Santa Cruz Team Replica Carbon V10 - Eurobike 2010

Sep 2, 2010
by Mike Levy  
The Santa Cruz carbon V10 has managed to get a lot of people very excited, and for good reason, it is one of the lightest and most advanced downhill frames available. We talked to one of the main men behind the development of the new super bike to get the lowdown on the how the new carbon frame came to be, and all of the other changes that have been made. Inside you'll find photos of both the bike and a frame that has been sawed in two to reveal it's secrets, as well as some great audio explaining each photo.

Read on...
I had a long day of work before the time came to make my way over to the Santa Cruz booth to see my intended prey, the new carbon V10. If you think that she looks good in the photo, you should really give it a proper look in person - simply stunning. Right away the bike gives the impression that there is nothing extra, just the material needed to make it one of the fastest bikes on the hill. It is both lighter and more adjustable than the aluminum version that it replaces. That's right, no more aluminum V10 for next season, but don't panic too much, frame price will be similar to what the alloy model was offered at and will also include the Cane Creek AngleSet headset that it will ship with from Santa Cruz. Expect the shipping date to be around the coming December, just in time for Christmas. Have you been naughty or nice? Press play and let Santa Cruz's Josh Kissner tell you the details.
I had a long day of work before the time came to make my way over to the Santa Cruz booth to see my intended prey, the new carbon V10. If you think that she looks good in the photo, you should really give it a proper look in person - simply stunning. Right away the bike gives the impression that there is nothing extra, just the material needed to make it one of the fastest bikes on the hill. It is both lighter and more adjustable than the aluminum version that it replaces. That's right, no more aluminum V10 for next season, but don't panic too much, frame price will be similar to what the alloy model was offered at and will also include the Cane Creek AngleSet headset that it will ship with from Santa Cruz. Expect the shipping date to be around the coming December, just in time for Christmas. Have you been naughty or nice? Press play and let Santa Cruz's Josh Kissner tell you the details.

Audio Loading...


Want to look fast? Santa Cruz will be offering a very limited run of Syndicate team replica bikes that closely resemble the bike ridden by Peat and Greg Minnaar. While the are sure to be pricey, the team-only Edge carbon rims have been left off the build list in the name of keeping the price somewhat reasonable. There will only be 100 made and I'm sure they will go quickly. Listen to the audio to hear the details!
Want to look fast? Santa Cruz will be offering a very limited run of Syndicate team replica bikes that closely resemble the bike ridden by Peat and Greg Minnaar. While the are sure to be pricey, the team-only Edge carbon rims have been left off the build list in the name of keeping the price somewhat reasonable. There will only be 100 made and I'm sure they will go quickly. Listen to the audio to hear the details!

Audio Loading...


This carbon link was a hint of what was coming down the road. This was first used on the last generation aluminum frame and it is carried over to the new carbon model as well. Take note of the factory fitted shock mud guard, a nice touch that I wish more companies would use.
This carbon link was a hint of what was coming down the road. This was first used on the last generation aluminum frame and it is carried over to the new carbon model as well. Take note of the factory fitted shock mud guard, a nice touch that I wish more companies would use.

The new carbon V10 will ship with Cane Creek's AngleSet headset that allows you to fine tune the bike's handling to the terrain or riding preferences. Depending on your rear wheel travel setting, you'll be able to pick a head angle between 63 and 66 degrees. The great thing about the AngleSet headset is that it lets you adjust the head angle independently of other values. This is truly one of the best products of the year. Hear more information by listening to the audio.
The new carbon V10 will ship with Cane Creek's AngleSet headset that allows you to fine tune the bike's handling to the terrain or riding preferences. Depending on your rear wheel travel setting, you'll be able to pick a head angle between 63 and 66 degrees. The great thing about the AngleSet headset is that it lets you adjust the head angle independently of other values. This is truly one of the best products of the year. Hear more information by listening to the audio.

Audio Loading...


