Ryders Roam Glasses with Fyre Tech - Review

Oct 3, 2017
by AJ Barlas  
Ryders Roam w Fyre Lens

These days there are a lot of options available for those that prefer to don eyewear when riding their bike and Ryders is a name that is typically synonymous with decent quality eyewear for a good price. But the Canadian brand is also capable of packing quite a bit of technology into their glasses and that’s precisely what they’ve done with the Fyre lens line. The Roam glasses with Fyre lenses feature a number of new technologies in an effort to enhance a rider's vision on the trails.
Ryders Roam Details
• Adjustable frame (arms/temple tips, nose piece)
• Wear with or without lower frame piece
• 3 lens tint options
• Medium fit
• Weight: 32 grams (claimed)
• MSRP: $239.99 USD / $239.99 CAD
www.ryderseyewear.com

These technologies include Ryders' anti-fog treatment, which combined with a number of other elements really impressed in the Tallcan goggle test last year. Another technology that the Fyre lens boasts is what Ryders are calling Colour Boost, which is a similar concept to what Smith and Oakley have done with their Chromapop and Prizm lenses, essentially looking to enhance definition by somewhat manipulating the colours viewed before they reach the eye. These, together with another three technologies are what make up the Fyre lens line of Ryders range.

Ryders Roam w Fyre Lens
Ryders Roam w/ Grey with Blue MLV
Ryders Roam w Fyre Lens
Ryders Roam w/ Brown with Gold


Technologies

Ryders new Fyre range of lenses include a number of claimed benefits all rolled into one. They include treatments that cover, anti-fog, UV protection, contrast enhancement, water repellency (in glasses? Yep), impact and scratch resistant lenses, and they’re photochromatic. Ryders have a list of names they use for these attributes, but we’ll instead focus on how they work in the real world. In short, though, the Roam glasses include all of the latest tech, rolled into one package.

The glasses come available in three lens options, with a light grey, yellow, and pink, covering a range of riding conditions that one could expect to encounter on the trail. Tested here are the light grey and the yellow. Each of these lenses features the photochromatic properties that Ryders use, which Ryders say are a little different to some. Rather than the lens simply growing darker in well-lit situations and lighter in darker environments, the lens is claimed to go either way while retaining the colour properties of the lens.

Ryders Roam w Fyre Lens

bigquotesWith its fast-acting, wide-range photochromic technology, the Varia lens responds very quickly and reliably, no matter what the temperature. In addition, it actually changes the colour of the lenses throughout their range instead of simply getting lighter or darker. This allows them to shift from a tint that has advantages in the dark, to a different, more suitable tone when conditions are bright.

For Ryders, it’s important that the Fyre lens retains the benefits of the chosen tint when changing for the given lighting situation. The grey lens tested is said to be optimal for low to bright conditions, offering a neutral colour shift and containing the lowest contrast enhancement of the series. The yellow lens tested maintains the same use with regards to lighting (low to bright conditions), but is said to enhance contrast, with a visibly more noticeable colour shift.


The Fit

Like with many pairs of riding glasses available today, the Ryders Roam include a range of customizations available to help provide a better fit to a wide range of people. The arms/tips are easily shaped to fit how you please and the nose piece is also easily adjusted. The tip of the arms and the nose pieces are also made with a Hydrophilic [anti-slip] material, to aid in better keeping them in place when the going gets rough.

Further to the above, the frame piece across the bottom of the lens can be completely removed, for that clear-as-possible field of view. Even though it’s able to be removed, it’s worth noting the position to begin with, with the frame cleverly placed under the eyes, taking into account that the eyes tend to look through the upper portion of the glasses when positioned on a bike.

Ryders list the fit of the Roam as a medium one, with a 48mm high lens by 130mm wide. They should fit a wide range of riders well and I found them to provide ample coverage, despite multiple busted noses that personally create all sorts of issues with eyewear.
Ryders Roam fit without lower frame .

Ryders Roam w Fyre Lens
Ryders Roam fit without lower frame
Ryders Roam fit w lower frame
The Roam fit w/ lower frame


Three Questions with Ryders Mike Quinn

Ryders have traditionally been known for providing solid functioning eyewear at competitive prices. The Roam Fyre glasses appear to show a departure from this, why is that?


Good question. Looking at the price alone it would seem that the Roam is a departure, but when you look at the features of the lens alone—never mind the frame with all of its adjustable bits and removable lower rim—it's still offering excellent value for money.

Competitors with similar glasses range from around $160 to $230+ and they're just using a polycarbonate lens with a colour boosting technology. The Fyre lens has the colour boosting technology but it has a pile of features that similar priced lenses don't:

• Fyre is made of NXT, so it has far better optics and all of the impact protection of the competition.
• It has Varia photochromic, which is the highest-range, fastest-acting photochromic available, allowing it to constantly adapt to light conditions.
• It has our military grade anti-fog—the best fog-resistant coating available. It offers 3x the fog-resistance of the next best coating on the sports eyewear market. The competition don't use a fog-resistant coating.
• It has the colour boosting that I mentioned plus all of the best scratch-resistant and hydrophobic coatings available.


