First Ride: Salsa's New Spearfish and Horsethief

Mar 5, 2019
by Daniel Sapp  


The two 29" wheeled bikes that have been revamped in Salsa's line up are the 120mm Horsethief (pictured above) and the 100mm travel Spearfish (pictured below).

Both of these names have been in their catalog for a few generations now but the latest iterations have a number of updates that make them relevant to a large number of mountain bikers. Geometries are updated and now include a flip-chip, suspension is said to be improved, and parts specs are catered to modern trails and more aggressive riding.




Salsa Spearfish Details


• Intended use: Aggressive XC
• Wheel size: 29"
• Rear-wheel travel: 100mm
• Boost 12x157 spacing
• 1x specific
• Carbon frame (aluminum option too)
• Double 24oz bottle mount
• Size: S through XL
• Price: $2,399 - $5,199 USD (aluminum and carbon models, carbon frame only: 2,999)
• Available now
www.salsacycles.com


The Spearfish is the shortest travel bike in this group, and it falls nicely into the current crop of progressive XC rigs. The frame has 100mm of rear-wheel travel and is coupled with a 120mm fork. There is room for two water bottles and a tool kit on all sizes. There are also bolts on the top tube for a bag or whatever else you want to fasten and keep within reach.


Salsa Horsethief Details


• Intended use: Trail
• Wheel size: 29"
• Rear-wheel travel: 120mm
• Boost 12x157 spacing
• 1x specific
• Carbon frame (aluminum option too)
• Double 24oz water bottle mount
• Size: S through XL
• Price: $2,399 - $5,199 USD (aluminum and carbon models, carbon frame only: 2,999)
• Available now
www.salsacycles.com


The Horsethief is Salsa's 120mm travel trail bike. With a 67-degree head tube angle and 140mm of travel up front, the bike is geared to be a versatile all-arounder. Like the Spearfish, it's available in a variety of spec, starting at $2,399 USD and topping out at $5,199 USD for now. The bike has a stout parts spec that includes wide bars, a short stem, dropper post, and Minion tires that make it capable and versatile while also being durable.


A Brief History of Salsa

Salsa was initially based in California but was purchased by distributor Quality Bicycle Products (QBP), based in Bloomington, Minnesota, and brought on as one of their several in-house brands. Back then, Salsa's role then was filling some gaps in supply that QBP had, more than anything else.

According to the team at Salsa, there initially wasn't a strong vision with the purchase, although the potential was there. Salsa was producing what seemed to be anything and everything - sunglasses and headbands to sports bras and tri-bikes, and the brand eventually lost direction and purpose.




Jason Bouchier came on board and took on the Salsa project. In 2009, the brand re-launched with a new vision that catered to the ever-growing gravel and endurance racing segment with the tagline, "Adventure by Bike." Since that time, it's been a slow but steady and methodical process of re-building and re-imagining itself. Salsa has established itself as one of the leaders in the whole gravel and fat biking scene, especially with its midwest roots. With that segment figured out, it was time to move more aggressively into the mountain bike world. While Salsa had a few off-road rigs, they had a lot of room for improvement. Until more recently, that just wasn't a priority. As Joe Mieser, Salsa's Product Manager said, "It's funny we all do mountain bike a lot, it's what we do...we're mountain bikers, but we participate in these other activities as well."

Salsa had some of the earlier 29'ers, and even a 120mm model before that was much of a thing. They were just a bit before they became popular. There was the Mariachi and the Dos Niner, two, at the time, progressive bikes. But time went on and with Salsa's focus on the gravel, fat, endurance segment of the sport, those bikes became dated.

Salsa developed the first generation of the Spearfish and Horsethief. At the time, they were standard single pivot bikes with flex stays; nothing that exciting. They sold but apparently not really that well as the sales manager for Salsa at that time approached the design team and challenged them to make a more sophisticated product to help sell more bikes.

With that, the design team went to the drawing boards and discussed how they were going to not only make a good suspension system, but do so while navigating the complex landscape of there being a lot of patents on suspension. As Meiser said, "we had to decide whether we could make something useful that works well or did we just need to license a platform?"

The team saw that there was a gap in the US market for "Split Pivot". Devinci was using it in Canada but no one was in the US and it would work well with what they wanted to develop. So in 2014, the second generation of suspension bikes, and the first generation of Split Pivot bikes were launched by Salsa.



