis and charger damper... win win win
  • 23 1
 $1700 for WC, $1275 for team... Pick up a team and a $188 solo air kit and save yourself $237 plus you'll have a coil kit to collect dust in your garage. not too shabby.
  • 5 15
flag jaame (Apr 1, 2014 at 22:21) (Below Threshold)
 Black legs are the only really interesting thing about this fork because the Marzocchi 380 will piss on it in terms of performance and reliablity. They should market it like this: Boxxer: For when you just can't wait six hours between services.
  • 2 8
flag fredro (Apr 2, 2014 at 8:34) (Below Threshold)
 uh, seraph... i believe its 448 gms to a pound, not 454.
  • 6 0
 Incorrect. One pound equals 453.592 grams.
  • 3 0
 i stand corrected. I'm going by 28gms to an oz, 16 ozs to a pound. but to be exact, the ounce is actually 28.3495 grams. all adds up to the 6 gram difference. actual pound is indeed 453.592 gms.
  • 15 1
 fredro , this is the internet , you must never concede and always argue your case , regardless of validity Wink
  • 10 0
 dont wanna engage in an internet war, especially with sir seraph lol. he knows his $hit. besides, the numbers are the numbers. and numbers don't lie. i can admit when I'm wrong. (this is ONLY the 3rd time I've ever been wrong, for the record...EVER!!)
  • 1 1
 That 3℅ was a joke by their marketing department, for the Vivid Air. Unfortunately, many people didn't see it as such, and the joke sailed clear over their heads.
  • 4 0
 you could say that 3% of the time, the joke works every time.
  • 9 0
 I heard they were re-branding it to the Rockshox Sex Panther in 2016
  • 8 0
 Fredro just realised his dealer has been ripping him off for ounces this whole time.
  • 2 0
 Lol... Nailed it!!!!
  • 2 0
 "works 60% of the time, every time"
  • 64 7
 not sure if April fools prank......
  • 26 1
 Its not, they have all the dampers laid out and everything explained fully. 100% sure, its legit!!
  • 14 0
 either that or its one hell of an effort
  • 10 1
 Oh no they wouldn't!!! If its April fools, imma gonna jump of the next cliff i see...
  • 2 4
 it shouldn't be, because RS have been testing DLC coating for about 3 y i think, so its time to release it to people!
  • 8 2
 Pretty big fail on releasing it on april fools day. No one believes it or pays serious attention to it. I was actually scrolling through to find where it starts to get funny, but it dissapointed me
  • 1 0
 Its actually pretty funny and interesting. It creates a dilemma and people start to talk about it like how we are doing. Its also something new and stands out rather than a release date that does not mean anything and is rather bland. I think its awesome personally.
  • 15 11
 if you guys are ACTUALLY unsure if this is a ridiculous april fools or a new release, well, god help you.

The difference between tapered cranks, endure sashes, tire size adjusting rims and this LENGTHY appraisal of wildly complicated fork internals should be obvious to even the most boneheaded idiots among us. go slap some cold water on your faces, for you are indeed asleep at the wheel. pity we have to share our precious oxygen with you dolts,you are indeed a waste of brain matter.

on second thought, id like to offer you all a really good investment opportunity in bottled water thats been charged by moon crystals. its only 100$ a gallon but you have to act fast there's a limited supply. PM me for details on this fantastic opportunity.
  • 7 2
 ^ Fake off ya panker!! We got a mister know it all here...
  • 5 0
 Well that ain't DLC
  • 2 0
 ^ Haha helll no. right you are sire. I dont think some people understand the implications of DLC, and why it hasn't made it onto consumers forks, it simply isn't viable.
  • 3 0
 I thought it might be a joke when I read this part:

"The question in our minds, and possibly yours as well, is if the general public, those who are planning on shelling out some their savings for a new fork, will buy the 'less adjustments is more better' approach, especially when the company's previous top offering included separate low and high-speed compression and beginning and ending stroke rebound adjustments. "

With all the varied types of tracks and conditions on the races circuit, I'm a little surprised the pros are satisfied but it sounds like they are.