The big news may be the new carbon frame, but there are more changes to talk about as well, one of the biggest being the ability to adjust the bike's travel. Up until now the V10 had a full 10 inches of travel, something that a lot of riders loved, but some wanted the option to have less depending on the course. The new model is adjustable from 10
The big news may be the new carbon frame, but there are more changes to talk about as well, one of the biggest being the ability to adjust the bike's travel. Up until now the V10 had a full 10 inches of travel, something that a lot of riders loved, but some wanted the option to have less depending on the course. The new model is adjustable from 10" down to 8.5". By setting the V10 into it's shorter travel position you'll also end up with a slacker and lower bike. Combine the travel adjust with the Cane Creek AngleSet headset and you have one very adaptable bike. Bring on the steeps and gnar, but she'll be ready for anything else as well. Push play to hear about it.

Audio Loading...


Just imagine having to cut one of these beauties in half... It nearly brings a tear to my eye. The carbon frame was in development long before you or I heard about it, and Santa Cruz used their Syndicate race team to help in the process. The carbon mold that is used to make the frame is incredibly expensive so it was very important that the geometry be 100% dialed before it was cast in stone. Listen to the audio to hear about the development process.
Just imagine having to cut one of these beauties in half... It nearly brings a tear to my eye. The carbon frame was in development long before you or I heard about it, and Santa Cruz used their Syndicate race team to help in the process. The carbon mold that is used to make the frame is incredibly expensive so it was very important that the geometry be 100% dialed before it was cast in stone. Listen to the audio to hear about the development process.

Audio Loading...


Santa Cruz knows that the some riders are still wary of carbon frames, no matter how strong they prove to be in testing. To that end they offer both a stand up warranty and an impressive crash replacement policy. The carbon frame has proved to be as strong as the aluminum model in every regard, and even more robust in some of the tests. The warranty and crash replacement program are great, but the fact that the aluminum frame has been discontinued is what shows Santa Cruz's confidence in what they have been able to achieve.
Santa Cruz knows that the some riders are still wary of carbon frames, no matter how strong they prove to be in testing. To that end they offer both a stand up warranty and an impressive crash replacement policy. The carbon frame has proved to be as strong as the aluminum model in every regard, and even more robust in some of the tests. The warranty and crash replacement program are great, but the fact that the aluminum frame has been discontinued is what shows Santa Cruz's confidence in what they have been able to achieve.

Audio Loading...


The new carbon V10's seatmast looks very different from it's aluminum brother. Take note of the visually different types of carbon used in different areas of the frame and then push the play button to hear Josh explain it.
The new carbon V10's seatmast looks very different from it's aluminum brother. Take note of the visually different types of carbon used in different areas of the frame and then push the play button to hear Josh explain it.

Audio Loading...


Listen to audio to hear Santa Cruz's Josh Kissner explain the different layups and varying wall thickness's that you see in this photo. Check out how thick the carbon is just aft of the headtube! There is a reason that carbon is used on everything from F1 cars to the space shuttle, you can put material exactly where it needs to be and keep it thin and light in areas that don't require it, resulting in both an incredibly light and strong final product.
Listen to audio to hear Santa Cruz's Josh Kissner explain the different layups and varying wall thickness's that you see in this photo. Check out how thick the carbon is just aft of the headtube! There is a reason that carbon is used on everything from F1 cars to the space shuttle, you can put material exactly where it needs to be and keep it thin and light in areas that don't require it, resulting in both an incredibly light and strong final product.

Audio Loading...


Massive amounts of carbon material have been used to build the ISCG-05 chain guide tabs and you no longer have to worry about voiding your frame's warranty when mounting taco-type protection.
Massive amounts of carbon material have been used to build the ISCG-05 chain guide tabs and you no longer have to worry about voiding your frame's warranty when mounting taco-type protection.

Audio Loading...


The guys at Santa Cruz felt that their current Driver 8 aluminum rear end could actually be made lighter than a carbon version, so that's what they did. They didn't simply want to use carbon for the swingwarm just because the front triangle uses it, but only if there was going to be an advantage, which there wasn't. Makes sense to me.
The guys at Santa Cruz felt that their current Driver 8 aluminum rear end could actually be made lighter than a carbon version, so that's what they did. They didn't simply want to use carbon for the swingwarm just because the front triangle uses it, but only if there was going to be an advantage, which there wasn't. Makes sense to me.


