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Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection - Press Release

May 23, 2016
by Ryders Eyewear  
Our 30th anniversary collection is here and one thing is glaringly obvious - we've has come a long way in three decades. In 2015, we introduced antiFOG and Photochromic antiFOG - fog-resistant lenses that actually work. In 2016, along with an impressive number of new designs and a massive increase in the assortment of antiFOG models - everything to make a mountain biker happy - we’ve introduced the veloPOLAR™ lens to their collection. Developed for roadies, it offers the benefits of a polarized lens without the compromises that are normally associated with polarization. This means it filters out the bright, blinding glare without hiding a slippery surface or blacking out an LCD screen. The veloPOLAR™ lens enhances definition and utilizes our antiFOG and hydrophobic coatings so it remains clear for your entire ride.

On the gravity side of things, we've introduced a brand new MTB-specific goggle to the market called the Tallcan. It’ll be hitting the shelves in June so keep your eyes peeled.

With well over 200 choices in our 2016 line and a wide spectrum of leading-edge lens technologies, our 30th anniversary collection was worth the wait.

Images from Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection PR


2016 antiFOG

Whether you’re grinding through a tight, twisty climb or stopped trailside waiting for your out of shape friends, fogged lenses are an inevitability for many of us when wearing MTB eyewear. Our antiFOG lens is the ultimate solution to this all-to-common problem. And you don’t have to take our word for it. Ever since its launch, our antiFOG has received glowing reviews from the biggest names in bike media, and with the 2016 additions, there is so much more to choose from.

How does it work? The back of the lens has a military-grade, hydrophilic layer. The layer absorbs and disperses water vapor/humidity throughout the material, eliminating the opportunity for it to condense on the surface as fog. Our antiFOG will absorb more than any other fog-resistant treatment, and it’s far more durable, never washing away or requiring reapplication.

The front of the lens needs to overcome an entirely different set of challenges than the back, so it only makes sense that it’s treated independently with a hydrophobic coating. This layer defends against saturation by shedding water to provide a clear view, free from large drops and water marks. It also makes the front of the lens smooth and slippery, so it’s a lot easier to clean and many times more scratch-resistant than an untreated lens.

Like every RYDERS lens, the antiFOG lens is decentred, making it optically correct to reduce distortion and eye fatigue. It’s extremely impact-resistant, scratch resistant, and provides 100% UV400 protection. It even comes in a variety of lens tints and premium lens technologies such as Photochromic (automatically adapting to light conditions) and veloPOLAR™ (a partially polarized lens, fine-tuned for road cyclists).

Images from Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection PR


Seventh

The semi-rim for those who don’t like the sci-fi look of semi-rims, the Seventh has a flat top to give it a more casual appearance than its more aggressive-looking peers. And it does this without sacrificing the performance benefits that make semi rims so popular for athletic endeavors. In fact, the Seventh performs better than many frames out there because of its fully-adjustable, hydrophilic nose pads and temple tips that allow you to custom fit the frame to suit your face, your helmet, and to optimize the amount of airflow behind the lens. Beyond the standard lens options, it’s available in antiFOG, Photochromic, veloPOLAR antiFOG and Photochromic antiFOG.

Images from Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection PR


Nimby

The Nimby features a lightweight, rimless design with a shield lens for unobstructed peripheral vision. Designed to meet the demands of cyclists of all kinds, the angle of the lenses and the resulting airflow can be customized by adjusting the nose pads - less airflow for road, more for mountain. It’s also available with antiFOG and Photochromic antiFOG lenses.

Images from Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection PR

Images from Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection PR


Loops

Named after the MTB mecca of Kamloops BC, the Loops looks good. Really, really good. It’s surprising how incredibly well it works for riding considering its ultra-casual appearance. And with its huge, protective lenses, its wide frame for fog-fighting airflow, and its hydrophilic nose & temple pads to keep them in place, the Loops is an all-around performer. It also looks stunning on both men and women.

Images from Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection PR

Images from Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection PR


Tallcan Goggle

Available this June, the Tallcan is the latest addition to our MTB-specific goggle collection. It includes a fog-fighting, double-layer clear lens that works like a double pane window. The outer lens prevents the cooler outside air from contacting the inner lens that is in contact with inside humid air. This results in less opportunity for vapor to condense on the inside of the lens. For further protection, we have applied a fog-resistant coating to the inside lens. The MTB-specific air intakes are much like those on the tried-and-true Shore goggle (the first-ever goggle designed specifically for MTB) in that they prevent breath vapor from entering the goggle at lower speeds while simultaneously drawing cool air from the front and the sides. Where the Tallcan stands apart from the Shore goggle is in the design of the outriggers, the size and shape of the lens, the high-airflow upper mesh, and the moisture-wicking, ultra-comfy foam. The outriggers provide an excellent fit and added stability with both DOT approved DH helmets and trail/enduro helmets, and the lens is substantially taller than the Shore lens (hence the Tallcan name) for a larger field of vision.

