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Review: RockShox Vivid - Shock Week 2023

Aug 23, 2023
by Dario DiGiulio  
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RockShox Vivid Ultimate



Shiny and new, the RockShox Vivid is the freshest shock in this week's lineup. The Vivid name was long dormant in the RockShox catalog, so it's fitting that the reintroduction of that model came with a host of new features and the highest level of refinement their team has put into a shock to date. There are some significant performance claims being made here, primarily around the coil-like performance that the Vivid is supposed to deliver. If true, it could very well be the new benchmark for downhill air shocks. For all the pertinent details, head over to the First Ride article from the initial launch.
Vivid Ultimate Details
• 2-position Threshold lever
• High-speed compression - 5 clicks
• Low-speed compression - 5 clicks
• Hydraulic bottom-out - 5 clicks
• Low-speed rebound - 20 clicks
• Weight: 738 grams
• Price: $699-729 USD
rockshox.com



Setup

In keeping with the entirety of the current RockShox lineup, the new Vivid is relatively painless to set up, thanks to the limited clicker positions, sag gradients, and ease of on-trail adjustment. The 5 clicks of high and low compression damping offer distinct differences between each spot, making bracketing single clicks fairly easy to grasp. Thanks to the handy little 3mm knob attached to the rebound adjuster, you can make any needed compression adjustments on trail without needing extra tools.

We were aiming for about 18-20mm of sag on the Nomad, which for my riding weight of about 180 lb resulted in 215 psi in the air can. My rebound was usually either 7 or 8 clicks from closed, and I typically ran the LSC and HSC in the middle setting. Hydraulic bottom out was +1 from center. I found the LSC was the adjuster I was most prone to changing for different tracks, though the middle position strikes a pretty ideal balance on the Nomad.

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Big knurled LSC knob.

Climbing

The Vivid's Threshold lever provides a very firm platform, just shy of a full-on lockout. I like this binary-feeling approach to a shock lockout for two reasons: One, it really shores things up for paved climbs and smooth fire roads; Two, you know pretty quickly if you accidentally left it on for the descent. Because it's so firm, I don't ever use it on trail, but if you subscribe to the Henry Quinney method, then your shock should actually be softer for the climbs anyway. The Vivid is sensitive enough to hum through all the littlest bumps on your way up trail, and has excellent grip in loose and steep terrain.

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HSC and Threshold.
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HBO up top.

Descending

Put succinctly, the Vivid looks and feels like a RockShox Float X2. Take that as a compliment, because the best-in-class sensitivity of the X2 had pretty much been unchallenged until now. Not merely matching performance, the Vivid also offers some distinct RockShox features that are unique to their lineup. One attribute that really stands out from the crowd is just how quiet the shock is, hardly making a peep even under great duress.

That quiet performance fades away nicely, but there's no mystery that the Vivid is working very well underneath you. We were hugely impressed with how well the shock performed on our test Nomads, and it has handled very different kinematics with equal composure. Some bikes might benefit from the external control of high speed rebound, which is present on the competing X2, but you could make a vice-versa argument for the adjustable hydraulic bottom out that the Vivid has and the X2 lacks.

Ultimately the two are neck and neck, and most of the decision will come down to brand preference, which of those two settings you'd rather have, and whether you want every possible click in the range (X2) or relative simplicity of setup (Vivid). Time will tell if the Vivid's durability is up to the 100-hour service standard they've laid out, but if it proves to be that burly, then that might be the detail that puts it ahead of the Fox shock in competition for best beefy air shock.

As to whether it's a true competitor to an actual coil shock, the jury is still out, though the competition may be close there as well. We're planning some side-by-side comparisons for the long term review, so stay tuned for that. In the meantime, I'm willing to say that the increased tunability and lighter weight might put the Vivid above a coil shock on the right bike, for the right person.

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Gotta love the sag gradient.
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Rebound knob.
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And cheeky little 3 mil.



Pros

+ Silent performance
+ Effective and distinct adjustments
+ Hydraulic bottom-out will complement some kinematics very well


Cons

- Lack of high speed rebound adjustment
- Fitment may prove tricky on some frames



Author Info:
dariodigiulio avatar

Member since Dec 25, 2016
195 articles

146 Comments
  • 235 8
 -Feels like an X2 -Isn't an X2 Pretty compelling case already
  • 112 4
 I'd wager a lot of riders would like the performance of an X2 without the unreliability of an X2
  • 20 136
flag pargolf8 (Aug 23, 2023 at 9:40) (Below Threshold)
 Holy shit give it up
  • 20 4
 @pargolf8: people discussing real world upsets you how? because there are many of your kind, i am genuinely curious to your madness
  • 8 0
 @ReformedRoadie: I have the pre-shitty generation (2020-2021?) and it just runs flawless.

