Round Up: 10 Canadian Manufacturers Making Exciting Stuff

Feb 28, 2020
by Sarah Moore  



Previously, we took a look at ten British, German, Continental European, and American manufacturers making exciting stuff.

Now it's time to head to Canada. Chances are you've heard of some standout Canadian bicycle manufacturers such as Devinci, Rocky Mountain and Norco Bicycles, but what do you know about the components manufacturing industry in the country where Pinkbike is based? With 9.984 million square kilometers of land, Canada is the second-largest country in the world, although it only ranks 39th in terms of population with just over 37.5 million inhabitants. We might not have the same depth of manufacturing industry here that some other countries do, but we make up for it with the Whistler Mountain Bike Park.





WE ARE ONE


This Agent rim is on a proprietary jig getting drilled out ready to be built. Notice the angle drilling to allow the nipple to engage with the spoke at the proper angle.
This Agent rim is on a proprietary jig getting drilled out.
Signed off and ready to to be built.
Handlaid in Canada.

The "proud-to-be Canadian" brand was born in 2017 when former racer Dustin Adams decided to start laying up carbon fiber rims to provide quality wheel building from his hometown in Kamloops, British Columbia. The Canadian company has grown each of the three years they've been in business, and now offers multiple high-end carbon wheel options and a bar and stem combo.

In pursuit of the do it yourself process, Adams does everything in-house. This allows for 100% ownership of the process, proper quality control, and prototype testing which can be done whenever necessary, within the same facility, for immediate feedback.

bigquotesThe biggest differentiator for a company our size vs others is our ability to create, pivot, and produce at a much faster rate with pinpoint accuracy. We behave like a rapid prototyping house, but also have the tools to scale a project into production really fast. This allows us to prove out concepts and to make determinations quite quickly – not wasting time on something that isn’t going to become successful.Dustin Adams

We Are One's website.





NORTH SHORE BILLET

The latest machine technology and manufacturing processes help reduce overall costs.

North Shore Billet has been producing Chromag stems, chainrings, seat collars, in addition to welding dropouts and disk brake tabs, for over 15 years.
From raw aluminum to finished product, in Whistler.


All of the products on North Shore Billet's website are made in the brand's Whistler facility. The team there prides themselves on doing as much in house as possible, bringing in raw aluminum and shipping out finished packaged parts around the world. The only process that they outsource is anodizing.

Over the years North Shore Billet has also made parts for most of the local Canadian bike companies including Rocky Mountain, Norco, Knolly, Banshee, and Chromag. For most of these companies, North Shore Billet is either making prototype parts or derailleur hangers for their bikes. In the case of Chromag, North Shore Billet has been producing a significant portion of their bike parts (stems, chainrings, seat collars, and weld in frame parts such as dropouts and disk brake tabs) for over 15 years.

Allen said that it is challenging to directly compete with companies who manufacture in regions with lower labour costs. To offset their disadvantage of having higher labour and input costs, North Shore Billet uses the latest machine technology and manufacturing processes to reduce overall costs. While this helps, all manufacturers have access to the same equipment and technology so they also have to focus on making a consistently great product while maintaining high quality standards.

bigquotesWhen people get our parts in their hands and on their bikes, they appreciate the difference and are eager to support a small company that cares about what it's making.Chris Allen, North Shore Billet

North Shore Billet's website.





VORSPRUNG SUSPENSION

It's machines like this that allow Vorsprung to manufacture in Whistler, British Columbia.

Vorsprung is known for their Custom Tractive Valve Tuning System.
The company manufactures all the hardware for their tuning kits in house.


Vorsprung Suspension provides a range of suspension upgrade and tuning products that they design, develop and manufacture in-house in Whistler, British Columbia. Their workshop also provides suspension services, including custom tuning, repairs, and servicing.

In 2011, before the company even officially existed, Vorsprung founder Steve Mathews had begun work on what went on to become the Tractive Valve Tuning System. Vorsprung says that the kits identify damper architecture weaknesses and problems and improve upon them with upgrade parts. Tractive kits are available for RockShox's Monarch Plus and Super Deluxe rear shocks and Fox's Fit4 damper.

Vorsprung's other products include Luftkappe air piston kits that enlarge the negative air chamber to reduce the initial spring rate and increase the mid-stroke rate. They also recently launched their Smashpot Coil Conversion Kit, a fork coil spring conversion system for single crown enduro forks, which features externally adjustable hydraulic anti-bottoming technology to deliver a precise amount of bottoming resistance.

