Video: RockShox's Wireless Reverb AXS Dropper Post Explained

Feb 6, 2019
by Mike Levy  


If you're going to make a wireless 12-speed drivetrain, you might as well throw some of that technology at your dropper post, right? That's exactly what RockShox have done with the new Reverb AXS that uses an encrypted wireless network in place of the normal Reverb's hydraulic hose. The post's travel is still non-indexed, and it's controlled by a funky, button-style remote, with 100mm, 125mm, 150mm, and 170mm travel options.

If this is what the future looks like, the future ain't gonna be cheap; the Reverb AXS will sell for $800 USD when it hits the shelves this coming April. SRAM hasn't released a weight yet, but they say that it's within a few grams of the normal Reverb, so expect it to come in around 650-grams with its remote.


Reverb AXS Details

• Travel: 100, 125, 150, 170mm
• Electronic, wireless design
• Re-designed head, clamp
• Faster, fixed return speed
• SRAM battery, CR2032 in remote
• Lengths: 340, 390, 440, 480mm
• Sizes: 30.9, 31.6, 34.9mm
• Weight: TBA
• MSRP: $800 USD
• More info: www.sram.com/rockshox






Inside the Reverb AXS

So, what exactly is happening when you push the remote's button? And why isn't this thing called the E-verb? I only know the answer to the first question, with the gist being that RockShox has combined existing wireless tech with tiny electric motors and batteries.

Let's start up top with the remote, pictured to the right.

Without the need to pull any cable or, in the hosed Reverb's case, push some oil, they were free to come up with an entirely new remote. The new AXS ''controller'' (their words, not mine) sees a wide, easy to hit thumb paddle that's tucked up close to the underside of the handlebar so you don't have to unwrap your thumb to hit it. You're also probably a lot less likely to smack it with your knee for the same reason, and because it's now a literal button (under the paddle) rather than a lever, it only needs to travel a few millimeters before activating the post.

The remote is larger than I expected - after all, it still needs to house some electronics and a CR2032 battery - and it's on the same AXS program as the drivetrain, so you can customize the "controller touch points" to your liking.
n a
"My mom was a dropper post remote and my dad was a garage door opener."

Another tidbit worth noting is that there seems to be plenty of room on the remote for SRAM to add in another button, say if one wanted to be able to control their suspension lockout, maybe? Further integration down the road is very likely, even if SRAM wouldn't comment on their long-term plans.


n a
n a
You need to press that small button on the back of the remote to pair your Reverb AXS, something that also keeps ''friends'' from messing with your bike. The AXS app lets you choose which button controls what, from the shifter to the Reverb remote.


Want the Reverb remote to act as a shifter and one of the "touch points" on the right-hand remote to operate your seatpost? That takes all of about thirty seconds using the free AXS app that's available for iOS and Android devices. My boss wants to yell at me daily for not understanding or using Google Docs (ugh, they're my personal TPS Reports), but even I figured out how the AXS app works pretty quickly.

Now to the seatpost itself. Think of it this way: with the notable exception of the Vent Valve (more on that later), the Reverb AXS remains largely the same as its forebearer from the stanchion down. That means it's still a twin-tube layout, and there's still an internal floating piston (IFP) that separates the air and oil, albeit an updated one to go along with improved oil and grease. But from the top of the stanchion up, things are drastically different.


n a
The SRAM battery that clips onto the back of the Reverb AXS is the same as what's used to power the wireless Eagle AXS drivetrain. On the Reverb, SRAM says you'll get around 40-hours of battery life.


The original Reverb actually uses two separate hydraulic systems: the post's internals, and the remote and hose. Put simply, the only thing the traditional Reverb's hydraulic remote does is open and close an oil port on the seatpost. All other hydraulic posts need the same job done, of course, but they do it with cable-operated remotes instead.

A few years ago RockShox decided they wanted to do the same job but without any hoses or cables.


n a
From left: the battery mount and cover, the post's head with the plunger still inside (the small red part), the circuit board, and the motor with the gearbox attached.


To do that, a small electric motor needed to be squeezed into the post's head, which was no small feat. First, the right motor needed to go in there, and it had to be powerful enough to open and close the oil port, but it also couldn't require too much juice. The answer is the same tiny motor that's found in the Eagle AXS derailleur that spins up to something like 80,000 RPM. Just like the derailleur, the Reverb AXS has its own RC car-sized gearbox to handle all the RPMs and torque required to open and close the oil port.

Wireless and electronic or not, the Reverb AXS still needs that oil port to open and close for it to be able to go up and down through its travel. This is also what gives the Reverb the infinite range feature that allows you to move it a few millimeters at a time or make your seat disappear under you.


n a
The motor sits inverted on the head, with the gearbox activating the plunger.


The motor sits inverted behind the re-designed clamp, with the tiny gearbox at the bottom that aligns perpendicularly with a plunger. When you hit the remote with your thumb, a signal is sent through an encrypted wireless network to a receiver hidden inside the post's head. Technology does technology things at this point via the circuit board, and the little motor goes from zero to full torque instantly. That's put through the gearbox that then depresses the plunger and opens the oil port, and then the post is free to go up or down.

I think that it's important to point out that none of the above is a feat of engineering or pushing the limits of technology. Sure, the packaging is impressive, but as long as it's been executed correctly, the technology itself isn't something that we should be shunning, especially when it comes to dropper seatposts and drivetrains.

There are a couple of other things to mention beyond the whole 'no wires' angle, the first being something called Vent Valve. I don't think it's out of line to say that RockShox invented the squishy dropper post when they invented the original Reverb - it worked well when it worked, but it could also be the world's most annoying suspension post. That's caused by air and oil mixing inside of it and, well, air being squishy and all...
n a
This little guy is the plunger. The oil port sits hidden inside the white section.

The fix is to bleed the post's hydraulic system, a daunting job for the average rider that's far beyond doing the same to the remote. Vent Valve is the answer, RockShox says, and it's essentially a built-in way to push the air out of the system without having to bleed the thing. All you have to do is flip the post upside down, depress the stiff Vent Valve button (that is also the top of the air valve) with your thumb, and then compress the post while a friend activates the remote. It's a two-man job [edit: only if you use the remote. It's a one-man job if you use the button on the Reverb].

If that sounds similar to what BikeYoke has going on inside their Revive post, that's because it is, only RockShox uses an IFP to keep the air and oil separated, and BikeYoke does not.

You might have to do it a couple of times, but it takes all of a minute or two and the Reverb goes back to being rock solid under your ass. Not gonna lie, I bet a lot of people would have liked this feature on their older Reverbs, too. Sadly, it isn't retro-fittable.


n a
n a
No, that's not a seat bag. The Reverb AXS' electronics required a complete re-design of the head to fit everything inside. Along with that came a new way to make seat angle adjustments.


All of that computer stuff, along with the electric motor and gearbox, required RockShox to ditch the proven twin-opposing bolt head design for something that looks like a single-bolt setup at first glance. Thank God it isn't, though, because those terrible things are just terrible. Instead of depending on just the single bolt that clamps the seat's rails to also hold the angle, there's a second, locking bolt that's used to adjust tilt. You still need to back off the clamp bolt, but once that's done you turn the second bolt to make angle adjustments before locking everything back down.

The electronic internals necessitated the head's re-design, but this new setup is also far easier to deal with than the common opposing-bolt layout.

Enough about what's inside of it; let's get onto how it performed.





No Hose, No Worries?

The usual press camp disclaimers apply here and to any so-called "first ride reviews'' that you may read elsewhere - we all got two or three rides in on the Reverb AXS dropper while in Tucson, Arizona, which isn't enough time for a proper review. That said, the early impressions were quite positive all around.


n a
My Reverb AXS and Eagle AXS wireless drivetrain were installed on a Yeti SB130. It turned out to be a great bike for the rocky, pointy terrain that surrounds Tucson.