However once I see a good deal on CC I'm jumping right back.
  • 17 34
flag pargolf8 (Aug 23, 2023 at 14:00) (Below Threshold)
 @baca262: my madness lol. Its a bike website, take it easy guy. The amount of comments for and against x2 is donkey kong. Like ya’ll got nothing better to do besides either bitch about your experience or condone it. Cool. How many times we need the same stupid ass comment upvoted. We all have different experiences with the same product. Cool great lets talk about it 15 more times
  • 5 2
 @ReformedRoadie: True, I personally feel the Float X is a better performing shock for a wider range of applications. An X2 is only good when pushing hard on gnarlier and faster descents where a Float X is more in tune with a variety of terrain and bikes. I would only run a X2 on a bike with around 170 travel. As where a RS Vivid will be at home on smaller travel bikes and all trails IMO and has 5 configurations of the shock to chose from .
  • 14 2
 RockShox > Fox because it has the word Rock in it. Rock beats Fox. Now I just need 1 thousand Canadian pesos.
  • 2 0
 @likeittacky: only 2 configs to choose from. DH version or non-DH (enduro?) but both are Ultimate. The other 3 versions are OEM, not aftermarket according to the PB first ride.

Since they have a DH version I'm guessing they intend that one for big hitting bikes.
  • 3 2
 @someguy101: Rockshox has gone after punters with partially adjustable 'run what ya brung' product for about the past 10 years. They seem to be levelling up lately, but I will still go with fox for the adjustability.
  • 1 0
 @FaahkEet: The DH version comes with a longer eye to eye that's it
  • 6 2
 @pargolf8: so, you hate it when people complain? you'd rather live in lala land where problems don't exist, until they're big enough to harm you?

i know what's up, you just want to put others down. what you don't understand is that you're cutting the branch you too are sitting on. to your kind, ego comes before survival.
  • 3 10
flag pargolf8 (Aug 24, 2023 at 5:47) (Below Threshold)
 @baca262: i think you’re reading into this a bit much baca….good luck with your future x2 endeavors. Be it a positive or negative experience i hope you continue to comment on PB about that experience for years to come. Make sure to drive that point home and you will receive all the likes..i mean upvotes..
  • 55 0
 When you say "You'll know if you accidentally left the lock out on " I felt that in my soul.
  • 60 0
 I felt it in my ankles
  • 53 3
 Anyone else just stopped using any sort of climb switch? Literally every time I would forget to turn it back. Even when I'd tell myself, "this time I'm gonna remember" I get up the hill then just forget, probably from being excited the climb is over lol.
  • 14 0
 @DylanH93: yep, after 2,000ft of climbing my brain turns off and I forget it all the time. Happens after 500ft climbs too but I have less of an excuse then
  • 7 0
 @DylanH93: I'm super glad no one has implemented a climb switch for brakes, retract the pads for climbing, put them back for the descents . . .
  • 19 0
 10 seconds after the start of a stage: "Lock out is on. This is my life now"
  • 3 1
 @DylanH93: most bikes have a good enough kinematic these days.
  • 3 0
 25% of the time I forget to open it back up at the top of the climb every the time.
  • 3 0
 Went riding with a less experienced buddy last week, looked at his shock and said "are you sure that's not locked out?" (I wasn't sure which way the switch was on his shock). He was convinced it was open. 2 hour ride later, back home, look at the shock after a wash, and yep, he'd had it locked all ride and hadn't complained about performance...
  • 6 0
 @DylanH93: Have a rule: kneepads down and locking shock go together as well as knee pads up and unlocking shock. Never do one without the other, and you never forget to pull your kneepads up. So basically just lock out on long road climbs.
  • 1 0
 @dave-f: Give us a chain switch, pops off the chain for descending then pops back on when you pedal
  • 1 0
 @TeaPunk: Canyon tried that
  • 1 1
 @dancingwithmyself: Or maybe dropper post down = unlock shock // dropper up = lock shock
  • 42 3
 Give me the Pros and Cons
  • 46 0
 Demand and you shall receive.
  • 35 1
 @dariodigiulio: give me a million dollars
  • 63 0
 *Demand and I will consider.
  • 6 0
 Pro: seems good
Con: can’t buy them
  • 2 3
 @artistformlyknowasdan: would you by me a monkey
  • 2 0
 @poah: Haven't you always wanted a monkey?
  • 33 1
 Maybe add a servicing section to the review. If you can carry out an air can service on this without special tooling that would be a win for the Vivid over the X2
  • 18 1
 The Lost Co youtube channel on the vivid mentioned that it is pretty easy to do the aircan service at home. Forgot if they mentioned special tools, but you don't have to pull the damper apart like you do with an X2
  • 5 0
 I read the only real special tools are a strap wrench and a vise so not bad. Every shop should have a vise already and a strap wrench is pretty cheap so sounds like a win.
  • 13 0
 Does an X2 really need an air can service if it gets a full rebuild every few months? I'm on my 3rd X2 and have never had to worry about buying special tools to do a service.
  • 2 0
 @whiteranger3: Yeah that's what i was getting at. You can buy the fox tooling but you may as well just buy another shock its that expensive!
  • 3 1
 Everyone reading the new Vivid review: ‘will it solve the air can home mechanic issue that made the old Vivid and current X2 suck?’ The review: ‘ ‘.
  • 21 0
 Hopefully we get reviews of an Aria, Kitsuma, and TTX2 in Shock Week as well. Run down of some of the bigger air shocks.
  • 10 1
 I’d like to see the new DVO-I’ve been pretty happy with the last generation.
  • 4 0
 @wyorider: add the Manitou Mara Pro
  • 18 1
 I like 5 clicks of adjustment vs. 20 clicks. SIgn me up
  • 12 2
 Suuuuper tempted to order one for my ‘23 Enduro Expert.