Though Ryders has a higher price-point in some of our glasses, the competitors have left off the most expensive and, in our opinion, the most valuable features. All have left off the military grade anti-fog, and some have used inferior lens materials and/or haven't included any photochromic technology. These are very important features to leave out.

Ryders Roam w Fyre Lens
Two of the three lens colour choices, one with the lower frame, the other without.

The colour shift of the lenses is milder than some of the competitors. What is the reason for the mellower shift?


The colour boosting increases with the activation of the lens so in its lightest state it's boosting at a fraction of what it can do in its darkest state. This is the nature of the technology—it requires light absorption/filtering to work.


There’s no plain clear lens available, yet your team’s proximity to the North Shore must mean you ride in our dark forests. Is there a clear lens option in the works? If not, what is the rationale for this?


We have clear anti-fog in other frames, but the Roam is only available in the three Fyre lenses. We wanted to launch the Fyre lens technology in frames that were exclusive to those lenses for easier identification. The idea was for it to be a complete package—the best frame with the very best lens. We don't have a plan at this time to offer the Roam in any other lens. Performance-wise, both the grey and the yellow Fyre lenses are excellent in the dark because they remain quite clear and the colour-boosting—however mild in its light state—helps to boost contrast. The yellow offers quite a bit more contrast than the grey so it's the best option in low light, though both are great. I ride with the Roam in the dense forests of the Shore and Squamish, in the Chilcotin alpine, on the roads and even for night riding. I've been spoiled so I don't like riding with anything else...

Though some brands claim that their clear lenses allow 100% of the light through, this is obviously not true or the lenses wouldn't have the ability to reflect light. In other words, they would be 100% invisible to the naked eye—obviously impossible.

In reality, a clear lens blocks anywhere from about 8% to 15% of the light. In its light state, the Fyre lens is only 8% to 15% darker than a clear lens, but a clear lens doesn't enhance contrast and is made of Polycarbonate so it doesn't have the crisp optics of the NXT lens—a difference that is surprisingly noticeable to the naked eye.



Performance

Mixing between the two lenses, the grey is definitely quite neutral when looking at contrast and colour shift, where the yellow lens is very obvious. However, I was pleasantly surprised when putting on the yellow lens that it wasn’t so drastic that it made it hard on the eyes, which others I’ve tried have (I own a pair of the Oakley Evzero Prizms, but can’t wear them with the Prizm lens for this exact reason). The shift was obvious, but the colouring was more reasonable and took little time to adjust to—in fact, I would say it took virtually no time, with it being comfortable from the start.

On the trail, the grey lens tended to be my go-to when riding while the sun was high in the sky. With the woods around here (Squamish/Whistler/Vancouver) being dense and dark I found this to be the best time to wear them. They do a fantastic job of adjusting for the light, allowing plenty through when under the canopy, but quickly changing to cut down on the amount of glare when out in the open. Quick sections of trail that darted in and out of the woods resulted in a little too quick of a change for the lens to catch, but it wasn’t a big deal in reality.

Ryders Roam w Fyre Lens
The Roam's yellow Fyre lens was found to be better for those darker rides.

The yellow lens worked better when the light was a little darker or flatter, providing more definition, but not necessarily being brighter. Bear in mind, these are pitched as working best in the same lighting conditions as the grey lens (low to bright conditions), but I found that they could still perform in slightly darker conditions thanks to the more pronounced colour shift provided by the lens. That extra contrast provided by the shift being the reason for this. It's not as clear as a… clear lens, but it's an improvement over the grey in lower lit scenarios.

I started out with the Roam in their stock form—with the framing across the bottom of the lens—but coming from a pair of Smith PivLock V2 quickly found the frame irritating and disrupting my field of view. Once removed, which was really quite easy to do—though I did need to give more effort than I felt comfortable doing—the glasses were similar in relation to coverage as the Smith. They did a great job of keeping branches and debris from the trail out of my eyes, and for anyone that has issues with watering eyes while riding, rest assured these have you covered there too.

Ryders Roam w Fyre Lens
The field of view and amount of protection when the lower frame was removed is on par with the best out there.

The one negative that I have for the otherwise excellent pair of riding glasses is the price. Ryders are typically known for their great value eyewear and what they include for that price, but at $239.99, the Roam Fyre lens line is far from cheap. Yes, they’re packed with a load of technology—literally everything that you could want in a pair of glasses, but you’ll have to decide whether that tech is important enough to stomach the cost. There is also no real light or clear lens, which would be very appealing to those living in a similar area as The Shore/Squamish/Whistler, with it getting incredibly dark in these woods.