When they introduce an upside down DH fork, I wonder if will it will keep the Boxxer name?
  • 4 2
 It makes sense, though. Thousand adjustments on a fork used to be better for marketing reasons and it was easy to screw up your set up. Simplicity is pretty damn awesome!
  • 7 0
 Fox tried to simplify things for the rider by going to CTD, which caused more problems than it solved. Hmm
  • 2 0
 Yeah, but it worked on the Pike! Wink
  • 4 0
 Nah, they'd call an inverted one the Rexxob.
  • 24 0
 Awesome article with tons of technical detail! I don't even ride DH and I thought this was super interesting, and it was cool to hear about the development process. Nice work, PB! (and RS)
  • 8 0
 I wholeheartedly agree. Great tech article. Keep writing more articles like this one PB. Much better than the usual pinkbike tech articles that are nothing but marketing bs with no technical info and a bunch of coined phrases.
  • 2 0
 Yeah was really well written, covered everything really, good stuff. Pleased to hear I can bring my 2010 Boxxers up to near 2015 spec for a few hundred too!
  • 18 1
 I am more stoked that they are calling the mid range Teams instead of R2C2.
  • 6 0
 They can't use the R2C2 nomenclature anymore, you'd need 2 more knobs that they removed for simplicity's sake.
  • 4 0
 Would be quite a fail if they had kept it as R2C2. But I agree, 'team' is a lot easier to say than 'arrtwoceetwo'
  • 7 0
 does sound a little bit like r2d2 which is fun
  • 18 2
 Yes, yes ,yes, ah yes!!!!!!! TRIPLE BIKE GASAM!!! Definitely getting them!!!
  • 18 2
 So you are saying you love those thick, long, black... stanchions?
  • 2 0
 Correctomundo!! I love the long but thin 35mm sanctions... Wink
  • 8 2
 Funny though, after riding Fox40s for so long the 35mm stanchions look positively thin and flimsy.
  • 1 2
 I wonder if Fox will come out with a 'fox 40 suppository' to compete against cane creeks energy suppositories. Should be much stiffer than the oppositions version....
  • 4 2
 Bigger stanchions are not necessarily better. When RS redeveloped the Boxxer chassis quite a few years ago, they tested different diameter stanchions. The WC test riders felt more beat up and went slower with larger diameters. RS' extensive testing showed that fore/aft movement was part of the bump absorption characteristics of a fork.

What I wrote above was reported on Pinkbike many years ago.
  • 3 1
 Iamamodel, you're right...it's probably just a visual thing. Remember the Monster T made everything else look like a girl fork for a while.
  • 1 0
 I too have the visual problem of wanting the bigger stanchions. One reason I sold my Boxxer WC for my 40's. But I just have to tell myself to get what feels best, and what will get the job done. All these new forks looks super amazing, so now it's all up to feel.
  • 1 0
 I don't think any of you guys got my joke. Personally I prefer the feel of Boxxers. I had pre 2010 boxxers and loved them if it hadn't been for Dorados I'd have changed to newer style Boxxer wcs. It's not about all out stiffness in fact Fox has made the 40s less stiff in the last couple of seasons if that says anything.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel - what are you saying, that there was a Boxxer 40s prototype at some point??? Big Grin
Bigger stantions - less slippery, more technology to make them feel smooth and butterly. And then there's something else - some frame designs look good with one fork, others - with another fork, thirds - with a third kind of a fork. But not vice versa! For example - the Sunday looks AWFUL with a pre-2010 Boxxer... but is nut if you put a Fox 40 at the front. Smile
  • 1 0
 @hitarpotar: that's just a matter of opinion how the Sunday looks with old style boxxers vs 40s. I'd say the Sunday looked really nice with the old style boxxers just look at Sam hill's bike from 2007.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, i'm looking at it - it's stunning! The only thing that ruins it for me is the Boxxer. It's just that the Boxxer's stantions are too tiny for the big tubing of the frame. Razz
A more massive fork like the 40s is perfect match. Smile
  • 13 0
 don't fuck with me.. if it's a April fools day prank i burn all the pinkbike hq
  • 6 0
 Honestly, I'm really excited about the fact that they're providing more information about the shim stacks. I feel that lots of amateur racers are interested in modding their forks, and with only compression and rebound damping, swapping out the stacks could definitely have a big impact on this fork.
  • 7 1
 If its not April fools I would like to know why exactly riders no longer needed a HSC adjustment. That adjustment it so crucial in set up these days to not have one just seems odd, Riders do hit bigger things and hit things harder over the weekend so support needs to increase how did they manage that without the adjustment, how can the need for HSC just go away?