To be honest, I’ve come to love the feeling and performance of Rockshox suspension components far better than Fox equivalents.
Have owned both…. Multiple forks… multiple shocks… and the Fox’s always seem to feel good for… a week.. then they seem to always lose their “plushness”. ‍♂️
  • 2 9
flag succulentsausage FL (Aug 23, 2023 at 10:22) (Below Threshold)
 This. I don't do any damper service on any of my RS stuff because it feels totally fine for a long time and some seal or something will eventually blow in the damper requiring it to be replaced. I do wish RS had a way to rebuild dampers, since that'd be less wasteful, but I don't mind dropping a new one in at home every 3-5 years.
  • 12 1
 @succulentsausage: You do know that rockshox has detailed instructions to completely rebuild the damper, as well as service kits available?
  • 6 0
 @fred-frod: I think they may be referring to the charger 2.1 damper which has at least one critical seal that is not serviceable and a bladder that is not replaceable. If that seal or bladder fail you have to replace the entire damper.
  • 1 2
 @WalrusRider: Just make sure it fails before the warranty runs out; problem solved. The damper in my Zeb started leaking oil out of the compression dials and when it was sent it for warranty, they just replaced everything inside of it.
  • 17 4
 If it works then it’s already better than an X2
  • 22 1
 The X2 works, it just doesn't stay working very long.
  • 9 0
 The X2 feels great - until you're 2 weeks in.
  • 10 1
 Where's the EXT Aria in this testing?
  • 2 0
 Still waiting for that review…that thing is the best air shock in my opinion. Everything else is just average. The only downside that I see is the price.
  • 3 2
 How dare they not include the shock that costs nearly double as much as this.
  • 7 6
 Overpriced.