Yes, it goes up and down as it should, and the non-adjustable return speed is faster than the previous models. It also makes cool 'vvvvt' sounds when it does its thing. Most importantly, there's no delay between you pushing the button and the motor opening the port - it is much, much faster than Magura's Vyron dropper. It also feels damn near instantaneous next to a normal Reverb.

Part of that is down to not having to push a lever (or plunger on older Reverbs) through its stroke, however short, to activate the thing... Because it's literally a button that you push, the activation speed seems to be about on par with flipping a light switch and having the room brighten up.


n a
The Reverb AXS' action is faster, especially because there's no lever or plunger to depress; think lightswitch kinda speed.


The new button-style (sorry, it's a ''touch point'') remote also lets you easily make those smaller micro-adjustments in seat height that you might do if you like steep, technical climbs, or if you like to tinker to match whatever kind of terrain you're on. All you do is push on the button using the edge of your thumb so that it merely grazes it, which is enough to lower the seat by maybe 5mm or so. That sounds useless when I describe it now, but it's certainly not on the rolling, rocky trails around Tucson that dart up countless rises and through even more dry washes. Amazing trails, but they're a lot of hard work for someone in the middle of a Candian winter.

The Reverb AXS was almost trouble-free. Mine refused to raise back up on one occasion after being lowered for a tricky righthand corner that I probably deserved to crash on, although it was sorted out within a few seconds after we removed the battery and re-installed it. No word on the cause, either, and I asked around but no one else had a similar issue. Technology, amirite?

There are a few other things to note as well, especially the fact that no one is going to be able to "hack" into your Reverb and take control of it. Just like the Eagle AXS drivetrain, the post runs on an encrypted wireless network that's paired to the contro... er, remote, and you need physical access to the component in order to pair it because you have to depress the pairing button. You have to know the component's serial number, too. Russia probably doesn't care about your E-verb, either, so no worries there.
n a
Is the added complication worth it? I suspect so, but only a long-term review will answer that.

As for battery life, the little CR2032 that's up in the remote should last for a couple of years, and there's a button on the side of the Reverb to activate it if you manage to run the remote dry or break it in a crash. And speaking of that, RockShox does plan to sell replacement paddles, and maybe even offer a few different versions to boot. I expect some aftermarket options to pop up as well. As for the important SRAM battery on the post itself, it's the same as you'll find on the back of the Eagle AXS derailleur, meaning that you can swap them around if need be. I was told to expect around forty-hours of life from it (double the drivetrain battery's life), which should be thousands of up and downs, and a warning light will tell give you its status. It only weighs 25-grams, too, so you could easily carry a spare with you.




This isn't a review, but I was pretty impressed with the performance of the Reverb AXS, aside from that unexplained stuck-down moment. After just two days on it, I know that I'm going to prefer the wireless AXS model over the traditional design. Funny thing, though, is that I don't say that because there's no hose, but rather because the wireless design necessitated some much-needed improvements to the Reverb as a whole. Yes, even over the last update.


n a
There was plenty of fun to be had on Tucson's trails, especially when you can make your seat disappear at the blink of an eye.


Not only is the Reverb AXS much, much quicker than its predecessor, it is also far easier to modulate the travel due to how the remote is designed and because the action is instantaneous. Vent Valve is obviously a godsend, too, and the whole thing does away with that silly hose as a bonus. Well, maybe it was the other way around, but the bottom line is that the Reverb AXS shows a lot of potential. The only thing left to do is to spend a good chunk of time using one and find out if it's reliable.

If everything checks out, do you think you'd be willing to part with $800 USD for the wireless Reverb AXS?


349 Comments

  • + 875
 Why not try and make normal reverbs work first?
  • + 13
 to be fair, the issue on the current reverb was the hose, so they technically solved that problem. I get your point tho
  • + 41
 anyone remembers their silver collar reverb
  • - 17
flag SnowshoeRider4Life (Feb 6, 2019 at 7:32) (Below Threshold)
 their problems lie within the hydro line from the lever and this solves that
  • + 115
 More weight, more expensive, more things to go wrong... sure sounds like the next evolution of the reverb to me!
  • + 83
 @SnowshoeRider4Life: Ha ha, no the IFP failures that cause seatpost squish is NOT from the hydraulic line.
  • + 18
 @SnowshoeRider4Life: while I totally see what you are saying, why the hell would you spend triple the market rate on a post from a company with a known bad track record for posts?
  • + 41
 Yep! Get a BikeYoke Revive if you want one that works seamlessly. Only Pinkbike can manage to be impressed by a test in which the drop stops working after one ride!!!!!!!