Images from Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection PR


Nelson

Hydrophilic nose pads and temple tips are an unusual find on eyewear that looks this casual. But it’s these very features that allow this model to work for MTB because they keep the glasses stuck firmly to your face. This is really quite fitting considering the Nelson is named after the stickiest town in BC.

Images from Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection PR

Images from Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection PR


Khyber

The Khyber is a women’s-specific sport/casual crossover with adjustable, hydrophilic nose pads, big lenses, and a tight wrap. The adjustable nose pads are perfect for a wrap like this because they allow you to wear the glasses a little further away from your face for optimized breathability.

Images from Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection PR


Carlita

The Carlita can be worn for practically anything. And don’t take our word for it. 24-hour MTB world champion Sonya Looney wore the antiFOG version for her entire race when she claimed the title last Fall. And she didn’t just win, she pushed hard and crushed the entire field by 50 minutes. If she pedaled that hard for that long without fogging up, what else can be said?

Images from Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection PR


Thorn

Big boxy lenses and a gentle wrap make the Thorn perfect for mountain bikers who want big coverage without compromising on airflow. Hydrophilic nose pads keep them from bouncing around or slipping down your nose and the array of lens options, including antiFOG and Photochromic mean there’s a Thorn for any environment where you’d be likely to ride a bike.

Images from Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection PR


Caliber

The hydrophilic, adjustable nose pads and temple tips of the 2016 Caliber allow you to customize the fit to your preferences. The wide temples provide extra protection, and the lens geometry is optimized for full coverage and a great field of vision. There are tons of options including antiFOG, Photochromic antiFOG, veloPOLAR antiFOG, and Photochromic lenses. The GX version includes a foam gasket for added protection from wind, debris, and for the fatbikers out there, cold and snow.

Images from Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection PR

Images from Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection PR


Face

Frames don’t get much more durable than this. The Face is burly as hell, and with its hydrophilic nose pads and temple tips, it's kept firmly in place. It’s also available in a pile of antiFOG and Photochromic options. Designed for protection, the wrap is tight enough to keep the bad stuff out of your eyes while not affecting your peripheral vision, but it’s not so tight on the average face that lack of airflow is an issue. Like the Caliber GX, the GX version of the Face includes a foam gasket for added protection from wind, debris, or cold and snow if you’re into fatbiking.

Images from Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection PR

Images from Ryders Eyewear 2016 Collection PR


MENTIONS: @RydersEyewear



Author Info:
RydersEyewear avatar

Member since Oct 18, 2011
16 articles

36 Comments
  • 17 1
 Honestly, I can't say enough good things about Ryders Eyewear. Lens quality seems solid, not much distortion when looking through the lens. Also, fit and function are deadly, and they really do work well for riding applications. Kudos on 30 years!
  • 1 0
 They're so great. I've had a pair of the photochromic/polarized ones for ~3 years now. They're my year-round favorites for mtb, ski touring, fishing, driving, and having a beer outside. And CHEAP. Best deal out there by far.

Unfortunately now I want pretty much all of these new models.
  • 12 0
 Is it just me or is anyone else wondering why clear lenses aren't always one of the first options they give us with new glasses/lens tech? Maybe its just a PNW thing but I like my forest unfiltered and you know...night rides
  • 5 0
 dude yellow lenses are the best for low-light I've been using an unmirrored yellow lense for evening riding and it helps so much
  • 1 0
 @MaxDeutsch: I tried them at first but after switching to a clear lens I can say I definitely prefer them. My issue isn't so much with yellow but more with photochromic. I get the sense they expect it to replace a clear lens at its least shaded point but it still robs you of those few precious rays that come oh so in handy when riding dark forests in the winter months
  • 2 0
 @heinous-anus: I'm with you on the photochromic thing. Im all for the idea but they just don't react to low light quickly enough. Ride from the open into some dark evening woods and you've had it. Sadly the choice of good fees with clear lenses seems to be diminishing.
  • 1 0
 * good frames
  • 1 0
 Been using orange/yellow lenses all the time now, for all but blistering sunshine.
I find them great for crisping up my vision, I need glasses for driving but , not quite bad enough for riding.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, I had the photochromic ones before, and it sometimes annoyed me that in dark forests the lense would still have a tint and never seemed to go back clear again.
  • 1 0
 Yellow or persimmon lenses are awesome in low light. When it's mixed with high contrast in sunlight/shadow, like in the middle of the day, Oakley Fire Iridium are hard to beat. Clear is cool by all means. As for anti-fog, the only thing that works for me is vented lenses.