Vorsprung Suspension's website.





BLACKSPIRE

Blackspire makes chainguides, chainrings, cranks, stems, wheels, pedals, saddles, seatposts and more.

Black Spire Designs was founded in 1985 by Charles Gordon and is located in South Western British Columbia at the foot of the North Shore Mountains. The company manufactures and assembles all of its parts with the exception of some handlebars and stems with the six CNC machines and several processing machines they have in-house.

bigquotesWe manufacture in Canada because we are less expensive than many of the quality makers in Taiwan, and certainly some of the those in less well-regulated countries. When we say the product is made from aircraft-grade material, we can back it up with reliable test results. From foreign countries, test results are mostly junk.

Foreign goods may be less expensive, but the real expenses of running the business start after the goods leave the factory. And when you look at SRAM and FOX they have shareholders to respond to. And big salaries to pay. So everything is relative.
Blackspire Designs

Blackspire's website.





9POINT8

9point8 Fall Line

9point8 Stout Stem
9point8 Stout Stem


Founded by Jack Pittens and Steven Park, Nine Point Eight Inc. launched their first dropper seatpost to the world in 2013. The company is located in Ancaster, Ontario, near the Niagara escarpment and engineering geeks will understand the name 9point8 as the accelerational constant due to gravity - 9.8 meters per second squared. Their Ontario factory is modest, with a small engineering team and four full-time employees covering all manufacturing, fulfillment, and service. Their in-house manufacturing shop has CNC milling, CNC turning, manual machine tools, vibratory finishing, laser, broaching and honing machines, and automated and manual inspection and testing systems.

All engineering and design is done in Ontario, as is prototype development and ride testing. They started off manufacturing everything in house or locally and while they have evolved to source most components offshore, they still manufacture select critical components in house.

bigquotesWe take advantage of the manufacturing capabilities and competitive cost of select offshore parts manufacturers, while maintaining creative and quality control in Canada.Steven Park


9point8's website.





Daambuilt



Daambuilt is a custom bicycle frame builder out of Montreal, Quebec. You'll have seen by now that we aren't highlighting Canadian frame manufacturers in this article, but Daambuilt also makes accessories for bikes, including custom racks and, most recently, a linkage fork.

It's been a treat to follow the whole project and see the linkage fork come together on Daambuilt's Instagram.


Daambuilt's website.





PINNER MACHINE SHOP



Pinner is a small company (a one-man show) in Whistler, British Columbia. Peter Fowler works out of a home machine shop that currently uses manual equipment and not CNC machines.

The shop offers Boost Adaptor kits for Hope, Onyx, DT Swiss, and Chris King hubs that are machined to order, a derailleur hanger Thru-Tool for Chromag, Devinci and Trek frames, as well as custom machining solutions.


Pinner Machine Shop's website.





STRAITLINE



Straightline Precision Industries Inc. was founded in 1996 by Mike, Dennis and DJ Paulson with the intent of producing machined and fabricated components for local industries. In the beginning, it was all manual machines in a garage. Today, Straightline Precision uses newer CNC machines and is a diverse contract manufacturer of components for the aerospace, instrumentation, medical, heavy machinery, and sporting goods industries.

In 2006, Straightline Precision added Straitline Components as an in-house brand that designs and manufactures aftermarket mountain bike components in Canada. Everything but the anodization is done in Canada. Anodization is done in Portland, Oregon, because the procedure is heavily regulated in Canada due to environmental concerns. The brand manufactures everything available on their website with the exception of a few screws/bolts in Canada in their CNC machine shop that has a variety of high-end CNC lathes, mills and turning mills.

bigquotesThe biggest difficulty is cost. With us manufacturing all of our products right here in Sidney, BC, the cost of material, labour, shipping, overhead etc. is far higher than if we were to get our products made overseas. However, we pride ourselves on quality and in order to continue to provide our customers with the high quality products they have come to love, it is essential for us to continue to manufacture the products ourselves.


Straitline's website.