The good news is that after a summer of use, they’re still functioning sensationally and the scratch resistant lens has helped them make it through a riding season with little to show for it, where others I’ve owned were marked up in a similar timeline. The anti-fog treatment is still working, with the glasses not fogging up on me yet, the definition still clear, and the photochromatic properties still functioning.

Ryders Roam w Fyre Lens
Water no longer sheds from the lens how it did when new. When new, it made a noticeable difference to vision when riding in damp conditions.

The one thing that has stopped working as well as it did when they were new is the water repellency, which showed its weakness in a recent wet ride, forcing me to remove the glasses and actually wipe them down. Initially, this was a non-issue and the water literally sheeted off the lens, but now I am forced to remove them altogether as the rain no longer bounces from the lens, instead, big blobs of water sit squarely in my field of view.


Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesRyders have again produced a piece of performance eyewear that there is little competition for in terms of all-out functionality. Literally, stick them on and ride, and forget they’re even there. No fogging, great, clear vision, and for the most part long lasting. The price is a high one, no doubt, but they are packed with technology that works on the trail and if they last double the length of time that similar competitors do, then they show their value and so far they seem to be going that route. If you’re a rider that prefers to cover their eyes when riding and is looking at similar technologies, the Ryders Roam with the Fyre lens has to be considered. AJ Barlas



123 Comments

  • + 70
 Cool looking glasses...although "Literally, stick them on and ride..." as opposed to other glasses where you have to assemble, calibrate and tune before you ride...
  • + 56
 I will disagree as most glasses are not designed to fit dogs and require assembly, calibration and tuning in order to function correctly. That being said I usually get them on and then panic and spin in several quick successive circles and the glasses fall off so it is probably not worth mentioning.
  • + 8
 @IamTheDogEzra: The ColourBoost feature is a waste of money for you. And you'll probably just chew on them. Just get a pair of DeWalt safety glasses for a tenner and have no regrets.
  • + 3
 @iamamodel: DeWalt: like wearing Saran wrap instead of a condom...good freakin' luck with the end result!!
  • + 4
 @cartoon: I ride 5k km of trail a year in all conditions and they've been perfect. No worse than the Rudy Projects I accidentally stepped on and finally swore off expensive glasses. Good luck getting your money's worth from your [insert boutique brand here].
  • + 1
 @iamamodel: Im with you, when it comes to clear riding glasses a cheap pair gives you 90% of the performance at 15% the price.
  • + 6
 I nick the cheap nasty safety glasses from work so 100% cost/performance ratio
  • + 3
 Safety glasses are the way to go. Get them in bulk and they're less than $1/peice. You will lose/break/scratch any glasses you wear MTBing so I don't see the point of spending this kind of money if you're in any way price-conscious. You can get safety glasses with UV filtering and tint of various grades.
  • + 1
 @iamamodel: did you like project Rudy or these more ? Looking at Tralyx vs Fyre roam by Ryder’s. Which do you prefer ?
  • + 1
 @Dylpickel: I just go for cheap DeWalt safety glasses. Scott make them too
  • + 57
 Can't get over the fact that they're $240.... Buy a pair of Pit Vipers for $69 and f*ckin send it!
  • + 19
 Also look like a complete douche at the same time so theres that...
  • + 21
 @chillrider199: maybe in your time era, this is 2017 time to get retro! #PitsandChicks
  • - 11
flag chillrider199 (Oct 3, 2017 at 8:42) (Below Threshold)
 @treekilla: Im 19...
  • + 24
 @chillrider199: i'm 19 too bro! I own three pairs of Pit Vipers! #sendit
  • - 1
 $239 US is not equal to $239 CAD. WTF. If they cost us $239 US they should charge the north of the borders Eleventy Million for them. This is xenoprejudicing!
  • + 22
 @chillrider199: We're Mountain Bikers, looking like douches in our brightly coloured pajamas and ridiculous sunglasses is an integral part of the culture, might as well embrace it.
  • + 3
 For their flagship product I don't see this as insane. AND this is in CDN prices! They also have many other glasses lower than $100 with some great technology as well... and Pit Vipers? Seriously?!
  • + 17
 ho-ly-shyt that price....