Even if it’s better, will it be twice the price better??
  • 19 0
 They didn't have a fitment for the Nomad in time for the test, but we'll be getting one in for a long term review.
  • 1 0
 @vbsorin: one of my buddies has one and he said it feels good. He says it's worth the cash but I don't believe him lmao
  • 6 0
 I'm sorry to moan a bit, but there isn't really much content in this review. Nothing objective like timed runs or dyno results and not even much subjective stuff like a description of the behavior of how it rides and feels.
  • 7 1
 Did you guys test the 2024 X2 or a previous gen? There are some tuning and internal updates on 24.. Curious if your review was based on those.
  • 11 0
 We tested the most current version.
  • 38 33
 “Ultimately the two are neck and neck, and since we are pretty clueless about suspension in general, it’s better to keep our major advertisers happy, because our content is free and we need to pay our mortgages”
  • 1 1
 apparently, adjustable suspension is made just so us nerds would unwittingly give it free promotion. giving more than rebound adjustment to an average person is asking for it
  • 12 0
 To be fair, PB addressed the reliability issue plaguing X2 users. Props to them!!
  • 10 3
 Have tested. Can confirm. IS GOOD.
  • 11 0
 Looks like you triggered a Fox fanboi or 3. Jeez!!
  • 6 0
 Are you guys planning to do a coil shock group test?
  • 3 1
 Did you guys get anyone on the heavier side of things to ride it? If yes, where in the adjustments did they fall? Was rebound maxed out? PSI?

Rockshox doesn't have the tuning page up yet, so its hard to tell where I'd fall into the adjustment range or if I'm just on the outside of it.
  • 4 0
 My x2’s have been great. They’re probably from ‘18/19, were those the good ones or something?

Competition is always good regardless.
  • 2 0
 Yep, they went to shit in 2021
  • 4 0
 Off Topic: Does a common car shock absorber, like a Corolla, have low and high speed circuits, even if they are not adjustable?
  • 3 0
 This shock really has me excited for next years bike purchase. A coil like air shock with hydraulic bottom out has me stoked. On paper best of all worlds.
  • 9 1
 meh, air shocks already have the progressive and tuneable spring curve, it's the coils that need hydraulic bottom out
  • 7 0
 @baca262: The old bottom out bumper on X2's makes me disagree. In general for ALL shocks I think having a hydraulic bottom out is better than an elastomer or rubber design. Will be more consistent and I would think better durability.
  • 1 1
 @heatproofgenie: But your not supposed to use an elastomer as a bump Stock as often. The progressive spring curve should be enough
  • 1 1
 @fred-frod: Disagree. In short you should never use the last 20% of your travel? Sure you shouldn't all the time but to say never, hard no.

Kinematics have improved big time and still are so reliance on a big ol elastomer to be a bottom out wall is less needed but bottom out protection of some kind will probably always be a thing.
  • 1 1
 @heatproofgenie: An elastomer is not working in the last 20% of travel, more like the last 5%.Also I never said never, just less often than a hydraulic bottom out.
  • 1 1
 @baca262: coils have a bump stop, have so many different spring options and used to have different bump stop options. We moved away from so many technologies already.
  • 1 0
 @baca262: Air needs it more than coil, because air ramps up towards the end of stroke and then without it returns more energy to the bike/rider on rebound.
  • 1 2
 Still no HSR,
  • 2 1
 @zyoungson: do you need HSR? My vivid has it and I do use it, but only1 click each way normally and a comfort thing when I am riding badly!

You remember the 5th element shock, or for ultimate plushness and Avalanche woodie with the additional valving (it only needed 1 rebound but omg it was plush and bottomless.

Sometimes the problem with too many dials is its easier to mess things up!

www.avalanchedownhillracing.com/woodie.html
The woodie was the smoothest shock I have ever ridden, or my memory may be tainted over time because it was up against a DHX5 or 5th element, the original Vivid air etc.
  • 3 2
 @zyoungson: fox shocks need HSR because of the extremely harsh kickback from the air spring, especially at higher pressures, and even worse again when volume spacers are added.

Rockshox and various other suspension brands have much better ways of handling how the shock responds to bigger hits
  • 2 3
 @ponyboy24: Fox (DH)X2 shocks have externally adjustable HSR. The others have preset HSR that, unless you have a custom tune, you'd better hope works for you.
  • 2 1
 @ponyboy24: Air spring ramp up will give feedback no matter what the shock. Fox just gives the option to dial that out. If you are outside of the 65-80kg weight range then hsr tune will probably be out. Fox gives the option to adjust that.
  • 1 1
 @zyoungson: firstly if you don't weigh between 65-80kg you simply should never use a Fox air shock, you won't ever find a good setup.

secondly you should learn and understand what the hydraulic bottom out control is doing on Rockshox and other brands of rear shock. Primarily it enables to the release of the built up energy in the shock when you get into out the deep travel, thus you can tune out the harsh kick back.
  • 1 0
 Is there a practical reason why DH shocks are “backwards” (i.e. piggyback is on the same side as the stanchion) WRT lighter duty air shocks? At first I thought it was so they could have a larger air can, but this must be an optical illusion since the air can has to slide under the piggyback anyway.
  • 5 0
 Yes, you need a big air can and a big piggyback to have a lot of oil. And such architecture is simpler and most oil is not insulated with air can, so it will be cooler.
  • 3 2
 My enduro bike coil shock weighs less than 100 grams more than either the Vivid or X2. Having a tough time seeing the benefit of air if the bike is designed to accommodate coil.