Other than the one ride reliability, it is a bit of clunky looking beast. 650 grams would make it the class leader: meaning the heaviest by a fair bit! Keep adding weight to our bikes! Good job!
  • + 28
 $800 !!
  • + 11
 Not even two weeks ago I posted "I can't believe Rockshox has not stolen Bike Yoke's revive feature yet." Douchebags.
  • + 0
 Especially the remote, since even the 1x lever is very finicky
  • + 6
 @kmg0: Is that what he's "fixing" in the video that he said you need a buddy to help with? Just hold the button and push the other button while balancing on one foot and touching your nose...something like that. Sounds easy enough.
  • + 3
 @jaybobo: No it just doesn’t work any where near as good as the compition. Like not even close. Easily the worst dropper post I’ve used lately. It’s to the point where I’m bringing my own post for demos so I don’t have to use the Reverb.
  • + 5
 +$800
  • + 37
 Is there a VPN option for Chinese riders?
  • + 4
 But my friends has always worked flawlessly so they all must work fine.
  • + 36
 How many people have a box full of broken Reverbs and parts? You feel like you can't throw them away because you paid so much but really it's worthless garbage.
  • + 13
 Ive had 5 IFP failures across a number of reverbs - absolute junk. Srams close to breeching trade descriptions and trading standards by selling that lump of toss for the last 6 years. Totaly sh*t prodiuct thats still cack. They absolutly should focus on getting reliability in what they have rather than strapping a motor to a poor design.
  • + 2
 @endurocat: I know right, better come with a life time warranty!
  • - 18
flag tacklingdummy (Feb 6, 2019 at 10:34) (Below Threshold)
 My reverb works excellent. It is all about a good bleed.
  • + 14
 @tacklingdummy: A good bleed doesnt stop the IFP from failing.
  • - 11
flag MrDiamondDave (Feb 6, 2019 at 11:32) (Below Threshold)
 It works. Your mechanic don't work
  • + 4
 @noweyout: I just told my Dentist and he has one on order
  • + 9
 @duzzi: Digging the one up components version myself.. Flawless
  • - 3
 @willy970: I have had a couple of reverb and never problems with the IFP. It is a good post. However, with so many options on the market now, I will probably get a different one just because maintenance and replacing parts on the reverb is very time consuming and complicated.
  • + 8
 Reverbs are so bad that I currently have a new one for sale for $140 with zero offers a month later. At this point I don't think I could give it away. The idea of a free dropper is outweighed by the hassle of it failing and needing expensive service constantly....
  • + 3
 @MrFogg: I'll take it
  • + 2
 Just when you thought mountain biking couldn't get more expensive
  • - 3
 @WayneParsons: muthafukas betta start makin mo money!
  • + 2
 Just increased the cost of a normal rebuild by 3x.
  • + 6
 I would buy this if it came with the feature of messing with your mates dropper as he is about to hit a massive feature hahahaha, would be fucking hilarious. Like an eject seat.
  • + 1
 @endurocat: The fact that it is demoed on a Yeti should tell you something.
  • + 14
 @smithcreek: I'm more concerned with how I'm going to cable lock my $800 seatpost to the bike while I run in to buy a macchiato.
  • + 6
 @Flowcheckers: @Flowcheckers: normally yes, but I just "donated" my steaming pile of reverb detritus to someone else, so they now have a really big collection of Returds. I now need to find someone to take all my leaky XT brake calipers and then I will be making real progress.
  • + 3
 That’s right get a Bike Yoke Revive, and you will not have one problem. You can also get a 185mm drop. I still the original Revive. Zero issues.@duzzi:
  • + 1
 Sold!@mtbikeaddict:
  • + 9
 What the hell are you guys doing with those Reverbs?? Im on my forth Reverb now since it came out and I never had any unexpected failure. Ofcourse it needs service like any other hydraulic device. I rebuild it once a season and never have any issues. And its great since you can do full rebuild at home, its simple, service instructions are available as well as service parts. Try do that with Fox transfer if you dare!
  • + 1
 @stefanfresh: Friday Fails would become Flyday Fails lol
  • + 1
 because: then final product would be 100% bikeyoke dropper post.
  • + 2
 @jaybobo: So you wann be fair? You are completely wrong!
  • + 1
 @SnowshoeRider4Life: Man, please! Get your facts straight, before posting! Please!
  • + 3
 @smithcreek: Hold your horses!!! ;-) We want to be looking into their design carfefully, before we jump to conclusions, right? But be assured, that we will do so.
However, I am not even sure, if we could possibly even afford fighthing such a big company even if there was patent infrigement. They´ll always have the longer leverage.
Wait, maybe we could do a croud funding lawsuit. LOL...
  • + 2
 @SnowshoeRider4Life: unfortunately pink bikers cannot handle the truth
  • + 2
 @fastedjones: Not quite correct. Or REVIVEs are doig pretty well, but honestly, if you are THAT ONE PERSON out of 100, you will still get a problem. Although this (1%) is a riduculously good failure rate for a dropper post, I am still not happy with it. We´re still trying improving our stuff every single day. Every single customer having a problem with one of our products is one customer too much.
  • + 1
 @codypup: The gold standard!
  • + 1
 @oldtech: The reverb i had worked great, except for when it was below 40 degrees lolol
  • + 2
 well I have one from 2012 I guess, never serviced (maybe thats the secret) just going up and down perfect.
  • + 1
 @smithcreek: If they would also steal Bikeyokes quality materials, tight manufacturing tolerances, smart construction and easy serviceability, the reverb might actually be worth buying.
  • + 2
 Me! My shop has about 15@Flowcheckers:
  • + 1
 ...´cause that´s gonna be the first one that will work - maybe ;-)
  • + 2
 +3
I never understood the hydraulic actuation in the first-place more shit to go wrong, but now this...natural evolution of the electronic craze i guess. I can see it now some kid mid race run cant get his dropper down cuz the battery died haha. OneUp and Wolftooth never look back!
  • + 1
 @nekislav: To be fair, none of mine have flat out stopped working...well, other than when its pretty cold, then I've had them get stuck down (just after a fresh bleed no less). Warms back up, and it works fine again. But every one of them developed the Reverb "droop" (i.e. when you sit on it on it at full extension it compresses a 1/4" or so...man, that was poorly worded) pretty quickly, and I've had mixed results in getting good bleeds on them. Point being, they should've just moved to a cable actuation a long time ago. Plus, the original push button "lever" was abysmal in terms of ergonomics and function. Hell, I even like my Bontrager a lot better for no other reason than its easy and quick to rebuild.
  • + 1
 If I could up vote that one a thousand times I would!
  • + 1
 @SnowshoeRider4Life: my issue is usually when I come from sea level up to a few thousand feet of Elevation and it is chilly it always requires a blade
  • + 2
 @SnowshoeRider4Life: oh so I'm not complaining because the new remote n the bleeding edge fitting makes bleeding this Reverb literally a 10 second job. No issues to give the Reverb a quick bleed in my book for what it offers.
  • - 1
 It's a POS. @oldtech:
  • + 1
 @codypup: Through the seat.
  • + 1
 @freeridejerk888: Everyone's entitled to their opinion.
  • + 1
 It's more a fact tho. I don't have 15 of any broken part in my shop. Well maybe this brskes but still. I would conclude that yes indeed with proof it's a pos @oldtech:
  • + 1
 This model comes with a bleed lever like the Revive. Hopefully it will fix the issues and also become available on the standard version.
  • + 1
 @freeridejerk888: I'll take a couple of the good conditioned ones. I'd bet I can fix them and make them work.
  • + 112
 Awesome!
is there a coil conversion?
  • + 111
 Is there a repeating cycle/ rhythmic mode? I'm asking for a friend...
  • + 5
 Interesting. Now I can finally make it look like my saddle has hemorrhoids.
  • + 3
 @Deuce-DeuceAndAHalf: I want to upvote this but its currently sitting at a perfect 69 votes
  • + 53
 i can't believe Sram thinks i can afford this new dropper post and cell phone all at the same time
  • + 59
 Comes with ass recognition system.
  • + 59
 or “ARS” for short
  • + 2
 and with constant ID-10T scanning! ...yep rider still is one for buying it!
  • + 4
 @noweyout:

PEBSAH Compliant


Problem Exists Between Saddle And Handlebar
  • + 42
 Saw $800 MSRP.... skipped right down to the comments
  • + 25
 Saw $800 MSRP on another site - came to PB comments to see the reaction.
  • + 6
 I saw "Reverb" in the title and immediately skipped the article for comments we all knew were coming. Reverbs come with a guarantee called failure.
  • + 39
 Will it lose wireless connection and stop working when the temperature drops, like all other Reverbs?
  • + 28
 You would think Sram would solve all of the reliability problems with the reverb first before introducing the added complexity of wireless electronics. What will be next, Guide AXS brakes with wireless braking?
  • + 6
 The automotive industry using hybrid technology have begun to go down this route. Don't give them any ideas.
  • + 4
 @defineindecline: Yup, Toyota Prius and new Honda NSX already have brake-by-wire technology in them.
  • + 4
 @AD4M: Wired is slightly more reassuring than wireless though.
  • + 7
 The technical term is lipstick on a pig
  • + 5
 That was my first thought: A mechanical-hydraulic-electronic-wireless seatpost made by SRAM (of all things) sounds like the worst possible reliability nightmare.

Maybe alongside a pneumatically actuated drivetrain made by Crankbrothers.
  • + 31
 Wow, that's really neat **sees price** Uh, no.
  • + 7
 I'll wait for a small company to actually make it reliable and affordable.
  • + 4
 I think that dropper post are one of those components that are generally extremely overpriced. It's a seat post that moves up and down that's its sole purpose. You can spend $800 or $150 for two items that accomplish the same function. I'm certainly willing to shell out the cash for top notch components, but the $150(ish) KS E-ten I have on my trail bike is 100% adequate for my needs and works perfectly.
  • + 25
 Can't wait to be a early adopter of a modified version of a product that sucks....
  • + 20
 Sram drive trains have been nothing short of phenomenal in my experience, but the Reverb may be the single worst product ever made for a mountain bike. It has come as stock equipment on every bike I have bought in the last five years and has been the single biggest pile of crap I have ever had the misfortune of using. Six out of six of the brand new Rock Shox Reverb's I've had have malfunctioned within six months of owning them, so when you tell me there's an electronic version I simply cringe at the absolute pile of flaming garbage that it must be. My current solution has been to buy a Fox transfer post, which may be my favorite seat post I have tried in the last five years of riding mountain bikes.
  • + 11
 Think the Raceface Turbine was worse, but yeah probably not by much.
  • + 2
 Joplin. Much worse.
  • + 3
 5 out of 5 worked perfectly for me... current one is 3 years old and still working great with one service. Either you're doing it wrong, or I'm doing it right.
  • + 21
 Why are you parroting their marketing speak about “encrypted” network? Every single f*cking Bluetooth connection is encrypted. There is nothing new or newsworthy in that whatsoever.
  • + 15
 Because even with that in there some people are commenting about hacking them?
  • + 2
 @brianpark: those people do not know what they are talking about.