You want scratch proof, fog proof, shatter proof and wrap around lense for full field of vision? Here's a three pack - theyre $10 at Home Depot:

www.homedepot.com/p/3M-SecureFit-400-Series-Black-Neon-Green-Frame-with-Anti-Fog-Lens-Safety-Eyewear-3-Pack-SF400-W-3PK/206346283

...and when you're done riding you can build a shed and not worry about a nail flying into your eye on a botched swing.
  • + 8
 @NYShred: Ugh. The optics on the cheapest work glasses make me woozy if I'm on the bike. I can't even handle them when doing labor. I started buying slightly more expensive safety glasses for this reason, even though I destroy a couple sets a month.
  • + 1
 I will stick with my Bolle Spider safety glasses for £8 thanks
  • + 2
 @Fix-the-Spade: words of wisdom
  • + 1
 @zepper: not all companies are from the states you know...
  • + 2
 240 for a pair of riding glasses... oh hell no!
  • + 1
 @chillrider199: you look like a douche with these too
  • + 0
 @NYShred: I wear 5 dollar pair of Dewalt safety glasses...Whats the old saying..'There is a sucker born every minute" P. T. Barnum,
  • + 44
 They are super expensive now because they were acquired by Essilor back in 2013 and then Essilor merged with Luxottica in 2017. So the original Ryders which offered an affordable alternative for shades to ride in has been swallowed up by the largest glasses corporation in the world which infamously charges an insane amount of money (comparative to the price of manufacturing their product in China) for said shades. They kept the Ryders name, but they aren't really Ryders anymore...
  • + 13
 @handsomedan didn't these dudes force Oakley out of the retailers (which they also own) and bought them after their stock dropped? Bits of this info is on their wiki page. Shady f*cks.
  • + 8
 @Milko3D: yep, that was same douche company
  • + 4
 Essilor brought us new opportunities and resources. We are still the same authentic Ryders brand - from people to culture, there is very little that has changed. We continue to offer a variety of options at the lower price point, but now can compete at the premium level as well. As AJ mentioned, although our FYRE tech is more expensive than consumers are used to, it is loaded with 5 x the technology as a similar priced competitor - sticking to the value for money structure.
  • + 3
 @Milko3D: That is correct
  • + 7
 Based in North Vancouver, always have been always will be. Dedicated to helping people see better on bikes since 86.

We do now have the help of some of the greatest minds in optics and frame building that help us deliver the highest level of performance, but still at an accessible price. No other brand at the moment can offer the level of performance of the Fyre lens.

Fyre lens is the most extreme performance, but there is something in our line for everybody. we have our anti-fog all through the line, (below $100 CND) nobody else offer that.

We make eyewear for a living because we want to make you see better so you can enjoy the ryde.



ROY WILLIAMS
Director of Product Design & Development
"The better you can see the faster you can go."
RYDERSEYEWEAR
  • + 8
 These things probably cost less than $10 to make in China. Just shop on Aliexpress once and you'll see all this amazing technology in glasses 1/10 the price of this pair.
  • + 3
 They don't just own the glasses companies, they own most the shops as well. Fucking monopoly.
  • + 4
 @zdebruine: but will you get "5 x the technology" and "the most extreme performance"?

EXTREME TO THE MAX... AND SO ON!
  • + 7
 @RydersEyewear: @roverra:

I had a pair of Ryders and I liked them.
Eventually though I end up scratching them one way or another. Can't keep buying fancy glasses every couple of months. But that's another story.

Could you guys explain, possibly in a nice featured behind the scenes article, what goes into making a high-end riding glasses?

I'm sure I haven't considered a lot of the issues you have/had to solve and the price is justified especially once you use modern methods of manufacturing and design and pay the employees a decent salaries. But without somehow 'seeing' that it's hard to even consider the purchase.

How scratch proof are they? Both frames and lenses. What's the optimal care? How effective are the coatings you offer and how long they last? The review above states that it wears off after a certain amount of time.

I hope I'm not coming off as an ass, I'm genuinely curious!
  • + 3
 @Milko3D:

Thanks for the question—it's a big one but we'll give it a go:

A whole lot goes into designing a pair of effective riding glasses. Fitting a wide range of faces is one of the biggest factors. They obviously have to be stable and comfortable but they also have to be the proper shape, size and fit for good airflow at a variety of speeds. The design also has to accommodate different helmet retention systems—and there are lots of them.

Most premium sport brands primarily use polycarbonate as their lens material, despite the trademarked names that they've given to the material to make it look proprietary. Polycarbonate is extremely shatter resistant, inherently 100% UV protective, and can be formed and finished to provide excellent optical clarity and minimal distortion. That said, there are big differences between the lowest and highest quality polycarbonate lenses. Manufacturing and finishing methods can result in very different quality lenses despite them being made of the same material.

Aside from the FYRE lenses, which are NXT, Ryders uses premium polycarbonate lenses throughout our line. These lenses are finished with the best scratch-resistant coatings available and they do not wear off for the life of the glasses if they are properly cared for. Calling them 'coatings' makes them sound temporary but they are in fact harder than the lens material itself (that's why they're more scratch resistant, and hydrophobic, than the untreated lens) and they are permanently bonded to the lens.