The aluminum V10, in all it's different stages of development, was proved to be not only one of the most successful race bikes ever built, but also a reliable favorite of the average shredder. There isn't really any doubt in my mind that this new carbon version will find the same acclaim, but that's just my opinion. Lets hear yours below!

Visit the Santa Cruz website to see their entire range.

Stay tuned for more Eurobike coverage!



136 Comments

  • + 14
 What exactly is the crash replacement policy? Two year warranty? I think it should be at least 5 years with a frame that is going to cost over 3000.00 USD. Anyone who rides DH, seriously, knows that you are going to put the bike down in the rocks at some point and its not a matter of if but a matter of when. I have seen carbon frames hit the rocks...and the next thing you know the bike is for sale. Structure might be stronger than aluminum but what happens when this frame hits some unforgiving boulders and the fibers start to protrude? I think I will be sticking to aluminum and I will stay worry free. Just an opinion.
  • + 2
 ^^^^ this guy knows his shit, also what worries me is if you spend thousands of dollars on a carbon bike, and a small rock or pebble carries from the front tire and puts a nice nick in the downtube or something. jesus
  • + 1
 Most high end frames only have a 2 year warranty even on aluminum ones that cost more than 3000
  • + 1
 One thing to keep in mind is that a lot of riders won't keep a DH frame for more than two season, even one as expensive and incredible as this. I think I'd keep it forever, but there are lots of people who will be on something else come the next season. DH bikes get around!
  • + 1
 A small detail here: vast majority of companies gives you 2 years warranty and then you can go huck yourself, pay a full retail price for a completely new one. SC gives you a crash replacement program which WORKS. SC is also very generous to warranty claims. Haven't got that feeling when speaking to dealers of other companies before I bought my Nomad Smile Well SC bought me with that so I bought them Wink
  • + 2
 the 2 year warranty covers manufacturing defects, the lifetime crash replacement warranty gives you a discount on spare parts if you manage to snap it. Santa Cruz do this to show they are confident in the carbon technology
  • + 1
 Every bike i have ever owned has had a crash replacement, hell I just got a free replacement and my bike was off warranty for a year!
  • + 1
 they've done this crash replacement program for all their frames since a long time. When you buy the bike or a frame they say on the warranty card or on one of plenty of product broshures and owners manuals (can't remember): they did everything they could so it serves you as long as possible, and they wish you keep it forever Wink as far as I rode few of their bikes (including mine), the geometry is so dialed and tech details are so well solved that I just don't want ot get rid of it. It's hard even between their own frames! I wanted to change my Nomad for Blur LT2 and I just can't do it, I love this bike!
  • + 1
 hardtail freerider, I hae been riding a carbon xc bike for 2 years now and had tons of rocks kick off the tire into the downtube and bottom bracket and all they do it put a nick in the clear coat. I have crashed the bike hard into logs, done 4-5 foot drops on it and it is fine did I mention it is an XC frame. I also have a V10 and nomad but the carbon one has been through a lot and I have no concerns with it. I used to ride with guys on old school trek oclv hardtails from the 90's which had holes in the bottom bracket area and they still rode them hard for years.
  • + 5
 Bring back the aluminum version! Having both gives the riders the option. Even though it's a dh race bike, there are many freeriders out there who ride it. I'm sure they would prefer the aluminum. Give riders the choice! Great bike nonetheless!! Santa Cruz is the best!!
  • + 3
 The aluminum frame is gone because this carbon model is lighter, stronger, and close to the same price. Makes sense to me.
  • + 3
 The thing is with this frame, and carbon in general you have to throw out all of the conventional rules that are used for metal frames. Sure its thin in places, but that is obviously a place where there are less load forces, and thick layups are not needed. It may even look like there are places on the frame that you can crush with your bare hands, but Ill bet the farm that this thing is tough and you all just fear change. I hate to break it to you all, but in 10 years we will probably all be riding Carbon bikes. So Everyone, please stop trying to be an lounge chair engineer and predict how this thing will fair, because I am sure they did plenty of testing.
  • + 2
 You forgot titanium!
But I don't get why there is so much commotion about the carbon v10 and not about the gt fury carbon?