DEKERF



Chris Dekerf is a respected bicycle frame builder based in Richmond, British Columbia who won the “Artisan Award” at the 2016 North American Handmade Bike Show. He also builds titanium and steel forks which are works of art.

bigquotesBuilding forks is a unique and special craft in and of itself. A well designed fork that is matched to the frame correctly is critical for the bike to steer and handle properly. Chris has a long history of building bicycle forks for everything from traditional lugged road bikes through to his current ‘Tuning’ fork designs for all road and mountain applications. The design of the ‘Tuning’ fork is similar in esthetics to the wishbone used on rear of Dekerf frames which makes for beautiful frame and fork package; either in steel or titanium.Dekerf

Dekerf's website.





RACE FACE

Next SL crankset
Every single one of Race Face's carbon cranks is made in Vancouver, BC, including this Next SL crank.

Race Face Next R review
And this Next R crank.
Race Face Next R wheel review
Race Face has a semi-automated wheel assembly/building line in Vancouver.


In business for more than 20 years and distributed in more than 40 countries, Race Face is definitely not a little-known company. However, there really aren't very many Canadian components manufacturers that are able to manufacture in this Great Northern country of ours and it is a little-known fact that Race Face actually makes every single one of their carbon cranks (Next SL, Next R, and SixC – Plus the Easton Cycling EC90 crankset) in Vancouver, BC. The brand does this using carbon sourced from the USA, a truly made in North American product.

Race Face also has a semi-automated wheel assembly/building line in Vancouver where they build portions of their Race Face wheel line including the Next SL, Turbine SL, Turbine R and Next R.

Race Face's website.





We know there will be some brands that we missed, so let us know your suggestions in the comments. We're keen to discover more brands doing it in-house in our backyard.d






10 Lesser-Known American Manufacturers Making Exciting Stuff
10 Little-Known British Manufacturers Making Exciting Stuff
10 Little-Known European Manufacturers Making Exciting Stuff
10 Little-Known German Manufacturers Making Exciting Stuff


187 Comments

  • 124 5
 “Little known manufacturers” to “manufacturers making exciting stuff”. I see what u did there pinkbike Wink . Prob in response to all the “hey these aren’t little known mfg’s whaaaa”
  • 175 0
 pinkbike is responsive to their users in the content they publish like no other website that i know of. haters gonna hate, but i love this site.
  • 47 0
 Glad to hear I wasn't the only one getting tired of people trying to prove how knowledgeable they are about the boutique bike parts industry...
  • 6 1
 There’s a vast knowledge on MTB content still untapped within the PB community, all PB have to do is listen and ask in the comment section. And best of all it’s free!
  • 10 1
 So, Ive learned that Canada is cheaper.. and more expensive than making stuff in Asia....
  • 6 3
 @jfleming10: Unless it's about the Grim Donut lol
  • 3 0
 @NorCalNomad: ha, touche! now they're just playing with us...
  • 11 1
 But now we need to ask ourselves if flat pedals and chainrings qualify as “exciting”
  • 4 2
 @Ausatz: And one time, in Band Camp......
  • 2 2
 @Hayek: More exciting than the fornication that I was made to witness last Sat on Dr. Ruth.
  • 2 1
 @jfleming10:
I know no other community quite like the pinkbike community...
In order to save some time, I often only the comments...
  • 1 2
 @NorCalNomad: Top comment of the year so far ! LOL
  • 1 1
 They almost could have pulled it off with this one, there are ones here that I've never heard of.
  • 1 0
 @Hayek: some do! I remember getting a derailleur hanger for an old yeti asx from NSB and it made me feel all the feels.
  • 1 1
 @Hayek: Try a Blackspire oval ring and you'll get it.