Do you worry about your phone Bluetooth being hacked. Hint: it is not an issue.

This is just marketing mambo jambo to create an illusion of added value. Boohoo. Low power Bluetooth or whatever they use is encrypted. Stop the presses.
  • + 6
 @Axxe: Explanations are not for people who understand already. Do you question including instructions with things you have used before as you know what to do from the last time you used it?

If you don't know that Bluetooth is encrypted as standard then it would be reasonable to worry about someone f*cking with your dropper post or gears without your permission. Making it clear that this is not possible is both reasonable and prudent.
  • + 23
 Looking forward to sitting on hold with warranty.
  • + 21
 Hmm $800 dropper, $2k drivertrain, plus frame, suspension, carbon wheels....$30K bikes bought with 60 month loans here we come!
  • + 7
 Apropos that that rollout was done on Yeti's.
  • + 1
 Don't forget the $2,700 Message fork...
  • + 2
 Don't forget about Fox live-valve, for added absurdity. If you make it an E-Bike, you could probably hit the 25k today.
  • + 15
 Reverbs came stock on my last two bikes and they have easily been the worst component I've ever owned. Constant breakdowns. I've bled that lever so many damn times I couldn't round it off to the nearest hundredths. Replaced by warranty 5x, comes back with the exact same problem. A1, B1, B2, etc, doesn't matter. I love sram drivetrain stuff, but I just can't get behind a Reverb anymore.
  • + 18
 My mom also has a remote controlled post... oh wait
  • + 15
 SRAM needs to put the crack pipe down
  • + 10
 Hmmm, the Magura Vyron is $300, is lighter, has a 3 year head start on production and customer use/feedback, and now has a 2nd version available. I get that SRAM has a lot of cool integration features between the seatpost and the AXS group set, but $800 WAY to much for a dropper. I am perfectly happy with my Transfer, and there are lots of inexpensive and reliable options available now. If I was going to “try out” a new wireless option, I definitely would not drop $800 on this. That and I still have PTSD from the multiple failures and warranty returns with the hydro Reverb.

My Eagle X01 shifter and derailleur have been fantastic, so not here just to slam SRAM in general>
  • + 1
 Clearly you've never tried a Vyron. They are so slow they are pretty much unrideable. Oh and they can't get wet, like, at all.
  • + 0
 @paulbalegend: Yeah we have a much improved and faster version already out but agreed the first one was a little slow. They are super durable however.
  • + 11
 Manufacturers take note: There is a market for wireless 27.2mm posts.
  • + 8
 No plans for a 27.2 Reverb, I was told. Because it's a twin-tube layout, things would just be too small/tight for a 27.2 version to work.
  • + 2
 The X Fusion hilo 27.2 100mm is a pretty good post. I used mine for 3 years during which it need 1 rebuild. Have you considered it? I know it's not wireless.
  • + 3
 @woofer2609: Yeah, heard good things about the hilo. I've got the newer KS Lev in 27.2, which has been awesome, but interested in wireless to avoid the external cable routing.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: 10-4. Makes sense. Thanks!
  • + 3
 @Steelies4ever:
I just bought a Trans X with 110mm for 119 euros.
It's the JD-YSP36 version.
Works just fine.
www.bike-discount.de/de/kaufen/tranzx-jd-ysp36-remote-sattelstuetze-395x27%2C2mm-760697
  • + 1
 @OneTrustMan: That looks good too! What is it with companies using "X" in their name though.
Trans-X, X-Fusion, Brand X,etc.
  • + 1
 @woofer2609:
I don't really know man.
That post has a nice lever for that price and it's fast. The speed ist controllable.
Tha feeling of the post is not that smooth, but hey, at least it's not the shitty creaky e13 dropper that can crush my ballz off.
  • + 1
 @OneTrustMan:

I have the external routing, 80mm version on my Cove Hummer for 2 years now. Never skips a beat.
  • + 1
 Encrypted remote?!?! If i can't control my buddy's seat post then i'm out. sorry. lol
  • + 7
 I know TONS of people have had issues with their reverbs. I’m one of the rare people who hasn’t had a single issue. In fact, as embarrassed as I am to admit it, I haven’t serviced my Reverb ONCE in over three years. That’s with riding 3-4 times a week.

$800 is way too much for this tho and I’ll be waiting (perhaps another 3 years of non-servicing!) for the price to drop.
  • + 9
 How much fun it would be to hack the System and see what will happen at the Megavalanche next year Smile
  • + 5
 Lol Im buying a jammer this year for sure Wink
  • + 1
 @NotNamed: You mean a cable actuated post?
  • + 9
 Oh my God, that would be awesome... one man with a shifter controlling all da posts... a video picturing it would feature an orchestra playing Ode to Joy
  • + 5
 Imagine the possibilities! It can measure your body weight and tell you that you need to rehydrate. Or that you gained/ lost weight since the last time, connect to My Fitness Pal or Apple Health, Garmin, whatever. Middle aged triathletes will be thrilled!
  • + 7
 Fox Transfer is a better post and a 1/3 the cost.
Bikeyoke is a better post and 1/2 the cost.
SRAM is blowing it with the wireless electronic BS.
  • + 2
 I bought my first BikeYoke after having decent off and on success with a KS Lev, good luck with the Transfer and the BikeYoke?

Flawless since day 1. Absolutely one of the most reliable dropper I've had and will be on all my bikes from here out.
  • + 5
 I can just imagine the conversation.... (not based on real life at all....)

R&D Engineer - "We know how to make the Reverb more reliable"
R&D Director - "Can you make it cheaper?"
Marketing - "We need a differentiation, the competition is killing us"
R&D Director - "We can give you wireless"
Marketing - "What an awesome idea, that will give us what we want to make a difference in our sales figures"
R&D Director - "Lads, we have a new project, you will love it, we are going wireless"
R&D Engineer - "But we know how to make the current post more reliable, move the actuator to the bottom, make it cheaper and lighter"
R&D Director - "Great idea guys but please stick to the business plan that we have global alignment on, we are going wireless, if you are not working on this key project then I need to know why"
R&D Engineer - "But we have working samples which show how reliable this new design is!!!!"
R&D Director - "Why have you worked on that, its not part of the business goals, we need wireless and we need it now, lets stay focused on the company goals".

6 months later.....

R&D Director - "I will now push this as my idea and take all the credit, we have wireless"
Marketing - "Thanks R&D Director, this is exactly what we need to make a difference in the market, nobody will care about the price as we have removed a cable and this looks amazing as a market differentiator"
Pinkbike - "Thanks for the seatpost, we will review it"

Customer..........
flag adrennan (18 hours ago)
Why not try and make normal reverbs work first?

R&D Engineer - Sits and watches all smug that he was right all along but is still miffed as that R&D director is on the big money and the marketing guy has his new product launch bonus.


Being the R&D engineer, this is pretty much how it goes.
  • + 2
 Love this and the disclaimer. Reminds me of this. lol
www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKorP55Aqvg
  • + 8
 @this pace, motorcycles will look ridiculously inexpensive!
  • + 7
 Good thing that we can pull the seatpost out of the frame and use it for a fight again. Just like ten years ago.
  • + 6
 Since it has a battery they really need to integrate a taser...hope it doesn't malfunction though... Wink
  • + 0
 Sit down comrade Chen
  • + 4
 This is all wonderful halo product type kit and all, but it raises 2 questions for me:

1) As its mechanically all proven old-hat tech (wireless encryption notwithstanding), why the hell has this taken so long to come to market, from SRAM or anyone else?

More importantly, 2) Will Rockshox be putting the Vent-Valve on a new revision of the hyrdo-handraulic basic Reverb? I'm sick of cases of reverbitis, the extra 10mm of suspension that precedes the moment the dropper drops for the terminal time and dances the seat-post gallows fandango.