Our FYRE lenses are NXT. These are a step up from polycarbonate and the best lenses for sport use, offering all of the same impact and UV protection as polycarbonate, but NXT is 10% lighter weight and has an optical clarity that's a lot closer to that of glass lenses. Glass lenses offer the best optics but are very heavy and hazardous when impacted, so they're not good for sport use. There are only a handful of brands that use NXT for their lenses, and the big brand that we all knOw is not one of them.

As far as care goes, if you're going to wipe a lens, you should always use a clean cloth, preferably microfibre, and make sure that there is no grit present. If there's any risk of grit, you should wash the lenses. A rinse is often fine, but if you want to give them a good cleaning, use a mild soap and rinse thoroughly.

To maintain the best performance, our antiFOG lenses should be washed and air dried after each use. This ensures that there are no oils or other contaminants that can clog up the antiFOG layer, making it less absorbent. The antiFOG coating needs to be able to absorb and disperse vapour to be effective. It should be noted that dirt and grease sitting on the coating will not damage it as it's permanent and will not wear off, but dirt and grease should be removed for best performance.

I hope that helps.
  • + 1
 @RydersEyewear:

Thanks for the thorough write up!
That's quite interesting about the 'coatings'.
Do you have plans to update the goggles lineup as well?
  • + 1
 @Milko3D:
We now have the "TallCan" this goggle is the only MTB specific goggle out there. TallCan comes with many features to keep the wind and debris out of your eyes and preventing fogging.
We will be releasing a new lens for the TallCan with a trial specific tint and mirror combination.
We will also expand out the GX collection. GX are glasses that are designed to function like a "lite" goggle. The Roam would fall in the GX class, also Face GX, Tsuga with side shields, and a couple of the new 2018 styles.

We are going to continue to evolve what a goggle is and does as the sport evolves.

ROY WILLIAMS
Director of Product Design & Development
RYDERSEYEWEAR
  • + 13
 Fancy tech eyewear certainly make a difference, but I tend to lose, scratch and break my glasses when mountain biking, so I've resorted to 6 euro safety glasses from the hardware store across the street. Ironically I haven't managed to trash them yet.
  • + 16
 3M Safety glasses in a pack of 5 for $20 USD. I upgraded mine by drawing on an Oakley logo with a sharpy.
  • + 5
 @apcastagno: SHHHHHH!!!!! Luxotica will buy 3M’s glasses and bump the price 900%!
  • + 2
 Safety glasses get my vote too. £8 for Bolles
  • + 1
 DeWalt for me. Very happy. I still remember how I killed every boutique pair of shades/clears I ever owned. Forget that. WOM.
  • + 13
 hard to believe the brand that used to sell sunglasses on a rack for $35 is now selling similar for $239.99
  • + 13
 $240 for safety glasses! Geeeezzzz get real
  • + 6
 I bought a pair of the Ryders with the rain coating and whatever else they claim in a clear lens. I find there is distortion in the lens and the anti-fog / anti whatever does not work.

I rode with guy that picked up a set of the 3M glasses, tried them on a ride and liked them way better, all for unde $20 (CAD) versus the big $$$ Ryders are trying to fleece us for. My glasses were closer to $100, so not as crazy $$$ as these new and improved ones, but seeing as though my $100 glass purchase seemed excessive and didn't yield very favorable results the thought of the $240 glasses is insane.

I will pick a set of these up when I pay $2500 - $3000 for my new carbon wheels, oh wait, that's never,
  • + 7
 ...and you can head straight to a electro dance party after your right with the appropriate eyewear Very important sellling point!
  • + 4
 Many of us need prescription lenses, looks like Ryders is still working on that option. I know, I could get laser surgery (nope, watched my wife's, not doing it, plus she wears glasses again now), or wear contacts (don't like them). They are ALWAYS expensive. I looked at Oakley but went with Adidas since they were the most reasonably priced that I could find, but I could only get them in a lens that has color-enhancing tech but a little darker than I would like. Would love to be able to get these in the yellow but prescription lenses. For less than Oakley's.
  • + 6
 We will be offering a full prescription program in the coming weeks, stay tuned.
  • + 2
 @RydersEyewear: That would be game-changing (if it’s affordable). I do have a prescription Jawbreakers, they are not bad, but fogging is an issue and the way they insert prescription lenses in them... well, it looks kinda funny.
  • + 2
 @themanro: Yeah, I was buying cheapos from Zenni (like 40 bucks) but they don't fit great and have the prescription inserts behind the shields. Look funny, but mostly they limit your field of view, and they are tough to clean if you get muck in between things. I want direct inserts! I'm really enjoying the Adidas ones I got, just want a lighter tint for evening rides through the woods.
  • + 1
 @TenBeers: I have a weird prescription but went with Zenni even though their prescription sun glasses don't work. They can add tint to any lens, so you can go with a "sportier" regular frame and add some tint - I did mirror green and I've been pretty happy with them.
  • + 2
 @RydersEyewear: that's what I'm after
  • + 4
 whats wrong with a pair of clear saftery glasses from your local hardware store for $10??? $240 is ridiculous. i mean seriously, where is the $230 worth of extra stuff in these?
  • + 0
 riding with cheap safety glasses is like riding a Walmart mountain bike with cheap jockey underwear under your shorts...it works but not very well.
  • + 2
 The optics of cheap safety glasses is usually really poor. Look through a pair of cheap eye wear and move them up and down so that you are alternately looking through them and not. Do things move when you do this? That will adversely affect your vision and riding. I once found a pair of fake Oakley glasses and wore them riding down the trail. Rode terribly. I tried to put a real Oakley lens in them but it wouldn't fit so I knew they were fakeleys. Since I wear contacts I need protection from dirt and crap. I am sensitive to shit optics. That said, the price for good optics is probably pretty damn inflated. I'm willing to pay more for good optics and good fit.
  • + 1
 @Someoldfart: i wear clear safety glasses everyday for work. The optics and fit are excellent. they are precoated in antifog, 100% UV proof and are rated for impact (i doubt most sunglasses are). I have used them for riding and they are just fine Try a set of Bolle brand clears.