Split Pivot Explained

So what exactly is Split Pivot? It may be a little misunderstood so let's look at how it differs from a single pivot.

With a single pivot bike, the wheel and brake are attached to the same member which is then attached directly to the main triangle. Whenever you tune that linkage, you have to tune it for pedaling, coasting, and braking. A lot of times, what's good for pedaling isn't great for braking and vice versa and there's usually going to be a compromise. When you set it up for pedaling, the suspension will firm up and you're going to lose a lot of travel and have poor traction while braking. If it's set up for braking then it's not going to have as much support for pedaling and you'll get a lot of bob, etc. There are ways to mediate this but that's the basic "how it works."




With the Split Pivot design, things are, well, split apart. The chainstay, the single pivot portion of the suspension, carries the wheel and handles all of the pedaling. The brake is attached to the seatstay and there's a pivot there - the seatstay is a floating link. From a pedaling standpoint, it is indeed a single pivot but the braking is said to be isolated from it, therefore it's taken out of the equation when it comes to tuning and the braking and pedaling can be tuned independently of each other. So, it's like a single pivot but only half of it.

Where Split Pivot really sets itself apart, according to the team at Salsa, is the ability to tune braking. They can tune the anti-rise so that the active braking isn't using much of the suspension travel and they can also change the pitch of the curve so the braking is consistent throughout the travel.


Why Super Boost?

Salsa's history has a lot of different axle widths, especially with fat bikes. 170 and 197mm rear ends are the standards in that world and the three factors they always found themselves dealing with were tire fit, chainstay length, and drivetrain compatibility. In looking at the new bikes, according to Pete Kosky, Salsa's Product Development Engineer, they knew they wanted to shorten up the back ends but also fit a larger volume tire, at least a 2.6'' because in some of the situations they and their riders find themselves in - adventure riding, bikepacking, etc. the big volume and additional amounts of mud clearance are necessary. "We wanted to have all three but it's difficult to impossible to do with 148mm. With Super Boost, we could have all three."




Aside from the technical aspects, the team wanted to ensure they could build the bikes with Super Boost and stay under $2,400, so they worked with manufacturers to ensure that the products would be available to do that and also communicated with other brands. They didn't want to design anything that was unstable or a trend.

Apparently, according to Meiser, Salsa had been wanting to go with 157mm for some time, even with the previous generation of bikes, but 148 became popular right when those bikes were slated to be released so they had to go with that standard. As Meiser said, "I wish boost had never existed." With 157mm, they are able to reduce the back end by 5mm more, add 1/4" of tire clearance, and run normal size chainrings. There's a normal Q factor, better drivetrain fit, and a stiffer rear end and wheel. The team at Salsa strongly believe that for 29" tires, this is the only way to go.

For those worried about crankset compatibility, the Spearfish and Horsethief framesets will ship with a crankset.


Frame Details

According to Meiser, "It's important to us that the bikes are modern and progressive, cliche as that sounds, and how it says everything and nothing at the same time. We know it's important that we're balancing all of the design factors together. Trails are built differently than even a few years ago, bikes are being ridden hard. All of this is pushing the design of bikes to be different. We wanted to have a good all-around mountain bike. This is not an EWS bike and right now, the rider looking for an EWS bike isn't looking to Salsa...although we would love to get there one day."

I think this is one of the more practical and reasonable stances a bike brand could take. Kudos.




As far as spec goes, these bikes are both in the lower half of travel classes and Salsa wanted them to be good all around rigs. They wanted them to handle well everywhere and they didn't want to design a bike for just one place. For spec, they included appropriate tires. The Horsethief has a DHF/DHR combo while the Spearfish has a Forekaster/Ikon set up and the folks at Salsa have apparently been running DHF/DHR's on both bikes, but they know that may not appeal to the most common buyer of the Spearfish.

There are also wider handlebars, dropper posts, and mounts for two bottles and a tool kit on each bike.





Geometry and Kinematics

There are quite a few updates from the last generation to this one on both the Spearfish and Horsethief. Both bikes ride far different from their predecessor and a lot of that is due to the updates in the geometry and how the suspension works.