As SRAM/Shox build specs are so common for pre-built bikes, a trickled down reverb that has some longevity would be fantastic without adding an extra $/£/€ 500-600 for the wireless tech.
  • + 6
 everytime @mikelevy was in the video, i couldn't avoid looking at his wannabe mustache. grow some proper hair, man!
  • + 8
 Frown It's so soft
  • + 1
 Its a Cartapiller Caterpillar if you are from the east coast.
  • + 2
 @mikelevy - As a bald man, I have to shave my head. You have the same problem on your upper lip.
  • + 1
 I wasn't going to comment on the creeper tash but...since someone else did...

What's up with the Creeper Tash Levy?
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: no man, mine is just envy: i'm bald as foook, i've got the same problem of @MorganBH
  • + 3
 @mikelevy: Lol, Mike, how did you manage to look like the molester and the child at the same time.
  • + 3
 So only the network is encrypted? That's disconcerting as someone could still physically connect to my dropper and steal all my descending secrets. I'll wait for the fully encrypted at rest and encrypted in flight version 2.0
  • + 7
 You can afford 2 Vyrons if you can wait them a bit longer to actuate
  • + 3
 April 1st gets earlier every year.

$800 for a fricking seat post. A SEAT POST!? What the actual F?!

That'll equate to about £600 which is utterly mental for another thing you've got to remember to charge and at the end of the day it's A POST. WHICH SUPPORTS YOUR WEIGHT. Is a cable really that much hassle???

Oh and it's Bluetooth so 90% of the time it simply won't work. Then randomly after turning it on and off again for the hundredth time it will start working for an indeterminate period before shitting itself again.
  • + 7
 Its not bluetooth - it runs on the same AIREA protocol that etap has been running on flawlessly for the last 3 years.

But hey lets not let the facts get in the way of a good rant Wink
  • + 4
 @moominator: Yeah fair point, but the article was soooo long and boring with PB jizzing their pants about yet another utterly pointless and ridiculously overpriced 'development' I tuned out completely.

Have we really hit the point in human existence wherby the only way to make things better is by adding hideous amounts of complexity for imperceptible benefit? Like the other commenters have said, RS should really sort the Reverb out before electrifying it.
  • + 1
 @veero: what do want to know is, who decided to pronounce "axs" as "axis"?
  • + 3
 @veero:
I must admit I've got a pretty good technical understanding of the AXS stuff and a bit of ride time on the product also, I was fairly sceptical at first as to what perceptible difference the products could really make to the quality of ride / performance but ill just say that i don't want to go back to cables!

Looking just at the Reverb for sure there is some added complexity but also some simplification. The installation / pairing / go ride time is genuinely seconds rather than minutes and that includes fitting the seat.

Internally the new IFP / sealing and lubes used help with return speeds especially in the cold (This i can confirm - its colder here than Arizona!) and they must have some confidence in it as they've increase the service interval from 200 - 600 hours. The vent valve purge for air in the oil side on the IFP is a huge step forwards. The article is incorrect and the procedure can easily be done single-handedly and you don't need to use the controller either. Hopefully this will be rolled out across the rest of the reverb range.

In use the activation of the Reverb for me is a bigger step forward than the drivetrain (and the drivetrain is bloody good!) - there is just so little movement and effort required over either of the 2 prior remote systems and the control over micro adjustments to seat height is much improved.

So yes while its undoubtedly more complicated on the inside from an end user perspective in IMO a much simpler product.

Im sold anyway!

Lets not forget steep seat angles will be the saviour of dropper post reliability too! Smile
  • + 1
 @jaame: Its neither its "Access"
  • + 1
 @moominator: retarded either way. If it's Access, can't they call it Access? Deliberately spelling it wrong does not make it cool.
  • + 1
 @moominator: Ok so I've had a bit more time to read up on the Sram wireless stuff, the SRAM system does actually use Bluetooth but only to connect to your phone for the shifter set up not for the post actuation so my bad.

Anyway, in the cold light of day I can obviously see the benefits and if you were to ignore the price then fine. But as a collective the bike industry seems hell bent on innovation no matter the cost, almost the costlier the better. Looking at the prices for some of the other AXS stuff, £500 for a set of cranks etc etc etc and quickly you'll end up at £2000 and well beyond for a complete groupset before you've even bought the post. Unless you work in the trade and get massive discount, are given this stuff or literally have money to burn this sort of thing can be a real barrier to new people coming into the sport. People at work go goggle eyed when I tell them how much my Patrol build was and that's only using alu rims and XT grouppo which I can get for less than £500.

I'm more convinced of the wireless dropper than a wireless shifter at this stage, the stealth cable can be a faff, especially the Reverb hydraulic hose but cable droppers really aren't that bad and after a couple of goes can be done in moments and unhooking the cable noddle and lifting the post can be done in seconds. But internal routing hides the cable away. I'd rather replace a £5 cable and wire to get it working again than need a howmuch£?! battery to get it moving.

The whole 'time to fit and ride' thing is hollow justification. Sure I've been up later the night before a ride than I had planned but again hollow justification for the sheer cost.

They've obviously done their homework on the protocol, no doubt some enterprising so and so will breach it but the consequences are far less serious than other wireless connectivity applications.

So the vent air feature is an improvement but is an improvement for a problem which should never have been there in the first place and has plagued legions of Reverb owners who swear NEVER AGAIN. 3 Reverbs, 2nd went back on warranty for the squishiness after 6 rides, replacement was fine for 2 years and only 1 re-grease. Would I touch another one? Hell no, and definitely not at that price. It would need at least 2/3 generations of maturity and price drops to make it other than on a wish list.

Sure Shimano Di2 still had the wires and they may have messed up recently with the XTR 12 speed release, but they won’t be down for ever and here’s hoping a more reasonably priced alternative comes out in the reasonable future.

I’d rather phase replacement of a £4-5k bike every 2-3 years than a £10k bike which is where all these bits are heading to, which as I said earlier is MENTAL. But if those infinitesimal gains are what you’re after then go for it.
  • + 1
 @veero:
Yes the component / phone protocol is BLE - ive only been using it in anger for a couple of days but it seems pretty stable.

I get the whole cost thing too but what i don't quite get (and this isn't a personal dig its rife through this comments section and MTB in general) is people being offended by the price of top end stuff coming to market. Nobody is being forced to buy this stuff - standard Reverbs and GX/NX Groupsets aren't going anywhere and if that (or something from any other brand) works for a particular rider and budget then that's just great. I just don't get the anger at all. This stuff trickles down to mass market because of the successes of the top tier aspirational product (look how relatively quickly NX Eagle appeared after XX1/X01)

Understand your position on the Reverbs too but at least through revisions in the post its clear attempts are being made to improve things. The IFP is better so your less likely to get "squish" and if your unfortunate enough to do so 30 seconds later and its gone. For sure for some people 'Reverb' is tarnished and that does stick and takes some shaking Avid Elixirs are 11 years old (and were dogshite) but yet some people still refuse to consider SRAM brakes today because of this.

For every 10 people in your position who want a £4-5k bike every 2-3 years (which you can still get and will get better every 2-3 years because of trickle down) there will be 1 who will want to drop £10k every 12months and fair play to all of them.
There will also be 100 people happy to get a £1000k bike every 5 years and think those spending £4-5k are mental... and then there will be 1000 people ..........

I'm all for just cracking on - enjoying riding my bike and not judging people for what they choose to spend there hard earned on. More choice is good for the industry and the technology drive to make better stuff benefits everyone at every price point along the way. Its just senseless to me why so much of the market cant see and embrace that.