  • + 2
 As far as I'm aware, Ti is heavier than aluminium - It just has a massive strength to weight ratio in comparison? Correct me if I'm wrong...
  • + 1
 You are correct that Ti is heavier than Al, but much much stronger, so you can use make small skinny tubes (like steel frames) with Ti that are lighter than the oversized tubes you need for Aluminium.
  • + 2
 If you sponsored by the company and do not care about replacement and of course money is no object...absolutely, this bike is sick. But if you are like most people and have to work hard for your bike...go with aluminum. We are not talking structure strength...we are talking real world crashing every once in a while, rocks flying off the trail right into your frame and shuttling your bike next to other guys that don't care about your bike (pedals, truck beds, rocks,you get my drift). It's not about being a genius, all you have to do is have a little common sense to see the logic.
  • + 1
 you are absolutely right.....
  • + 2
 man that is a sick bicycle. although i am a bit wary of how thin the carbon is in some areas. if you had a big lad riding that frame and he came up short on a jump, would it survive? weight limit? good step forward for mtb'ing though!
  • + 2
 Considering all of peoples comments about the bike how "it is to weak and too expensive" i don't see why people cant just accept that it is a nice bike and Santa Cruz have obviously put a lot of time and effort into this bike. So cant some people just accept it for what it is and how amazingly beautiful it has turned out. It will be one of the fastest downhill bikes out there and good luck to it.
Also to charlies comment about it snapping it probably wont and if it does i'm sure Santa Cruz will definitely supply you with a brand new one and probably extra parts to keep you as a happy customer.
  • + 2
 There seems to be a lot of speculation regarding the durability of Carbon. One thing to keep in mind is that the aerospace industry has been using carbon applications for years. I know that airplanes take less impact abuse then a mountain bike...however the amount of stress that an airplane goes through proves that carbon is strong and most likely strong enough for a mountain bike. BTW...that bike is DOPE!
  • + 2
 i was able to get a hold of this bike, number 58/100 Smile . its an amazing bike and has virtually no flex or even sound. the only sound i hear through even the roughest of rock gardens are the tires plowing through the rocks. not to mention its red. (red makes you go faster)
  • + 2
 lol that is so messed up... they said when they originally posted the carbon proto that the carbon would be offered and not a replacement.... soooo that kept all the people buying 2010 aluminum frames when they coulda just waited a season and had a carbon one for just a bit more. HAHA santa cruz just shafted all of you suckers. Brilliant marketing tho.
  • + 1
 well if price tag for alu version was (as far as I can remember) 2700$ and carbon is 2850$ then it is pretty stupid to keep both for sale isn't it? Especially having an alu Driver 8. People could figure it out themselves...
  • + 1
 Or they possibly changed their minds?
  • + 1
 Or they obviously wanted to sell the rest of their aluminum bikes. Especially seeing as the have about a nine month lead time from overseas I doubt they just "changed their minds" ...they are not dumb
  • + 2
 yes this is what happened probably, I see no problem with that! But it's pretty stupid when people blame others for doing such thing. As if S-Cruz should throw all the stock to the garbage just so that some forum geek feels not cheated... not cheated by what. Get some job try to start your own company, see what it takes to have one, get the proper understanding of what it means to pay the bills. Then start arguments that SC are money-oriented basterds. FFS - bloody wee forum beigists! political correction from teenage years: get some real life problems, beigism at its best...
  • + 2
 Waki what are you talking about? Throw frames away? Get real life problems? wtf... Just like any thing else in the world when the new model comes out the old one is sold at a discounted price. Santa Cruz obviously wanted to get the full MSRP for the alu v-10 for as long as they could. I say smart move on their part, others say they got ripped off
  • + 1
 A crap i got into this again... it was nothing against you, i tried to agree, writing down stuff then my boss showed up and I haven't finished. You are right as hell! I wanted to write something about rffr's attitude with him calling people suckers etc...
  • + 1
 I love the carbon V10, just need to figure out how to break my 2005 aluminium V10 so I can trade up! One thing that seems odd considering this is a Syndicate race bike is the use of what appears to be a steel spring on the rear shock. With a carbon frame, carbon rims and a host of other weight saving parts they are obviously trying to make this bike as light as possible so why the steel spring?