I had no idea they were manufactured right around the corner from me.
  • 1 1
 @drivereight: and worth every penny!
  • 75 1
 Handlaid, me during college.
  • 14 4
 Shame on you, college was like going to a all-you-can-eat buffet. It’s in the institution of matrimony where handlaid takes on your meaning.
  • 1 1
 @Staktup: Esepcially if you went to a state college.
  • 2 2
 This makes up for the "boner" comment above by "cuban-b".
  • 2 1
 Sounds painful with a pierced Woody.
  • 37 2
 I really wanted to make a comment aboutRace Face being "little", but looks like PB took the wind out of my sails. touché le buttholes.
  • 107 0
 Complaining about not being able to complain. The ultimate pinkbike comment.
  • 6 2
 @Mtmw: suck it @wakidesigns
  • 14 12
 @shameless0tool: I am really sorry but given their carbon cranks are made in Canada doesn’t really shed a good light on “Made in Canada”.
  • 2 1
 @Mtmw: RIGHT?!!
  • 1 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Come on, man... I doubt you're riding a bike made of compressed 100% post-consumer recycled fibre.
  • 4 0
 @plyawn: why when who what? I recycle most of my comments about carbon fiber cranks and rims
  • 37 0
 DeKerf=Legend.
  • 4 0
 Been drooling over his work since I first saw a frame the mid-90s. Those seat stay junctions are iconic.
  • 7 0
 One of the OG guys that threw the finger to the mainstream and was a GOD to me when I was a kid. An inspiration and innovator I look up to still today!!
  • 8 0
 Original owner of a 2000 DeKerf Team. In 2006 I took it back to Chris to have a disc mount brazed on, and a repaint in classic Dekerf copper. After years of hard use, and numerous other upgrades, it is going strong, although mostly it sees use putzing around town with cx tires on pathways, gravel roads and dirt paths. Occasionally I throw on the knobby xc wheel set and hit the mountain trails- such a fun quick bike! I still occasionally encounter riders who comment when seeing it, about how legendary his bikes were (are!) After owning a couple of FS bikes over the intervening years since getting the DeKerf- my main ride nowadays is a DeKerf built Chromag Surface- what goes around, comes around.
  • 1 0
 Still have my 99 Dekerf Generation. Sitting on my trainer but I put that bike through so much and never had an issue. Got to love a steel hanger, never breaks, just bends.
  • 2 0
 Love that Chris made it on here. My Team SST has never done me wrong.
  • 2 0
 I have a 1997 Dekerf Generation frame that has been a XC racer, a wee DH monster, a SS commuter and is still going strong. I even sent it back to Chris in 2000 to have a disc added to the rear triangle. I may need a Dekerf Ti CX frame soon...
  • 30 4
 anyone heard of OneUp??
  • 6 1
 I was expecting OneUp to be the first one to be listed there...
  • 22 5
 They didn't pay their advertising fee ;-p
  • 79 1
 Of course we've heard of them - they're based in the same town as us Wink They don't manufacture their stuff here though so didn't make the cut for this piece.
  • 3 3
 @sarahmoore: understood, but to be honest, I was being facetious. Great company, great guys!!
  • 3 2
 Does OneUp produce in Canada? That would take quite a varied set of production facilities to produce what they design.
  • 3 1
 @vinay: They do not manufacture their products in Canada.
  • 2 2
 Manufactured in China?
  • 5 4
 But they are some of the best designers, and managers of manufacturing and quality control, not to mention how great they are when contacted. A lot of thumbs up for one up
  • 5 0
 there are lots of Canada-based companies that manufacture elsewhere. No judgement on their quality but they're basically marketing, sales and distribution operations; not very exciting photos compared to CNC machines and greasy hands holding intricately cut parts...
  • 16 0
 Blackspire is great products. We stock quite a few pairs of their pedals and a lot of their chainrings. I have been running their oval rings for the past couple years. Their anodizing seems to hold up really well to fade too.
  • 1 1
 Ive had great success using their oval chainrings too
  • 1 1
 I second that always used blackspire for chainrings and guides since the 90’s still my choice for chainrings now no question
  • 1 6
flag blackthorne (Mar 1, 2020 at 19:35) (Below Threshold)
 “From foreign countries, test results are mostly junk.”

