RockShox Reverb Telescoping Seatpost: First Ride

May 16, 2010
by Mike Levy  
RockShox unveiled new thru-axle forks and a prototype 5" drop telescoping seatpost today at their 2011 product camp in Durango, Colorado.
Inside you'll find all the details and lots of pictures of the new Reverb seatpost!

Updated with video, watch to learn more about the new Reverb seatpost

Read on...
Watch the video to learn more about the new RockShox Reverb seatpost

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photo
2011 RockShox Reverb seatpost


Day one at the Durango, Colorado, RockShox camp saw us ride all sorts of new and exciting pieces of equipment, but the new addition that caught my attention was RockShox's entry into the telescoping seatpost category. Dropping posts are very quickly becoming a must have for many riders, and for good reason. They can add a level of flow to a ride that otherwise would at best require the pilot to slow down and pick their way through the gnarly bits with a seat that is hovering dangerously close to important body parts, or force the rider to come to a stop and lower their saddle for maximum downhill enjoyment. There are a lot of people out there that won't desire one due to lack of challenging terrain, or because of stubbornness, but the bottom line is there is a good chance that you would benefit from installing one on your AM or XC machine. I'm going to go out on a limb and say that in the coming years dropping posts will be like disc brakes, most serious bikes will have one. I'm guessing that the good people at RockShox feel the same. Enter the Reverb telescoping seatpost.


photo
2011 RockShox Reverb seatpost


The Reverb uses a combination of air and oil to control it's 5" of stroke. Much like a air spring rear shock, inside you find an internal floating piston (IFP) that separates the two so there is no cavitation. While there are other seatpost options that use suspension fluid, the new Reverb takes it a step further by having a hydraulic bar mounted remote to activate the post. No more needing to make adjustments due to a stretched cable on a post that is very sensitive to tension, or having to replace a rusty cable the no longer moves freely through it's housing. The Reverb uses RockShox's Xloc hydraulic remote that can be mounted in tandem with your Avid brake perch to keep your cockpit tidy, or on it's own if you'd like to be able to mount it in a different position. One very interesting feature on the new post is the ability to easily adjust the return speed via a dial on the Xloc remote. More on this below. Keeping the insides inside and the outsides outside is a serious triple lipped seal with foam ring that sounds like it is better at doing it's job than a lot of competitors fork seals.


photo
Cutaway of the hydraulically controlled Reverb post


RockShox Reverb details

• 125 mm/5" of infinite adjustment
• Hydraulic actuation using 2 wt. suspension fluid
• IFP (internal floating piston) separates air spring and fluid
• Remotely operated by Xloc push button (left or right sides to be avail.)
• Return speed adjustable via dial on Xloc remote
• three-key anti rotation design
• Shaft material: 3D Forged 7050 Alloy
• Head material: Forged 7050 Alloy
• Includes Speed Lube bleed kit
• Zero offset head
• 30.9 mm and 31.6 mm diameters
• 380 mm and 420 mm lengths
• 515 grams
• September release date
• MSRP $295 USD


photo
This dial controls the Reverb's return speed and made quite a noticeable difference


Before we hit the dirt with the Reverb under us it was made very clear that although it is very close to production, it was still in prototype form. Regardless, I was simply blown away by how smooth and consistent the Reverb performed. Todays ride was close to four hours long and the terrain had quite a few climbs that split up the rocky and technical descents. In other words, the perfect place for a telescoping post. Grabbing hold of the Chromag saddle to check for play revealed only the slightest amount, around 1-2 mm at the end of the seat which means a whole lot less than that at the source. Three different keyed sections within the post should keep play to a minimum, but only time will tell how it holds up over a long season of all-weather riding. The Xloc remote took very little force to activate, much less than any cable activated remote, even with a new cable. Instead of a lever that would pivot, the Xloc is actually a button that you depress to lower or raise the saddle. There is a fair bit of throw, but it only takes a few millimeters to activate the Reverb seatpost. A dial at the hose junction, similar to the bite point adjustment dial found on Elixir brakes, is used to select the desired amount of rebound speed. Turning it in speeds up the return speed, while turning it out slows it down. The dial turned easily with my fingers. At first I wasn't overly convinced that this would be a useful feature, but I changed my tone once on the dirt. One of the biggest benefits of a dropping post is the ability to only lower it by an inch or two to lower your center of gravity on fast sections. Having the rebound set slightly slower than I would have otherwise used allowed me to bring the saddle up slowly to the point where I wanted it without it just extending to it's highest position. Very cool.