There are longer front centers, shorter stems, and slacker angles overall. One thing that stands out on the geometry as not quite so progressive is the seat angle. A lot of brands are trending steeper and steeper but Salsa believes that it's a fine balance and opted to stay more conservative citing that the steeper the seat angle, the further out it's going to push the front end. Also, with their suspension design, the bikes pedal higher in their travel which keeps you more forward.




The new bikes have a lower starting leverage ratio to allow riders to run a lower air pressure in the shock. There's more progression at the end of the stroke as well. Justin Steiner, Salsa's Brand Manager, says, "Riders are charging harder and there's an expectation that your 100-120mm bikes are still there for you when things get spicy." The geometry and suspension updates reflect that.

The other big update that makes this bike more modern from the previous generation is that it's 1x only. It's better optimized around that drivetrain and that gave more room for the team to work on the suspension and tire clearance.




First Ride Impressions

bigquotesSalsa have always had a range that comes to mind as being solid and reliable rides, but their mountain bikes in years past haven't really stood out from the crowd. With the new updates to their line, Salsa now has three solid bikes that are capable, versatile, and in my opinion, could line up against most anything else out there when it comes to being a very well-rounded ride. In the time that I was able to spend on each of the three updated models, I was impressed with the ride quality of each one and I am looking forward to spending more time on at least one of them in the near future for a full review. Daniel Sapp








97 Comments

  • + 94
 I've always thought of Salsas as the bikes that weirdos and quirky people like to ride. But they've also been riding for dozens of years and they can beat you in both climbs and descents in their weird Salsa while you can barely keep up in your fancy new SB150 or SC Nomad.
  • + 23
 Ha! Been humbled on a few climbs by dudes on salsas, I know what you mean..
  • + 15
 Thats so true. You get passed on the climb by the dude who's obviously been bikepacking for the last 3 weeks on his drop bar fully loaded rig or on the descent by the singlespeed highpost hardtail...
  • + 30
 I feel personally attacked.
  • + 1
 We have a sweet 5-6h trail with sweet 0,5-1,5h segments that are an absolute blast when ridden separately on different days. You just want to pedal your ass off intensely, keep the speed up and then go home... But folks on Salsas and Surlys take the whole thing at the snail pace... and eat cashew nuts instead of Snickers... Different horses for different strokes or something
  • + 2
 @atourgates: You meant to say "triggered".
  • + 3
 Definitely for the weirdos. Salsas got me back into mountain biking. And learned a lot on those bikes.
  • + 1
 It's not like you have to be ashamed of getting passed on the climbs by a 120mm bike if you're riding a nomad Smile
  • + 1
 @Naturel: as long as tyres are the same there’s a lot to be ashamed of. If I take Nomad with Exos and you take 120 DC bike with 2 ply minions I’d have to wait for you on top. I wouldn’t even use lock out Smile
  • + 1
 And by the way, can all other manufacturers follow suit and put superboost spacing on their shorter travel bikes? One spacing to rule them all. I would finally be able to justify a bling wheelset and use it for DH, Enduro and XC.
  • + 1
 @Naturel: there are not that many people who broke a good 29” wheel with a good rim on 142x12... also we can call it 157 DH spacing, Super Boost is actually an inferior design as compared to a regular 157 since difference in flange offset creates too much imbalance between drive side and non drive side. Finally an offseted 142x12 hub, placing the rim right in between the flanges, like Cannondale did is even better than 157, the spoke angles are better. Sorry.

To put it simple, boost is a scam and Trek along Sram deserve all the sht being thrown at then for creating it.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: totally agree with everything my dude. Although I'll still smash you witn dh tires even if you have ardent race (my favorite XC tire). I am the kind of guy who has the terrain to justify big tires on my XC but it's still my favorite bike. So much more poppy and stupid fast. Sorry Waki
  • + 1
 It's just that the Enduro bike I want is 157 so I'd like a 157 short travel bike. But not a Salsa
  • + 1
 @Naturel: It’s not about that, its about you on light tyres vs you on heavy tyres. If we consider the bike as the variable on a climb, the weight and rolling resistance of the tyres will always be the deciding factor. I was wanking out a climb in my hometown in Poland when on DH tyres to see how would I stack up against the rest of people on a mellow 30min climb and out of around 2k people I scored 150th on Strava. Like 7 minutes behind the best dude who is apparently one of the strongest XCers in Poland. Next year I came to the same place with DD/SG combo and I smashed myself by 2 minutes without even trying. Now one has to either suck or be ridiculosuly light and lucky to run away with 1plies when bombing down on a bike like Nomad.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: exo casing in BC is fine
  • + 53
 "Aggressive XC" not familiar with that term... is more or less slacked out than downcountry?
  • + 12
 Yes. Smile
  • + 100
 Aggressive XC = crotchless bibs.
  • + 13
 @johnski: ahahahahahaha that was better than finding crack in Enve rim of Columbian ex pro roadie
  • + 1
 If anyone wondered why I put them with Surly "focused on gravel and fatbiking".
  • + 25
 Dave Weagle designed link, slack headtube, water bottle mounts, modest price, they don't look half bad, and a good attitude from the Salsa dudes. "This is not an EWS bike and right now, the rider looking for an EWS bike isn't looking to Salsa...although we would love to get there one day."