Unless It's super warm, Goggles are alway best though. I have Dragons with Ski double lens, I took away the foam from the top vents and I can ride all day in them
  • 2 0
 @gibbon-on-an-orange: I have ryder photochromic and they change quite quickly. But I'm not in and out of the canopy all the time. On the Shore, once you're in, you're IN.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I have a pair or Thornton antifog photochromatic and they just gone fog up. Even in the worst Irish conditions.
  • 1 0
 @Kamba6: Once, a quite long time ago, I bought some really crappy glasses with yellow vented lens at Decathlon for 9£ or so and they didn't fog up almost at all. It took them 3 years for the frame to crack. The problem was that I was getting mud under them. Imust have something touching front of my cheeks and very few pieces of eyewear do it. Jawbones are one of them, but I could never ride in Oakley Radar like glasses, I'd die.
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I meant to say don't and not gone in my previous comment.

I know the feeling you describe. Thorn do a pretty good job of covering my eyes completely and there's plenty other options that do the same.

I'm not saying jawbone isn't a decent pair of glasses. I have no experience with them so can't say. However, I am saying that Ryders' claims of lenses not fogging up are true and I would consider Irish cold and damp climate to be a prefect place to test these claims.
  • 1 0
 @Kamba6: If you're just bombing downhill, they don't fog up. But if it's damp and you're climbing at a slow speed, they still can. I seem to recall on Ryders' first launch they were throwing around the term 'no-fog.' I haven't read or heard that at all anymore.
  • 2 0
 @rrolly: I climb pretty slow and it's almost always cold and damp here but I haven't had any issues.

I have no doubt that they can fog up but in my experience they are miles ahead of competition. And often at a significantly lower price.
  • 5 0
 Am I the only one who thinks the Nimby bears an uncanny resemblance to the Smith PivLock V2??
www.smithoptics.com/us/Root/Men's/Sunglasses/Performance/PivLock%E2%84%A2-V2-Max/p/VWMNXBOIB
  • 7 0
 I was always partial to a semi-rim...
  • 3 0
 Got the caliber antifog glasses at the end of winter, riding cold wet and damp Squamish/whistler and they were perfect! No worry about rubbing off the antifog when they get dirty either. Riding with friends with $150-200+ oakleys and smiths and the second they stopped they fogged up and were blind. My $90 ryders will permantly be better.
  • 1 0
 Mnah, vented Oakleys work great unless it gets super humid at low temperatures. I would never pay full price for Oaks, I bought two pairs of Jawbones second hand.
  • 1 0
 The ryders are the best I've worn to date, but they still fog up a bit on the real humid days we get out on the shore. I find I need to climb without them on during those days, while I'd rather just wear them and forget about them.
  • 2 0
 Unbelievable performance from Ryders Eyewear! I've tried many different brands over the years...err...decades...and I use Ryders cause they work! Great vision and style and the ANTIFOG is the real deal. Very proud to represent them!! (Plus the people that work there are quirky, wacked and cool...and I like that.)
  • 3 1
 Loops and nelson look sick. I just got some Oakley jawbreakers and i found that they're lil too tall, hitting the brow of my troy lee a1. So i learned i need to bring the helmet with me when sunglass shopping.
  • 2 0
 Can anyone comment on the functionality of the Face glasses with foam gasket? I've started riding with goggles for big descents and when I fat bike. Those seem like more of a stealth way to carry out the same function.
  • 2 0
 I really, really like my thorns. The lenses block airflow to your eyes on the descent but have lots of breathing room on climbscso they don't fog easily. Great stuff!
  • 2 0
 Ryders eye wear works awesome , feels great and leaves you with lift money for the hill.
  • 1 0
 I really like Ryders. They work. Are the Tallcan lenses replaceable? Does anyone know?
  • 2 0
 Hi CJ, Yes the Tallcan lenses are definitely replaceable.
  • 2 0
 Want a pair of them Seventh bad boys, they look sweet.
  • 2 0
 Available in the uk ?
  • 1 0
 Like rocking horse poo mate.
  • 1 0
 We need these in Europe. Please!
  • 2 0
 I used Reship.com to have a set of Thorn Antifog Photochromic shipped to USA and then to Ireland. This service was recommended to me by Ryders customer support. It took about 10 days for delivery. Shipping and handling was about $29 charged by Reship but Ryders were offering a discount on the first order at the time ( I don't know if they still do) so this wasn't so bad.

The glasses are amazing and work better than I could ever have expected in the horrible wet Irish conditions. I went with the yellow lens and the definition in low light is excellent. They haven't fogged up once, even on top of my sweaty, steamy post ride noggin and the hydrophobic coating on the outside of the lens does a great job of shedding water and mud.

Well worth the extra few buck to get them here
  • 1 0
 Can you get them prescription .????







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