The last time I buy anything from this company. At least have the balls to name the mysterious ‘foreigners’ The homogenous east, land of crap mass produced products right? Taiwan, Thailand, China, Vietnam, they’re all the same right?Well guess what, you can pick a crap supplier or a good one. It’s what makes the mountain bike industry go round, and you know it.
  • 14 0
 Chromag Trailmaster DT. Best saddle I've ever put in my ass.
  • 6 0
 i prefer banana seats for that.
  • 7 0
 @savagelake: Check yur browser, wrong " Pink " site....
  • 4 1
 I think you're doing it wrong...
  • 9 0
 @drunknride: Two nuns were riding their bikes down a cobblestone street on their way to the church. One nun says to the other, "I've never come this way before." The other nun replied, "It's probably the cobblestones."
  • 1 1
 CHROMAG suggests putting your ass on the saddle, not the use you are giving it!! But I guess its a free world. Smile
  • 2 0
 @AnibalR: Whenever I ride my bike I'm happy, that's what counts!
  • 1 0
 @enduroelite: Lol. Awesome
  • 14 1
 What about Naked Bicycles?!
  • 47 0
 Pervert.
  • 4 0
 Yep, Sam deserves all the recognition he can get. Absolutely beautiful bikes.
  • 4 0
 Thats frames, not components. Lots of small frame makers across Canada. Maybe thats a subject for a later series?
  • 1 1
 @ratedgg13: Well, DeKerf is up there, so this does not seem to exclude frame makers - ok, technically, only a fork is pictured here, but it‘s still a far stretch to call him a „component maker“ based on that.
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL: and some pretty amazing bar-stems www.dekerf.com/products/barstems
  • 8 1
 "Anodization is done in Portland, Oregon, because the procedure is heavily regulated in Canada due to environmental concerns."
Maybe these are the kind of reasons why people should buy products from developed countries with proper regulations (like Canada, it seems), or why the governments of such countries should correct the price of things when they cross the border to account for all environmental and social costs.
  • 1 0
 There are anodizers in the Lower Mainland that are very good, eg Altech. (also let's not start a bun fight here about anodizers. If you've had a bad anodizing experience, it's probably your part finish, especially if you polished the part after machining).
  • 2 0
 @The-Foiling-Optimist: At least a couple of the manufacturers listed above used to get their parts anodized in the lower mainland, until the scrap rate at that stage became prohibitive. There's a really good metal finishing place in Portland that they all use since quite some time. Given that anodizing involves acid baths (pools), electrodes and exposure time requirements that are sensitive to the alloy involved, type of anodization (regular or hard) as well as color desired, scrap parts stem from human error by the operator of the anodizing rig, sometimes to the tune of melting parts down to nothing. The way parts a racked, be it by marking surfaces, allowing air bubbles to be trapped in a cavity or straight up falling off are also big culprits. Parts are racked by hundreds at a time, so one error can scrap an entire batch that took days to machine. Polishing parts only makes them more shiny.
  • 1 0
 @Mat-S: interesting stuff
  • 4 0
 @cedrico: we are one of the manufacturers who use the guys in Portland - we don't actually use the bright dip process (the process that's prohibited in Canada), we use them because we tried every anodizer in the lower mainland and were sick of getting parts back damaged. And I don't mean the finish or colour wasn't quite right or that the racking marks were bigger than we wanted... I mean completely eaten away, or huge bare patches on non-reworkable parts due to racking instructions not being followed, or huge scratches in seal glands for the same reason, or half the parts going missing because someone shipped a box without closing it up (in one case, they'd cut a huge flap in the side of a box for some reason and not bothered to tape it up or anything). For a few months there a couple of years ago, one particular anodizer in the lower mainland destroyed about half the parts we shipped them (parts count being in the thousands) which cost us so much money that it very nearly put us out of business. The guys in Portland aren't perfect either but they're a lot better than that.