I'm running an Ohlins TTx22m for my Rocky Mountain Altitude and it weighs 813 grams, that's included the roller bearings, whose weight would need to be added to the Vivid or X2's posted weight anyways so we're talking about a 60-75 gram difference in the end. Coil's been great.

I also am not sure I buy the "air shocks are more finely adjustable" argument. In the Boxxer article, Rockshox recommends riders increase or decrease by 10PSI at a time ("Every 10 psi is roughly equivalent to what RockShox determines as a spring rate"). This implies riders can't tell the difference if the magnitude of the change is less than that. That's roughly a coil spring weight up or down difference.
  • 2 0
 That psi recommendation from rockshox is likely aimed at the
Middle bell curve user group… aka not super sophisticated user. So in a sense it would be a sophisticated users first round of bracketing.
Your weight comparison is compelling for coil!
  • 4 0
 Surely when you have adjustable hydraulic bottom out, externally adjustable high speed rebound isn't nearly as important.
  • 1 0
 Intro to question: the air pressure still builds up in the final travel range - the rebound energy from the compressed air is still present.
I can understand that the hydraulic bottom out would be designed to ‘catch’ the last portion of travel before the any risk of either bottom out or high pressure spike effect.
Question: but why would the addition of a hydraulic piston/ circuit at the last portion of travel change the characteristics of the compressed air pushing back on the chamber? Aka how does it really change the high speed rebound of the air?
Is this just a suction/ return flow retardation felt from the HBO?
Help? I woke up thinking about this… lol
  • 3 0
 Looks good, feels good. Let's hope it doesn't blow up after 2 weeks, like the previous Vivid or current X2.
  • 1 0
 Good call! Do it!
  • 1 0
 What size shock did you weigh as mine (205 x 65 Trunion) weighs 579 grams with the bearing adaptors fitted? Or 421 grams lighter than the equivalent sized coil for those that want to know.
  • 8 0
 my EXT Storia 205x65mm with coil spring is less than 700g
  • 1 0
 @souknaysh: I'm in a similar boat. I think my 205Tx65 weighs about 725g with a 425# spring. BUT it depends a lot on spring weight. EXT springs are just about 1g/1# so a 500# will be 75g more than my setup. And everyone else's springs are even heavier.

So for a light rider it could be a toss up, AND they'll benefit most from the low stiction of a coil. A heavier rider will pay a much bigger penalty for a coil.
  • 1 0
 @ohio: The Sprindex springs are also lighter than the OE RS springs and one gets the benefit of a 'tuning' range with the spring.
  • 1 0
 Can someone explain to me the Henry Quinney reason for riding with the shock open on the climbs?
I missed that viral, debate inspiring diatribe about the optimum hill climbing setup.
  • 3 0
 If you are climbing a smooth trail, a lockout will be more efficient because you will lose less energy to bike bob. Its not very much energy loss though.

On a rooty, or rough climb the open suspension will "smooth" out the trail giving you more grip. A stiff rear end is more likely to bounce off this stuff.