They really danced around explaining that.
  • 12 0
 The forks on my mx bike dont have HSC adjustment and im pretty sure i hit bumps harder than i ever do on my dh bike,
  • 3 0
 Thats what the extra shims are about. And the air spacers to make the air spring more progressive.
  • 3 0
 Avalanche cartridges do not have HSC adjustment either.
  • 1 0
 Factory setting on that as said and you can put more psi in it to stiffen them up and or you can just turn the low speed compression down or just add more chimney stacks!
  • 2 0
 www.avalanchedownhillracing.com/Rock%20Shox/Boxxer%2035mm.htm

yep true I got Avalanche cartridge and HSC is controlled via shims, once you set it up you don't need to mess with it.The general compression works well and its not spike or harsh and its controlled via shims. Also the new AvA cartridge offers Optional HSB compression blow-off system for the firmer feel without harshness witch is not present in the new RS charger damper. Guess what Avalanche fits boxxer, 888, fox and its set it forget it and its really maintenance free. I dont really remember not leaking Boxxer nor the word maintenance free about Boxxers i hope they will be better than before Smile
  • 1 0
 On Avy carts high speed compression is controlled by a tapered plug at the bottom of the cart.
  • 3 0
 Lockwood
Your MX fork also have a harder shim stack to compensate for that.

Sshredder
The extra shims are for that but the article clearly stated riders did not change teh shim stack (except smith)

So my question was that those riders who did not change the shim stack how did they suddenly no longer need to adjust the HSC over the weekend?

From what I understand avalanche is very different and they only need one adjuster, they also explain it very well why this is the case, its a true speed sensitive damper. This article did a good job of marketing the fork while explaining very little.
  • 3 0
 I'm not 100% sure on the finer details but LSC adjustments normally move a tapered needle into the piston bypass to restrict bypassing oil flow, HSC usually adjusts the preload on the shim stack as under high loads the shim stack lifts up allowing extra oil flow around the stack - I can't really tell from the pics but it looks like they've eliminated the sliding shim stack and adjusted the shims accordingly to give a more digressive damping curve by themselves, perhaps in combination with a higher flow piston to allow enough oil flow under fast compression...

Thats just my speculation, and 'Sshredder', I think you're talking about bottom out resistance, hydraulic bottom out resistance generally is a tapered 'plug' at the base as a final stand against harsh bottoming.
  • 1 0
 in AvA it's called ABS cone - anti bottoming system and its not related with a HSC.
About new charger damper i wonder for how long this rubber bladder will last if you run aggressive oil combinations and abusing on a hard ride during the summer with ambient temps around 35C+ ??
  • 10 1
 Awesome. Absolutely awesome.
  • 2 0
 What would be even better is if they released some 'exploded diagrams' of the fork, they are unbelievably handy in terms of fork servicing.
  • 17 11
 Oh no! A new fork, expensive and 27.5, they want our money again, Avalanche is so much better! Some company that no one ever heard of used that solution for years! I am so angry right now! bhwa bhwa boohwa bla blab!!!
  • 2 1
 hahahaha yup. pretty much spot on. Come for the new products, stay for the hilarious rants. You nailed it Waki Smile
  • 2 1
 HA! Amazing
  • 6 1
 It is available in two different wheel sizes???? STOP OPPRESSING ME WITH YOUR MARKETING BULLSHIT SRAM!!!! And so on and so forth.
  • 4 1
 I put these (low friction seal kit from tftuned - see link below) in my Boxxer and they move if you breath on them now, no stiction at all, surprisingly less oil leak and no dirt ingress either. TF say you will have to service them more, but I found with the stock seals beings so sticky I had to service them constantly to let them move much at all, so that's probably a moot point!

www.tftunedshox.com/Catalogue/Shop-Racing-Bros/Racing-Bros/Racing-Bros/TF-Low-Friction-Wiper-Seal-Kit-35mm-TFSEALS35LF