The best part about safety glasses is not having to cry every time you break, scratch or lose a pair
  • + 1
 @cartoon: I use 3m 2890 safety goggles. They look fine and visual quality is the same as any other sports goggles I tested. Additionally they are impact protection certified and have effective anti fog. Worth the 10 Euro (shipping included) IMHO.
  • + 3
 "Xtreme Hydrochloric Acid Kryptonium Iridium Special Xtreme Anti Fog Super Xtreme Poly Carbonate " lenes, = $3 made in China plastic lenes. I will save $240 and just be "extreme" by eating an ".99 xtreme supreme taco" from the Bell.
  • + 2
 A lot of people love their Ryders, but I've had no luck with two pairs. The arm broke off my first pair pretty quickly, and the photochromatic lens lasted only a few months before turning into a hazy yellow tint. They fogged up within seconds and the lenses scratched very easily, even from my gloves. Tossed those pair and went for a more expensive Anti-Fog a few years later. Much better product, for sure. They still fogged up when riding in Vancouver, but it just took longer. I could live with that, but the lenses themselves don't shed any water. If a tiny water droplet hits the lens, it is there to stay. I couldn't make it down any trail safely with even mild rain or even splash-back from puddles on the ground. I moved away from Vancouver a much drier area and they perform better now, but I notice that little moisture bubbles are developing inside the lens. Must be between to two pieces of plastic. No chance I'm spending even more money on these versions.
  • + 2
 @AJBarlas, Nikwax Visor Proof will restore the water repelling ability of your glasses in no time, it's cheap and a 125ml bottle will last you years. As for these, the lower frame makes sense since it closes up the gap between cheeks and lens that crud seems to have the magic ability to fly through, but hot damn is it ugly.
  • + 5
 Oh look another eyewear brand who thinks 240$ is a reasonable ask for a product that cost them exactly 3$ to make...
  • + 2
 These new lenses (Fyre, Prizm, Chromapop...etc) are actually worse at what they are designed to do than lenses before them. Oakley's old VR28 lens is a much better trail lens than the new "Prizm Trail" for daytime riding, and the old "Persimmon" lens has no equal in the Prizm line. There really is no good low-light lens (and no, clear is NOT a good low-light lens) with these new technologies. It's a shame that you can no longer get the older lenses because they truly were the best you could get.
  • + 4
 The anti-fog option is the value add. And that works as advertised, from personal experience. Otherwise, I would agree with you. The price is very hard to stomach.
  • + 0
 @jason3559: But it's not worth sacrificing definition and contrast for something that has been available for years (Oakley, for example, has had permanent anti-fog for over 15 years now). There are also lots of options in the aftermarket for re-applied anti-fog/hydrophobic coatings...you could always just use those.
  • + 2
 @TheRaven: whatever antifog technology Oakley had did not work for me! The Ryder's antifog was the first one that actually worked for me (I run hot, and sweaty), after numerous other fails. Worth the $$ IMO
  • + 1
 Don't tell anyone, but Prizm Trail is Vr28 Blue Iridium only made in China, which explains everything.
  • + 1
 @philshep: Anti-fog is simply a hydrophobic coating. After all what is fog - tiny water droplets right? The hydrophobic coating takes advantage of the surface tension of the droplets, and keeps them in droplet form, making them evaporate almost immediately. It's a variation on the same tech that makes "Rain-X" so awesome.

You have to understand that when it comes to sunglasses, aside from style, there's not a whole lot left to advance. The leading manufacturers have mastered lens manufacturing for perfect clarity decades ago, and contrast lenses have been around forever. Then you have light-reflective and water-repelling coatings. From there on it's all marketing. Every brand has their own spin on these same technologies but in practice it's all the same stuff. Prizm, Fyre, Chromapop are all elaborate marketing for contrast tints, and "anti-fog" is simply a hydrophobic coating a la Rain-X and NeverWet.