If you have a tendency to forgot that you have your shock locked out and end up descending with it locked or you spend more time on rough climbs then you might as well not bother with the climb switch.
  • 1 1
 Still a little confused about "zone 1", as sag is at 25-30%, 0-10% travel will only occur upon landing from full suspension extension or on the rebound of pumping. It seems no matter the case 0-10% will be a very short interval of time, seeing as even just weighting the bike in a sag test uses more than twice the travel, or when landing from a jump or drop the bike will generally go deeper into its travel. I like the idea of zone-specific damping, but it seems this first zone with no compression damping isn't a major change from any other new RS shock. Seeing as the first 10% of a shock's travel happens very quickly when you're actually riding.
  • 2 1
 It is called TouchDown technology, as it comes to play when you land from a jump. It is supposed to enable silky smooth touch down(see what they did?) because it is not damped and it ramps up once you are firmly on the ground.
  • 2 0
 @i-am-lp: As long as damping is zero at 0% travel, ramping up smoothly from there seems like it would be preferable to blowing through the first 10% before damping begins?
  • 2 1
 The weight of your bike on landing will put the shock past 10% travel before hands or feet take any load.
So it is essentially pointless, or another sram marketing 'feature'.
  • 4 0
 Vivid is back!
  • 4 2
 vivid has a max psi of 360, vs 300 on the X2. Should hopefully allow it to work for a wider range of heavier riders
  • 1 0
 In my last search for a bike I had to rule out a bunch of bikes because they were high leverage and had X2s, a combo that would put me well past the limit.
  • 1 0
 @mtmc99: yep, me too. 60psi isn't much more, but its something
  • 3 1
 That could also just mean it has a smaller air piston.
  • 1 2
 738 Grams?
No Argument anymore flor an Air shock. Thema I'd directly Go Form a lighter made cool shock and sls-like spring.

More reliability,more Sensitivity.

The only Air shock with this Kind of Performance,more reliability than the x2 but with a decent weight IS an Intend Hover. 450 Grams Form the 230mm length shock.
But ok, it is pricey
  • 1 0
 And EXT now have the Aria which allows the curve to be tuned with the second air valve.
  • 1 1
 @andrewbikeguide:

Yeah I Know, Aria anda the chickadehill twintube shock offen this. But weight seems to be similar high and the price is definetly above 1100 euros por each
  • 1 0
 The most sensitive airshock is the intend hover, unchallenged. It feels just like a coil shock.
  • 2 2
 I appreciate how you made an article about shocks, talking about architecture and adjustment range, yet dont mention either in the reviews and comparisons.
  • 1 0
 Simply went from X2 and DPX2 to coil (+Sprindex) even on a trail bike and never looked back.
  • 1 0
 Can it painless to set up if there isn't actually much to set up? 5 whole LSC clicks! 3 more than the climb lever, wow!
  • 2 1
 The new Vivid is coil-like. That is all you need to know. Wink
  • 1 2
 Except there is a coil with the same damper (maybe a different tune), the Super Deluxe Coil. Same eyelet part, same clicks, same almost everything except the spring.
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: It was a tongue in cheek comment because they always market air shocks as "coil-like".
  • 1 1
 @tacklingdummy: and mine was a (maybe too subtle) jab at the complete lack of acknowledgement from the media that there already is pretty much a coil version of this, just with a different name.
  • 1 1
 There’s no such a thing, it can be a good air, nothing like coil like an actual coil
  • 1 0
 @nicoenduro: That is the joke and the sarcasm. I have never had an air shock that was coil-like.
  • 1 0
 Does anyone know, will they review fox float x?
  • 1 1
 sniff sniff....smells like another industry lawsuit coming- haha rockshox float x2 is spot on
  • 2 2
 If this is as reliable as most RS stuff these days, it may be THE shock for every bike short of an XC race whip.
  • 1 0
 the real question is.. will it fit my hightower shock tunnel!?
  • 1 0
 Fitment has stretched my American brain haha.
  • 1 0
 Please give me a Fork Week. Maybe Only Fans would sponsor it?
  • 1 3
 "whether you want every possible click in the range (X2), or relative simplicity of setup (Vivid).

In other words, actual tunability, or sorta kinda moving back and forth around getting it dialed maybe someday.
  • 1 0
 Pinkbike, what shock should I put on my new Spire Smile
  • 2 2
 "I just press it in multiple times and sometimes it works"
  • 1 0
 @ 1:30
  • 1 1
 Feels like an X2 K cool fomo no longer exists I'll stick with EXT.
  • 2 2
 Why wouldn't they incorporate high speed rebound?
  • 3 1
 It's there, it's just not externally adjusted. RockShox/SRAM rarely offers this adjustment, they think they know better than you, despite not knowing your pressures and especially how many tokens you might use.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: I guess by offering it, it would overlap the zone that the hydraulic is effecting - hence changing the feel / feel defect that they have designed in.
  • 1 0
 @JosMaple: except the HBO is for deep compression/bump events, and HSR is for deep rebound/jounce events, so it doesn't matter if they overlap, they don't operate at the same time.
  • 1 3
 "Put succinctly, the Vivid looks and feels like a RockShox Float X2" - isn't Float X2 a Fox shock? O_o
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