Rotor's New RVolver Hub System and Dual Power Meter Cranks - Eurobike 2017

Sep 1, 2017
by Paul Aston  
Eurobike 2017


Rotor Revolver hubs


Spanish aluminum specialist, Rotor, have created a new freehub engagement system called the RVolver. This is the first hub under the Rotor namesake, but the engineering and manufacturing house EDR, that produced, and was recently acquired by Rotor, has been making motorcycle hubs for over 30 years.


Rotor Revolver hubs
This cutaway road hub shows how the steel ring fits into the hub body.


There are only a handful of hub systems on the market, nearly all of them revolving around a spring and pawl system. DT Swiss's Star Ratchet system and the Spragg clutch system from Onyx are one of the few that stray from the norm. Rotor says the RVolver system is almost a mix of spring and pawl with a star ratchet. Using cylinders that are activated by springs to engage, the 'clutch' ratchet ring floats towards the freehub body under power, and almost completely disengages when not under power, causing less drag. This sliding action isn't produced by a spring or magnets, it is achieved by angling and rounding the connecting pieces at precise degrees.


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Weight is saved constructing the hub from aluminum, with the only steel pieces being the ratchet ring, springs, and cylinders. The hub shell and freehub body don't wear with use, the steel ratchet ring can be replaced and the cylinders can be moved into the other five out of ten locations – basically, this hub should last forever.


Rotor Revolver hubs


Claimed weights are 112 grams front and 238 grams for a rear hub, Rotor compared this to the popular DT Swiss 240 hub set saying their product is lighter as well as using bigger bearings.


Rotor Revolver hubs


The road hubs have a 14º engagement, but Rotor are working on internals for the enduro hub that will have 5º pick-up. The MTB hubs will be available in boost widths only, with Shimano or SRAM XD drivers. Straight pull or j-bend spoke options with 28 or 32 holes. Everything is made in-house in Madrid, and a pair will cost around €500 when they are ready to ship this fall.



Rotor dual power meter cranks


Rotor also claims to have the first dual-sided, integrated power meter crank for mountain bikes. Power meter cranks are one of the brands best sellers in the road market and are gaining traction in the MTB world. Most power cranks generate a reading for each side, but this is calculated by reading the positive and negative power from one side – the dual design should give more accurate readings from the four pairs of strain gauges. The cranks are Bluetooth and ANT+ compatible and in connection with Training Peaks, should help you to optimize your pedaling stroke in conjunction with Rotor's adjustable Q-Rings. Available this December for €1250.


52 Comments

  • 31 0
 "basically, this hub should last forever" - See what standards have to say about that. With all the extra sliding faces and tight tolerances over pawls or ratchet rings, it looks like it would be far more susceptible to dirt too?
  • 9 0
 Eff, I actually am interested, but my ancient (2015) frame is 142!!
  • 3 0
 I guess "forever" translates like "three years, until we adopt 152mm stardard from DH hubs and force everyone to build new wheels".
  • 6 2
 Dual sided powermeter is a waste of money IMO. Team Sky did extensive testings with double sided Stages pm only to find out that as 90% of the population both legs develop nearly the same power passed a certain rpm (within +/-2% when at 100w/90rpm for those who wondered). But if dual sided can lower the price of one sided powermeters...
  • 11 3
 Agreed. Then how much accuracy do you need for 1.Am I getting stronger, 2. What's my pace at the moment? and optional 3. How big is my brag Watt cock?
  • 4 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Money can't buy enough mm ...err mW for #3....
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Mostly #3
  • 1 0
 But now that Stages has a dual power meter. Team sky has all switched and it’s so much better. ???? Fun how the story has changed.
  • 1 0
 Instead of dual-sided power meters, just get the chainring one.
  • 2 0
 For people who haven't suffered a massive unilateral knee injury sure. I ruptured my patellar tendon on my left knee over 20 years ago, took 2.5 years to return to sports, haven't stopped since. I know that I am asymmetrical in power to some degree and it would be cool to be able to (affordably) see the difference and try to balance things out. I have never used a power meter because they are so expensive and with standards changing so often never wanted to shell out that kind of money.
  • 4 0
 I am the 10%. I had nerve damage resulting in 30% less strength in my right leg. Regardless, dual sided allows you to clean your pedal stroke and make you more efficient.
  • 2 0
 @tsn73: that's a damn good point.
  • 2 1
 @tsn73: That seems to be the only valid use case. If you have a baseline of power imbalance from before an injury, then you see how close you are to 100% recovery. Also, if you know you have a significant power imbalance due to injury, you can get more accurate power numbers from one that takes both sides into account (a chainring or hub one would work for that also.)
  • 3 0
 "238 grams for a rear hub, Rotor compared this to the popular DT Swiss 240 hub set saying their product is lighter as well as using bigger bearings."