Love the idea of upgrading the damping internals. Might be on that if they come to UK for a reasonable price!
  • 3 0
 this is what the new seals do. Pike seals on a boxxer = heaven.
  • 1 0
 Ah yea, course same size sanctions. Does the pike have foam below main seals or rubber oil seal like boxxer? I think it is the rubber seal that is the problem child.
  • 1 0
 Thegr33k pretty sure I saw £269.99 mentioned on the dirt magazine review for just the charger damper:P
  • 1 0
 Cheers for the info, does sound about right from the $ price. I guess that might not be too bad? Still not so cheap, but I still have some modified Race internals so I might get a lot from this Smile
  • 7 0
 One step closer to rediscovering TPC damping.
  • 3 0
 Love the upgrades for older fork! Hope they upgrades come with some kind of a RockShox decal to put on the stanchion that will notate which upgrade is installed. Something similar to what PUSH does with their decals. Always like the new stuff but keep the upgrades coming for all of us with older forks that are due for rebuilds.
  • 4 0
 The upgrade kits are a very sweet idea and a good move to keep riders on RockShox products.

I bet there will be a bunch of used boxers REMOVED from the buy/sell after this article Smile
  • 1 0
 Yeah it is a good marketing move, letting existing riders stay in the family, love their upgraded forks & likely buy rockshox next time.
  • 3 0
 Queenstown seems to have become the default place to go if you want a PB article in the northern winter huh? Can anywhere else compete? How about Rotorua? 440 bike park? Various trails around Nelson, or Wellington? Christchurch? Signal Hill... the list of spots goes on...

In saying that, QT is mint, and has the only bike lift in NZ...
  • 4 2
 Didn't the market push back against CTD like approaches? I would be hesitant to give up control over high/low speed on either end. Tracks and conditions change, anyone who races knows this... and being able to make those subtle changes without taking things apart is a huge bonus for those of us who don't roll with personal mechanics. I do see the same argument that Fox had, "most people need simple, ready to ride out of the box", but for those of us who need to tweak, I don't see this fork being all that user friendly. Some of the quotes in there are just fantastic.
  • 3 0
 It's funny how things work fox has implemented the bladder design 3 years ago, rockshoxs does it now and all of a sudden it's innovative again even though other industries have been using it for a long time, fox comes out with ctd on short to mid travel forks and they are hated on although the 2013s did such, but now dh forks are having their adjustments dumbed down and it's the second coming, fan boys I guess
  • 5 0
 Its true that this isnt the greatest innovation since sliced bread but RS even admits that. I think the dumbed down approach is great. How many of us really adjust our forks and shocks every ride using every dial to come up with the perfect setting for every different trail. Im more of a set it and forget it person. If the factory tune is just right you dont need much to fine tune the ride. CTD wasnt a bad idea, its just rubbish because the factory tune itself is rubbish.
  • 2 0
 I completely agree that easier is nice, I think the problem with ctd is it locks you into the low speed as well which to me is hard to lock down in factory. I guess my point is most dh people want more adjustable suspension such as how the cane creek is, which is why to me people excited about this doesn't make sense to me when simpler suspension has been met with such opposition
  • 1 1
 @rodeoj it's a good point, depends whether you believe the claims that pro riders are happy with it. If they are then?? TBH personally I think I would benefit from less adjusters on my forks and know it is a lot easier to get them 'right'
  • 2 0
 If anything I've learned over the years that unless you understand what the adjuster does it isn't worth it. That said factory tunes are never good for people who understand how their bikes behave because you have to go out of your way and open things up to adjust things to your liking. If anything I'd get the new chassis and stick the last gen cartridge and coil spring in it only for the simplicity of having access to knobs for rapid adjustments.
  • 3 1
 Bladder aside, this just looks like a more complex version of SR Suntours' QSP dampners. SRAMs bottomless tokens are coincidently similar to Suntours' RUX DH spacer system... Hmmm... High Tech ambiquity? Maybe it's just me. Not hating, just saying
  • 2 0
 "After a season of racing and testing, it turns out that only a single World Cup racer, Devinci's Stevie Smith, runs a stiffer damper setup with the extra shims added into the compression stack. And his setup is far from being a one-off, with those extra shims being the very ones that come stock within the cartridge of an off the shelf BoXXer." This is the most shocking thing in this article. I actually don't believe it. Every time I get new suspension I feel like I'm screwing around with it for ages to get the correct suspension tune, the stock one is nowhere near right. People use tuning shops like TFTuned to adjust their suspension to suit them. And if you go to MX, even amatuers change their shim stacks for each track they go to, and there are programs (Shim ReStackor) to predict the performance of a certain shim stack. Surely WC riders are doing way more tuning than us?
  • 3 0
 I was a bit worried scrolling down waiting on the price to show up just thinking if they were going to follow bike prices expecting a $3000 fork
  • 1 0
 I couldn't see a price. I looked twice, which was nice.