photo
The Reverb's Xloc remote can be integrated into the lever perch or used on it's own


On the trail the Reverb was impressively smooth. It didn't take any extra body weight or require me to "bump" it when I wanted to lower the saddle, it dropped wether it was under load from my entire body weight or if I was only gently pushing on the seat. Likewise, the return stroke was smooth and consistent. It was also firm and never lowered unless I pushed on the handy Xloc remote. Right now there are a number of different options to pick from with choosing a telescoping post, but I'm sure that RockShox is on to something with their hydraulically remote controlled Reverb post. Eliminating the steel cable actuation makes a lot of sense, and if the Reverb proves to be as reliable over the long haul as it was smooth and refined as my single day on it, RockShox has just raised the bar. If I had to pick the one issue with the Reverb, it would be that riders will have to wait until this coming September to get their own. Hopefully we'll have a production version to test before that!


photo
The zero offset head uses a two bolt design



photo
Prototype #8?


Stay tuned for more from the Durango RockShox camp!


Rockshox.com

Author Info:
mikelevy avatar

Member since Oct 18, 2005
2,032 articles

96 Comments
  • 13 2
 rockshox has been the first one to actually make an adjustable height seatpost that has a decent range of adjustment. sorry other companies, but 4" just isnt enough to comfortably rip downhill and have FULL leg extension on the way up
  • 2 3
 The Black Mamba has twice the adjustment actually. Also, Gravity Dropper will soon be introducing it's 5 inch model... I love some of the features the Reverb has, but it requires a few more tools and know-how for maintenance compared to the relatively simple G.D.
  • 3 7
flag Andy-M (May 15, 2010 at 3:05) (Below Threshold)
 • 125 mm/5" of infinite adjustment

It has 5" of adjustment, not 4
  • 5 0
 thats why i was saying that rocksox is getting it right with 5", as opposed to other companies mostly just doing 4"
  • 1 0
 The KS 950r is 5" as well, just bought one and love it...wish it was 6" though (gotta love being tall). The RS post does look amazing....can't wait to see how they hold up long term.
  • 2 1
 4" is definitely enough height adjustment to ride AM/FR comfortably. My Command Post works great for all riding conditions.
  • 2 0
 Twice the weight of my Thomson but I am thinking I will buy one of these over the Joplin and Command.
  • 1 2
 I just got the Command Post and it has made a world of difference. as of Right now the command post is the best on the market.
  • 1 1
 Have you tried any other brands? Also, KS has had 5" for a couple of years now. Rockshox is definitely not the first. So many opinions, so little facts around here.
  • 3 0
 these kind of posts are awesome. ive been running a pure racing one for a year and wouldnt want to go back to a normal post. i too suffer with a kona and a yeti with smaller seat tubes spacewolf so got one of these
www.pure-race.com/KS%20i850.html
but you can also get these
www.pure-race.com/KS%20i900.html
or these www.pure-race.com/KS%20i7.html
  • 2 0
 thanks!!! Smile I didnt knew about them cheers
  • 6 0
 This is soooo sick! Big Grin Razz
  • 13 0
 Wow, the technology. This is what us "old-schoolers" used to run. www.bikepro.com/arch_products/seatposts/ahiter.html
  • 3 0
 Sick, sick and more sick! Having ridden three other designs, I am really keen for September to roll around so that I too can give this a whirl! Nice write up Mike! Enjoy Durango!
  • 1 1
 You have too many toys. Can I test this one?
  • 1 0
 You may have to wrestle Mike for it Lee!
  • 5 0
 Sick! RS ought to do a good job of this...seeing as how it is similar to suspension.
  • 3 1
 Adjustable seatposts are one of the greatest inventions for bikes ever. It makes for efficient pedaling at all times. Saves energy. Allows you to keep up speed at all times. Made me a much faster rider. Drop it while descending. Raise it when climbing or traversing. Especially great on trails with constant grade changes. It also allows you to place the seat at the right height for leverage at any given grade. Dont be a hater. Try one and you will say why didnt I get one sooner !
  • 2 0
 As far as I can see here, people who dont welcome this idea are the ones mostly focused on some area of MTB, either DH or XC, thus the idea not making much sense to them.