  • + 1
 Perhaps because someone wants to fine tune his/hers sag by buying another spring, and a wrong Ti one would pretty much a waste. A the same time it's pretty strange to buy a complete bike without a shock spring. Fox does not provide own Ti springs with their shocks as far as I am concerned, so I guess it gets a bit messy for SC to make additional orders at third party. But I might be wrong.
  • + 1
 This is a team replica bike, for sale to the public. Some of the parts (like the wheels) have been downgraded to make it more accessible to the public. Also, spring rates are dependent on rider weight, so it's probably one of the first things to be swapped out... kind of the same reason why bikes don't come with pedals - at least high end ones anyway.
  • + 1
 The real truth is that there is almost no profit margin on Ti coils. Even with OE pricing they still will not be able to source a good ti spring for under $200usd. In comparison the OE pricing for a steel spring is under $10usd, yes under $10! At the end of the day it all about the profit margins and if the numbers dont make sense they wont do it
  • + 1
 The thing about carbon fiber is the wear. It's a fact that it is a very stiff, hard material. However. When they started using carbon on plane falps they realized that although it was harder than aluminum it wore out more. The water and the wind filter into the pores of the carbon fiber and weaken it. So the issue here is really about how long you want the bike to last.
  • + 1
 Those bikes have had a lot of testing by the Syndicate team, so if from that testing they weren't happy with using carbon then they wouldn't be putting them out to sale. It looks pretty sorted to me. Have no idea what the effect a rock bashing into the frame is, but Santa Cruz probably know and it might not be as bad as you guys think.
  • + 1
 The downtube is incredibly thick, much thicker than the aluminum tube used on the previous version V10. As opposed to going with large diameter thin tubes that may possibly dent/crack, Santa Cruz has used smaller diameter thicker tubes to ward of impact damage. The opposite route from some other companies, but after hearing their explanation it certainly makes sense.
  • + 2
 have they gone to a longer stroke shock with this frame? If i remeber correctly all production v-10 bikes have used a shorter travel shock than usual for a dh,which was the only downside to the bike? fill me in if im wrong.
  • + 1
 The longer stroke shock is used on this V10.
  • + 1
 I thought carbon was going to be questionable until i started riding my Edge AM wheels. After multiple 4 and 5 foot drops to flat on my 6" travel bike with no after effects on the wheels im sold that carbon is here to stay!!!
  • + 2
 Or they obviously wanted to sell the rest of their aluminum bikes. Especially seeing as the have about a nine month lead time from overseas I doubt they just "changed their minds" ...they are not dumb
  • + 1
 Bit of an odd question but does anyone know the name of the red paint like cherry red for example. I'm getting a bike sprayed and like that colour but don't know the name of the paint
  • + 2
 I'm nowhere near smart enough to enter the "carbon v. aluminum" debate so i'm just going to trust santa cruz did there homework and see how this plays out.
  • + 0
 i've dented almost all my bikes on the down tube, if i had a carbon bike it would've cost me a new front triangle. sure, it may perform better, but i think it makes the bike more elitist, as in only the richest can afford one. surly that frame wouldn't last an average DH rider more then a season. For those that can afford a new bike every year, great, go ahead, but that carbon bike, but for the average rider, i think it's over kill
  • + 1
 Watch the testing they put the frame through on the Santa Cruz website. Pretty impressive if you ask me. www.santacruzmtb.com/v10_carbon
  • + 1
 A pity there's no Mike Forentino or Joe Graney, I love their attitude to internet forums and misjudgement of their products Smile
  • + 3
 great review,and the frame look so nice
  • + 2
 looking good santa cruz! keep the innovation coming!
  • + 2
 anyone know how much it weighs?
  • + 2
 33-34 lbs
  • - 2
 "Listen to audio to hear Santa Cruz's Josh Kissner explain the different layups and varying wall thickness's that you see in this photo. Check out how thick the carbon is just aft of the headtube! There is a reason that carbon is used on everything from F1 cars to the space shuttle, you can put material exactly where it needs to be and keep it thin and light in areas that don't require it, resulting in both an incredibly light and strong final product."