Just looks like a fun bike catering to your avg trail rider trying to have a good time. Good looks.. the only negative I can point out now is a questionable seat tube angle, and depending on how you look at it, the superboost situation - which I would argue is a benefit.
  • + 6
 I think that these two bikes are hitting their marks quite well. Seat tube angle is debatable, because, you know I am dynamic on the bike and can move my hairy backside fore or aft as appropriate. The super-boost is the only real pain with yet another hub size to add to the collection - I always have a spare set of wheels for each of my bikes, and the collection is starting to get out of hand with 9mm QR, 142x12mm, 148x12mm, and if I went with a Salsa, a spare 157mm Super Boost-a-nator.

I imagine the 120/100 bike will ride not too indifferently to the Rocky Mountain Element - a very overlooked XC/Marathon/Trail bike. 'cept the Salsa outdoes Rocky with that top top bottle / toolbox mount...
  • + 2
 Problem I find is from the very beginning I read that split pivot didn't require the precision of DW link and therefore should be cheaper to manufacture- so the problem is Salsa isn't passing that saving on.

Their frames should not cost what DW Link frames cost plain and simple.
From when he got the patent:
What is Split Pivot?

Split Pivot is Weagle’s answer to a call for a suspension system that is simpler to design and produce that his acclaimed DW-Link design, but still offers comparable performance.
The appeal of the design to manufacturers and consumers is that the design is less reliant on tight tolerances and machining spec, which in the end means a mechanically robust high-performance system that costs less.
  • + 2
 The bikes look interesting, but the price is a little out of whack IMHO. As far as I'm aware, Salsa is still QBP's house brand, and should be a bit less expensive that the "name brands", or at least that's how they've always been before. Was interested in the Horsethief, but at $200 more than a comparably equipped Smuggler, or a whopping $800 more than a GX built GG Trailpistol my interest dropped off significantly.
  • + 1
 Just what benefit does a 100mm travel frame get from superboost?
  • + 1
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: Wide tires and short chainstays, if you're into those things. Or, to look at it another way: why would you want a narrower hub that produces less strong wheels?
  • + 2
 When you start looking at the bikes close up, you can see that Salsa puts some time and effort into the smaller details. Where else are you going to get a bottle mount on your top tube? And they pedal and descend great - not as spongy as a Specialized Horst Link, and not as stiff as a Pivot DW link.
  • + 17
 This article had a lot of great background info, but man, talk about mailing it in in terms of "first ride" impressions. Three run-on, vague sentences to describe three different bikes. Why bother posting anything if that's the amount of effort and info you're willing to hand out? This is completely worthless in terms of learning anything at all about how the bikes ride.
  • + 4
 I agree. This couldn't have been more unhelpful, its basically just repeating what the product launch told us.
  • + 1
 Was thinking the same thing. It's not a first ride impression article at all.
  • + 0
 This should be top comment.
  • + 2
 The original PB owners sold the site to a click bait company. That's why all the titles have changed like 3 months ago. At least they seem to be listening to users complaints in the comments. BTW if the OG pinkbike guys are reading, you are an inspiration. Starting a site like this one out of passion and becoming the number one reference in that field and then making a few mills to be able to ride all day everyday for the rest of your life... Mad props
  • + 1
 But yeah, all that being said please try to be consistent, this a press release not a first ride...
  • + 11
 The dual 24oz water bottle mounts had my curiosity, the top tube mount now has my attention. I'm digging the versatility.
  • + 1
 I can see place for four bottles on that frame.
  • + 1
 For persons (like me) who hate carrying water on their back, the HT looks really versatile. Not sure how big a bottle you could get on the top tube, but even a 20 would net you almost 70 ounces of water on the bike. I dig.
  • + 7
 Honestly these bikes fill the "needs" of the majority of mountain bikers out here. Just decide if your a little more baggy or spandexy and ride away...