I have a DH bike, a XC bike and an AM bike, and will absolutely welcome seat height adjustablility on the fly on the AM bike (DH always fixed down, XC always fixed up, AM realy depends on the day, trail and mood as the ideal position for the seat changes about every 5 mins or so...)
I'm actually waiting for this bad boy like a kid waiting for Santa (all the others I tried have a bit too much play on the saddle).
  • 4 1
 It drives me crazy always 30.9 or 31.6 if you have kona or something like 30.0 forget about those kinds of seatposts only gravity dropper witch reduction damn
  • 4 3
 buy a better frame.
  • 1 2
 I second that.
  • 3 0
 "better" is a relative term
  • 2 0
 same here, I just got a gently used Iron Horse 7 point with the 30.0 tube. My old Transition preston also had the 30.0
  • 1 0
 I'm in the same boat with my 6 point. Take note bike parts companies who want my business, there is a need for a 30.0 dropper seatpost and it seems there are none available!
  • 1 0
 Thank god SRAM is now on the adjustable seatpost train aswell. They have a habit of making good things better at good value for money (2010 Boxxer Team for example). If it´s less than 100€ and works well, it´s mine as soon as it´s out!
  • 2 0
 Less than 100 euros? I wouldnt count on that... expect 225-250 euros
  • 1 0
 I am stoked on this.
After a 3 hour AM ride on trails where I must have stopped and adjusted my seat post 20 times, this would have been a real benefit to my ride. Technical tight climbs followed immediately by long flowy singletrack, followed by tight technical descents. I can see this post being on my Rune before this time next year.

Way to go SRAM for stepping up to the plate, and stepping up the game. Those Pure Racing posts look tight too, I wonder if there is a local dealer?
  • 1 0
 I haven't bought a new post yet but I keep debating it. Do I want to add 2/3 of pound or 300 grams to be able to adjust my seat height on the fly? I can probably only know with a test ride. My fear is that currently I will hold off even standing as long as I can to get that one last stroke in before a descent/turn. What are the odds that I will take the time to adjust the seatpost a full 3 or 4 strokes before? In the end I will probably waste more energy moving the 300 extra grams and missing the x number of pedal strokes per drop/raise.