Maybe I'm a minority! Big Grin
  • + 1
 @moominator: I'm not hating on people who spend their hard earned on top flight kit at all, they can do what they want. It's the ever increasing piss taking the bike industry does and gets away with year on year. In 2001 £500 saw you a set of top of the range single crown forks. Now that figure can be £1300 -1500. Little more than compound 3% per annum. Yet we get our pants pulled down every year and seem to lube up for the manufacturers.

I'm done with reverbs even though I was lucky the price of this thing is a final nail. I rode an 18 demo bike a few weeks back with SRAM Guides on and they were just as shit as the Codes I had on a DH bike 4 years ago, and back in the day I loved my Avid Juicy Carbons, multiple sets. I agree to an extent that more choice is good but for some components (stems, bars wheels) there is a dizzyingly pointless array of samey products indeterminable from one another.

Digressing slightly there, sure the trickle down would be good but it's going to be a while before this hits a wide spread affordability. The idea is nice but yeah way out my price range for more. Feel free to crack on and post up how good this stuff is in a little while.
  • + 8
 That mustache tho!
  • + 2
 For that much money I’d want...

It to have the same internals as a fox transfer.
It to be the same weight as a fox transfer
It to have gps and remember where I put the post up and down so I don’t even have to press the button.
  • + 1
 Your third idea is brilliant. It could use your phone / Garmin etc. I think that would be an app without too much trouble.
  • + 3
 @iamamodel: Just hope GPS accuracy is good enough. Being 5 meters off horizontally might result in hilarious behavior...
  • + 2
 "Much much faster than the Vyron." Is that the first or the current generation Vyron? Also I may not have read the article properly so forgive me if it has already been mentioned, but does it stay put right when you release the button just like a cable/hose actuated dropper or is it like the Vyron where you have a time window where you have to keep the saddle steady in the desired position until the port automatically closes? The latter seems a bit hard to do out on the trail, though I've got to admit my time on a dropper equipped bike is very limited. On a dig session I borrowed a buddies bike to test a section but how hard I pushed down on the saddle with one elbow whilst flipping that lever, it didn't really come down. I asked him to slam the saddle for me before I could even drop in. Wink
  • + 2
 It stays put when you release like a cable/hose post, only faster.
  • + 1
 @Jparker164: Thanks!
  • + 2
 I would definitely want to try out a wireless dropper post but the price is a joke.

Wireless technology is not something new and spending that kind of money on a dropper post is ridiculous.
I will consider buying when it reaches the 350$ level (in about 4-5 years) Smile
  • + 3
 Got my Magura Vyron 3 years ago for $300 with 0 problems and now it's my only seatpost in three bikes cause the other crap broke.
  • + 5
 Rockshox wireless dropper: $800USD
Magura wireless dropper: $350USD/$470CAD

Well then.
  • + 1
 honestly does Sram expect anyone to buy this post at 800 dollars, ya it looks cool and the idea is super cool but really? and why get this when you could pay less than half the price and get a seat post that works just as well. and what happens when it breaks or your scratch it?
  • + 1
 Typical SRAM......add a feature, but keep an imperfect technology. I'll bet these things still need a full teardown if you lift by the saddle with the post down, and that the rebuild involves a fistful of zip-ties. I'm still running an A2 Reverb, but it is (at best) a flawed product (Wolftooth ReMote kit helps). A lot of newer droppers are more compact, have fewer failure modes, and are simpler to service than the Reverb.

SRAM should have developed a bulletproof IFP first, then looked into wireless actuation.

And one final gripe-that battery pack looks like no tool roll under the seat...BOO
  • + 2
 Rockshox: hey we have this really expensive and amazingly unreliable product so we decided to add some expensive complicated electronics to it! Complete bike buyers will love to pay for this lol
  • + 1
 What I don't understand is why go to all the trouble of making an electronic dropper post that still requires you to use your body weight to drop it? I mean that's part about droppers that never made sense to me. Unless you know the trail that you are riding and can prepare for a descent by dropping your post ahead of time you're stuck squatting down to drop your post right as you enter a descent. The motion of sitting into your dropper post is not the same as the attach position needed to descend, unless you have a taint made of titanium (taintanium ????) you've got to squash the dropper down with your ass and then pop back up into the attack position. I would have thought that the big selling point of an electronic dropper would be that it's operational in both directions without the need to use your body weight. Oh well, like others said, I'll just wait for another company to do it better for less. Innovation be damned!
  • + 1
 exactly!!
  • + 1
 This is exactly what I've been hoping for! Not that I could afford it either way, but then I'd at least want one. Someone should make a compilation video of a bunch of clips of pros dropping their posts going into descents.
  • + 1
 I love RS's drivetrain /non-seatpost suspension / Brakes and have used them for years - but this pricing is outrageous and unsubstantiated in the article. I know it takes investment, time, and effort of many people to develop and bring new tech to market - this is a real driver of cost. That said, Given tax, tariffs, and other issues - I'd love to hear from someone at the Big S on why they feel $800 was right for margi.... erm I mean, the right MSRP for the global market.
  • + 1
 Beta testing/customers/data/feedback

They need to sell a ton of them. They will be $112 as part of an OEM parts package if you buy a complete groupset, forks and shock.

The price is a red herring.
  • + 2
 I usually geek out on new bike tech, but neither of the new SRAM gadgets excite me. I’m more than fine with “regular” Eagle and the Fox Transfer post that came stock on my bike has presented zero issues in over a year.
  • + 4
 That remote is really a bad joke. Would rather use 10cms of wire and hide it inside the bars
  • + 1
 It's very ergonomic, though. Easy to use and intuitive.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: But the lever stands out like a sore thumb..
Make the battery and sensor more close or parallel to the bar so that it wont hit everything and break when you crash.
The lever looks like an afterthought sadly.
  • + 0
 I watched a GCN video yesterday, the 10,000 calories in a single ride one.

One of those presenters has a trek road bike with no external cables or hoses. On the bar there are the two brake/gear lever units... And that's it. You cannot see a single cable or hose externally.

That would be cool on an MTB.
  • + 1
 Please drill your bar, fork steerer, maybe stem, in preparation for $699 wired version.
  • + 0
 @PinkyScar: it could be just hidden under grip and still wireless if we speak about connection to mech
  • + 0
 Hmm… build the remote into a grip… and then battery and electronics could be hidden inside the bar, and the button(s) could be on the grip. Sleek and no releasing your grip on the bars to use. Now, who's going to make this happen…?
  • + 1
 @Spittingcat: that makes a sense, ha?
  • + 1
 Bleeding edge technology is never cheap. I love the simplicity of a mechanical bike, but I welcome innovation and pushing the envelope to improve what we have now. It's only a matter of time before we have droppers thet can drop on their own. That will be a big improvement, especially if they can find a way to do it without batteries.
  • + 1
 That is exactly what I was looking to see, if there was a 'down' button...why is this so hard???
but aside from the easy install w/o hose or cable, why do I want this? And for how much?
  • + 4
 @ReformedRoadie: Because physics. This would add complexity and weight, as you'd need a really big and strong motor to compress the post. You need 50+ kg to compress it, so expect a 2kg post.
  • + 2
 @Pavel-Repak: I'm thinking you would make changes so that you are not overcoming 50+ kg...but whatever,
We've past the complexity threshold, with a wireless operation.
If I can surf the internet and navigate with staelites from my phone, I would think moving an seat up and down a shaft isn't too tough a problem to solve.
  • + 1
 @ReformedRoadie: The reverb uses a cup seal, which seals better with more pressure applied. It might be doable to use less pressure, but the motor to pull it down would still add atleast 100g.
  • + 1
 Dropper posts are already pretty expensive for what they are. basically the same thing that is in a office chair and the whole chair cost 100 bucks. Still why i don't have a dropper post, cuz i'd rather shred... And, I'm a broke ass. Lolz. But yea 800 is hell to expensive. Thats near the price of a new bike for half the kids out there starting out!
  • + 5
 No room for my tube/co2/levers bundle under there tho
  • + 20
 Interesting fact: SRAM tested the e-Verb by cutting the back out of a seat bag so it'd fit over - and hide - the battery.
  • + 7
 big fanny strikes again
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: brilliant, all I can think when I look at it is that it's just like a 90s style topeak bag!
  • + 1
 Hell, why not electronic motorized seat angle adjustment too, a la Special-zed's problematic post?