$379 for the upgrade seems reasonable though
  • 5 0
 2014 boXXers going on sale!
  • 6 1
 And now do the same for Lyrics please.
  • 7 2
 and the totems =]
  • 1 0
 That was my first thought too! Charger upgrade for all 35mm forks please.
  • 4 0
 Totems are discontinued.
  • 1 1
 And the Lyrik has been almost replaced by the updated Pike....
  • 1 0
 Why buy a whole new fork when I can just upgrade the damper?
  • 4 0
 some bikes are better with 170mm than 160mm. Lyriks are still 20mm so that's a huge plus.
  • 1 0
 I was considering getting some 55CR's but I may wait a bit to see If RS does anything with 170mm and a charger damper. Seeing how totems are discontinued they should up the travel on the lyrik to 180mm to make it adjustable to 170 and 160 and put a charger damper in it, I'd buy that over the 55CR then.
  • 2 0
 yes the totems are discontinued, but if they are selling after-market dampers then it would suck if they didn't make them in 180mm. I may be one of few, but I would certainly rather upgrade the damper in them rather than buying a whole new fork....
  • 2 0
 Totem was discontinued, and the new Pike seems to have a lot of overlap with the Lyric. I'd love to see the charger put in a single crown fork with 180mm and include the 20mm Maxle. Whether they call it a new longer Lyric, a resurrected Totem, or a Ham Sandwich I don't care. I just want a single crown 180 that will fit a 27.5 wheel. Right now the only option for this is the X-Fusion Metric. Not bad option, but still...
  • 1 0
 It seems their only 180mm travel fork is the domain at the moment, since they're going on about how well the damper eats up gnarly terrain and begs for more and they're happy that they can make a long travel version of the unit, it would really make sense if (like you said) brought back the totem or make a longer lyrik to cater for those that wand a slightly chunkier fork than the pike. But I also think they would to well to offer an after market damper for the totems people are still using (why were they discontinued? they're great), I would certainly buy one.
  • 2 0
 It's an odd situation. The benefit to a revised Lyric is that it's 35mm vs 40 on the Totem, so it would be easier to create a Lyric sized Charger damper (hell it might already fit in 160 mode) than make a bigger one for the 40mm totem. The Domain is promising but it's coil only and heavy as hell (a full pound more than a Metric). Everything seems to be going air. Nobody needs a 180 29" fork, but 27.5 has all but taken over the 160 group and is quickly gaining in the longer travel including obviously DH. There are folks taking bikes like the Norco Range and adding a coil to be a park bike. I've seen more than one Intense Uzzi fully converted to 27.5 and I've seen an increasing number of 67er builds (26 rear/275 front). The slack as hell new SC Nomad would be a prime candidate for a fork like this.

Please RS gods and Jeremy Boobar hear my plea! Give me a 180mm 27.5 air sprung fork!
  • 2 0
 If you are doing something so so long ... means you must get better in it .... means better in design and production,sourcing, testing.... lowering costs .... then why its still expensive !!!!!
  • 2 0
 The "dumbing down of mountain biking" trifecta is complete:

1) 650b/29
2) suspension with LESS adjustment
3) removing obstacles and grooming wide trails to make them just like riding on a sidewalk
  • 3 0
 How long before they sell the internals. So I can throw them in a second hand Boxxer for 1/4 the cost.
  • 2 0
 june for the charger, air side august
  • 4 0
 "Cash inside a hockey sock"... that's so... Canadian.
  • 2 0
 will the black stanchions w/ goldish/whiteish/silverish Boxxer decals be available for purchase if you want to upgrade from a 2014 model?
  • 1 0
 This is awesome! I like how you can do an upgrade. If I got my hands on one, I'd like to be able to put a back to back test on the two cartridges to just see for myself how they compare
  • 2 2
 WOW, again "NEW BLACKBOXXX" revolutionary internals, straightly copied from MX forks, whose dual chamber tech is more than 15 years old.How the hell is it possible that fork manufactorers have not copied the technology earlier..??Just crappy plastic mission controls, marzo cartridges with non adjustable shimstacks etc. "inventions" have been released every year since the invention of dualcrown downhill forks.And now they reinvent dualchamber forks.Well done R&D guys at fork manufactorers Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Is that true that you can simply buy the Charger damper and install it into the Team and/or RC forks? If it's that easy, there's no need to buy a WC. Plus you have the option to go coil AND save money?
  • 2 1
 ''Reducing the amount of adjustments, simplifying the package..."
I thought this was going to be an Aprils Fools joke where RS started using CTD.
  • 3 0
 If this is an april fools joke I'll be pissed...
  • 2 0
 "although the process is only being applied to the newer 650B lowers at this point in time" ...... Why?
  • 2 1
 26" is going away of the dodo bird unfortunately.
  • 2 1
 Today has been a very depressing day ... First they came out with a badass nomad carbon and now the boxxer with the blackbox style stanchions ... If only I had money ....
  • 3 0
 If this is april fools I WILL KILL MYSELF
  • 3 0
 Just do it Wink
  • 1 0
 Damper upgrade cost seems pretty reasonable especially if you have an older boxxer. Maybe next time. That last photo is awesome.
  • 1 1
 What...? No upside-down? Rock-Shox... it's about time you put it out there! Surely you could come up with a fork that has the feel of a Dorado, the stiffness of a 40, and for about half the weight.
  • 3 4
 New fork? Looks like the same 15 year old fork they've always had to me. Boxxers (and all RS products for that matter) look like they belong on Wal-Mart bikes. Just look at how inadequate that POS looks on that 951.

Gimme a Dorado or an Emerald. That's the good shit.
  • 1 0
 Lol almost 500$ between the R2C2 and WC? Just because its Solo Air? Purchasing the Solo Air as spare parts and put it into a R2C2 would be cheaper.. o.O
  • 1 0
 Can anyone tell me when this fork will be available for purchase? Sorry if this is already in the comments didnt feel like scrolling through them all to be honest.
  • 1 0
 Already seen many people on the Bpxxer Charger: Can anyone compare their damping and working characteristics to the Manitou Dorado Pro? :-)
  • 3 1
 Can I has black stanchions now?
  • 2 1
 I finally got a pair of WC's last month, now the new 1's are coming out.........
  • 1 0
 Last lease on designlife because the 2015 1/2 will be an upside down boxxer.
  • 2 0
 A fork that weighs almost as little as my wheelset...I'm so outdated!
  • 2 0
 Will the damper fit in a lyrik?
  • 1 0
 What is wrong with DH damper? It is much more tunable ( which is probably the reason they had to dumb it down for Pike).
  • 2 0
 the LSC does nothing on the DH damper
  • 1 0
 Bollocks.
  • 2 0
 dt swiss new gravity rim!?
FRGravity?
  • 1 0
 Just a thought it would be good if the article had relevant comparison (like weight, price etc) with the other brands. thx!
  • 2 0
 April fools.. Jeremiah Boobar....bwahhhahahahahaa
  • 1 0
 Except Jeremiah Boobar is his real name. The bar was named after him. The more you know.
  • 1 0
 Hmm thanks, I thought about that after I posted, but then I thought... What are the chances? That's what happens when your kids wake you up at 5 to play April fools jokes on you... You just can't seem to get back on trackSmile
  • 1 0
 i think today aprils fool never ends!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • 1 0
 dammit i wish i didnt get a new world cup this year, the new boxxer feels so amazing
  • 3 1
 Factory set high speed compression? This is 2014. give me a break sram.
  • 2 0
 Do Canadians really store their loonies in a hockey sock?
  • 3 0
 You don't?
  • 2 0
 that intense frame is badass
  • 2 0
 hope you did not bought a 2014 boxxer recently :s
  • 1 0
 Guys! buy the Teams for 1200 and than get the air internals and save like 300 bucks! :o
  • 1 0
 or get some old boxxers and just get new internals!
  • 1 0
 Someone needs to proof-read these articles...a lot of the sentences make no sense
  • 2 0
 I want the white ones so bad. They'd looks so sick.
  • 2 0
 what does the fox say now?
  • 1 1
 says Kashima
  • 2 0
 the old boxxers are better
  • 2 1
 April fools? Or nah?... I can't tell
  • 2 0
 Sweet! And about time!
  • 2 0
 oh shit look out fox
  • 2 0
 Want want want
  • 1 0
 Crap... Something else I need to buy.
  • 3 2
 2016 - MORE DIALS - BUY THE LATEST AND GREATEST
  • 2 0
 april fool for sure
  • 1 0
 Definitely going in the right direction with this.
  • 1 0
 PAOK k as min **misw pote
  • 1 0
 Bbb, bu, but, Its still not turned upside down!!
  • 1 0
 I hope those prices aren't April Fools day.....those are quite reasonable!
  • 1 0
 They better release a 559 version.
  • 1 0
 So when will this nice fast black shiny stuff hit the stores?
  • 1 0
 Time to get one for the Lyric sorted please RS
  • 1 1
 April Fool's - There is nothing about this on their website. They would have posted it on their own website if it was legit.
  • 1 0
 Almost shit myself when I saw how nice that Intense was :O
  • 1 0
 Looked all over for the charger damper to buy and can't find it. Dammit!
  • 1 1
 if this is an april fool, they have put too much effort in!
  • 1 3
 "The damper can be installed into any BoXXer that uses 35mm stanchion tubes, so 2010 and newer"