The flip side is dropping the post to really rail some turns or hit some downhills equals more fun which you can't put a price on. So when are the demo units coming?
  • 1 0
 I just made the switch from a standard post to a Specialized Command post and it has made an incredible difference in my riding. Then only down side is the $300 price tag
  • 1 0
 T-woot, such a hater. I have ridden for years and just bought a bike with a Crankbrothers Joplin, I tell you I am never going back to a regular seat post again. Sure people can have fun without it, but they too can have fun with it too and lots of it. It is like most things in mountain biking, they come in expensive until the mass public take them up once they realise how awesome they are and then they produce more, the technology matures and they become cheaper. Disc brakes and suspension for example. I ask how they are not innovative? And dude you comment about getting a motorbike for the same price with an engine etc, wtf? And the Sh*tbike articles are a bit of fun in themselves. You certainly can have fun on whatever you are riding, but what is wrong with having the money to buy something more enjoyable to ride, something that can perform better, something that can make you faster, something new?
  • 1 0
 I have a KS 950 remote and gotta say I like the idea of the plunger style remote over the lever style. And the boot on the remote is nice too. KS is supposed to be adding a "waterproofing" for their remote in future models too but currently it gets stuck from time to time especially when wet or muddy. I don't think the variable speed control is really that necessary though. I just want something that can go up and down on demand.
  • 1 0
 come on september !! hurry up. I am one more rider that will be pleased to use one. I just dont see any point anymore , to get off , take my 6mm and drop the seat down for some steep stuff, then back off again and raise it. Need that POST !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i i think ill never get off the bike again !!
  • 1 1
 Gravity dropper is still by far the best. it stays down unlike the crankbrothers one. your seat doesn't wiggle like every other one i have sat on, and it just works. i have had mine for 6 years and it still works like day one. go graviy dropper!!!
  • 2 2
 I just couldnt justify spending the full msrp on something like this, again prices in mtb world do not make sense when you can get a dirt bike with more time spent engineering it than a mtn bike for the same price + and engine... these seatpost arent innovative to me, thats just my opinion. These are another 'you gotta have it to have fun' product. And I've seen friends of mine to some awesome stuff with their seats all the way up. Its not the bike, its the ride, like the point the Sh*tbike articles on the last page of bikemag are out to make.
  • 1 2
 Good to see Sram getting into this market,cos i know this prototype loox dull,but by the time this new Rock Shox Reverb post makes it to production i'll bet it'll be a good rival for the leader of the pack for a long while now,the Crank Bros Joplin.Nice work folks.
Gringo.Beer tup Beer
  • 1 0
 I think it's generally accepted that the Joplin is the worst adjustable post on the market.
  • 8 5
 just another cable to get in the way
  • 7 4
 or something to go wrong
  • 10 8
 ...what ever happened to stopping and adjusting your seat, are people to lazy to do that now?!
  • 5 2
 The whole idea is that you don't have to stop. I wouldn't call that lazy. LAZY is me, who finds any excuse to stop - that's why a non-adjustable post suits me just fine Smile
  • 2 9
flag JVosburgh (May 15, 2010 at 9:50) (Below Threshold)
 If you ride XC or All Mountain (so not you gorgefreerider), adjustable seatposts are second on the list of most important inventions for the mountain bike since the first basic rigid off-road bikes. The list goes something like this (for me) in order of importance:
1. clip-in pedals
2. on-the-fly adjustable height seatposts
3. disc brakes
4. front suspension
5. 29 inch wheels
6. rear suspension
*This list is for XC and All Mountain and would obviously different for Downhill or Freeride.
  • 13 1
 I dunno man... I know the list would be different for everyone, but I think the invention of front suspension has done more for mountain biking than all of these inventions combined!
  • 1 0
 stop and adjust? when ur riding buddies pass you for first dibs on the trail - you'll want one. try one - keeps your ride a nice flow. riding without an adjustable find myself not lowering for many mini-downhills thru the forest. when you drop the post on many of the downhills previously you haven't - it's a sweet different feeling - like having an old bmx bike on the track. "Rolla Coasta uh huh!" If really want uninterrupted flow - time for Whistler or a Motorcycle.
  • 5 6
 These are the ultimate waste of money, most of us arent racing, we can take the extra second to hop off the bike and drop our seats.... jeeeez dont be afraid to look to the left and rights of the trail vs just straight ahead.
  • 3 2
 i dont even hop off.. i just stand up, coast, and adjust it while balancing. improves skill + gets it done + saves money.
  • 3 1
 T-woot, you're missing the point. Imagine that you're rolling down some sweet singletrack and suddenly the trail veers upwards, then continues to descend about 40 feet later. Are you really going to stop, raise your seat, climb, stop, lower your seat, and descend? These seatposts aren't for XC riders or racers, they're for am/fr riders who frequent rolling singletrack with varying inclines/declines.
  • 4 0
 well, T-woot Just the other day i was ripping some sweet single track with my post up for full leg extending power. then there was a fallen tree of considerable size that was never there before so I dropped my saddle "ON THE FLY" and BAMM! did a huge bunny hop right over it that I could not have done if my post was at full extension.
  • 4 0
 Hans Rey was quoted in a recent mag saying that the adjustable height seatpost is the most innovative mtb product of the last ten years! Now if you don't listen to the people posting on here then perhaps Mr. Rey's opinion will carry more weight.