Now make something like the Stumpy EVO = what everybody "wants"!! Smile
(even though it's mostly wasted potential for the likes of me)
  • + 6
 As a Spearfish owner, I would say the thing that disappoints me the most about the new bike is the weight. I have mine built up at 22.5lbs right now. There is no way that is happening with the new one, and I believe they are going to miss a lot of the racing/ endurance crowd because of it. 2019 Spearfish frame weight (MD) = 6.8lbs, 2015 Spearfish frame weight (MD, carbon) = 4.97lbs.
  • + 2
 Saw the same thing. But I looked closer, and it appears that weight includes a heavy crankset, as well as a headset. So I was thinking possibly low to mid 5's.
  • + 1
 @gooutsidetoday: Frame weight includes the shock, headset, and thru axle. The crank weight is not included
  • + 1
 @bouwpakket: then that is indeed portly. People ragged on the sb100 for its 5.5lb frame weight...
  • + 9
 Where is the “ride” part of “First Ride”?
  • + 12
 At the bottom, "First Ride Impressions" - Right now, yes, they're minimal and far less than we usually have since this is what we had the opportunity for with rain and snow in the desert last week. I'm not going to act like we've been able to ride the bikes enough do a more comprehensive first look or review when we haven't spent the appropriate amount of time on the bikes on telling terrain. In the time I did spend on the bikes, I can say I'm looking forward to riding them a lot more.

We do have one of the bikes coming for a full review so stay tuned for that in a few months!
  • + 3
 I'm actually kinda surprised Salsa didn't make the bikes more versatile by adding clearance for 275x3.25" tires, 29x2.8, and favoring space inside the frame for frame bags over standover clearance. That being said, they still are pretty spacious front triangles in a market where even a single bottle is a luxury.
  • + 2
 Overall wish Salsa would stick to the dirty hippie adventure theme instead of averaging a Spec/SC/everything else in terms of styling. Like the utility of the extra mounts, not feeling the superboost and some geo figures but that's life
  • + 1
 My first full-sus bike was a 2009 Salsa El Kaboing. Got the frameset new for $400 on sale in 2010, and built it up with Hope/Mavic wheels and a travel-adjust Pike. That bike was awesome on the tight, rocky trails around SLO. Maybe I'll pick up one of these frames and build it up, I really like Salsa's philosophy of building bikes for both fun and adventure.
  • + 4
 @danielsapp That whole history lesson and not even a single minor shout-out to Ross Shafer? C'mon.
  • + 2
 Blowing it.
  • + 1
 @danielsapp: Or mention of the Big Mama 29'er??
  • + 1
 Well done Salsa. I had a previous generation Horsethief that was a very good bike. Used it from everything from Enduro to XC and Stage racing with some great result across the board. It just needed some refinement in the execution. I think that these are a great next step and have my interest.
  • + 1
 Everyone that's complaining about "superboost" hasn't spent enough time in the industry...this is essentially a return to an old standard. I am all for this, less proprietary boost hubs the better
  • + 4
 New super boost is different hub flange, brake and cassette spacing than the old 157 dh standard
  • + 2
 @calstahl: Flanges are wider, but brake and cassette spacing is the same as 157 DH hubs.
  • + 3
 I hope you guys end up doing a review on the Rustler. Looks like the most exciting bike of the three of them.
  • + 2
 I don't get the hub standard complaints. If you buy a new car, do you expect the bolt pattern and offset will be the same as your old one?
  • + 1
 It's not a car
  • + 2
 I always wonder if these names of bikes come from the area I live in. black hills,sd
  • + 1
 They are! My parents live in Spearfish, and the bike is named after the town. The guy at one of the local bike shops says the guys at Salsa come out to the hills every year to test new bikes.
  • + 1
 I'm not super happy about another hub standard. I get it. Progress is good, but we just now started to see boost 148 take over.and here comes another hub standard.
  • + 0
 If anyone thinks there is a ride quality difference between a split pivot (um... single pivot) and a regular single pivot, then I have some waterfront property in Florida to sell you
  • + 0
 Are all carbon wheels equal tho?
  • + 2
 There are a lot of options out there when choosing bikes. Never have I ever heard "I really want that Salsa"
  • + 15
 I agree with this 100% but that was then and this is now. Their new batch of bikes puts them on the radar and piques my interest.
  • + 1
 Their nitche is bikepackers and ultraendurance racers really. But maybe should be a bit wider. Also not mentioned is that the price is reasonable. And if I'm not mistaken they are sold through REI.
  • + 1
 @danielsapp: yeah, they sound pretty great for a lot of my trails and I've never wanted a salsa mtb.
  • + 1
 @JesseE: For sure. Even with the little I've ridden them, if I just needed to get a bike that was a budget friendly failsafe option to ride wherever I think the Horsethief would be on the short list.
  • + 2
 Bucksaw was the "it" bike for a while in a lot of circles.
  • + 1
 It’s cool to see a local company on pink bike but I still probably won’t buy anything from them besides fat bikes or gravel bikes
  • + 2
 It's Salsa, not salsa! Regards, George
  • + 1
 @danielsapp The pricing in the article is wrong. According to the Salsa website, both frame only options are $2999.
  • + 1
 Updated
  • + 0
 what's all the hub-bub with the water bottle cage option on frames?