hate to say it but that is not the reason carbon is used in f1 cars. In fact... it's not even remotely close. Carbon fiber is used in f1 to reduce impact to the driver in a crash. Carbon disperses impact really really well. That is the only reason carbon fiber is used instead of lighter more efficient carbon composites. (Think it was discovery or history channel that had the show on carbon).
  • + 2
 I'm not sure what you mean- "...carbon fiber instead of lighter more efficient carbon composites"
Carbon fiber is what makes up a carbon composite... The fiber is either a continuous, long, or chopped, and is infused with a polymer of some type, usually an epoxy.

I know they do make layups for certain applications that are designed to dissipate energy as it fails, or even specifying the failure location so that it isn't catastrophic. Is that what you meant?

Light-weighting from CFRP comes from two things though. carbon and epoxy are both significantly lighter than Al or Steel. 2- if your part doesn't need to be strong in a certain location or direction, you can use the material more efficiently. I'm fairly certain this practice is applied to F1. They throw composites everywhere else in the automotive industry to reduce part weight and to reduce part count by combining parts. If you can do the same thing in F1, why wouldn't you?
  • + 2
 rffr shows off his carbon knowledgabilty again Smile c'mon man! this si the CF use in bicycle at its finest!
  • + 1
 Remedy, you do realize that the majority of matter in this world is based on carbon? IE carbon composites can relate to something not even close to carbon fiber.

I think you mis understood me about the f1 comment. All I said was that it is NOT used for strength... it is used specifically for impact absorbsion.

I don't quite understand how your comment has anything to do with what I said. I didn't put down carbon, nor did I say carbon fiber was not a carbon composite. I said... different carbon composites outside of carbon fiber. (Remember again, carbon makes up the majority of the matter in the world, just like plasma makes up the majority of space).

Bikes would not use carbon for the same reason f1 cars would so I don't quite get where your going with that. Bike companies aren't using carbon for safety/impact resistence, they are using it for sheer strength and weight savings.

Like mentioned... if you have any questions feel free to research it or watch the carbon themed show on history or discovery channel.

btw Idk why your arguing/debating either when my comment was specifically made NOT to be debatable. It was a sheer comment.
  • + 1
 Yep, most things do have some form of carbon in them. In fact, purely by definition, you could call my foot a carbon composite in that it's made up of more than two types of material, and one of them is carbon. Heck, even the epoxy in the V10 is made up of carbon. But if I have a glass-fiber/epoxy mix, I'm not going to call it a carbon composite... this just simply isn't done. A carbon composite either has a PAN or pitch based carbon fiber, in some type of resin matrix. There is also a C-C composite, where even the matrix material is carbon, for high temperature applications.

I agree, engineers probably aren't designing bikes to protect the rider in the event of a crash. Designers turn to carbon composites because you make a part of equivalent stiffness and/or equivalent strength at less than half the weight. Impact resistance can also be considered, but if that was your only goal, there are certainly cheaper avenues to explore.

I think I was just annoyed by the comment is all. Don't get me wrong, if I replied to every comment that annoyed me, well I wouldn't have time to ride. I just felt I could contribute as I do know a little about the topic.
  • + 1
 I'm very happy that I am not the only one writing essays here. Let's show kids that this is the appropriate discussion, not just "siiiiick!". I like how deep you guys go into carbon thing, if you add my philosophical deliberations we could create some science here! who knows maybe in one year we will be posting reference list under our comments!