Sorry for all you haters out there like T-woot...you have NO idea what you're missing. I've got a KS950 with a 36 talas up front. I can change from a cross country bike geometry to a FR/AM with a few clicks...all without having to get off my bike!
  • 3 0
 T-woot, you dont have to be a racer to use one. if you wana stop every time you hit a uphill or down hill go ahead, but is a great invention. i think of it like a fork, you dont need it, but it makes it a hell of a lot more fun!
  • 2 0
 I bet you've got one now!
  • 1 2
 @elitipton: 11 years later when it's standard yeah. Get off your high horse.
  • 2 0
 @T-woot: jeeez
  • 2 0
 @T-woot: Sounds like you couldn't get your seat out of the way and it went up your ass
  • 2 0
 Want list!
Love the fact that they went with a hydraulic system.
Also, that you can adjust the "rebound speed"!
  • 1 0
 nice.. another altrnative to my piece of S*@T Joplin.. cant wait to get rid of it and replace with other brand such as this one.
  • 1 0
 Check out the Specialized Command post. This this RULES
  • 2 0
 You just bombed a downhill, find a surprise climb, seat post still too low, GET OUT OF THE SADDLE AND CLIMB!
  • 1 0
 I never thought I'd want one either but tried a GD and fell in love with the idea. nut sack ho! Smile
  • 2 0
 I don't understand how people can claim one to be the best when they haven't ridden all of them.
  • 4 1
 somewhat expensive....
  • 2 4
 Yeah $300 on a seat post!?! WTF!
  • 6 1
 It's not just a seatpost though...
  • 4 4
 I realise that but do you not think that's still quite a lot of money for what is effectively 2 pipes with a spring in it? (and yes i realise it's a lot more complex than that but still)
  • 5 3
 by your standards your fork more then 4 pipes with a spring?
  • 2 1
 I thought someone would say that. Sus forks make a significantly bigger difference to the ride though compared to a telescopic seatpost.
  • 1 0
 • Shaft material: 3D Forged 7050 Alloy
• Head material: Forged 7050 Alloy

What?
  • 2 0
 SUCH BS!!! EVERYONE MAKES A 30.9 POST SOMEONE ELSE MAKE A 27.2 !!!
  • 1 0
 Cramk Bros is working on a 27.2 version soon to be out
  • 1 0
 but the seat wiggles on crankbrothers and the seat bounces up when you hit a bump.
  • 1 0
 KS is also coming out with a 27.2 model of their post. It is actually going to have a booster can under the seat similar to a air can on a booster can on rear shock for additional pressure needed due to decreased volume.
  • 1 0
 correction. they have the specs out for the KS 27.2 right here www.kindshock.com.cn/en/product.asp?id=56&show_list=1. This one is 100mm travel only.
  • 1 0
 Just spoke to BikeCo and they said it's supposed to ship around a month from now and probably going to be around 350USD.
  • 1 0
 I rode a Giant Reign with a dropper post , it was pretty much cheating. Definitely going to be on my bike in the future.
  • 1 0
 i wont feel too tall this time.
  • 2 1
 • Includes Speed Lube bleed kit


Haha
  • 1 0
 is it me or does it seem a bit early to be releasing new stuff for 2011
  • 1 0
 That's how the bike industry works.
  • 1 0
 Nice! Big Grin Looks so good!
  • 1 1
 I want to see a video of this in action
  • 1 0
 I'm getting one.
  • 1 1
 It's the 90's again. An old idea brought back to life with new technology.
  • 1 0
 What's wrong with that? or does it just remind you you're getting on a bit Wink

Personally I quite like the idea. Except I'm not waiting for Rockshox and I'm out to get a KS i950 when I've got a bit of spare cash.
  • 1 1
 I don't recall height-adjustable seatposts being available in the 90's.
  • 1 0
 The (mountain-)bike is reinventing itself all the time, so why not reinvent seatposts every few decades too?
  • 1 1
 Doug White (White industries) invented and made a prototype in the 90's, never produced...
  • 1 1
 RockShox Reverb looks like a needle
  • 1 0
 No I beam?? Frown
  • 1 2
 Any word on what sizes will be available?
  • 2 0
 • 30.9 mm and 31.6 mm diameters
• 380 mm and 420 mm lengths
  • 1 1
 the differnt lengths: is the 31.6 420mm or 380mm? what is the minimum height?
  • 1 0
 I think it means both diametres are available in both lengths. And I would imagine the min height would be the full length minus 125mm... Plus or minus a bit for that clamp thingie where the seals are
  • 1 1
 That is just awesome.
  • 2 4
 ridiculous...
  • 2 1
 "• MSRP $295 USD"







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