Maybe in a few years, sitting on a bike will require as many set-up "touch points" as the leather seat on a dentist's luxury car.
  • + 5
 Quick release seat clamps aren’t dead... ????.
  • + 1
 I use one. Is that weird?
  • + 1
 At the end of the day I enjoy my Reverb. It has had a few corks here and there but everything worth having always requires a little maintenance. I own four of them and will buy another. They are also not that complicated to rebuild by yourself. Rebuild kit is only around $50 to fix a broken one.
  • + 1
 I like the clean look of the bike with AXS. Next thing, find a way to integrate brake hoses into the bars like on modern road bikes. Don't tell me it's not practical, my plastic surgeon bike on my wall in the living room looks ugly with those hoses out front!
  • + 2
 As a designer those remotes are humongous!! Terrible.. They still haven't fixed the angle issues of the remote dangling down like a sack of nuts clipping sh!t like legs etc.
  • + 1
 Good news is China/Taiwan, the masters of mass produced low cost electronics, will have cheap knock offs available in just a few short months!

And I mean that in a good way...
  • + 1
 As if Sram doesnt mass produce in Taiwan lol.
  • + 2
 Cool tech, but for nearly 3x the price of a more reliable, mechanical from another brand (Fox Transfer), no freakin' way! Sram has lot their mind.
  • + 2
 $800 and it's as reliable as Microsoft Windows? Pulling a battery to get it working again is a no go for my fall/winter/spring riding.

Insert UK comments here...
  • + 1
 How does the remote work? Do you press and hold the button to open the system like the normal reverb? or do you tap the remote button and it opens the system for a specified time interval?
  • + 2
 it works just like the normal lever. hold it its open, let go its closed. it feels just as fast as the cabled version, a little easier to push the button than the lever i found.
  • + 4
 As a Magura Vyron v2.0 owner all I can say is, $800??.... GTFO
  • + 0
 do you still need to sit on the post to make it go down?
that is the only reason i would consider an electric dropper.

simplicity is beauty, and so this thing is butt ugly.

i had a fleet of di2 bikes at a rental shop i wrenched at. the batteries went out at times, that never happens to cables or hydraulic oil
  • + 0
 Cool idea, wrong dropper post. Thankfully Transition swapped the one on my Sentinel for a brand new KS lev. Sold the Lev to cover the cost of the Fox Transfer I angrily bought the last and final time my Reverb failed. Sram should really go back to the drawing board on that awful ride-ruining piece of shit post. But... it would be cool if @SramMedia started building Shockwiz chips in their forks and shocks!
  • + 2
 Not for me, the Reverb is still far too complicated for what it is. Which is why they constantly fail. Which is why this one will also constantly fail.
  • + 2
 1000 cad and it only broke once during the two test laps... SOLD on shimano, whenever they get their product actually ready for market.
  • + 0
 I can buy a great 170mm dropper post from One Up for $200 and they expect me to want an $800 dropper post that does the same job but is bulky, less reliable, more complicated .... um, seems like an answer to a problem that no one has.

Having used di12, let’s say I’m not that impressed. Call me a Luddite, but putting sensitive electronics on a mountain bike that I routinely throw into the dirt at high speeds, that just seems dumb.

I broke my dropper lever off my bars during a spill last summer, the lever was shattered, cost to repair $50. Replacing a $200 lever would really piss me off.
  • + 2
 I love it but too pricey for me. Good to see the market working to get those bikes up over $10k again. I was beginning to think bikes were getting more affordable.
  • + 2
 2800$ and all i got was was a post and derailleur. Never dreamed i'd be able to type that previous sentence and it be true.
  • + 2
 any info on insertion length vs a normal reverb. by removing all the actuation gubbins surely this e-post would be shorter? That's the only real benefit I can see with this
  • + 1
 Yeah, I would like to know if the quoted lengths include whatever that is hanging out of the bottom of this post.
  • + 2
 To be honest I was more interested in that Chevy behind him. They should have given it a different name, I feel like reverb is tainted.
  • + 1
 Now if this could also control your front and rear suspension settings, that would be great. So when your seats up your suspension is stiff, and when it's fully dropped its fully active.
  • + 2
 Meh, I’m more interested in a review on the Ergon SM saddle. A lot more relevant than a dropper only dentists want.
@mikelevy
  • + 4
 Only two days on it but it was invisible to me. That's a good thing.
  • + 3
 Hopefully there aren't going to use their paying customers as beta testers.
  • + 0
 I'm concerned that he says it moves up and down faster than a standard reverb. I think I have darn near bruised myself before from the speed of the thing... It's going to boot me off the bike!
  • + 1
 I mean, it looks cool and may be worth a little premium over cable-actuated, but I can't help but think they really missed the mark with the price.
  • + 2
 I wonder how many bike mechanics decided to quit their job and pursue a new career after reading this article.
  • + 0
 $800 worth of tech and I still have to mash it down with my butt?? I would love to try a dropper with two buttons, one for up and one for down. That way you could drop it without having to sit down.
  • + 1
 why not just make a single 170 AXS reverb, and use the software to control what length it extends to? the 170 isn't THAT big that it wont work on most bikes.
  • + 1
 In contrast to the Eagle AXS which looked solid and a good price, this missed the boat with that price. Oh and I hate Reverbs.
  • + 1
 mike: "is it too expensive?"

every early adopter/kid with parents cc: "Bro I can't get one?? wtf dude, Mom, get the meatloaf!"
  • + 1
 Well my Reverb needs to bled and have a oil change to work in weather 3C and below in Metro Van. Otherwise is just locks in the down position.
  • + 1
 I was sort of hoping that It wouldn't be encrypted. I was looking forward to seeing people bomb down trails and then have their dropper extend for no apparent reason.
  • + 3
 f*ck that $800 seatpost let’s talk about that sweet ass Chevy truck!
  • + 0
 The electronics box is located right where my back tire likes to spray gobs of mud, which manages to find its way into the tightest of gaps, and smallest of crevices. No thank you
  • + 2
 I love it ignore the issues of the current reverb and come out with one double in price and expect people to buy it.
  • + 2
 I was already wondering why my dentist kept insisting I needed a lot work done....Now I understand!
  • + 1
 The best part is how, after paying $800 for it up front, you can also pay almost the full price of other awesome droppers when you need it serviced!
  • + 2
 Can I get a seatpost lock please, someone stold my 800 wireless seatpost.....dopeeeeee.
  • + 0
 If you can afford $800 for a seatpost a thief will be taking the whole bike, not just the post.
  • + 1
 Reverbs are the worst posts out there. Unless... paired with a wolftooth sustain. Then it’s great. Thank you wolftooth! Electronic? No thanks.
  • + 3
 Still doesn't solve the internal issues which are tolerance & design based.
  • + 2
 Wtf???!!! it wasn't crap enough and said to give it another go???