Language can be improved as well: "I believe that Specialized's arduous attempts to lower the standover in their recent bicycle line appear to me as nothing more than a tasteless nonsense!" "Me and my dear friend Montgomery ambled to this fine location in the woods of southern New Hampshire finding our selves in marvelous singletrack, a day I shall never forget indeed!"
  • + 1
 i think this is just SICK! i love carbon and i love team replica builds even more!
  • + 2
 just ordered mine soooooo stoked Big Grin
  • + 1
 So, they mention that it will ship in Nov/Dec, but when can I actually order?
  • + 1
 Right now.
  • + 3
 Ordered. Medium, Matte Black, Vivid. So stoked.
  • + 1
 Have anyone noticed that the carbon linke on Syndicet bikes is much thicker than the one used on this "production" bike?
  • + 1
 Looks like the team riders are using the stronger link from the Driver 8. I wonder if they had problems, or just being extra careful.
  • + 2
 wow.
  • + 1
 there is NO way that I am not getting one next season
  • + 1
 anyone know how much the frame weighs?
  • + 2
 They say it's 2 lbs (906g) less than the existing V.10 3.
  • + 1
 i want that bike so badly
  • - 1
 would it not flex a bit like a cf hockey stick? if so after a year of flexing in my experience with hockey sticks they start to warp what ever way they were flexed
  • + 2
 nice analogy... hockey stick to bike frame...hmmm
  • + 1
 hes right though, a hockey stick undergoes alot of stress. and someone who is going to buy a v10 is going to push it to its limits. i dunno i guess we will see in a few years how this bike is
  • + 1
 Hockey sticks are designed to flex by the thickness of the carbon fibers placed at the flex point. That's why it flexes in the same point every time. Ever notice how the carbon blade of your hockey stick doesn't deflect?
  • + 8
 Your hockey stick was designed to flex, thats why it flexes, not becuase it is made of carbon fiber. Carbon fiber is a very versatile material and can be engineered to do exactly what you want with it. It can be made very stiff or flexy depending on the need. Cannondale have bikes where the chainstays are carbon and designed to act as the pivot for the suspension by bending! While at the same time they make carbon cranks that are ultra stiff to get the power from your legs into the drive train. It all depends on how the engineers design the product.

Its pretty obvious that SC did alot of testing, they have the best riders in the world riding their bikes, harder than anyone here can. They can clearly take the abbuse they were designed for. Just because your more comfortable with the old, doesnt mean that the new is not better. That is how technology goes, and has gone for centuries. Humans are just hesitant to change. I would easily put my faith in the bike to hold up. Its like others have said, carbon fiber is used in the automotive industry, our bikes dont go 200 km/h, cars do well over that. If its strong enough for them, then its more then strong enough for us. Look at rally cars if you really need convincing.

Anyways this has been a long enough rant, it just seems that anything new in the bike industry is met with the same cynicism on this site no matter what, and its getting old. Embrace the new and exciting changes, they are what has been progressing our sport, and will continue to do so.
  • + 2
 Well stated
  • + 1
 more news more news huf huf
  • + 1
 OMG!!!!!!!!
Does anyone know the weight of steves bike?????
  • + 1
 around 16.5kg I'm pretty sure
  • + 0
 LOL! "only $600, coz we all have that to spend every time we crash our bikes!
Lovin the santa cruz v10 carb tho Smile
  • + 1
 my DH bike if full of bumb on the down tube, i'm pretty sure if i call devinci they will ask me to go f'/% myself. 600$ for a brand new frame if you explode it is quite better then 3000$ ?
  • + 2
 awsome. the next step.
  • + 2
 god you killed a v10 D:
  • + 1
 Scuse me guy's...does it say how much it weighs?
  • + 1
 I think the new Decline mag review has it at around 34lb/15.4kg.
  • + 1
 Awesome but I think something that light would be uncontrollable by most people (in dh)...
  • + 1
 carbon = rad
  • + 1
 Daddy like.
  • + 1
 PRICE?
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.082054
Mobile Version of Website