The reason for this is that pretty much all the good brands are owned by one of three companies. Oakley is owned by Luxottica and Ryders is owned by Essilor...and, interestingly, Essilor and Luxottica just merged in January. So you can expect to see alot of Oakley tech showing up in Essilor's brands now...that's what happened with Luxottica's brands when it bought Oakley.
  • + 4
 @TheRaven: True anti-fog coatings are actually the opposite of hydrophobic coatings--they're hydrophilic coatings. They work by absorbing and dispersing water vapour throughout the coating so it can evaporate before it has the chance to condense on the lens as fog.

You're correct that fog is simply tiny water droplets, but those droplets aren't heavy enough to be repelled by the hydrophobic coating. Rain-X is a hydrophobic coating and therefore has the reverse effect of a hydrophilic coating.

There are a few other sport brands that offer true anti-fog lenses, but Ryders is the only sport brand that offers an anti-fog that passes the military standard, which through independent testing shows 3x the fog resistance of these other brands.
  • + 2
 @RydersEyewear: I was still able to fog up my Ryder's Anti-fog the other day though, so they do still fog up. I find they clear the fog once you set riding and if I pull the glasses away from my face to allow more airflow though the back but fog they still do. I have two pair of Ryders and a pair of googles but they're not all rainbows and unicorns...
  • + 1
 I have a pair of Ryders Inverts. 50$ on amazon. They are comfortable and don't fog but also fit small for their claimed "large" size. They aren't great to wear without a helmet either, due to the small sizing and how far they stand off your face. Not worth 50$
  • + 2
 So if these are Fyre tech, does that mean you go to put them on and it turns out the lenses don't actually exist, you can't take them off, and then you need a class action suit to get your money back?
  • + 1
 Bought a pair earlier this summer after almost getting a stray branch in the eye. Styling is dubious but that seems to be the case for all similar crazy-lens-tech biking shades (Oakley, etc.), which are all at least the same price if not higher - I personally wouldn't wear these while having a post-ride public beer, unless you enjoy the strange looks and/or comments deservedly coming your way. I also run them without the bottom frame, mostly because they feel lighter on my nose and look less extreme/crazy/enduro. I'm still pretty self-conscious about looking like an enduro douche but they do work really well, especially in lower light areas - they adapt really quickly to bright and dark areas and you can definitely put them on and forget about them anywhere from bright midday sunshine right up until dusk, which you can't do with normal glasses. They've never fogged up on me. I do get annoyed about sweat running down from my helmet to eyebrows to the inside of the lens, which is tough to wipe clean without stopping and taking them off - I don't know if the rimless design makes this more of a problem, but I suspect that's just a normal function of wearing glasses while biking? Anyways, yeah...expensive but they seem to work really well if you want some fancy lens features.
  • + 1
 Question: whilst some like Oakley Jawbreakers are $$$, they at least have replaceable lenses (again $$). Do these have replaceable lenses or become useless junk when scratched badly. Surely they didn't miss this opportunity to go to 6x the tech in these glasses?
  • + 6
 Safety glass steez.
  • + 2
 Comes with a free High Viz Jacket and steel toe caps.
  • + 1
 and I run into trees
  • + 1
 Its amazing how we as mountain bikers seem to fall for this..everytime. Slap biking or Mountain biking on a product and jack the price 500%. I wear DeWalt DPG94-9 Dominator Safety Glasses...Under 5 BUCKS! Am i less safe with them? No. Can I see well..YES. So can someone tell me why I would spend those prices for a Ryder?
  • + 1
 I bought a pair earlier this year. They have been great. The photochromic action is pretty quick so yeah, you put them on at the beginning of the ride and you don't need to take them off because they are too dark or they have fogged up. I can cause them to get a little steamed when it's cold and wet out. But a little water spit on the inside and they are good. I use them without the lower frame. Yeah they look goofy walking around town in them, but I have other glasses for that. And street glasses don't work on a bike because when you get low, I'm looking over the tops.
  • + 1
 Isnt Ryders the cheapo brand that is always at the end of the till on some rotating wooden stand that you buy because every shop needs cheap shades? Like Bloc? It just seems that these are not that cheap...
  • + 4
 $240 for Ryders???? hahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha
  • + 5
 Eye-watering prices
  • + 0
 Wow what a bunch of ill informed comments! Oakley forced out of retailers?! Seriously? They own Sunglass Hut the largest sunglass retailer in the world. Ryders is still a North Shore Cdn company just like Arcteryx, or Sugoi, or Sombrio or Race Face, or Rocky Mountain etc. Essilor gave these guys access to technology they never had before. What Essilor brings to the table is huge tech and it's technology that costs more. Just like your $250 helmet or your $7k bike...better performance costs more and there is no better performance tech in glasses in the market. I know some of the people at Ryders and some people's comments here could not be more wrong or off target. They still do great products at a range of price points. And as passionate cyclists who live they sport, especially MTB, they wanted to create the best MTB glasses ever. I worked in retail and sold all the eyewear brands for 20+ years and these guys are the most honest authentic brand out there.
  • + 8
 Brett Arends, a columnist for SmartMoney.com, said: 'One company has excessive dominance in the [eyewear] market. The appearance of variety is an optical illusion.
'Oakley was a big competitor,' he continued. 'Then they had a fight with Luxottica, a dispute about pricing, so Luxottica basically said, "We're dropping you from our stores". [Oakley's] stock price collapsed. How is Oakley going to reach their consumer if they can't get their glasses into Sunglass Hut?'