Damn it!
  • + 3
 Still wont be as nice as my bikeyoke
  • + 2
 Take my money. Much easier dropper install, uncluttered cockpit, and the post works better?! Yeah, take my money.
  • + 3
 You can buy 4 Oneup Dropper posts for the price of one of these...
  • + 3
 At $500 that Magura wireless dropper is suddenly looking like a bargain.
  • + 1
 No thanks. Staying with cables, cheaper posts with better reliability that are much easier to maintain without the over priced and complexed rebuild kits.
  • + 2
 Also did they think to have a shifter with 3 buttons that lets you control your shifts and dropper from one hand?
  • + 1
 You can do just that with the app.
  • + 1
 We are very much frozen in here in ID right now, so admittedly I am way more stoked on the desert trails and cacti than the seatpost
  • + 2
 What a silly product! Gimme $2 cables.
  • + 2
 Friends don’t let friends reverb
  • + 1
 Too much facking money.
I’ll wait on no name brand one that cost half the price.
  • + 1
 Does it come with play or is that an optional add-on that I can choose at the time of purchase?
  • + 1
 $800 for 40 hours of up and down action is not that much if you think about it
  • + 2
 Is anyone seeing the fork decal???
  • + 2
 "uses an IFP to keep the oil and air separate" no it doesn't
  • + 1
 I can buy an AR-15 and a case of ammo for the same price sram wants for a tube that goes up and down. LOL, no thanks.
  • + 2
 One up components FTW!!!!!
  • + 1
 Love. It. I don't have $800 to spend on a seatpost, but if I did I would buy this for sure.
  • + 2
 No mention of compatibility with Alexa? I'm out
  • + 2
 does reverb still coming with autosag function?
  • + 1
 Starting to get like roadies with all this tech for the sake of tech, keep it simple, stay raw!
  • + 2
 Is that a new Pike I spy?
  • + 1
 $800 is just silly. I don't see there being much of a market at this price.
  • + 1
 In about 5 years all this electronic actuated stuff will be standard issue on the Pro Race models and its gonna be awesome!
  • + 0
 I really hope not.
  • + 4
 @goroncy:

Love my Magura Vyron
  • + 3
 see you in 5, when the price has dropped 1/3
  • + 1
 Can I warranty my 3 saggy broken Reverbs for one of these fancypants e-Reverbs? Serious question.
  • + 1
 So when I snap the lever off when I lean it against a wall how much will that cost me exactly?
  • + 2
 f*ck anything Rockshox/SRAM..unreliable garbage!
  • + 2
 Totally missed the chance to call it the Everb.
  • + 0
 wouldn't like to lay that down with a control module hanging off the back! it pains me to keep replacing the saddles i tear off Frown
  • + 1
 I'm all for product progression, but I don't like my bank account to cry more than I do when I crash.
  • + 1
 I don't get what the big deal is, magura has had an electronic post for years? Unnecessary hype as per
  • + 2
 Yeah, but that post is slow and the lever is junk. But I still would rather buy the Magura than the E-Reverb.
  • + 1
 This is good. My girlfriend doesn't like it when I fiddle with all the hose
  • + 1
 My KS works perfect after three years. To many what if's with an electric post.
  • + 0
 SRAM screwed a lot of people with the Reverb, now a more complicated $800 one? Fool me once, shame on me. Fool me twice, shame on you ( SRAM ).
  • + 2
 i still like the fox transfer the best
  • + 2
 Levy, can you provide any details on that dope ass blazer?
  • + 1
 seconded.
  • + 1
 Unfortunately I ignored my mum when she told me I should be a dentist & I went out riding my bike instead!
  • + 2
 what a f*ckin waste of R&D resources
  • - 2
 I have NEVER had a side clamp/single clamp bolt seat post maintain the correct saddle angle. After hitting a large bump it always adjusts the saddle tilt.

Does this explanation make sense?

Two bolt systems, one fore, and one aft completely solved this problem, but it appears the location of the actuator on this would make it hard to use the two bolt system.

My question: Does this post use a single bolt clamp similar to the first gen Giant dropper post, and is there ANY possibility of the saddle tilt angle changing after an impact?
  • + 2
 No, it's a two-bolt system. The bolt that tightens the seat rail clamp doesn't hold the seat's angle - that's the other bolt. We had zero slipping issues and I don't expect it to, either. Full review down the road.
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: Thanks, my bad, I am dumb. i just watched that section of the video that better explains this.
  • + 1
 Will it work if someone around you using the microwave or washing machine?
  • + 2
 Where are you mountain biking that you have a washing machine/microwave nearby?

Trials in the laundromat? Downhill cafeteria sessions?

Exactly Zero is the number of times I've been on a trail and had either within 100m of me.
  • + 2
 No 200mm option. Bummer.
  • + 1
 Bet it shows up in a year or so. I'd have been more willing to save up the $$$ if it gave us another 200mm option.
  • + 1
 if I could hit the button for it to drop, you can have my wallet
  • + 1
 Ouch, 800 dollars on a seatpost, roughly £750...I cant afford that
  • + 1
 How many timbits does it weigh?
  • + 1
 @mikelevy, are you growing a moustache?
  • + 1
 Silver collar again? Will wait for the black one )
  • + 1
 80,000 RPM! How come this hasn't raised an eyebrow?
  • + 1
 Blazer details and review please
  • + 1
 aaaand 15.000usd are comming!
  • + 1
 Why, that is pure genius! make a product with even more points of failure!
  • + 1
 No water bottle mount? No thanks
  • + 1
 For $800 I'd at least want the seat to vibrate massage my ass while riding
  • + 1
 oh look, more uselessly complicated shit nobody needs...
  • + 1
 If you crash and pierce the battery, will it deathstar your testes?
  • + 1
 Holy cow that’s expensive, no matter how well it works.
  • + 1
 With 800 you can get about 6 brand x dropper posts, just saying ????
  • + 1
 Forget the seatpost, let's take a closer look around that garage.
  • + 1
 Ha....ha....ha.... out in the bush
  • + 1
 I'm a likely buyer for the AXS, but this doesn't interest me in the least.
  • + 0
 The idea of vent valve comes from BikeYoke Revive?? (震惊!德国工艺惨遭抄袭)
  • + 10
 It's pretty similar, which is mentioned in the article, too.
  • + 1
 Wireless electronic rear shock remote please for Rockshox rear shocks!
  • + 1
 Like the first comment."make your original Reverb work first!'
  • + 1
 Battery case looks like my vape. Bro.
  • + 1
 Now our seatposts will give us 5g but cancer. Wonderful
  • + 1
 I love that car in the background!
  • + 1
 $800. where do i send the check?
  • + 1
 For the record I like ho'se.
  • + 1
 Your mom was a dropper post remote.
  • + 1
 Does it have a vibrate option?
  • + 1
 applying for dental school today
  • - 2
 Fuuuuuuck that. I like mountain biking, not playing with my self while staring at all my electronic gizmos. I'm going to go ahead and say it, our crew will beat your ass if you show up with this stuff.
  • + 7
 I bet you drive a lifted pickup.
  • + 3
 Body lifted with stretched tires on 20s@Pavel-Repak:
  • + 1
 Just because the tech is there doesn’t mean it’s needed.
  • + 1
 Wow!! Only $800 for a seatpost that never works? I’m throwing down!
  • + 1
 At first sight it looked like a tire lever pouch under the saddle.
  • + 1
 That's why I love mountain Bike so much and pinkbike.com
  • + 1
 So, this means regular xx1 Eagle will drop price?? Hahaha
  • + 2
 LMAO $800
  • + 1
 Will this work with my Motorola RazR V3?
  • + 1
 I'd rather have that truck!
  • + 1
 Maybe just buy 4 One-Up posts instead.
  • + 1
 LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL. Okay now make the normal reverb work
  • + 1
 The Fleshlight of posts, it sucks.
  • - 1
 fuck this! slowly making bikes into planned obsolescent machines. Oops,sorry that battery isnt being made anymore, you are going to have to upgrade.
  • + 1
 too
much
mo*
  • + 1
 Laughing my wallet off
  • + 1
 That's using your ass!
  • + 0
 No one could force me PAL
  • - 2
 It's just gonna get hacked by the Russians.
  • - 2
 RockShox Weirdless Reverb
  • - 2
 Here comes the $15,000 mountain bike.
  • - 2
 Someone post a link to a good freeride bike RTR please.
  • - 2
 I'm glad not to use a dropper post!
  • - 1
 NO!!!
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