  • 1 0
 @VorsprungSuspension: That's a mega bummer. I'm happy yall survived.
I wonder if other manufacturers in the bike industry use the bright dip process. I just read about the NOx off-gas from that process - sounds nasty.
  • 11 1
 I didn’t realize all Canadians were machinists.
  • 54 0
 What was that? I couldn't hear you over the sound of all my machines.
  • 17 0
 We comment on keyboards machined from a single block of aluminum... kinda loud though to be honest.
  • 6 0
 Hey, didn't think I'd see Peter Daam get a shout out here! I actually have one of his bikes. It's great! Let me get into "new school" geo a bit before it was cool, and the process was awesome too. Peter let's you be as involved (or not) as you like.
  • 7 2
 LOVE my staitline pedals, got 3 pairs. Totally bomb proof an the deepest concave of any mtb pedal I've stood on. I've smashed the things into rocks an roots an even done a massive unintentional pedal grind down a big slab in Scotland. They take anything I can throw at them! Say what you want about light wieght thin pedals, these are damn well unbreakable
  • 4 0
 I actually thought they quit existing... haven't seen their products around my neck of the woods in ages
  • 1 0
 @b-mcclelland: dame, web site is still up though
  • 1 0
 @b-mcclelland: yeah me too, used to see them around a lot.
  • 1 0
 The pedals dont break, but the amps were notorious for backing out and stripping threads out of your cranks. You have to use LOTS of locktite to get them to stay, even then its iffy.
  • 1 0
 They are the Moses of rocks. Literally! The original De Facto was bombproof, and even a fool could maintain them. The AMPs ar bit more sensitive and they had the tendency to squeal under the shoes. My only gripe with these pedals were the bushings having quite a resistance when pedaling. For DH it's not an issue, in fact, it is even good that they don't spin like hell, but for normal biking, a pedal with bearings is better. IMHO.
  • 5 0
 What’s up with Straitline? I was a fan of their products back in 2010 when I built my first downhill bike. I ran their Silent Guide for years and still have a nice seatpost collar and spacer kit from them. I was checking their site and they had no stock / had limited quantity from specific products / certain product were not manufactured anymore. I thought they are out of business.
  • 1 0
 Their machine shop generally does a lot of custom work and I believe bike stuff is a second priority for them, I really like their products and the guys that work there are solid but it really just seems like a side project for them.
  • 8 0
 those 9.8 stems look gooooood!
  • 11 1
 Their seatposts are also fantastic. Not cheap, but work so damn well and have a track record going back a few years before anybody else was making anything that was in anyway reliable.
  • 3 0
 It's like a Terminator renthal stem
  • 7 1
 +1 on 9.8
Those guys are rad. Amazing service to, if you encounter any issues.
  • 1 3
 @big-red: They are reliable but damn finnicky to get right. Also the seat collar being perfectly round (and very tight) means mine looks like hammered trash now.
  • 2 0
 I have had nothing but problems with their dropperpost though. Bought a 200mm dropper from them, and within three rides the post lost air pressure. Emailed the company multiple times, and all they said was that it's normal. So now every two weeks I have to remove the seat, and add air. The good thing is that removing the seat is quite simple. Having to add air every two weeks on a $400+ dropper is really annoying. Not a dentist and cannot buy another post for now.
Wouldn't buy again.
  • 7 0
 @abzillah: that's not normal. I think you should try again.