DT Swiss 240s centerlock boost rear hub = 232 grams +/-5%

DT Swiss 240 road rear hub with Shimano style freehub = 212 grams +/- 5%

How is this Rotor (non-disc, no "rotor") rear hub lighter again?
  • 1 0
 I was going to say, something didn't sound right
  • 8 1
 Dt swiss for the win
  • 6 1
 Please start making good looking stuff Rotor
  • 5 1
 Thank You MICHAEL HADLEY For Producing the Highest quality Hubs available. CHEERS
  • 1 0
 My bike cost less then that set of hours hubs and the only thing I would change would be the hubs pick up. 5° sounds magical don't know what my current hub has but it's hideous
  • 2 0
 Worst I've ever had was an old Shimano Deore with 12 poi. That's 30° between engagements!
  • 2 0
 5 degrees = 72 poi?! that thing would be incredible!
  • 3 0
 @samjobson: 72poi = Chris King.
  • 1 0
 Doesn't Hadley do a 120poi hub too iirc?
  • 3 0
 Project 321 has 216 poe. Love mine.
  • 7 0
 Industry Nine = 3degree , 120 POI
  • 1 0
 Industry Nine hubs are ridiculously reliable too and easy to service.
  • 2 0
 onyx... infinite. i swear the only lag i feel is the chain stretching under tension
  • 1 0
 Indusrty9 FTW! 3 degree engagement, super easy to service with no special tools required, super light without giving an inch in terms of reliability and strength, and they're available in any color you want. 14 degree engagement is crap.
  • 1 0
 @gibbon-on-an-orange: Hadley used to but it wasn't strong enough, it's just the 72pt now. Love mine (72), so easy to work on and spin for ever! The Rotor mechanism is neat, curious to see how it holds-up long term.
  • 1 0
 High nr of POE is a dick measuring race. Worlds best trial riders like Macaskill use 48 or less... and they are the ones who actually need it. I had 18 on DT 350 and it was too little, sure. But changed to 36 and there's no way I could utilize more. If you say you need more then show me your pedal kicks off a 6ft drop or those 2 seconds missing to Minnaar you lose out of delayed acceleration...
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I just like how it feels. Im entitled to that after spending my money on said item aren't I?
  • 1 0
 @Tmackstab: nope. waki's opinion is the only one that matters. #allhailwaki
  • 2 0
 @Tmackstab: fair point! But the way it is adverstised is "performance". I like Coil shocks for no rational reason
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I mean technically there is a performance advantage as the freewheel does engage quicker which means you get moving sooner. As for time across the finish line? its F all you're right. That being said if you had 2 identical stems on a table for the same price but one was 5g lighter than the other you'd grab the lighter one. Will you notice a difference? No but it is lighter nonetheless.
  • 1 0
 @Tmackstab: there is a performance advantage in absolute terms but not in relative ones. If I had two stems on the table, given to me for free, one with Ti bolts and one with steel, I'd go for steel. I hate small Ti bolts, making sure to keep them greased so they don't seize. It's all about everything... nobody gets everything. I could have chosen DT ratchett with 54 POE for exactly same price as 36. Went for 36 because it SEEMED more reliable to me. Because I've seen the size of these teeth on the 54. 36 seems scary enough. I also asked a world class trials rider if he would care to go 36-54. He said no. I do wheelie drops on my trails often, the last thing I want is snapping freewheel system while doing it. Even though they are no taller than 3ft, it would make for a rather literal dirt eating . I am also learning to pedal kick. I need a reliable system.
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Yeah I guess a 'performance' upgrade is a subjective term. Everyone wants something different. Some reliable, some lighter etc.
  • 1 0
 @Tmackstab: I absolutely agree with you, we all like different things. I subscribed to Dr Pimple Popper channel once, for fks sake... I am playing "saving people from themselves" game here, silly of me. But you have to admit, that there is threshold of sanity between reliable - unreliable, which leans towards reliable. It's gamble, some people like to gamble. Like those who buy Ax-lightness bars - 780mm wide, 130g... or put air shock without reservoir on a 160 Enduro bike... sure... I can respect them as human beings, hell I didn't even yell at a kid without helmet on pumptrack today, but... but I just need an affirmation that I am not the only one feeling it's a bit stupid. That's possibly why I wrote it. Smile Here, have my soft side
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I like the cut of your jib Waki
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: - I've Built custom mid-mount E-Bikes, with Freewheel cranks..
Having High # of POE helps a fk TON
  • 1 0
 @e-moto: freewheel cranks vs freewheel hub. Well, trials riders use that system because it is far stronger than freehub. Those pawls and teeth on ratchet are huge compared to what you find in the freehub
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: gotta say im with the "lower degrees" crowd to a large extent- i used to have this nasty shimano rear wheel on my hardtail and swapped it for a hope pro4 and the difference was astounding. probably had a lot to do with the 38mm carbon rim also, but i digress. that being said, i also have a chris king ISO rear hub and i hated it so much that it now lives on the wall- the drag was really noticeable. plus chris king hubs in general...too many over-thought fragile aluminium parts and tiny little screws , they're definitely made for people with small hands and large bank accounts.
  • 2 0
 Funny thing about Rotor...they don't actually produce a single rotor.

I mean if you're going to name your company "Rotor"...would it kill you to at least offer one set?
  • 3 0
 1250 €? Think ill wait for the carbon version.
  • 3 0
 The alloy freehub body doesn't wear with use................
  • 2 1
 we need many engagement point...........At least 72 points


^^*)
  • 1 0
 Top Gun rules of engagement exist for your safety and for that of your team.
  • 1 0
 Son your ego is writing checks your body can't cash.
  • 2 0
 Industry mother Fucking NINE !!!!
  • 2 1
 Should name it hud.
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