www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2215287/Luxottica-The-eyewear-company-total-domination-setting-astronomical-prices.html
  • + 5
 Luxottica (owners of Oakley) are in the process of absorbing Essilor like the implaccable corporate Shoggoth they are so often compared to. Luxoticca aquired Oakley in a hostile take over, they cut Oakley out of their retail chain and tanked it's stock price, then made an offer at the old stock price. I would hope Ryders can maintain their independence, but when Luxoticca are involved you never know.
  • + 1
 What a load of garbage, dude.
  • + 2
 Too dear, glasses for riding get too fucking recked, no point spending loads buy cheapos Chuck em in recycling when fu ked , repeat.
  • + 2
 240 dollars? that's a disgusting profit margin. even those of us riding 5k dollar bikes can smell that bullshit a mile away.
  • + 1
 $239?! They're kidding right?? They have to be kidding. Do they come with anything else? Or is it just 1 pair of glasses for $239??
  • + 1
 Let me tell you guys about these sweet glasses I got for $10, then be superior about them in a "I'm cheap as hell and am feeling emboldened by it" sorta way.
  • + 1
 Luxottica purchased Oakley. Luxottica is an Italian company. Essilor is French. What does the Oakley purchase by Luxottica have to do with Ryders?
  • + 3
 Everything since as of January 2017, Luxottica and Essilor are the same company.
  • + 2
 The letter "i" = low sales figures
  • + 2
 And here I am using a pair of hand me down Oakley's and a couple of lenses
  • + 2
 These things probably cost less than $10 to make in China.
  • + 1
 ryders - the really kool brand name i read and always cringe over
  • + 1
 Its a Taiwanese throw away bike brand from where I'm from
  • + 1
 Dragon EnduroX with transitions lens is still king. No lens change ever.
  • + 1
 except those fog up like crazy when you stop for more than 3 seconds. Same price but the arms have to be cut to fit in an helmet.
  • + 1
 @counterpoint: never had a fog problem. Then again I live in one of the driest places.
  • + 2
 Just get Jawbreakers
  • + 1
 They look like safety glasses you'd get on a construction site.
  • + 1
 with a pair of these and my dirt suit.... can anyone say Wing Night...!??
  • + 1
 Why long word "without" is writing fully and shorter "with" is like "w/"?
  • + 1
 without is abbreviated as "w/o"
  • + 1
 @mdgentile: I meant here, in this review, under 6th & 7th photos. )
  • + 1
 Does anyone make riding glasses with a prescription lense option?
  • + 2
 Oakley
  • + 2
 Yes, we will be launching a complete prescription program shortly!
  • + 1
 @RydersEyewear: awesome thanks for the response!
  • + 1
 Rudy project makes great prescription lenses for their cycling glasses.
  • + 1
 When did the price of Ryder's go up %400 ??
  • + 1
 When they had to grease the wheels of pink bike for advertising
  • + 3
 When they started making lenses that have as much tech as Oakley's top level models? I mean, I don't get all the talk about the price - you can still get a pair of $49 Ryders if you'd like - I have a pair. Those just don't shift almost immediately from 77-17% or whatever it is, and have super clear and strong and light lenses. What's not to get?
  • + 1
 @shortcuttomoncton: same quality as overpriced Oakley's hahaha. Just bought a pair of Dragon Enduro X for $50 , they're polarized and transition tint lenses. Just a nice as any Oakley... Only $50!
  • + 1
 @Beez177: I mean, I'm not gonna argue that Dragon Alliance glasses can be had for pretty cheap - I have a pair too. I like them. I'll point out that the MSRP on the EnduroX is like $240 in Canada - about the same price as the Ryders. ca.dragonalliance.com/shop/sku/720-2358

Sounds like you got a great deal at $50....
  • + 1
 no
  • + 1
 pit vipers for the win
  • + 1
 blocking all the haters!
  • + 1
 Sounds dumb
  • + 0
 Uglier than a man's ass, it is.

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