maybe it's just me --- I stopped using water bottles with MTB's back in the 90's. hydration packs for me
  • + 1
 Only a sharpie away from a GT karakoram "tequila sunrise" colorway on a modern bike.

Someone need to do it!
  • + 2
 I'll have the roast duck with the mango salsa.
  • + 2
 Where can we get those bike stands!
  • + 3
 Superboost bikes hmm
  • - 2
 So Boost 148 shouldn’t have existed. Awesome.

Read between the lines. If you buy anything not 157 spacing you are throwing money away. 148mm is going to be deader than 26 inch wheels. Don’t be fooled by sales and what shops say. If Salsa isn’t doing 148 anymore, it’s obsolete.

Kind of like how 27.5 shouldn’t have existed....

Mountain bikers really are a bunch of suckers.
  • + 4
 What’s wrong with 27.5
  • + 1
 meh. i predict 148 will win out. salsa has always been behind the times on standards, but i wouldn't trust them jumping on this as a sign that the whole industry is on boost 157 (it's not), i would say this is just salsa trying to get ahead of the curve and prove they are modernizing, and maybe jumping on board too fast

and even if 148 doesn't stick around, there are boost adapters for pretty much every kind of wheel out there.
  • + 2
 Ohhhh. Totally winner if they come with Salsa Rasta skewers!
  • + 1
 So let’s make a bike that every company under the sun is making.
  • + 1
 No stand over. No Shimano. No sale.
  • + 1
 Is that split pivot the same as the Orbea rallon R5 one?
  • + 1
 That turn has to be at sweetwater!
  • + 1
 What is the weight?
  • + 1
 Looks like, I dont know.
  • + 0
 I do not get the slack seat tube angles on xc/trail bikes in 2019.
  • + 17
 It's all a balance. Just because we have the ability to have really steep angles now doesn't mean its the best in all applications. Not every bike needs to be at 77.5 but there are a lot of bikes that benefit from it. You can't look at one or even a couple of numbers and judge a bike off of them, it's how everything works together and in this case, it works well.
  • + 1
 I love the way my 2015 Spearfish pedals, climbs and descends, and I have done plenty of 50+ mile trail rides on it while feeling remarkably un-crushed at the end, but I have the seat slammed almost all the way forward to compensate for its 73.5 degree seat tube angle. If the 2019 model had a 75 degree seat tube angle it would be perfect for me.
  • + 3
 You need steeper angles with long travel bikes because the angle gets slacker as the suspension sags. Shorter travel bikes have less sag and need less steep angles.
  • - 1
 Let me tell you, I am a tech at a shop and we sell Salsa. Very Bad Reps, Very bad builds and all around.
  • + 1
 Supper boost ????
  • - 2
 'Super Boost' on-board.
What next? Extra-Super-Boost followed by the Extra-Super-Boost-Plus 159.69mm two years later?
f*ck those 'standards'!
  • + 1
 And....sold out.
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