They have a test for this. Fill your post to 100 psi, and submerge it in the kitchen sink. If you see air bubbles escaping at the seal, there is a faulty seal. Take pictures and send them. They will fix the issue. There has been some staff change over in the last year and the guy doing customer service there now is really awesome.
  • 3 0
 @privateer-wheels: Thanks for the tip, I'll have to try this
  • 2 0
 @privateer-wheels:
Thanks, I'll try that out and will contact 9.8 again.
  • 5 0
 Good things happening in the Great White North, for sure! Not components, but let's not forget about softgoods companies like TREES Mountain Apparel that make great bike kit too! Bravo.
  • 3 0
 The Trees kits are really nice. My gf is a big fan of the Quebec based clothing company Peppermint as well.
  • 3 0
 good call. never heard of them, and just ordered some jerseys cuz of ur post. thx!
  • 6 0
 I purchased a Dekerf Team ST from Chris in 1998. An incredible bike. He is an artist with steel and titanium.
  • 3 0
 I got the chance to ride one of DaamBuilt's bikes a while back, and it was stellar. The new linkage fork is amazing too. Definitely at the top of my list for a custom frame, but I now I'm thinking that I'd better put down a deposit sooner rather than later seeing as the secret is out! Stoked to see them make this list, well deserved.
  • 5 0
 If I ever splurge on a set of carbon wheels, We Are One will get my money. Besides, if I have a Chromag I feel obligated to keep her all Canadian!
  • 4 0
 We Are One are stellar. Great products, and a good bunch of guys.
  • 1 0
 You won’t be disappointed! Mine have been awesome and the guys there were all great to work with!
  • 3 0
 No Tairin Wheels?, There's more than a handful of people around riding these now. I see you changed the name of these articles from "little known" to "exciting stuff". I think a company building precision hubs and wheelsets out of Vancouver is pretty exciting. Especially for the price!
  • 1 0
 I don't think Tairin is manufacturing in Canada, are they? Can you confirm?
Their new Mugen hubs look promising. Their newest alloy rims also look stellar.
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels: I thought that was their whole schtick - Made in Canada.
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels: @PHeller @mitchbike I was under the impression they build in Canada, but parts are from overseas. Correct me if I am wrong!
  • 1 0
 @theconorcons: that's what I thought.
  • 9 0
 Thanks for the mention. We did manufacture the entire Shogun hubs from Feb 2018 to Oct 2019. But right now we are manufacturing the raw parts through 3 different countries while assembly, laser, small parts, and quality control happens here. The rims are fully made in Taiwan before they are shipped over. All wheel builds are done here in Surrey, BC. The Mugen hub will also be assembled and QC'd here. If its worth something, all the research and development is here in Surrey, BC. With wheels assembled here we do our propietary techniques and jigs that allows us to warranty the wheels wont need re-tensioning or any major true-ing forever. We will be at the BC Bike Show tomorrow for those that want to know more~
  • 6 0
 I wonder how many people can pronounce " vorsprung" properly.
  • 11 0
 Probably everyone who has watched all of Steve's Tuesday Tunes can not only pronounce "vorsprung" but do a fair-to-middling impression of his voice. I'm also very good now at drawing plots that I don't understand on the whiteboard.
  • 4 0
 How many people can say it or read it and not hear it in Steve's voice?
  • 6 0
 @tbmaddux: hahah we actually anglicize the pronunciation for the sake of ease of communication, the correct German pronunciation is "for-schproong" but because most English speakers struggle to work out what the hell that word was (especially over the phone!), we started pronouncing it as "vor-spruhng" Smile
  • 2 0
 @VorsprungSuspension:
How did you come up with this name?
  • 1 0
 @VorsprungSuspension: can you confirm that the founder is an engineer?
  • 2 1
 @Schlumo: seemed appropriate given we're working with dampers and springs, and given the meaning of the word in German Smile
  • 10 0
 @mrtoodles: doesn't need confirming, any engineer worth their salt will tell you they're an engineer before they even introduce themselves anyway.
  • 1 0
 @mrtoodles: Thought it was the strayin bloke. Pretty sure he's the real deal mate.
  • 2 0
 Lot's of complaints about bike costs rising and here we have a bunch of stuff that generally isn't OEM spec to increase the expense of riding. How can we justify any of it? My $2000 bike just became a $3500 bike through upgrades? Please explain commenters.
  • 1 0
 Some people don’t buy completes, but instead build their bikes up with parts such as these. So no OEM. Or OEM parts can break or wear down, and you have to replace them with something.
  • 5 0
 Chromag makes some pretty exciting and phenomenal stuff!
  • 3 0
 They put their logo on it. Im guessing they dont make their bars in house and says in the article that north shore billet machines all their billet parts
  • 1 0
 @solarplex: they don’t produce stuff themselves but they have local builders like Dekerf and North Shore Billet do it for them.
  • 1 0
 One correction on the Blackspire quote, "...when you look at SRAM and FOX they have shareholders to respond to." SRAM isn't a publicly traded company. It's primarily owned by two of the company's founders, brothers Stan and F.K. Day.
  • 3 1
 Just because a company isn't publically traded, doesn't mean there aren't shareholders.Those brothers technically could be the the shareholders in their own company. Certainly the rest of the company has to answer to them, regardless.