well this must be the april joke
.....
for sure!!!!!
....
  • 3 3
 BIG WHEELS ARE FASTER_____o^o_____O^O_____BY BY 26
  • 1 1
 But its not 2015 so.... isnt that 2014.2?
  • 1 2
 RS(T) Boxxer! Well done... NOT!
More plastic internals! Hope they are recyclable
  • 2 3
 One compression and one rebound adjust? Highly doubt that it's real.
  • 1 1
 Whyyyyy sooooo 27.5…..
  • 1 4
 If it says boxxer you know its gonna suck. Too many other options out there that are proven winners, why would anyone buy into the rock show hype train.
  • 1 2
 Still buying a fox fork.....
  • 4 6
 I call April Fools!!!!!!!!!!!
  • 2 5
 TL, DR
  • 6 9
 DVO Not Sram
  • 10 5
 Did you think before writing this? DVO - no one has ever won anything on this. Boxxer - everyone wins everything on this. But no, you're right. DVO must be better, 'cuz its green right?
  • 2 1
 New version is plain black with decals. So this don't apply to them now. Smile
  • 5 1
 Funny you think that the only way you can tell a product is the best is if racers are winning on it. I think that racers are being paid to ride what their sponsors tell them to ride. These sponsors want to sell products and have you think their products are the best, which in this case it is working. The majority of racers could be riding huffies and still be kicking ass. I would rather hear real rider experiences on products to see how well a product works rather than racing results.
  • 2 4
 Everyone is using boxxers. Fact. They are all in all a good fork, low maintence ( except wc ) and nice looking too.
I think wc riders use what they want to use. If you are Sam Hill, i think all suspension manufacturers would easily offer you a sponsorship if you were looking for a new fork. Wink
  • 2 0
 Forget racing results, I would merely just like to see how the DVO performs under us punters for a year - the real test. You know, those of us that don't have a team truck swapping parts and servicing the fork after every run.
  • 4 1
 Everyone is using boxxers?? mate1998 are you sure?? I would say Fox is more present at the WC and compare to Fox, Boxxers are light ages away from everyone.
Well not to mention the return of Mz 380 and many more off market cartridges. Boxxer is design to be well introduced easy accessible marketing trick Smile
  • 1 0
 Fox FLoat 40, not impressed, sold quickly
  • 1 0
 Does anyone know why the new 2015 air spring cant be fitted into the 2010 boxxers? read somewhere bcos of internal diameter difference? any workaround? really would like to fit in the new air spring!
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