  • 3 0
 @privateer-wheels: Absolutely true. My point was that the number of shareholders is very small. Additionally, as a privately held company, SRAM doesn't have the same external pressures for quarterly profit gains. It's very different to how a publicly traded company like Fox has to operate.
  • 2 0
 Stoked to still see Chris DeKerf getting attention for his amazing work. He's been doing lusty frames and forks since I worked in a bike store, and that was a looong time ago. What a legend.
  • 5 0
 Chromag?
  • 6 0
 They're mentioned under North Shore Billet since North Shore Billet manufactures their products.
  • 1 0
 @sarahmoore: thanks, I learned something new today!
  • 3 0
 Aw hell yeah!! Love me some North Shore Billet!! @leverfingers is an absolute legend!!
  • 4 1
 Me I prefer to buy from NinePointEightZeroSixSixFive. Same stuff but more precise.
  • 1 0
 So nobody commented yet on the fact that Canadians openly outsource environmentally dirty work to the US? Thats quite a slap in the face, isn't it?
At least I had a good laugh Big Grin
  • 1 1
 Better to destroy the american environment than ours.That country is in the gutter anyways.
  • 2 0
 I used to lust after Dekerf frames when 853 steel frames became all the rage in the late 90's. They are still beautiful
  • 2 0
 Love my Blackspire chainrings! I've had nothing but great luck with their products.
  • 2 0
 Exiting stuff race face? I will be more exited when they figureout warranty department
  • 3 0
 I was excited to find out where to get some quality allen bolts
  • 2 0
 That's some premium anti-foreigner propaganda from Blackspire it must be said.
  • 1 0
 Still have a pair of straitline DH pedals in the family. A $20 bushing replacement kit every couple of seasons is it all takes to keep them going forever.
  • 2 0
 Taken the small out of the title!
  • 3 0
 Lots of good stuff eh!
  • 2 0
 Wearing down the wifey for a Daambuilt custom FS. Soon my precious....
  • 2 1
 Race Face is a rather large successful company that has almost every part manafactured in Asia except for carbon cranks.
  • 2 0
 Which is why the mostly only mentioned carbon cranks, and the wheels that are laced in Canada.
  • 3 3
 I didn’t know success was measured by failure rate
  • 2 0
 my 13 yr old got my loaded de kerf kiddo doesn't know how lucky he is
  • 2 1
 What's the background / reason for the German name Vorsprung and the German product name Luftkappe, does anybody know ?
  • 6 0
 Der Kommisar in town, uh-oh!
  • 2 0
 Because of their name and the names of their products, I always thought it was a German company. Until today.
  • 4 0
 I lived in Germany for a while before starting Vorsprung. It seemed like an appropriate name given what we're working on. Luftkappe was chosen because we wanted something that was self-descriptive, distinctive and when you googled it, always came up with the right thing. Translated from German it's literally just "air cap" which is pretty much what the product is, but lacking any more creativity than that, that's what we went for!
  • 1 0
 @VorsprungSuspension: I lived in Germany and speak German, too, so I never even batted an eye at the names. Always made perfect sense to me, so much so that I just thought it was a German company.
  • 1 0
 @VorsprungSuspension: What about the amazing Smashpot?
  • 2 0
 @burkerider: Mix and mash of dashpot (a basic damper type) and "smash". It has a hydraulic bottom out circuit (essentially a compression circuit that only engages in the last 50mm of travel) vaguely akin to a dashpot hence the name.
  • 3 1
 Wrong title, it'd say '9 canadian manufacturers and Race Face' lol
  • 1 0
 didn't know straitline was still in business. haven't seen anything from them in a loooooong time
  • 1 0
 Awesome post! Could have made it a “BC Companies” story without much difficulty... Razz
  • 1 0
 Straitline hyper link is broken.
  • 1 0
 Not anymore
  • 2 1
 @danielsapp: Thanks Dan! Smile
  • 1 0
 Thank you!
  • 3 1
 Was One Up left out?
  • 8 0
 Oneup is made overseas
  • 3 0
 @Tmackstab: Exactly. Designed in Canada and excellent quality but all produced off shore
  • 2 0
 Where's Altruiste Bikes
  • 8 0
 Altruiste, Naked, YESSBMX... We do have some great frame manufacturers in Canada, but we were looking for components manufacturers for this piece!
  • 1 1
 @sarahmoore: For science, the frame is technically a component of the bicycle...
  • 1 0
 What's that last one? Haven't heard of it..
  • 1 0
 OneUp also makes deadly stuff!
  • 1 0
 Have a cracking time with them cranks
  • 1 0
 I wish Straitline still mad the SSC stem
  • 1 0
 What happened to Roach (clothing, pads, etc.)?
  • 1 0
 What about one up components and chromag
  • 3 2
 Isn’t Canada part of America?!?
  • 1 0
 Blackspire is great! I was on the pedal box for a number of years!
  • 1 0
 Ride NF needs to be added pronto!
  • 1 0
 Props to WeAreOne. I love seeing Canadian companies doing well.
  • 1 0
 Chromag Squidworx
  • 3 2
 Where is Randy?!!
  • 1 1
 SRAM doesn't have shareholders.
  • 1 0
 Keep it local!
  • 1 0
 Shout out to Yess BMX!!
  • 1 0
 #FPF
  • 1 1
 Structure?
  • 1 1
 Only make a frame, not parts.
  • 1 1
 @ratedgg13:

Dude they make stems,handlebars, pedals, wheel sets, seat post clamps etc
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13:
Oops wrong comment
  • 1 4
 What is this Raceface, I have never heard of them before. They must be a brand new company, maybe if they are successfull a someone like Easton will buy them in the future...
  • 1 0
 They are both owned by Fox

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2020. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.030534
Mobile Version of Website